Saint Patrick Parish GenWeb
  The Memoirs of Annie M. Holt and the
People of Bocabec, Past and Present
Posted 3 Dec 2000

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a part near shore was bought by John Campbell, New Jersey.
When John Campbell and wife Beth had previously purchased Hardwood Island
from Fayette Woodworth, he also purchased a small lot down by the shore near
Crichtons and Mill Cove from me (Kavend property) so as to have a landing
place coming from the Island. That next year he built a beautiful place,
ranch house style, near eastern end of Hardwood. Summer visitors here who
had travelled in the west said it was really ranch house style, and had
all handmade furniture. They enjoyed it so much, staying quite late in
season. They went on a very stormy Sunday to look after their boat at the
shore. While there they heard an explosion. Hurrying back they were just
in time to rescue their hand bags and some clothing. People said it was
something faulty about propane gas fixtures. It was the same year as the
explosion in a new canteen near Gilman's Corner, on way to St. Stephen,
when several were badly injured. Mr. & Mrs. Campbell then built a similar
only smaller building on this inshore property. Again, all furniture was
handmade. He built a guest house beside it, which now has been fitted up
for summer cottage. When Mrs. Campbell died, after some years of illness,
Mr. Campbell sold, but later regretted leaving our shores, and bought a
piece of land before mentioned over the hill. He built a garage and guest
house, but no house. Lived alone in his mobile trailer, first a very
expensive one, for which he had gone to Detroit himself and brought it here.
To have that he had to build a foundation, and having frequent visitors with
trailers of that kind (or anykind) built another foundation. They used to
return to Mexico in winters, at first, but now each winter is in Florida.
This first property at shore, Mr. Campbell sold to a business man, Stevens,
in Boston. Stevens later presented this to Williston Academy, a prep school,
connected with a Mass. College. Mr. Steven's son was one of the Academy
staff. This former Campbell cottage is now Williston Academy Lodge, and is
where the staff and their families can each come for a two weeks' vacation.
They are very fond of it here.

    Just across from here, after crossing a small bridge, is a road leading
to Crichton's Point. I know that some Haley's lived there and there is an
old Haley cemetery. Then I remember a man who lived alone there-- Samuel
McWilliams of Bocabec, who moved to St. Stephen. We children thought it was
wonderful to see a man with a double set of teeth-- the only one whom I have
ever known with such. To that place came David CreightonCrichton Sr. He had been
a young man from New Glasgow, N.S. As a sailor he had come in one of the
many ships coming to the shipbuilding village (once quite a village) at
Digdeguash Basin, above Digdeguash Bridge. He liked it so well, he settled
down in that vicinity and left the sea. They had several daughters and two
sons. Some of their family are buried in Presbyterian Cemetery. One year
when Mr. Crichton first owned the McWilliams place down below us, Mrs.
Crichton took her young son Edward to visit a daughter near Boston, Mass.
and two daughters in Portland, Maine. When spring came, she came to her
daughter, Winnifred (Mrs. Isaac Lowery) in St. Stephen, who was not then
expected to live. Mr. Crichton went with our family in our boat "ANNIE MAY"
and brought home his son. Later when Mrs. Lowery died, Mrs. Crichton
brought the three boys and little girl home here. When Mr. Lowery remarried,
he took one boy and Effie home with him. She married in Bocabec, Clarence
Miller, and with two children moved to St. Andrews. On the death of Mr.
Crichton, the old lady had her son James and family come home to be with
her. Their oldest, Mabel, died in early teens. Clarence, next, was one of
four Bocabec young men who on the first day of declaration of World War I
(Aug. 4th. 1914) enlisted for over-seas service. Clarence was killed in
action. Curtis Lowery was injured in wrist in the first weeks they were
in action and was invalided home. Raymond Cunningham lived in St.Andrews,
and he and LeRoy McCullough of Holtís Point, were in the heavy fighting.
Roy was shell-shocked, but married in Saint John, but died some years ago.
Other sisters and brothers of Clarence Crichton were Myrtle, Rachel,
Winnifred, Eleanor, David, Howard and Hilda. The latter married Calvin
Tinker, Campobello. When James Crichton died, their son Howard and family
came to live with his mother. His wife, Nellie Little, Bartlett's Mills,
had nine children. Mildred, oldest, while attending High School in St.
Andrews got summer employment with Mrs. Leighton, wife of Dean Leighton
of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. When Mrs. Leighton once knew the
fine location of Mildredís home at the shore on Bocabec Cove, she wanted
it for summer home. They had one in St. Andrews, and later, Mrs. Leighton
fell heir to an old home in St. Andrews. When Howard found he could buy
the Frank Foster home, he sold to Mrs. Leighton. Dean Leighton retired

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