Descendants of John Lattimore, Sr.

Charles Lattimore Elliott, faithful member of the Broad River Genealgocial Society has requested that his family research be added to our website for your use. We thank Charles for his generosity and hope his hard work can offer valuable clues in your search.

This work will be divided into three parts:

(1)
Alphabetical Index
An alphabetical listing of the descendants of John Lattimore, Sr

(2)
Outline Descendent Tree
John Lattimore, Sr's family tree

(3)
Genealogy Report
Where they were, what they did and much more information on the John Lattimore, Sr and his descendants in this journey through the lives of 10 generations of the Lattimore family.. This is a very detailed report and may take a few minutes to download, but it is well worth the wait!

Please let Charles know if his work has been helpful, drop him a note c/o BRGS and we'll pass it along.

 

Genealogy Report

Generation No. 1

1. JOHN2 LATTIMORE, SR. (LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1685 in Ireland, and died July 1761 in Prince William County, Virginia. He married SARAH Abt. 1720 in Pennsylvania. She was born Abt. 1695, and died Aft. 1761 in Prince William County, Virginia.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE, SR.:
REMARKS: John Latimor (Lattimore) was the youngest of three brothers: Daniel, Samuel, and John Latimor, who sailed from Ireland to Philadelphia about the year 1690. I don't know when or where he was born, the names of his parents, or whether he had any other brothers or sisters. I don't know why they left Ireland or why they came to America or why the brothers separated. There are various spellings of the family name until after the 1790 Census, including Latimor, Latimore, Lattimore, and Latemor. This is not surprising, as there were no well defined rules for spelling English names until Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789.

John and his brothers were probably "Scotch-Irish", and they probably arrived in Philadelphia as "bond" (indentured) servants". They may have been orphans. Bonded servants were of two categories, voluntary and involuntary. In the first category were those men and women who desired to come to the colonies but were too poor to pay the costs of transportation. Of their own accord they bound themselves to an employer for a specified time in return for transfer and maintenance. The involuntary category included orphans, vagrants, paupers, debtors, and convicts.

The Scotch-Irish were Scotch protestants (Presbyterians) transplanted to Ulster, the northern most of the four historical provinces of Ireland (Munster, Lienster, Connaught, and Ulster), during the 17th Century after James I put down an Irish rebellion and caused the flight of Irish earls from Ulster. English and Scottish families were induced to migrate to Northern Ireland as part of James I's pacification program. The English settled in three counties: Antrim, Armagh, and Derry; the Scots settled in Down, Donegal, and Tyrone; and both English and Scots settled in Fermanagh and Cavan. Monahan remained Irish. By 1640, about 50,000 Scots had arrived in Ireland. Scottish settlers outnumbered the English because Scotland was closer to Ireland and the Scots were more anxious to move.

The Scots hoped to escape from poor conditions at home and the severe religious restrictions imposed on Presbyterians by James I, head of the Church of England. The Scots faced bitterness, resentment, and rebellion becaused theysettled in areas claimed by the native Irish. Their problems were aggrivated by mutual religious hostility of Roman Catholics versus Anglicans and Presbyterians. Nevertheless, more Scots poured across the Irish Sea after Oliver Cromwell led Puritan Rebellion against Charles I, invaded Ireland in 1649, and became Lord Protector in 1653.

The throne was restored in Charles II in 1660, who was succeed by James II, a
Catholic, in 1684. James II was unpopular after his marriage to Mary of Modena brought close ties to the Catholic and imperial policies of Louis XIV of France. James II was forced into exile by the Glorious Revolution of 1688. He was defeated in 1690 at the Battle of the Boyne by William of Orange after he tried to restore himself to the throne in Ireland. William of Orange, who was Protestant, had married James II's daughter Mary, who was reared as a
Protestant. Another fifty thousand Scots migrated to Ireland after William of Orange and his wife assumed the throne as William III and Mary II.

Although the Scots prospered in Ulster, they resisted intermarriage and tried to maintain their own identity and independence as a people. They often found themselves restricted by the English, who exercised control over religious, political, and economic affairs. The Protestant English Kings attempted to impose conformity to the Church of England in both Scotland and Ireland. The English enacted laws curtailing religious rights and the formation of presbyteries, and they made Presbyterians pay tithes to support the Church of England. They closed meeting houses and made it difficult for Presbyterian clergy to preach and to baptize and marry their parishioners.

After William and Mary assumed the throne, England's leaders decided to block the drain of England's manpower to the colonies unless it fitted with England's mercantile scheme of empire. The colonial land promoters turned to the Germans, Scotch-Irish, Welsh, Swiss, French Huguenot, and other discontent Europeans and to bond labor as a partial solution to their labor problem.

The largest number of voluntary bond servants went to Pennsylvania, where conditions were favorable and the demand great. Many showed up in New York, but few in New England. Virginia and Maryland through the seventeenth century attracted their share until Negro slavery became the common solution to the labor problem. The Germans were the best known of the voluntary bond servants, although a great many English and Scotch came in the same way.

The voluntary bonded servants contracted to work for three to five years in exchange for passage, and, on arrival in America, the ship captain or his agent sold their services to plantation owners or farmers for what they would bring; i.e., carpenters, weavers, and other craftsmen sold for much more than unskilled laborers. Convicts were commonly indented for seven to fourteen years, depending on the character of the charges against them. The Colonies regulated treatment, and in many colonies they enjoyed extensive rights during the bond period. At the end of the indenture all became freemen, and in many colonies, the plantation owner or farmer was required to provide each freed man with clothing, a gun, and a small tract of land after their term of service.

The earliest source of information regarding John Latimor and his brothers is a letter written years later by his nephew. The letter states that John Latimor was a "mere boy" when he came to America. Therefore, he was probably born about 1785. It said that he was the youngest of the three brothers, and they separated in Philadelphia. Orphans were routinely apprenticed to whoever would assume responsibilty for their livelihood, and they were sent to the colonies if they were not placed locally. Upon arrival in the colonies, they were "auctioned" to whoever would pay for their passage and assume responsibility for them. The letter writer probably has probably confused his grandfather and his great grandfather. Other information indicates that his grandfather married Isabel Frazier in Virginia about 1740 and that his great grandfather moved from Pennsylvania to Virginia about 1730. The letter was written in about 1854 by Samuel Lattimore, who was born in Rutherford County, North Carolina in 1790. It was written to William Houston, the writer's step-son, and referenced in an unpublished paper, dated 12 August 1939, prepared by P. Cleveland Gardner.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point Oregon, who is descended from Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History", which includes the following quotation from the Samuel Lattimore letter:

"My grandfather, John Lattimore, was brought when a youth from Ireland and landed at Philadelphia, then seperated from his brothers--I know not how many--and went himself to Virginia. Whether he married in Pennsylvania or Virginia, I do not know. Grandmother's name was Isabel Frazier. She had black hair and black eyes. Grandfather had red hair and blue eyes.

My father was the youngest of the family. His mother died first, his father soon afterward, while he was quite young. Father had two brothers, John and Francis, both with red hair and blue eyes. They married Stockton sisters, Jemima and Rachel.

Uncle John had three children, Daniel, John, and Rachel. All with red hair and blue eyes. Rachel married John Hoiles. They and cousin's Johns are somewhere in North Carolina. Uncle Franks are in Kentucky, all daughters, five in number. Two of them married Smiths, one Baily and one Douglas.

Father had three sisters, Margaret with red hair and blue eyes and married Newberry Stockton and went to Kentucky. Aunt Sarah had black hair and black eyes and married Robert Black and went to Kentucky. The other sister, Lettie, died young.

Think they landed in Philadelphia in 1690."

This letter was in the possession of Samuel's grand-daughter, Alida Lattimore, Putnamville, New York, and the information was sent to her by Mrs. E. B. Lattimore, Shelby, North Carolina, 3 November 1936.

Mrs. Jenkins believes that the John Lattimore who arrived in Philadelphia in 1690 is the great grandfather, not the grandfather, of the Samuel Lattimore who wrote the 1856 letter. She has determined that the immigrant John Lattimore died in June or July 1761 in Prince William County, Virginia, and that his wife, Sarah Lattimore, was the executrix of his will. The will was contested by his daughters. His son John was not mentioned among the contestants of the will; therefore, his son John may have predeceased him.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins, in her study, "The Lattimores, A Family History", writes that the 1730 tax list for the New London District, Chester County, Pennsylvania, lists "John Lateman" and "Daniel Latemor". It is possible that the "John Lateman" entry refers to John Lattimore, and the "Daniel Latemor" entry refers to Daniel Lattimore. Keep in mind that there were no well defined rules for spelling English words until Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789, and it is frequently difficult to read some people's handwriting. She also states that other Lattimores (and phonetic equivalents) in Colonial days have been researched, and no relationship has been found. She also states that the 1721 tax list for Chowan County, North Carolina, lists "William Lattimore",and the 1790 Census for Chowan County, North Carolina, lists "Samuel Lattimore". No relationship has been established.

In her introduction, Mrs. Jenkins writes, "Around 1732, the first large group of Scotch-Irish settlers migrated to Virginia from Pennsylvania along the Great Wagon Road. By the year 1736, Virginia was flooded with Scotch-Irish Settlers.

In Prince William County, Virginia, the Lattimores settled near an old Indian Trail leading south to the Carolinas. This trail was used as a major road by the settlers, and became known as "The Old Carolina Trail". It is likely this is the trail the Lattimores used on their trek south; always after more and better land.

They settled in the wilderness of the western Carolinas until after the Revolutionary War. Around the beginning of the nineteenth centry, when more land was opening up, most of the Lattimores pushed on west. Although on
branch of the family stayed in North Carolina, others went to Tennessee,
Kentucky and Indiana, always taking up land and starting churches."

Maps in "Kegley's Virginia Frontier", by F. B. Kegley, published by the Southwest Virginia Historical Society, indicate the Great Wagon Road extended south from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to Hagerstown, Maryland; crossed the Potomac River at Harpers Ferry; and continued south through the Shenandoah Valley to Winchester, Staunton, and Roanoke, Virginia, approximately the same route as the current Interstate 81. This route is also shown on page 184 of the "Historical Atlas of the United States", published in 1988 by the National Georgraphic Society.

Mrs. Jenkins writes that "the immigrant, John Lattimore apparently married Sarah, circa 1720-24, probably in Pa." She refers to references in Volumes 23-2 and 23-4 of the Virginia Genealogy Magazine to Mary and Charity Lattimore and based the marriage date on the articles. She also writes: "Between the years 1730 and 1734, John and Sarah apparently migrated to Virginia. The record shows John Lattimore purchased 200 acres of land in Prince William County, Virginia, from Thomas Furr in 1734, for the sum of 200 pounds lawful money of Great Britain." She references a 12 July 1734 entry in Deed Book B, pages 328-329, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, Virginia.

She also writes that "In 1740, John Lattimore, Sr., sold 50 acres of the before mentioned land to his son, John, Jr." Her footnote states: "13 Aug 1740 - Deed Book (3) E. pages 63-64 & 66-67, John Lattimore sold to John Lattimore, Jr., a 50 acre tract of land he had purchased from Thomas Furr in Prince William Co., Va. The purchase price was 2,000 pounds of tobacco. The 50 acres was bounded along William Furr's line; thence along the outline John Lattimore, Sr. had purchased from Thomas Furr. In Cummins family history, "Cummins Ancient, Cummins New", it is stated, Howson Kenner purchased 200 acres of land in Prince William Co. from John Lattimore and his son, John. No date of purchase is given, but the property purchased is referred to in Mr. Kenner's will dated 1778."

"In 1749, John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased 274 acres of land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County, Va. and Henry Smith of Stafford County. (There are no other records of this land, as most of the Colonial Records of Prince William and Stafford Counties have been destroyed)." The footnote states: "11 Oct. 1749, Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53, Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va. This deed was witnessed by Louis Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish of Hamilton consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier, plus the upper end of Prince William Co. Prior to 1752, there are few surviving county records, while the Hamilton Vestry Book is gone altogether, destroyed a leaf at a time as one eats an artichoke, in the Fauquier Clerks Office. Ref: Landmarks of Old Prince William by Fairfax Harrison, page 294. The Old Dominion Press, Richmond, 1924."

"John Lattimore, Sr., died June-July 1761, and although there are no will books available for this period in Prince William County, the Court Order Books for 17 July and 25 August 1761, show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore was presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested by the children of the deceased, Winny Cummings (Cummins), Betty Millard, Sarah Fernsley, Mary Pritchett, and Charyly Kite (Charity Knight). No mention of son John was made among the contestants of the will."

The footnote reads: "Vir. Gen. Mag. Vol. 23 #4, Oct., Nov., Dec., 1979. Appearing as witnesses for the children were John Jennings, Edmond Jennings, Thomas Harris, and Catherine Jennings. The children were ordered to pay costs, includ 50 lbs. of tobacco to each witness. 11 May 1761, elections were held for the House of Burgess. Running for election were, Col. John Bayles, Col. Henry Lee, Col. Henry Peyton, and Mrs. Landon Carter, Sr. John Lattimore voted for John Bayles and Henry Lee. It is not known whether this voter was John Sr. or Jr., but is presumed to be Sr."

"On 31 March 1744, Mary Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in Overwhorten Parish in Stafford County, Va., and on 23 October 1750, Charity Lattimore and John Knight were married at the same place. Marriage records of the other children have not been found." The footnote reads: "The Register of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Va. 1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes. Compiled and published by George Harrison Sanford King, Fredericksburg, Va. 1961."

"From the above records, it has been established that the known children of John and Sarah Lattimore were:

Winney Lattimore married Moses Cummins
Betty Lattimore " ? Millard
Sarah Lattimore " ? Fernsley
Mary Lattimore 31 Mar. 1744 Lewis Pritchett
Charity Lattimore 23 Oct. 1750 John Knight
John Lattimore Isabel Frazier

The marriage of John and Isabel is referred to in the letter written by their grandson, Samuel." A footnote states: "The linage of Moses Cummins may be found in "Cummins Ancient, Cummins New". Copy in hands of Lynn Rhodes, San Jose, Calif."

"No definite relationship has been established between Isabel Frazier and the other Fraziers in Prince William County, but one seems likely."

"In 1702, John Frazier was minister of Overwhorton Parish in Prince William County. Overwhorton Parish included Stafford County and all of Prince William, and "the bounds of the parish are not known." The footnotes refer to "Landmarks of Old Prince William", by Fairfax Harrison, published by The Old Dominion Press.

"A reference is made to an Andrew Frazier in the Prince William Court Order Book dated 1 December 1759. Births registered in Overwhorton Parish, 8 November 1754, William Frazier, son of Mary, was born at Mary Suddeths. On 12 June 1756, Mary Frazier, daughter of Isabella was born." The footnote refers to pages 60-61 of "Overwhorton Parish Register, Old Stafford Co., Va.", by William F. Boogher, published by The Saxon Printing Co., Washington, D.C., in 1899.

Mrs. Jenkins is probably in error when she writes that the Lattimores migrated from Pennsylvania to Virginia over the Great Wagon Road. Chester County is near Philadelphia, and the more logical route is south from Philadelphia to Baltimore and onward to Alexandria, Virginia. Prince William County is south of Alexandria, and Stafford County is south of Prince William County. This eastern route continued south from Alexandria to Williamsburg, Virginia; Edenton and New Bern, North Carolina; Georgetown and Charleston, South Carolina; and Savanah, Georgia.

She was probably correct when she established the relationship with the John Lattimore who settled in Prince William County. The best land had been taken, but tobacco quickly exhausted the land and the planters sold the depleted land to settlers from Pennsylvania. Alexandria, which was laid out in 1749, was the first town and seaport in the area. If John Lattimore had not purchased land in Prince William County, I would agree that he probably came down the Great Wagon Road. Winchester was laid out in 1744 at the intersection of roads or trails from what became Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hagerstown, Fort Pitt, and Roanoke.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


More About JOHN LATTIMORE, SR.:
Burial: Virginia

Notes for SARAH:
REMARKS: John Lattimore, Sr., died in June or July of 1761. The Prince
William County, Virginia, Court Order Books for 27 July and 25 August 1761,
show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore was presented in court by
Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested by the children of the
deceased: Winny Cummings (Cummins), Betty Millard, Sarah Fernsley, Mary
Pritchett, and Charyly Kite (Charity Knight). John Lattimore, Jr., was not
listed; therefore, he may have predeceased his father. This information is
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", written by Esther Lattimore Jenkins of
Myrtle Point, Oregon.

I have no information regarding Sarah's family, birth place, or death. Mrs.
Jenkins concludes that Sarah and John Lattimore were married in Pennsylvania
between 1720 and 1724. Since John Lattimore, Jr., purchased land in Prince
William County, Virginia, from his father in 1740, he was probably about 25
years old and preparing to take a wife. Since John Lattimore, Sr., is assumed
to have come to America in 1690 as a "mere" boy, he was probaly born about
1685. It is unlikely that he waited until he was 35 or 40 years old to marry;
therefore, I am assuming that he and Sarah married about 1715 and that Sarah
was about 20 when she married.

John and Sarah Lattimore had six known children: John, Winney, Betty, Sarah,
Mary, and Charity Lattimore. Their dates of birth are unknown. I have
assumed that the daughters were listed in the Court Order Book in order of
birth; i.e., the oldest daughter first and the youngest daughter last. The
contents of the will are unknown, as most of the Colonial Records of Prince
William County have been destroyed.

Deed Book B, pages 328-329, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County,
Virginia, shows that John Lattimore purchased 200 acres of land in Prince
William County from Thomas Furr on 12 July 1734, for the sum of 200 pounds
lawful money of Great Britain. According to Deed Book (3)E, pages 63-64 and
66-67, he sold 50 acres of this land to his son, John, Jr., on 13 August 1740,
for 2,000 pounds of tobacco. In "Cummins Ancient, Cummins New", the Cummins
Family History, it is stated that Howson Kenner purchased 200 acres of land in
Prince William County from John Lattimore and his son John. No date of
purchase is given, but the property purchased is referred to in Mr. Kinner's
will dated 1778.

According to The Register of Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia,
1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes, compiled and published
by George Harrison Sanford King, Frederickburg, Virginia, in 1961, Mary
Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in Overwharton Parish on 31 March
1744, and Charity Lattimore and John Knight were married on 23 October 1750.

Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County,
Virginia, shows that John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased
274 acres of land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County,
Virginia, and Henry Smith of Stafford County on 11 October 1749. The deed was
witnessed by Louis Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish
of Hamilton consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier County, plus the
upper end of Prince William County.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and SARAH are:
2. i. JOHN3 LATTIMORE, JR., b. Abt. 1715, Pennsylvania; d. Bef. 1761, Virginia.
ii. WINNEY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1718, Pennsylvania.

Notes for WINNEY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Winney Latttimore was born in Pennsylvania in about 1718, the
daughter of John and Sarah Lattimore. She was one of their six known children:
John, Winney, Betty, Sarah, Mary, and Charity Lattimore. Their dates of birth
are unknown.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, completed an extensive study
of the Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History", which
states that the Prince William County, Virginia, Court Order Books for 17 July
and 25 August 1761, show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore was
presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested
by the children of the deceased: Winny Cummings (Cumins), Betty Millar,
Sarah Fernsley, Mary Pritchett, and Charlyly Kite (Charity Knight). John, Jr.,
was not listed among the contestants of the will; therefore, he may have
predeceased his father. The contents of the will are unknown, as most of the
Colonial Records of Prince William County have been destroyed.

According to The Register of Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia,
1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes, compiled and published
by George Harrison Sanford King, Frederickburg, Virginia, in 1961, Mary
Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in Overwharton Parish on 31 March
1744, and Charity Lattimore and John Knight were married on 23 October 1750.

Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County,
Virginia, shows that John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased
274 acres of land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County,
Virginia, and Henry Smith of Stafford County on 11 October 1749. The deed was
witnessed by Louis Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish
of Hamilton consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier County, plus the
upper end of Prince William County.

I have assumed that the daughters were listed in the Court Order Book in
order of birth; i.e., the oldest daughter first and the youngest daughter last.

I have also assumed that Mary and Charity married when they were 20, and I have
extrapolated the birthyears on these precarious assumptions.

According to Mrs. Jenkins, Winney Lattimore married Moses Cummins (Cummings).
His linage may be found in "Cummins Ancient, Cummins New".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


iii. BETTY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1720, Pennsylvania.

Notes for BETTY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Betty Latttimore was born in Pennsylvania in about 1720, the
daughter of John and Sarah Lattimore. She was one of their six known children:
John, Winney, Betty, Sarah, Mary, and Charity Lattimore. Their dates of birth
are unknown.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, completed an extensive study
of the Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History", which
states that the Prince William County, Virginia, Court Order Books for 17 July
and 25 August 1761, show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore was
presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested
by the children of the deceased: Winny Cummings (Cumins), Betty Millar,
Sarah Fernsley, Mary Pritchett, and Charlyly Kite (Charity Knight). John, Jr.,
was not listed among the contestants of the will; therefore, he may have
predeceased his father. The contents of the will are unknown, as most of the
Colonial Records of Prince William County have been destroyed.

According to The Register of Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia,
1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes, compiled and published
by George Harrison Sanford King, Frederickburg, Virginia, in 1961, Mary
Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in Overwharton Parish on 31 March
1744, and Charity Lattimore and John Knight were married on 23 October 1750.

Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County,
Virginia, shows that John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased
274 acres of land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County,
Virginia, and Henry Smith of Stafford County on 11 October 1749. The deed was
witnessed by Louis Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish
of Hamilton consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier County, plus the
upper end of Prince William County.

I have assumed that the daughters were listed in the Court Order Book in
order of birth; i.e., the oldest daughter first and the youngest daughter last.

I have also assumed that Mary and Charity married when they were 20, and I have
extrapolated the birthyears on these precarious assumptions.

According to Mrs. Jenkins, Betty Lattimore married a Millard. This bit of
information was apparent in the listing of the children who contested their
father's will.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


iv. SARAH LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1722, Pennsylvania.

Notes for SARAH LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah Latttimore was born in Pennsylvania in about 1722, the
daughter of John and Sarah Lattimore. She was one of their six known children:
John, Winney, Betty, Sarah, Mary, and Charity Lattimore. Their dates of birth
are unknown.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, completed an extensive study
of the Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History", which
states that the Prince William County, Virginia, Court Order Books for 17 July
and 25 August 1761, show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore was
presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested
by the children of the deceased: Winny Cummings (Cumins), Betty Millar,
Sarah Fernsley, Mary Pritchett, and Charlyly Kite (Charity Knight). John, Jr.,
was not listed among the contestants of the will; therefore, he may have
predeceased his father. The contents of the will are unknown, as most of the
Colonial Records of Prince William County have been destroyed.

According to The Register of Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia,
1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes, compiled and published
by George Harrison Sanford King, Frederickburg, Virginia, in 1961, Mary
Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in Overwharton Parish on 31 March
1744, and Charity Lattimore and John Knight were married on 23 October 1750.

Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County,
Virginia, shows that John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased
274 acres of land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County,
Virginia, and Henry Smith of Stafford County on 11 October 1749. The deed was
witnessed by Louis Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish
of Hamilton consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier County, plus the
upper end of Prince William County.

I have assumed that the daughters were listed in the Court Order Book in
order of birth; i.e., the oldest daughter first and the youngest daughter last.

I have also assumed that Mary and Charity married when they were 20, and I have
extrapolated the birthyears on these precarious assumptions.

According to Mrs. Jenkins, Sarah Lattimore married a Fernsley. This bit of
information was apparent in the listing of the children who contested their
father's will.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


v. MARY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1726, Pennsylvania.

Notes for MARY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mary Latttimore was born in Pennsylvania in about 1726, the
daughter of John and Sarah Lattimore. She was one of their six known children:
John, Winney, Betty, Sarah, Mary, and Charity Lattimore. Their dates of birth
are unknown.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, completed an extensive study
of the Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History", which
states that the Prince William County, Virginia, Court Order Books for 17 July
and 25 August 1761, show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore was
presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested
by the children of the deceased: Winny Cummings (Cumins), Betty Millar,
Sarah Fernsley, Mary Pritchett, and Charlyly Kite (Charity Knight). John, Jr.,
was not listed among the contestants of the will; therefore, he may have
predeceased his father. The contents of the will are unknown, as most of the
Colonial Records of Prince William County have been destroyed.

According to The Register of Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia,
1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes, compiled and published
by George Harrison Sanford King, Frederickburg, Virginia, in 1961, Mary
Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in Overwharton Parish on 31 March
1744, and Charity Lattimore and John Knight were married on 23 October 1750.

Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County,
Virginia, shows that John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased
274 acres of land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County,
Virginia, and Henry Smith of Stafford County on 11 October 1749. The deed was
witnessed by Louis Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish
of Hamilton consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier County, plus the
upper end of Prince William County.

I have assumed that the daughters were listed in the Court Order Book in
order of birth; i.e., the oldest daughter first and the youngest daughter last.

I have also assumed that Mary and Charity married when they were 20, and I have
extrapolated the birthyears on these precarious assumptions.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


vi. CHARITY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1730, Pennsylvania.

Notes for CHARITY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Charity Latttimore was born in Pennsylvania in about 1730, the
daughter of John and Sarah Lattimore. She was one of their six known children:
John, Winney, Betty, Sarah, Mary, and Charity Lattimore. Their dates of birth
are unknown.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, completed an extensive study
of the Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History", which
states that the Prince William County, Virginia, Court Order Books for 17 July
and 25 August 1761, show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore was
presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested
by the children of the deceased: Winny Cummings (Cumins), Betty Millar,
Sarah Fernsley, Mary Pritchett, and Charlyly Kite (Charity Knight). John, Jr.,
was not listed among the contestants of the will; therefore, he may have
predeceased his father. The contents of the will are unknown, as most of the
Colonial Records of Prince William County have been destroyed.

According to The Register of Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia,
1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes, compiled and published
by George Harrison Sanford King, Frederickburg, Virginia, in 1961, Mary
Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in Overwharton Parish on 31 March
1744, and Charity Lattimore and John Knight were married on 23 October 1750.

Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County,
Virginia, shows that John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased
274 acres of land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County,
Virginia, and Henry Smith of Stafford County on 11 October 1749. The deed was
witnessed by Louis Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish
of Hamilton consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier County, plus the
upper end of Prince William County.

I have assumed that the daughters were listed in the Court Order Book in
order of birth; i.e., the oldest daughter first and the youngest daughter last.

I have also assumed that Mary and Charity married when they were 20, and I have
extrapolated the birthyears on these precarious assumptions.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.

Generation No. 2

2. JOHN3 LATTIMORE, JR. (JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1715 in Pennsylvania, and died Bef. 1761 in Virginia. He married ISABEL FRAZIER Abt. 1740 in Prince William County, Virginia. She was born Abt. 1720 in Virginia, and died Bef. 1761 in Prince William County, Virginia.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE, JR.:
REMARKS: John Latimor (Lattimore), Jr., was born about 1715 in Pennsylvania,
the son of John and Sarah Lattimore. His father was the youngest of three
brothers: Daniel, Samuel, and John Latimor, who sailed from Ireland to
Philadelphia about the year 1690.

There are various spellings of the family name until after the 1790 Census,
including Latimor, Latimore, Lattimore, and Latemor. This is not surprising, as
there were no well defined rules for spelling English names until Noah Webster
published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789.

According to family tradition, the first John Latimor separated from his two
brothers in Philadelphia and settled in Virginia. We don't know whether they
were separated immediately after their arrival (i.e., they were indentured/
apprenticed to different masters) or whether they separated after they reached
maturity. (Source: Letter written about 1854 by Samuel Lattimore, who was
born in Rutherford County, North Carolina, in 1790. The letter was written
to his step-son, William Houston. It is referenced in an unpublished paper,
dated 12 Aug 1939, prepared by P. Cleveland Gardner.)

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point Oregon, who is descended from Daniel
Lattimore and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the Lattimore
family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History", which includes the
following quotation from the Samuel Lattimore letter:

"My grandfather, John Lattimore, was brought when a youth from Ireland and
landed at Philadelphia, then seperated from his brothers--I know not how many--
and went himself to Virginia. Whether he married in Pennsylvania or Virginia,
I do not know. Grandmother's name was Isabel Frazier. She had black hair and
black eyes. Grandfather had red hair and blue eyes.

My father was the youngest of the family. His mother died first, his father
soon afterward, while he was quite young. Father had two brothers, John and
Francis, both with red hair and blue eyes. They married Stockton sisters,
Jemima and Rachel.

Uncle John had three children, Daniel, John, and Rachel. All with red hair and
blue eyes. Rachel married John Hoiles. They and cousin's Johns are somewhere
in North Carolina. Uncle Franks are in Kentucky, all daughters, five in
number.

Two of them married Smiths, one Baily and one Douglas.

Father had three sisters, Margaret with red hair and blue eyes and married
Newberry Stockton and went to Kentucky. Aunt Sarah had black hair and black
eyes and married Robert Black and went to Kentucky. The other sister, Lettie,
died young.

Think they landed in Philadelphia in 1690."

This letter was in the possession of Samuel's grand-daughter, Alida Lattimore,
Putnamville, New York, and the information was sent to her by Mrs. E. B.
Lattimore, Shelby, North Carolina, 3 November 1936.

Mrs. Jenkins believes that the John Lattimore who arrived in Philadelphia in
1690 is the great grandfather, not the grandfather, of the Samuel Lattimore
who wrote the 1856 letter. She has determined that the immigrant John
Lattimore died in June or July 1761 in Prince William County, Virginia, and
that his wife, Sarah Lattimore, was the executrix of his will. The will was
contested by his daughters. His son John was not mentioned among the
contestants of the will; therefore, his son John may have predeceased him.

John Latimor, Jr., married Isabel Frazier, and they had six children:
Francis, John, Margaret, Sarah, Lettie, and Daniel Lattimore. Deed Book (3) E,
pages 63-64 and 66-67 for Hamilton Parish of Prince William County, Virginia,
shows that John Lattimore, Sr., sold 50 acres of land to his son, John, Jr.,
for 2,000 pounds of tobacco. This was part of the 200 acres of land that John,
Sr., purchased from Thomas Furr in 1734. This sale suggests that John, Jr.,
had married and was setting up his own household. Therefore, all of the
children were probably born in Prince William County, Virginia.

Mrs. Jenkins writes that definite relationship has been established between
Isabel Frazier and other Fraziers in Prince William County, but one seems
likely. In 1702, John Frazier was minister of Overwharton Parish in Prince
William County. At that time, Overwharton included Stafford County and all of
Prince William County. Since Isabel Frazier was born about 1720, she could
have been the daughter of John Frazier.

Samuel Lattimore's 1856 letter states that Isabel Frazier died first, and her
husband died soon afterward, while he was quite young. Since he didn't contest
the will, he probably died before 1761. Therefore, he died in his 40s, before
his children were of legal age.

Mrs. Jenkins writes that Margaret Lattimore married Newberry Stockton, and
Newberry Stockton was granted 100 acres on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek
in Albemarle County, Virginia, on 15 August 1764. John Lattimore married Jemima
Stockton, and he was granted 200 acres on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek
in Albemarle County on 19 September 1765.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins, in her study, "The Lattimores, A Family History",
writes that the 1730 tax list for the New London District, Chester County,
Pennsylvania, lists "John Lateman" and "Daniel Latemor". It is possible that
the "John Lateman" entry refers to John Lattimore, and the "Daniel Latemor"
entry refers Daniel Lattimore. Keep in mind that there were no well defined
rules for spelling English words until Noah Webster published his "American
Spelling Guide" in 1789, and it is frequently difficult to read some people's
handwriting. She also states that other Lattimores (and phonetic equivalents)
in Colonial days have been researched, and no relationship has been found. She
also states that the 1721 tax list for Chowan County, North Carolina, lists
"William Lattimore",and the 1790 Census for Chowan County, North Carolina,
lists "Samuel Lattimore". No relationship has been established.

In her introduction, Mrs. Jenkins writes, "Around 1732, the first large group
of Scotch-Irish settlers migrated in Virginia from Pennsylvania along the Great
Wagon Road. By the year 1736, Virginia was flooded with Scotch-Irish Settlers.

In Prince William County, Virginia, the Lattimores settled near an old Indian
Trail leading south to the Carolinas. This trail was used as a major road by
the settlers, and became known as "The Old Carolina Trail". It is likely
this is the trail the Lattimores used on their trek south; always after more
and better land.

They settled in the wilderness of the western Carolinas until after the
Revolutionary War. Around the beginning of the nineteenth centry, when more
land was opening up, most of the Lattimores pushed on west. Although on
branch of the family stayed in North Carolina, others went to Tennessee,
Kentucky and Indiana, always taking up land and starting churches."

Maps in "Kegley's Virginia Frontier", by F. B. Kegley, published by the
Southwest Virginia Historical Society, indicate the Great Wagon Road extended
south from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to Hagerstown, Maryland; crossed the
Potomac River at Harpers Ferry; and continued south through the Shenandoah
Valley to Winchester, Staunton, and Roanoke, Virginia, approximately the same
route as the current Interstate 81. This route is also shown on page 184 of
the "Historical Atlas of the United States", published in 1988 by the National
Georgraphic Society.

Mrs. Jenkins writes that "the immigrant, John Lattimore apparently married
Sarah, circa 1720-24, probably in Pa." She refers to references in Volumes
23-2 and 23-4 of the Virginia Genealogy Magazine to Mary and Charity Lattimore
and based the marriage date on the articles. She also writes: "Between the
years 1730 and 1734, John and Sarah apparently migrated to Virginia. The
record shows John Lattimore purchased 200 acres of land in Prince William
County, Virginia, from Thomas Furr in 1734, for the sum of 200 pounds lawful
money of Great Britain." She references a 12 July 1734 entry in Deed Book B,
pages 328-329, for Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, Virginia.

She also writes that "In 1740, John Lattimore, Sr., sold 50 acres of the before
mentioned land to his son, John, Jr." Her footnote states: "13 Aug 1740 - Deed
Book (3) E. pages 63-64 & 66-67, John Lattimore sold to John Lattimore, Jr., a
50 acre tract of land he had purchased from Thomas Furr in Prince William Co.,
Va. The purchase price was 2,000 pounds of tobacco. The 50 acres was bounded
along William Furr's line; thence along the outline John Lattimore, Sr. had
purchased from Thomas Furr. In Cummins family history, "Cummins Ancient,
Cummins New", it is stated, Howson Kenner purchased 200 acres of land in Prince
William Co. from John Lattimore and his son, John. No date of purchase is
given, but the property purchased is referred to in Mr. Kenner's will dated
1778."

"In 1749, John Lattimore of Stafford County, Virginia, purchased 274 acres of
land in Prince William County from Richard Young of Orange County, Va. and Henry
Smith of Stafford County. (There are no other records of this land, as most
of the Colonial Records of Prince William and Stafford Counties have been
destroyed)." The footnote states: "11 Oct. 1749, Deed Book H-P, pages 51-53,
Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va. This deed was witnessed by Louis
Pritchett, among others. From 1744 until 1769, the parish of Hamilton
consisted of the territory of what is now Fauquier, plus the upper end of
Prince William Co. Prior to 1752, there are few surviving county records,
while the Hamilton Vestry Book is gone altogether, destroyed a leaf at a time
as one eats an artichoke, in the Fauquier Clerks Office. Ref: Landmarks of Old
Prince William by Fairfax Harrison, page 294. The Old Dominion Press,
Richmond, 1924."

"John Lattimore, Sr., died June-July 1761, and although there are no will books
available for this period in Prince William County, the Court Order Books for
17 July and 25 August 1761, show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore
was presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was
contested by the children of the deceased, Winny Cummings (Cummins), Betty
Millard, Sarah Fernsley, Mary Pritchett, and Charyly Kite (Charity Knight).
No mention of son John was made among the contestants of the will."

The footnote reads: "Vir. Gen. Mag. Vol. 23 #4, Oct., Nov., Dec., 1979.
Appearing as witnesses for the children were John Jennings, Edmond Jennings,
Thomas Harris, and Catherine Jennings. The children were ordered to pay costs,
includ 50 lbs. of tobacco to each witness. 11 May 1761, elections were held
for the House of Burgess. Running for election were, Col. John Bayles, Col.
Henry Lee, Col. Henry Peyton, and Mrs. Landon Carter, Sr. John Lattimore voted
for John Bayles and Henry Lee. It is not known whether this voter was John
Sr. or Jr., but is presumed to be Sr."

"On 31 March 1744, Mary Lattimore and Lewis Pritchett were married in
Overwhorten Parish in Stafford County, Va., and on 23 October 1750, Charity
Lattimore and John Knight were married at the same place. Marriage records
of the other children have not been found." The footnote reads: "The Register
of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Va. 1732-1758, and Sundry Historical and
Genealogical Notes. Compiled and published by George Harrison Sanford King,
Fredericksburg, Va. 1961."

"From the above records, it has been established that the known children of
John and Sarah Lattimore were:
Winney Lattimore married Moses Cummins
Betty Lattimore " ? Millard
Sarah Lattimore " ? Fernsley
Mary Lattimore 31 Mar. 1744 Lewis Pritchett
Charity Lattimore 23 Oct. 1750 John Knight
John Lattimore Isabel Frazier
The marriage of John and Isabel is referred to in the letter written by their
grandson, Samuel." A footnote states: "The linage of Moses Cummins may be
found in "Cummins Ancient, Cummins New". Copy in hands of Lynn Rhodes, San
Jose, Calif."

"No definite relationship has been established between Isabel Frazier and the
other Fraziers in Prince William County, but one seems likely."

"In 1702, John Frazier was minister of Overwhorton Parish in Prince William
County. Overwhorton Parish included Stafford County and all of Prince William,
and "the bounds of the parish are not known." The footnotes refer to
"Landmarks of Old Prince William", by Fairfax Harrison, published by The Old
Dominion Press.

"A reference is made to an Andrew Frazier in the Prince William Court Order
Book dated 1 December 1759. Births registered in Overwhorton Parish, 8
November 1754, William Frazier, son of Mary, was born at Mary Suddeths. On 12
June 1756, Mary Frazier, daughter of Isabella was born." The footnote refers
to pages 60-61 of "Overwhorton Parish Register, Old Stafford Co., Va.", by
William F. Boogher, published by The Saxon Printing Co., Washington, D.C., in
1899.

"John Lattimore and Isabel Frazier were married probably in Virginia circa
1740-1744. Their children were:
Francis Lattimore (ca 1744-1817) Married Rachel Stockton
John Lattimore (1745-1821) " Jamima Stockton
Margaret Lattimore " Newberry Stockton
Sarah Lattimore " Robert Black
Lettie Lattimore Unmarried
Daniel Lattimore (ca 1750-1831) " Ann Stockton"
The footnote refers to the letter written by Samuel Lattimore.

"When and where John and his wife Isabel Frazier died is not known

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Notes for ISABEL FRAZIER:
REMARKS: Isabel Frazier was born about 1720. She was probably born in
Overwharton Parish in Prince William County, Virginia, and she was probably the
daughter of John Frazier, who was minister of Overwharton Parish in 1702.
Overwharton Parish included Stafford County and all of Prince William
County. She married John Latimore (Lattimore), Jr., son of John and Sarah
Latimor (Lattimore), Sr., and they had six children: Francis, John, Margaret,
Sarah, Lettie, and Daniel Lattimore.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point Oregon, who is descended from Daniel
Lattimore and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the Lattimore
family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History". Her research revealed
that John Latimor, Jr., was born in Pennsylvania and that his father, John
Latimor, Sr., purchased 200 acres of land in Prince William County, Virginia,
from Thomas Furr in 1734, for the sum of 200 pounds lawful money of Great
Britain.

Deed Book (3) E, pages 63-64 and 66-67 for Hamilton Parish of Prince William
County shows that John Lattimore, Sr., sold 50 acres of land to his son, John,
Jr., for 2,000 pounds of tobacco. This was part of the 200 acres of land that
John, Sr., purchased from Thomas Furr in 1734. This sale suggests that John,
Jr., had married and was setting up his own household. Therefore, all of the
children were probably born in Prince William County, Virginia.

Mrs. Jenkins writes that no definite relationship has been established between
Isabel Frazier and other Fraziers in Prince William County, but one seems
likely. In 1702, John Frazier was minister of Overwharton Parish in Prince
William County. At that time, Overwharton included Stafford County and all of
Prince William County. Since Isabel Frazier was born about 1720, she could
have been the daughter of John Frazier.

Samuel Lattimore's 1856 letter states that Isabel Frazier died first, and her
husband died soon afterward, while he was quite young. Although the will books
for this period have been lost or destroyed, the Court Order Books for 27 July
and 25 August 1761 show the Last Will and Testament of John Lattimore, Sr., was
presented in court by Sarah Lattimore, the executrix. The will was contested
by five daughters of the deceased. Since John, Jr., was not one of the listed
contestants, it is assumed that he died before 1761. This is consistent with
his grandson's statement that he died quite young; i.e., in his 40s, before his
his children were of legal age.

Mrs. Jenkins writes that Margaret Lattimore married Newberry Stockton, and
Newberry Stockton was granted 100 acres on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek
in Albemarle County, Virginia, on 15 August 1764. John Lattimore married Jemima
Stockton, and he was granted 200 acres on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek
in Albemarle County on 19 September 1765.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and ISABEL FRAZIER are:
3. i. FRANCIS4 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1743, Prince William, Virginia; d. Abt. 1824, Barren County, Kentucky.
4. ii. JOHN LATTIMORE, b. 1745, Prince William County, Virginia; d. 12 March 1821, Rutherford County, North Carolina.
5. iii. MARGARET LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1748, Prince William, Virginia; d. Aft. 1798, Barren County, Kentucky.
iv. SARAH LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1750, Prince William, Virginia; d. Aft. 1798, Barren County, Kentucky; m. ROBERT BLACK, Abt. 1780; b. Abt. 1750.

Notes for SARAH LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah Latimor (Lattimore) was born about 1750 in Prince William
County, Virginia, the daughter of John Latimor (Lattimore), Jr., and Isabel
Frazier. She was the fourth of their six children: Francis, John, Margaret,
Sarah, Lettie, and Daniel Latimor (Lattimore).

"Latimor", "Latimore", and "Lattimore" are equivalent phonetic spellings of the
same family name. Children learned to spell from their parents, the same way
they learned to talk. Therefore, similarities in spelling are significant until
after Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789. "Latimer",
"Lattamore", and "Latemore" are other variants of the same family name.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, who is descended from
Daniel Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the
Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History". Her research
revealed that Sarah Latimor's father, named John Latimor, purchased 50 acres
of land in Prince William County, Virginia, from his father, also named John
Latimor, in 1740. Sarah and her brothers and sisters were probably born on
this small farm in Prince William County.

Sarah's mother died before her father, and her father died "quite young"
(before 1761, while he was in his 40s). The will records of Prince William
County have been lost or destroyed. Francis, as the oldest son, probably
enherited the family farm. Since all of the children moved to Albemarle County
between 1760 and 1765, they probably sold the farm in Prince William County to
start over in Albemarle County, Virginia, where Francis married Rachel
Stockton, John married Jemima Stockton, Margaret married Newberry Stockton,
Sarah married Robert Black, and Daniel married Ann Stockton. Lettie "died
young". She probably died before her mother and father and before her brothers
and sisters moved to Albemarle County.

Mrs. Jenkin's research revealed that Newberry Stockton was granted 100 acres of
land on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek in Albemarle County, Virginia, on
15 August 1764; Samuel Stockton, father of Ann Stockton, was granted 150 acres
on branch of South Fork of Mechum River in Albemarle County on 5 June 1765;
and John Lattimore was granted 200 acres on Meriweathers Branch of Pounding
Creek in Albermarle County on 19 September 1765.

Mrs. Jenkin's research also revealed that Reverand Samuel Black of the Donegal,
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Presbytery, moved to Albemarle County,
Virginia, in 1746-47, and was pastor of Rockfish and Mountain Plain Churches.
He had four sons, and one of them may have been the Robert Black who married
Sarah Latimor.

Between 1765 and 1770, Francis Latimor, John Latimor, Daniel Latimor, Newberry
Stockton, and several other families migrated to Mecklenburg County, North
Carolina, where Newberry Stockton was granted 300 acres on both sides of Clarks
fork of Bullock's Creek on 24 December 1770. The land was surveyed for Newberry
Stockton and the plat recorded on 28 November 1768, indicating that the
migration occurred in 1768.

This area became part of Tryon County, North Carolina, when it was created from
part of Mecklenberg County in 1769. At the time, the border between North and
South Carolina west of the Catawba River had not been surveyed. After it was
surveyed in 1772, it was determined that the land was in the Camden District
of Craven County, South Carolina, in what is now York County, South Carolina.

Since the Lattimore and Stockton families tended to stay together, the Robert
Black family probably participated in this migration, and they probably settled
near the Newberry Stockton family. They probably accompanied the Newberry
Stockton family to Rutherford County. We know that the Robert Black family
moved to Barren County, Kentucky, with the Francis Lattimore and Newberry
Stockton families between 1791 and 1798.

On 26 October 1773, John Latimor purchased 250 acres of land on both sides of
Clark's Fork in Camden District from Ezekial and George Potts, brothers and
heirs to John Potts, deceased. Newberry Stockton was one of the witnesses
signing the deed. This land probably adjoined Newberry Stockton's land, and it
was near if not adjoining the 150 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek that
his brother, Daniel Lattimore, received a warrant in 1770. Francis settled in
District 96, in what is now Union County, South Carolina, 20 to 30 miles
southwest of his brothers and brother-in-law.

Between 1791 and 1798, Francis Lattimore, his wife, and family; the Newberry
Stockton family; and the Robert Black family migrated to Kentucky, where they
settled in Barren County. Francis was granted 200 acres of land on Beaver
Creek in 1798. The Newberry Stockton and Robert Black families probably settled
in the same area.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County was taken by Militia companies. "Frank
Latimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves), "Cap. Jno. Latimor" (2
males over 16, 2 males under 16, three females, and seven slaves), and their
brother-in-law, "Newbery Stocton" (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1
female), were in the Fifth Company. The Census also lists "Danl. Latimore"
(1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females) in the Fifth Company. "Robt.
Black" (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 5 females) and "Jno. Black" (1
male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 5 females) are in the Nineth Company.
Robert and John Black are probably brothers. They have consecutive entries,
indicating they have adjacent farms.

The 1790 Census listings indicate that the heads of six Stocton families were in
the Fifth Militia Company: Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, and 2
females); Thomas (1 male over 16 and 4 females); David (1 male over 16, 3
males under 16, and 5 females); John (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 3
females); Newbery (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female); Davis, Jr.
(1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 3 females); and Daniel Stocton (1 male
over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female). Thomas Stockton was Newberry
Stockton's father. The others are probably Newberry's brothers.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Notes for ROBERT BLACK:
RESUME: Married Sarah Lattimore, daughter of John Lattimore and Isabel
Frazier. They settled in Kentucky. Data from unpublished paper, "The
Lattimore Family in Cleveland County, N.C.", prepared by P. Cleveland Garner
and dated 12 Aug 1939.


v. LETTIE LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1752, Prince William, Virginia; d. Bef. 1761, Prince William, Virginia.

Notes for LETTIE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Lettie Latimor (Lattimore) was born about 1752 in Prince William
County, Virginia, the daughter of John Latimor (Lattimore), Jr., and Isabel
Frazier. She was the fifth of their six children: Francis, John, Margaret,
Sarah, Lettie, and Daniel Latimor (Lattimore).

"Latimor", "Latimore", and "Lattimore" are equivalent phonetic spellings of the
same family name. Children learned to spell from their parents, the same way
they learned to talk. Therefore, similarities in spelling are significant until
after Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789. "Latimer",
"Lattamore", and "Latemore" are other variants of the same family name.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, who is descended from
Daniel Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the
Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History". Her research
revealed that Lettie Latimor's father, named John Latimor, purchased 50 acres
of land in Prince William County, Virginia, from his father, also named John
Latimor, in 1740. Lettie and her brothers and sisters were probably born on
this small farm in Prince William County.

Lettie's mother died before her father, and her father died "quite young"
(before 1761, while he was in his 40s). The will records of Prince William
County have been lost or destroyed. Francis, as the oldest son, probably
enherited the family farm. Since all of the children moved to Albermarle County
between 1760 and 1765, they probably sold the farm in Prince William County to
start over in Albemarle County, Virginia, where Francis married Rachel
Stockton, John married Jemima Stockton, Margaret married Newberry Stockton,
Sarah married Robert Black, and Daniel married Ann Stockton. Lettie "died
young." She probably died before her mother and father died and her brothers
and sisters moved to Albemarle County.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


6. vi. DANIEL LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1754, Prince William, Virginia; d. 12 February 1831, Jefferson County, Indiana.

Generation No. 3

3. FRANCIS4 LATTIMORE (JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1743 in Prince William, Virginia, and died Abt. 1824 in Barren County, Kentucky. He married RACHEL STOCKTON Abt. 1775, daughter of THOMAS STOCKTON and RACHEL ARNOLD. She was born Abt. 1750 in Albemarle County, Virginia, and died Bef. 1817 in Barren County, Kentucky.

Notes for FRANCIS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Francis Latimor (Lattimore) was born about 1743 in Prince William
County, Virginia, the son of John Latimor (Lattimore), Jr., and Isabel
Frazier. He was the oldest of their six children: Francis, John, Margaret,
Sarah, Lettie, and Daniel Latimor (Lattimore). Lettie died young. The others
migrated to Albemarle County, Virginia; then to Tryon County, North Carolina,
where they settled in what became Camden County, South Carolina; and then to
Rutherford County, North Carolina.

"Latimor", "Latimore", and "Lattimore" are equivalent phonetic spellings of the
same family name. Children learned to spell from their parents, the same way
they learned to talk. Therefore, similarities in spelling are significant until
after Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789. "Latimer",
"Lattamore", and "Latemore" are other variants of the same family name.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, who is descended from
Daniel Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the
Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History". Her research
revealed that Francis Latimor's father, named John Latimor, purchased 50 acres
of land in Prince William County, Virginia, from his father, also named John
Latimor, in 1740. Francis and his brothers and sisters were probably born on
this small farm in Prince William County.

Francis's mother died before his father, and his father died "quite young"
(before 1761, while he was in his 40s). The will records of Prince William
County have been lost or destroyed. Francis, as the oldest son, probably
enherited the family farm. Since all of the children moved to Albemarle County
between 1760 and 1765, they probably sold the farm in Prince William County to
start over in Albemarle County, Virginia.

The Lattimore brothers and sisters settled near the Thomas Stockton family, and
the two families intermarried. Francis Lattimore married Rachel Stockton,
John Lattimore married Jemima Stockton, and Margaret Lattimore married Newberry
Stockton. Daniel Lattimore married Ann Stockton, a cousin, daughter of
Samuel Stockton, Thomas Stockton's brother. It is not clear whether Francis
married Rachel Stockton before he migrated to Tryon County, North Carolina,
and settled in what became District 96 of Camden County, South Carolina.

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that Newberry Stockton was granted 100 acres of
land on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek in Albemarle County, Virginia, on
15 August 1764; Samuel Stockton, father of Ann Stockton, was granted 150 acres
on branch of South Fork of Mechum River in Albemarle County on 5 June 1765;
and John Lattimore was granted 200 acres on Meriweathers Branch of Pounding
Creek in Albemarle County on 19 September 1765.

Between 1765 and 1770, Francis Latimor, John Latimor, Daniel Latimor, Newberry
Stockton, and several other families migrated to Tryon County, North Carolina,
where Newberry Stockton was granted 300 acres on both sides of Clarks Fork of
Bullock's Creek on 24 December 1770. The land was surveyed for Newberry
Stockton and the plat recorded on 28 November 1768, indicating that the
migration occurred in 1768.

Tryon County was formed from Mecklenberg County in 1769. Its eastern border
was the Catawba River, and its western border was the Indian Line of 1767.
At the time, the border between North and South Carolina west of the Catawba
River had not been surveyed. When it was surveyed in 1772, it was determined
that Newberry Stockton and Daniel Latimor had settled in the Camden District
of Craven County, South Carolina, in what is now York County, South Carolina.

On 26 October 1773, John Latimor purchased 250 acres of land on both sides of
Clark's Fork in Camden District from Ezekial and George Potts, brothers and
heirs to John Potts, deceased. Newberry Stockton was one of the witnesses
signing the deed. This land probably adjoined Newberry Stockton's land, and it
was near if not adjoining the 150 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek that
his brother, Daniel Lattimore, received a warrant in 1770. Francis settled in
District 96, in what is now Union County, South Carolina, 20 to 30 miles
southwest of his brothers and brother-in-law.

Francis Latimor (Lattimore) married Rachel Stockton, daughter of Thomas Stockton
and Rachel Arnold, and they had at least five children: Rachel, Abby, Jemima,
Peggy, and Polly Latimor (Lattimore). They may have married in Albemarle
County, Virginia, or in District 96 of Camden County, South Carolina. They
were probably married in Camden County about 1775. All of the children were
born in District 96.

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that Francis Lattimore served as a Lieutenant in
the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War. Her source was the
DAR Patriot Index 1966. On 12 June 1786 he submitted a claim for 157 pounds, 10
shillings for militia duty before or since the fall of Charleston (12 May 1779)
in Brandon's Regiment of Anderson's Return. This claims is recorded under File
Number 4444 in the "Audited Accounts of Claims Growing Out Of The American
Revolution".

Mrs. Jenkins research also revealed that Francis Lattimore was issued a voucher
for 5 pounds and 10 shillings for his part of a pay bill in Col. Brandon's
Regiment in 1779 and that Lt. Francis Lattimore gave a receipt to Richard
Griffon on 20 June 1782 for forage for 7 horses and supper for 7 men. This
transaction is recorded under File Number 3123 of the Audited Accounts. Lord
Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown on October 18, 1781, but the war in the
South did not end until the last British troops sailed from Charleston on
December 14, 1782. The local militia were routinely tasked to provide
provisions and forage for Continental troops under Major General Greene, who
attack the British and Hessian forces at Ninety-Six in May 1782 and eventually
forced them back to Charleston.

The "Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution", by Bobby
Gilmer Moss, published by Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1983,
has the following entry on page 555:

"Lattimore, Francis
He served as a lieutenant in the militia under Capt. Robert Montgomery.
During 1779 and after the fall of Charleston, he was under Col. Brandon.
(Gibbs, Shadrack, S10740); A.A. 4444; T258; X2960."

The following entry for Col. Brandon appears on page 95:

"Brandon, Thomas
b. 1741, Pa.
d. 5 February 1802
After migrating to Union County, South Carolina, during 1754-1755,
he rose in 1780 to command a regiment in which he saw most of his
early service under Sumter. After resigning his post of colonel,
he took a position under Col. James Williams and was in the battles
at Musgrove's Mill, Kings Mountain (as a company captain), Blackstock's
Plantation, and Cowpens. A.A. 709; O235, W71)."

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that Francis Lattimore purchased 200 acres of
land in District 96 on 30 August 1786 from John Steen for the sum of 5 pounds,
bordering lands sold by John Steen to Davis Stockton. Francis Lattimore was
living on this land when he purchased it. This Davis Stockton was his wife's
cousin. On 3 December 1787, Francis Latimore was granted 427 acres in District
96, on both sides of Thickety Creek, a branch of the Broad River; bounded on the
sou southwest by John Thompson's land, on the east by Stockton land; and on all
other sides by vacant land.

Around 1788-80, Francis Lattimore moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina,
where he is listed in the 1790 Census, along with his brother John and several
Stocktons. In 1791, he sold his property in District 96 to Charles Clinton for
the sum of 400 pounds. Between 1791 and 1798, Francis, his wife, and family;
the Newberry Stockton family; and the Robert Black family migrated to Kentucky,
where they settled in Barren County. Francis was granted 200 acres of land on
Beaver Creek in 1798.

Many references exist in the Barren County Courthouse relative to transactions
involving Francis Lattimore, among them, Deed Book F, page 76, Francis
Lattimore gave 2 acres of land on Beaver Creek to Edward Young on 11 April 1817
for the benefit of a Presbyterian Church. Francis Lattimore's will, which was
dated 1817 and entered for probated in September Court 1824. Evidently his
wife, Rachel, died before 1817, as she was not mentioned in his will.

His will was rather extensive, as he named all oif his children and
grandchildren, and gave most of them something of value. He was most explicit
in naming the children; however, in spite of his detail, the will was the cause
of much litigation.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County was taken by Militia companies. "Frank
Latimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves), "Cap. Jno. Latimor" (2
males over 16, 2 males under 16, three females, and seven slaves), and their
brother-in-law, "Newbery Stocton" (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1
female), were the Fifth Company. The Census also lists "Danl. Latimore"
(1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females).

The entry for "Danl. Latimore" appears immediately after the entry for "Frank
Latimore", implying Frank and Daniel lived on adjacent farms. There are eight
entries between the "Cap. Jno. Latimor" entry and the "Frank Latimore" entry,
implying stops at several intermediate farms while collecting the Census data.

"Stockton" and "Stocton" are equivalent phonetic spellings for the same family
name. Francis married Rachel Stocton, his brother John married her sister
Jamima, and their sister Margaret married their brother Newberry. Daniel
Lattimore married their cousin Ann Stockton.

The 1790 Census listings indicate that the heads of six Stocton families were in
the Fifth Militia Company: Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, and 2
females); Thomas (1 male over 16 and 4 females); David (1 male over 16, 3
males under 16, and 5 females); John (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 3
females); Newbery (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female); Davis, Jr.
(1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 3 females); and Daniel Stocton (1 male
over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female). Thomas Stockton was Newberry
Stockton's father. The others are probably Newberry's brothers.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Notes for RACHEL STOCKTON:
RESUME: Rachel Stockton was born about 1750 in Albemarle County, Virginia,
the daughter of Thomas Stockton and Rachel Arnold. She was one of three
children: Newberry, Jemima, and Rachel Stockton.

Rachel Stockton married Francis Lattimore, son of John Lattimore and Isabel
Frazier. Her sister Jemina married her husband's brother John; her brother
Newberry married her husband's sister Margaret; and her cousin Ann Stockton
married her husband's brother Daniel.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County, North Carolina, reveals there were six
"Stocton" families in Rutherford County: Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under
16, and 2 females); Thomas (1 male over 16 and 4 females); David (1 male over
16, 3 males under 16, and 5 females); Newbery (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16,
and 1 female); Davis, Jr. (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 3 females); and
Daniel Stocton (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female).

The Francis Lattimore family moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, about1789. The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has the following entry for "Frank
Lattimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves). The one male over 16 was
Frank Lattimore, and the six females were Rachel Arnold and her five daughters.

The Francis Lattimore family, the Newberry Stockton family, and the Robert
Black family migrated to Barrens County, Kentucky, between 1791 and 1798.
Newberry Stockton was Rachel Stockton's brother; Robert Black was married to
Sarah Lattimore, Francis's sister; therefore, the three families were related.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Children of FRANCIS LATTIMORE and RACHEL STOCKTON are:
i. RACHEL5 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1776, Camden County, South Carolina; d. Bef. 1817, Barren County, Kentucky.

Notes for RACHEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rachel Lattimore was born about 1776 in District 96 of Camden County,
South Carolina, the daughter of Francis Lattimore and Rachel Arnold. She was
one of five daughters: Rachel, Abby, Jemima, Peggy, and Polly Lattimore. Their
birthdates are unknown.

The Francis Lattimore family moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, about
1789. The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has the following entry for "Frank
Lattimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves). The one male over 16 wasFrank Lattimore, and the six females were Rachel Arnold and her five daughters.

The Francis Lattimore family, the Newberry Stockton family, and the Robert
Black family migrated to Barrens County, Kentucky, between 1791 and 1798.
Newberry Stockton was Rachel Stockton's brother; Robert Black was married to
Sarah Lattimore, Francis's sister; therefore, the three families were related.

Rachel Lattimore married William Smith, and they had four children: Mary Jane
(Polly), Mysenia (or Mesina), Jenny, and William Smith. The two youngest
children were twins. William Smith died 8 September 1801. On 22 June 1811,
Rachel Lattimore Smith married James Wood in Barren County, Kentucky, and they
had two children: Rachel and James Wood. Rachel's sister Abby married John
Smith. William Smith and John Smith were probably brothers.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


ii. ABBY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1778, Camden County, South Carolina.

Notes for ABBY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Abby Lattimore was born about 1778 in District 96 of Camden County,
South Carolina, the daughter of Francis Lattimore and Rachel Arnold. She was
one of five daughters: Rachel, Abby, Jemima, Peggy, and Polly Lattimore. Their
birthdates are unknown.

The Francis Lattimore family moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, about
1789. The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has the following entry for "Frank
Lattimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves). The one male over 16 was
Frank Lattimore, and the six females were Rachel Arnold and her five daughters.

The Francis Lattimore family, the Newberry Stockton family, and the Robert
Black family migrated to Barrens County, Kentucky, between 1791 and 1798.
Newberry Stockton was Rachel Stockton's brother; Robert Black was married to
Sarah Lattimore, Francis's sister; therefore, the three families were related.

Abby Lattimore married John Smith, and they had two children: William
Lattimore Smith and Franics Lattimore Smith. Abby's sister Rachel married
William Smith. John Smith and William Smith were probably brothers.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


iii. JEMIMA LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1780, Camden County, South Carolina.

Notes for JEMIMA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jemima Lattimore was born about 1780 in District 96 of Camden County,
South Carolina, the daughter of Francis Lattimore and Rachel Arnold. She was
one of five daughters: Rachel, Abby, Jemima, Peggy, and Polly Lattimore. Their
birthdates are unknown.

The Francis Lattimore family moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, about
1789. The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has the following entry for "Frank
Lattimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves). The one male over 16 wasFrank Lattimore, and the six females were Rachel Arnold and her five daughters.

The Francis Lattimore family, the Newberry Stockton family, and the Robert
Black family migrated to Barrens County, Kentucky, between 1791 and 1798.
Newberry Stockton was Rachel Stockton's brother; and Robert Black was married to
Sarah Lattimore, Francis's sister; therefore, the three families were related.

Jemima Lattimore married William Douglas on 8 June 1801 in Barren County,
Kentucky. They had five children: Louise, Polly, Tabitha, Rachel, and George
Douglas.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


iv. PEGGY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1782, Camden County, South Carolina.

Notes for PEGGY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Peggy Lattimore was born about 1782 in District 96 of Camden County,
South Carolina, the daughter of Francis Lattimore and Rachel Arnold. She was
one of five daughters: Rachel, Abby, Jemima, Peggy, and Polly Lattimore. Their
birthdates are unknown.

The Francis Lattimore family moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, about
1789. The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has the following entry for "Frank
Lattimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves). The one male over 16 was
Frank Lattimore, and the six females were Rachel Arnold and her five daughters.

The Francis Lattimore family, the Newberry Stockton family, and the Robert
Black family migrated to Barrens County, Kentucky, between 1791 and 1798.
Newberry Stockton was Rachel Stockton's brother; Robert Black was married to
Sarah Lattimore, Francis's sister; therefore, the three families were related.

Peggy Lattimore married James Renick in Barren County, Kentucky. They had
seven children: Rachel, Polly, Abby, William, Cyrus, Lucy, and Samuel Renick.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


v. POLLY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1784, Camden County, South Carolina.

Notes for POLLY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Polly Lattimore was born about 1784 in District 96 of Camden County,
South Carolina, the daughter of Francis Lattimore and Rachel Arnold. She was
one of five daughters: Rachel, Abby, Jemima, Peggy, and Polly Lattimore. Their
birthdates are unknown.

The Francis Lattimore family moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, about
1789. The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has the following entry for "Frank
Lattimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves). The one male over 16 was
Frank Lattimore, and the six females were Rachel Arnold and her five daughters.

The Francis Lattimore family, the Newberry Stockton family, and the Robert
Black family migrated to Barrens County, Kentucky, between 1791 and 1798.
Newberry Stockton was Rachel Stockton's brother; Robert Black was married to
Sarah Lattimore, Francis's sister; therefore, the three families were related.

Polly Lattimore married John Bales in Barren County, Kentucky, on 24 February
1807. They names of their children, if any, are unknown.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


4. JOHN4 LATTIMORE (JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1745 in Prince William County, Virginia, and died 12 March 1821 in Rutherford County, North Carolina. He married JEMIMA STOCKTON Abt. 1773 in Albemarle County, Virginia, daughter of THOMAS STOCKTON and RACHEL ARNOLD. She was born Abt. 1747 in Albemarle County, Virginia, and died Aft. 1823 in McMinn County, Tennessee.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE:
John Lattimore (Latimor) was born in 1745 in Prince William County, Virginia, the son of John Latimor and Isabel Frazier. He was the second of their six children: Francis, born in 1744; John, born in 1745; Margaret, born about 1747; Sarah, born about 1749; Daniel, born in 1750; and Lettie, born about 1751. All of the children were born in Prince William County, Virginia, on their father's farm, which was purchased in 1740 from his father, also named John Latimor. Their father died before 1761, and according to family tradition, their mother died before their father, who died young (in his 40s). Lettie also died young (while a child). Francis married Rachel Stockton, John married Jemima Stockton, Margaret married Newberry Stockton, and Daniel married Ann Stockton. Sarah married Robert Black.

The surviving land records, court minutes, census listings, and so forth indicate that Lattamore, Latemore, Latimor, Latimore, Lattimore, and Latymore are alternative spellings of the same family name. The most common spelling during the Colonial period was Latimor, but Lattimore became the most common spelling after Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789. There are no surviving Latimor family bibles or other documents, and none of the surviving public records have John Lattimore's signature.

John Latimor is listed in the 1790 Cenus as "Cap. Jno Latimor," his brother Francis is listed as "Frank Latimore," and his brother Daniel is listed as "Danl Latimore." Since they lived in the same area, the same census taker recorded all the entries. The family name is spelled "Lattimore" on the tombstone on his grave, but the tombstone on his grave was probably erected by his grandson, "Big John" Lattimore, in the 1850s, probably at the same time that smaller tombstones of similar design were erected for Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter Lattimore, Big John's parents. The three tombstones on the three adjacent graves in the Lattimore Cemetery are of carved stone, and carved stone markers were not available in Rutherford County in 1821 when John Lattimore died.

In the January 1790 Minutes of the Rutherford County Inferior Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, John Latimor was identified as Captain "Jn Lattimore" and in the April 1790 Court Minutes he was identifed as Captain "Lattamore." In both cases, he was identified as Captain of the 5th Militia Company. He replaced Captain Stockton, who replace Captain William Whitesides in 1787.

The 5th Militia company consisted of able-bodied free males over 16 years of age in the Duncans Creek and Golden Valley sections of Rutherford County. The Captain of each militia company was elected by ballot by the members of the militia company. He was usually one of the larger land owners who was active in local affairs. According to the 1782 tax list for Rutherford County, William Whitesides, who was captain of the local militia company for many years, owned 380 acres of land. According to the same tax list, John Lattemore owned 281 acres in 1782, and he purchased an additional 250 acres in 1787.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SERVICE: According to family tradition, John Lattimore participated in the Battle of Kings Mountain. I am unable to find any record that indicates he was in the Battle of Kings Mountain, which occurred on October 7, 1780. However, he was paid for 61 days service as a private in the South Carolina militia during the Snow Campaign, the Cherokee War, the Briar Creek Campaign, and the relief of Charleston. His service is documented in the South Carolina "Audited Accounts of Claims Growing Out of the American Revolution".

My research in the South Carolina State Archives revealed that John Latimor submitted a claim for 17 pounds, 5 shillings, and 8 1/2 penny sterling on 29 August 1785 for 61 days duty in the Militia and a horse. The notation on the claim states that initially only 11 pounds, 1 shilling, and 1 1/2 penny sterling was approved for payment because there was no certification of 16 days of the duty or the delivery of the horse. The remainding certifications were submitted and he was paid for the claimed 61 days service in the Snow Campaign, the Cherokee War, the Briar Creek Campaign, and the relief of Charleston. This claim is assigned File Number 4445 in the "South Carolina Audited Accounts of Claims Growing Out of the American Revolution."

The "Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution", by Bobby Gilmer Moss, published by Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1983, has entries for all the approved claims. Since the entry for John Lattimore is very brief, additional data can be implied from the entries for people mentioned in his claim.

The following entry for John Lattimore appears on page 555:

"Lattimore, John
He served sixty-one days in the militia under Capts. William Byers, James Venable and Col. Neel. A.A.4445;X536"

On page 131 it has the following entry for Capt. Byers:

"Byers, William, Sr.
b. c.1730, Northern Ireland
d. c.1798
m. Elizabeth Walton
He was a member of the South Carolina Provincial Congress during 1775-76 and a captain in Col. Neel's regiment in the Snow Campaign, the Cherokee War, the Briar Creek Campaign, and the relief of Charleston. He resigned his commission 20 June 1779. (McElwee, James, W9553); A.A.975; A.A.5036A; A.A.1913; A.A.4445; C.S; A.G., p. 122; C.B.; R6; Y54."

On page 719 it has the following entry for Colonel Neel:

"Neel, Thomas
b. 1730
d. 20 June 1779
m. Jean Spratt
He served in several positions before becoming a colonel from the 'New Acqusition' territory. He was in the Snow Campaign with Colonel Richardson. In addition, he was in the battle of Great Cane Break and the siege of Charleston. Thereafter, he was under Sumter during 1779 and was killed in the battle at Stono. Landrum, pp. 73, 79, 310; McCrady, 1, 12, 364; A.G.: 122; C.B.: 172; A.A.5442; Journals."

On page 952 it has the following entries for James Venable:

"Venable, James
He served as a captain under Cols. Bratton and Neel and Gen. Sumter. (Allison, Alexander)"

"Venable, James
He served as a horseman under Capt. Moffett, Col. Bratton and Gen. Sumter. A.A.8042; L442."

There is no reference to the Battle of Kings Mountain in the Colonel Neel or Captain Byers entries, because Colonel Neel was killed at Stono Ferry on June 20, 1779, the year before the Battle at Kings Mountain, and Captain Byers resigned his commission on June 20, 1779, after the militia was defeated and Colonel Neel was killed at Stono Ferry. John Lattimore was probably wounded during the battle at Stono Ferry, since this was his last claimed battle.

EPILOGUE: Captain John died on March 12, 1821. He was buried on the hill north of his cabin. His grave is the oldest marked grave in what is now the Lattimore Family Cemetery in what is now Cleveland County, N.C., which was cut from Lincoln and Rutherford Counties in 1841. Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. Cleveland County was named for Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, and Shelby was named for Colonel Isaac Shelby. Both were heroes of the Battle of Kings Mountain. The Lattimore Family Cemetery is about two miles west of Polkville on the East side of Five Points Road, just North of Hinton's Creek.
Apparently John Latimor died intestate. If there had been a will, there would have been no need for his widow Jemima Stockton, his son Daniel Lattimore, and his son-in-law John Hoyle to agree to quit their claims to the parcel of land given by John Latimor deceased to his son John Lattimore. The quit claim was signed on April 20, 1821, before Jemima Stockton, her son John Lattimore and his wife, her daughter Rachel and her husband went to Tennessee. The quit claim was recorded January 13, 1830, in Rutherford County, North Carolina.

John Lattimore married Susanna Carpenter, and Daniel Lattimore married Sarah Carpenter, Susanna's sister. Susanna and Sarah were daughters of Samuel Carpenter and Catherine Eaker. Rachel Lattimore married John Hoyl. After John Lattimore's death in 1821, Jemima, her son John and his wife, and Jemima's daughter Rachel and her husband, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee. Her son Daniel remained in Rutherford County. Jemima died in McMinn County, Tennessee. The date of her death is unknown. Her will is dated 6 March 1823.

According to the Reverend John Hoyl entry (#60) in the "Genealogy of Peiter Heyl And His Descendants," by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker, John Hoyl and Rachel Lattimore had eleven children: Margaret, Thomas Lattimore, Jemima Hoyl, Levi Clark, John, Sarah, Susan, David Lattimore, Adam Clark, Danile Hilliar, and M. Narcisa Hoyl. The children were born between 1799 and 1824; therefore, they had a large family when they moved to Tennessee.

According to "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, John Lattimore and Susan Carpenter also had eleven children: Francis, John, Samuel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, Jemima, Rachel, Thomas Buchanan, Sarah, Joseph, and Caroline Lattimore. The children were born between 1800 and 1824; therefore, they also had a large family when they moved to Tennessee.

Francis returned to North Carolina and married his cousin Catherine, daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. They had nine children: Sarah, Susanna, Rachel, John, Daniel, Alvin Joseph, Samuel, Margaret, and Ulysses Lattimore. Therefore, some of the Lattimores in Clevland and Rutherford Counties are descended from John Lattimore and Susan Carpenter.

Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter, who stayed in Rutherford County, had nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah, Joseph
C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore. The children were born between 1800 and 1820. Most of the Lattimores in Cleveland County, North Carolina, are descended from this branch of the family.

John Latimor is referred to as "Captain John Lattimore" in P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family in Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Gardner notes that Captain John Lattimore was severely wounded in the battle of Kings Mountain, and it is said that by reason of this wound he carried a British bullet in his leg to his grave.
Since no sources are cited, Mr. Gardner's paper merely reflects the family tradition. As stated earlier, John Lattimore served as a Private in the South Carolina Militia during the Revolution.

Although all males over 16 except civil officials and people engaged in patriotic services were required to serve in the local militia, he was probably exempt from further service in the South Carolina militia after he was wounded during the relief of Charleston. However, he probably served in the North Carolina militia after he moved to Rutherford County. None of the militia records for this period have survived.

However, the Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions have survived. According to "Rutherford County, North Carolina, Abstracts of Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1779-1786", compiled by Hedy Hughes Newton, James Whitesides was appointed to collected the taxes in Captain Whitesides Company in July 1782, William Whitesides in October 1782, William Whitesides in January 1784, Thomas Whitesides in October 1784, Thomas Whitesides in July 1785, and James Whitesides in April 1786.

The entry for the April 1786 session identifies Captain Whitesides as William Whitesides, one of the pioneer William Whitesides' sons. James and Thomas were his brothers. The elder William Whitesides died in 1777. The younger William Whitesides and most of his brothers are not listed in the 1790 Census for Rutherford County. They probably joined the westward migration to Tennessee and Kentucky.

The Quarter Session minutes show that John Lattimore was on a jury to lay off a road in July 1782. He was also on a road jury in October 1782, a grand jury in April 1785, a road jury in January 1786, and a road jury in April 1786. The land records show that he was a relatively large landowner, and this activity indicates that he was a prominent member of the community. It is not clear whether he was elected or appointed, but the entry in the 1790 Census indicates that John Latimor was Captain of the local militia company.

John Lattimore's brother Francis and his family migrated to Kentucky between 1791 and 1798, and his brother Daniel and his family migrated to Indiana between 1809 and 1811. Therefore, most of the Lattimore's in present day Cleveland County are descended from John Lattimore.

Many references exist in the Barren County Courthouse relative to transactions involving Francis Lattimore, among them, Deed Book F, page 76, Francis Lattimore gave 2 acres of land on Beaver Creek to Edward Young on 11 April 1817 for the benefit of a Presbyterian Church. Francis Lattimore's will, which was dated 1817 and entered for probate in September Court 1824. Evidently his wife, Rachel, died before 1817, as she was not mentioned in his will.

The Lattimore family founded Mount Harmony Methodist Church, which was known as the Lattimore Meeting House. John Lattimore also endowed the church with thirty acres of land which was still held by the church in 1939. After his death in 1821, his widow Jamima, son John and his wife, and daughter Rachel and her husband, John Hoyl, moved to Tennessee. His son Daniel remained in Rutherford County and joined Big Springs Baptist Church, which was organized in 1818.

The "John Lattimore House" on Hinton's Creek that was nominated for the National Register of Historic Places, was named for his grandson, who purchased the tract and the house from his father, Daniel, on 1 Oct 1824. The nomination form states that the land on which the Lattimore House now stands was issued under patent to William Willis in 1771. On March 3, 1787, Willis's widow, Margaret, and Isaac Hinton sold 250 acres of the tract on Hinton's Creek to John Lattimore for 200 dollars current money.

The nomination form also states that Captain John Lattimore had acquired considerable land, seven slaves, and had become a prominent Rutherford county resident. It also states that Captain John Lattimore never resided in the John Lattimore house. It may have served as the home of one of the numerous Lattimores in the area or as a dwelling of a Daniel Lattimore tenant. It takes its name from Captain John Lattimore's grandson, John Lattimore, who purchased the land and the house from his father Daniel Lattimore on 1 Oct 1824.

LATTIMORE CEMETERY: The Lattimore Family Cemetery is on a hill on the east side of Five Points Road (S.R. 1373), about two and one-half miles northwest of Polkville, North Carolina. There are about one hundred marked graves and an undetermined number of unmarked graves. One of the oldest graves is that of Captain John Lattimore, who was born in Prince William County, Virginia, in 1745, and who died in Rutherford County, North Carolina, on March 12, 1821. Cleveland County was cut from Lincoln and Rutherford Counties in 1841.

The Lattimore Family Cemetery property is shown on Cleveland County Tax Map 1101 in Block 1 as Lot 2, consisting of 1.42 acres of Road 1373 (Five Points Road). The land containing the cemetery was deeded to the Trustee of the Lattimore Burying Ground Association on April 30, 1932, by Sam C. Lattimore and his wife Mary E. Lattimore. Frank C. Lattimore, the son of John Daniel Lattimore and the nephew of Sam C. Lattimore, was the original trustee. After his death in December 1992, John Bruce Lattimore, son of John L. Lattimore and nephew of Frank C. Lattimore, became the trustee.

Until the bole weevil wiped out the cotton crops in the 1950s and the farmers either went into dairy or beef cattle, hogs, or chickens or went to work in the textile mills, the cemetery was surrounded by cotton fields. It is now surrounded by pasture and timber land that has been in the Lattimore family since it was purchased in 1787 by "Captain John" Lattimore, who was listed in the 1790 Census for Rutherford County, North Carolina. He sold it to his son, Daniel Lattimore, and he sold it to his son, "Big John" Lattimore.

According to the 1850 Tax Lists for Cleveland County, Big John Lattimore, owned 733 acres of land in this area. Big John's log house, one of the oldest houses in Cleveland County, is in the trees on the east side of the cemetery. Big John's great-grandson, John L. "Johnie" Lattimore, owns about 190 acres of the surrounding land and lives across the road from the cemetery.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 10/97.


More About JOHN LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for JEMIMA STOCKTON:
REMARKS: Jemima Stockton (Stocton) was born about 1747 in Albemarle County,
Virginia, the daughter of Thomas Stockton and Rachel Arnold. She had at least
one sister, Rachel, and one brother, Newberry. There were probably other
brothers and sisters.

Jemima's grandfather, Davis Stockton, and her grandmother, Sarah, arrived in
Pennsylvnia from Northern Ireland. They were probably among the large number
of immigrants who began arriving from Ulster (Northern Ireland) in 1717, and
they probably worked as indentured servants in Pennsylvania for several years
before migrating to Virginia. On 12 March 1739, Davis Stockton was granted
400 acres of land on both sides of Joy Creek, a branch ofthe Rivanna, in
Goochland County, Virginia. This part of Goochland County later became
Albemarle County.

Davis Stockton sold the land on Joy Creek on 17 November 1741 and was granted
400 acres on both sides of Mechum River. On 15 August 1764, Jemima's brother,
Newberry, was granted 100 acres on Meriweathers Branch of Pounding Creek. On 5
June 1765, Jemima's Uncle, Samuel Stockton, was granted 150 acreas on a branch
of the South Fork of the Mecham River. I have no information regarding grants to
Thomas Stockton, Jemima's father. Since he was the oldest son, and her
grandfather died in 1760, Thomas probably inherited all or part of his father's
land on the Mechum River.

On 19 September 1765, John Lattimore was granted 200 acres of land on both sides
of Meriweathers Branch of Pounding Creek. John's grandfather, John Lattimore,
arrived in Philadelphia from Northern Ireland, lived in Pennsylvania for
several years, and migrated to Prince William County Virginia, where he
purchased 200 acres of land in 1734. John's father, also named John Lattimore,
purchased 50 acres of land from his father in 1740. After John's mother and
father died, John and his brothers and sisters migrated to Albemarle County,
where Francis Lattimore, John's older brother married Rachel Stockton, Jemima's
sister, and Margaret Lattimore, John's sister, married Newberry Stockton,
Jemima's brother. Daniel Lattimore, John's younger brother, married Ann
Stockton, Jemima's cousin.

Jemima Stockton married John Lattimore, son of John Lattimore and Isabel
Frazier, in Albemarle County, Virginia. They had at least three children: John,
Daniel, and Rachel Lattimore. The date of their marriage is unknown. They
undoubtedly married after John Lattimore settled in Albemarle County, and they
probably married before 1768, when Daniel Lattimore, Newberry Stockton, and
several other families migrated to Tryon County, North Carolina.

Tryon County was formed from Mecklenberg County in 1769. Its eastern boundary
was the Catawba River, and its western boundary was the Indian Line of 1767.
At the time, the border between North Carolina and South Carolina west of the
Catawba River had not been surveyed. The first courts of Tryon County were
held in what is now York County, South Carolina. The court house was moved to
what is now Gaston County, North Carolina, after the survey determined the
other site to be in South Carolina.

The usual procedure for obtaining a "Crown" patent included finding vacant or
unclaimed land which was technically the property of the state; preparing a
description of the land, including the number of acres, nearby waterways, and
neighboring land holders; petitioning His Majesty's Council to issue a warrant
(order) to survey the tract; recording the description of the tract and the
individual's name in the land entry book; preparation of the survey and return
of two copies of the survey to the Council; petitioning the Council to issue a
patent and paying paying all fees; and issuance of the patent, the recording
of the description and the name of the individual in the land grant book, and
the return of the patent with one copy of the survey to the individual.

The existence of a deed implies that a patent was issued to someone for that
tract. Existence of a patent implies that a survey had been made. Existence
of a warrant implies that an entry had been made in the land entry book. Not
every entry in the land entry book resulted in a warrant being issued, not
every warrant issued resulted in a survey, and not every survey resulted in a
patent being issued.

In 1770, Daniel Lattimore, John's brother, was granted 150 acres on Clark's Fork
of Bullock's Creek in Tryon County, North Carolina. Newberry Stockton, Jemima's
brother, was granted 300 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek on 24 December
1770. The land was surveyed for Newberry Stockton and the plat recorded on 28
November 1768, indicating that the Newberry Stockton and Daniel Lattimore had
migrated to Tryon County in 1768, staked their claims, and lived on the land
until their patents were granted.

On 26 October 1773, John Lattimore purchased 250 acres of land on both sides of
Clark's Fork in Camden District of Craven County, South Carolina, Ezkial and
George Potts, brothers and heirs to John Potts, deceased. Newberry Stockton
was one of the witnesses signing the deed. This land probably adjoined
Newberry Stockton's land, and it was probably near if not adjoining Daniel
Lattimore's land on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek. The deed described John
Lattimore as a planter in Craven County of the Province of South Carolina.

John Lattimore and Jemima Stockton may have moved to Tryon County in 1768 with
the Daniel Lattimore and Newberry Stockton families, or they may have followed
them to what is now York County, South Carolina. Francis Lattimore and Rachel
Stockton also moved to this area, settling in what is now Union County, South
Carolina. At that time it was District 96 of Craven County.

The land that John Lattimore purchased was a few miles from Kings Mountain
battleground. According to family tradition, John Lattimore participated in
the Battle of King's Mountain. I am unable to find any record of his
involvment in the Battle of King's Mountain, which occurred on October 7, 1780,
but 61 days service as a private in the South Carolina militia in the Snow
Campaign, the Cherokee War, the Briar Creek Campaign, and the relief of
Charleston is documented in the South Carolina "Audited Accounts of Claims
Growing Out of the American Revolution".

On 8 October 1783, John Lattimore sold his land in South Carolina, and he
purchased land on both sides of Duncan's Creek in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, on 13 October 1783. Daniel Lattimore, Francis Lattimore, and
Newberry Stockton also moved to Rutherford County from South Carolina. John
and Daniel appear on the 1782 Tax List of Rutherford County, indicating that
John moved to Rutherford County before he sold his land in South Carolina.

Thomas Stockton, Jemima's father, and Samule Stockton, her uncle, also moved to
Rutherford County. It is not clear whether they moved to Rutherford County
from Virginia after Francis, John, Daniel, and Newberry moved to Rutherford
County or whether they also moved to South Carolina. In any event, two of the
three known Lattimore children, John and Daniel, were born in Camden District
of Craven County, South Carolina. Rachel was born 19 August 1782 in Rutherford
County.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has entries for six "Stocton" familes:
Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, and 2 females); Thomas (1 male over
16 and 4 females); David (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 5 females);
John (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 3 females); Newbery (1 male over
16, male under 16, and 1 female); Davis, Jr. (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16,
and 3 females); and Daniel (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female).
All are in the Fifth Militia Company, the same company as "John Latimor" and
his brothers Frank and Daniel "Latimore".

It is evident from the Census listing that "Stocton" and "Stockton" are
equivalent phonetic spellings for the same family name. Samuel Stockton
was Jemima's uncle, Thomas Stockton was Jemima's father, Davis (David) was
Jemima's cousin, and Newberry was her brother. Davis, Jr., is Davis's son.
Only the relationships of John and Daniel are unclear. They could be sons of
either Samuel, Thomas, or Davis.

John Lattimore married Susanna Carpenter, and Daniel Lattimore married Sarah
Carpenter, Susanna's sister. Susanna and Sarah were daughters of Samuel
Carpenter and Catherine Eaker. Rachel Lattimore married John Hoyl. After
John Lattimore's death in 1821, Jemima, her son John and his wife, and
Jemima's daughter Rachel and her husband, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.
Her son Daniel remained in Rutherford County. Jemima died in McMinn County,
Tennessee. The date of her death is unknown. Her will is dated 6 March 1823.

Much of the above data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins, who is descended from Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


More About JEMIMA STOCKTON:
Burial: McMinn County, Tennessee

Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and JEMIMA STOCKTON are:
7. i. JOHN5 LATTIMORE, b. 1774, Camden District, South Carolina; d. 18 June 1833, McMinn County, Tennessee.
8. ii. DANIEL LATTIMORE, b. 1775, Camden District, South Carolina; d. 13 December 1833, Rutherford County, North Carolina.
9. iii. RACHEL LATTIMORE, b. 19 August 1782, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 27 October 1827.

5. MARGARET4 LATTIMORE (JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1748 in Prince William, Virginia, and died Aft. 1798 in Barren County, Kentucky. She married NEWBERRY STOCKTON Bef. 1790 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, son of THOMAS STOCKTON and RACHEL ARNOLD. He was born Abt. 1745 in Albemarle County, Virginia, and died in Barren County, Kentucky.

Notes for MARGARET LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Margaret Latimor (Lattimore) was born about 1748 in Prince William
County, Virginia, the daughter of John Latimor (Lattimore), Jr., and Isabel
Frazier. She was the third of their six children: Francis, John, Margaret,
Sarah, Lettie, and Daniel Latimor (Lattimore).

"Latimor", "Latimore", and "Lattimore" are equivalent phonetic spellings of the
same family name. Children learned to spell from their parents, the same way
they learned to talk. Therefore, similarities in spelling are significant until
after Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789. "Latimer",
"Lattamore", and "Latemore" are other variants of the same family name.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, who is descended from
Daniel Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the
Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History". Her research
revealed that Margaret Latimor's father, named John Latimor, purchased 50 acres
of land in Prince William County, Virginia, from his father, also named John
Latimor, in 1740. Margaret and her brothers and sisters were probably born on
this small farm in Prince William County.

Margaret's mother died before her father, and her father died "quite young"
(before 1761, while he was in his 40s). The will records of Prince William
County have been lost or destroyed. Francis, as the oldest son, probably
enherited the family farm. Since all of the children moved to Albemarle County
between 1760 and 1765, they probably sold the farm in Prince William County to
start over in Albemarle County, Virginia, where Francis married Rachel
Stockton, John married Jemima Stockton, Margaret married Newberry Stockton,
Sarah married Robert Black, and Daniel married Ann Stockton. Lettie "died
young". She probably died before her mother and father died and before her
brothers and sisters moved to Albemarle County.

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that Newberry Stockton was granted 100 acres of
land on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek in Albemarle County, Virginia, on
15 August 1764; Samuel Stockton, father of Ann Stockton, was granted 150 acres
on branch of South Fork of Mechum River in Albemarle County on 5 June 1765;
and John Lattimore was granted 200 acres on Meriweathers Branch of Pounding
Creek in Albemarle County on 19 September 1765.

Between 1765 and 1770, Francis Latimor, John Latimor, Daniel Latimor, Newberry
Stockton, and several other families migrated to Mecklenburg County, North
Carolina, where Newberry Stockton was granted 300 acres on both sides of Clarks
fork of Bullock's Creek on 24 December 1770. The land was surveyed for Newberry
Stockton and the plat recorded on 28 November 1768, indicating that the
migration occurred in 1768. This area became part of Tryon County when it was
created from part of Mecklenberg County in 1769. At the time, the border
between North and South Carolina west of the Catawba River had not been
surveyed. It was subsequently determined that land was in the Camden District
of Craven County, South Carolina, in what is now York County, South Carolina.

On 26 October 1773, John Latimor purchased 250 acres of land on both sides of
Clark's Fork in Camden District from Ezekial and George Potts, brothers and
heirs to John Potts, deceased. Newberry Stockton was one of the witnesses
signing the deed. This land probably adjoined Newberry Stockton's land, and it
was near if not adjoining the 150 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek that
his brother, Daniel Lattimore, received a warrant in 1770. Francis settled in
District 96, in what is now Union County, South Carolina, 20 to 30 miles
southwest of his brothers and brother-in-law.

Between 1791 and 1798, Francis Lattimore, his wife, and family; the Newberry
Stockton family; and the Robert Black family migrated to Kentucky, where they
settled in Barren County. Francis was granted 200 acres of land on Beaver
Creek in 1798. The Newberry Stockton family probably settled in the same area.
The 1790 Census for Rutherford County was taken by Militia companies. "Frank
Latimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves), "Cap. Jno. Latimor" (2
males over 16, 2 males under 16, three females, and seven slaves), and their
brother-in-law, "Newbery Stocton" (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1
female), were the Fifth Company. The Census also lists "Danl. Latimore"
(1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females).

The 1790 Census listings indicate that the heads of six Stocton families were in
the Fifth Militia Company: Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, and 2
females); Thomas (1 male over 16 and 4 females); David (1 male over 16, 3
males under 16, and 5 females); John (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 3
females); Newbery (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female); Davis, Jr.
(1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 3 females); and Daniel Stocton (1 male
over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female). Thomas Stockton was Newberry
Stockton's father. The others are probably Newberry's brothers.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Notes for NEWBERRY STOCKTON:
REMARKS: Newberry Stockton (Stocton) was born about 1745 in Albemarle County, Virginia, the son of Thomas Stockton (Stocton) and Rachel Arnold. He was one of three children: Newberry, Jemima, and Rachel Stockton. Davis Stockton, Newberry's grandfather, and his family settled in 1739 in the part of Goochland County, Virginia, that became Albemarle County. It is assumed that Newberry Stockton was born in Albemarle County.

Newberry Stocton married Margaret Lattimore, daughter of John Lattimore and Isabel Frazier; his sister Margaret married his wife's brother, Francis Lattimore; his sister Jemima married his wife's brother, John Lattimore; and his cousin, Ann Stockton, married his wife's brother, Daniel Lattimore.

"Latimor", "Latimore", and "Lattimore" are equivalent phonetic spellings of the same family name. Children learned to spell from their parents, the same way they learned to talk. Therefore, similarities in spelling are significant until after Noah Webster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789. "Latimer", "Lattamore", and "Latemore" are other variants of the same family name.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, who is descended from Daniel Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History". Her research revealed that Margaret Latimor's grandfather, also named John Latimor, purchased 50 acres of land in Prince William County, Virginia, from his father, also named John Latimor, in 1740. Margaret and her brothers were probably born on this small small farm in Prince William County.

Margaret's mother died before her father, and her father died "quite young" (before 1761, while he was in his 40s). The will records of Prince William County have been lost or destroyed. Francis, as the oldest son, probably enherited the family farm. Since all of the children moved to Albemarle County between 1760 and 1765, they probably sold the farm in Prince William County to start over in Albemarle County.

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that Newberry Stockton was granted 100 acres of land on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek in Albemarle County, Virginia, on 15 August 1764; Samuel Stockton, father of Ann Stockton, was granted 150 acres on branch of South Fork of Mechum River in Albemarle County on 5 June 1765; and John Lattimore was granted 200 acres on Meriweathers Branch of Pounding Creek in Albemarle County on 19 September 1765.

Between 1765 and 1770, Francis Latimor, John Latimor, Daniel Latimor, Newberry Stockton, and several other families migrated to Tryon County, North Carolina, where Newberry Stockton was granted 300 acres on both sides of Clarks Fork of Bullock's Creek on 24 December 1770. The land was surveyed for Newberry Stockton and the plat recorded on 28 November 1768, indicating that the migration occurred in 1768.

Tryon County was formed from Mecklenberg County in 1769. Its eastern boundary was the Catawba River, and its western boundary was the Indian Line of 1767. At the time, the border between North Carolina and South Carolina west of the Catawba River had not been surveyed. The first courts of Tryon County were held in what is now York County, South Carolina. The court house was moved to what is now Gaston County, North Carolina, after the survey determined the other site to be in South Carolina.

The usual procedure for obtaining a "Crown" patent included finding vacant or unclaimed land which was technically the property of the state; preparing a description of the land, including the number of acres, nearby waterways, and neighboring land holders; petitioning His Majesty's Council to issue a warrant (order) to survey the tract; recording the description of the tract and the individual's name in the land entry book; preparation of the survey and return of two copies of the survey to the Council; petitioning the Council to issue a patent and paying paying all fees; and issuance of the patent, the recording of the description and the name of the individual in the land grant book, and the return of the patent with one copy of the survey to the individual.

The existence of a deed implies that a patent was issued to someone for that tract. Existence of a patent implies that a survey had been made. Existence of a warrant implies that an entry had been made in the land entry book. Not every entry in the land entry book resulted in a warrant being issued, not every warrant issued resulted in a survey, and not every survey resulted in a patent being issued.

In 1770, Daniel Lattimore, John's brother, was granted 150 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek in Tryon County, North Carolina. Newberry Stockton, Jemima's brother, was granted 300 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek on 24 December 1770. The land was surveyed for Newberry Stockton and the plat recorded on 28 November 1768, indicating that the Newberry Stockton and Daniel Lattimore had migrated to Tryon County in 1768, staked their claims, and lived on the land until their patents were granted.

On 26 October 1773, John Lattimore purchased 250 acres of land on both sides of Clark's Fork in Camden District of Craven County, South Carolina, Ezkial and George Potts, brothers and heirs to John Potts, deceased. Newberry Stockton was one of the witnesses signing the deed. This land probably adjoined Newberry Stockton's land, and it was probably near if not adjoining Daniel Lattimore's land on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek. The deed described John Lattimore as a planter in Craven County of the Province of South Carolina.

John Lattimore and Jemima Stockton may have moved to Tryon County in 1768 with the Daniel Lattimore and Newberry Stockton families, or they may have followed them to what is now York County, South Carolina. Francis Lattimore and Rachel Stockton also moved to this area, settling in what is now Union County, South Carolina. At that time it was District 96 of Craven County.

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that the sale of the land on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek was recorded on 8 October 1783 on page 379 of Deed Book B in the Register of Deeds, York County Courthouse, York County, South Carolina. The entry states that it was acquired on 26 October 1773. My research revealed that the 26 October 1774 indenture for acquisition of the land was recorded on 30 August 1774 in Volume 2 of "Charleston Deeds", pages 162-164. John Lattimore paid 480 pounds for the land, which was granted to John Potts in 1767 by William Tryon, Governor of Tryon County and Provice of North Carolina. John Lattimore is described as a planter in Craven County in the Province of South Carolina. At that time Craven County include all of upstate South Carolina.

On 8 October 1783, John Lattimore sold his land in South Carolina and moved to Rutherford County, which was created from Tryon County in 1779. On 13 October 1783, he purchased land on both sides of Duncan Creek from Benjamin Shaw. The purchase is recorded on page 134 of Rutherford County Deed Book J-L. On 4 February 1786 he purchased 200 acres on South Creek of Little Broad River from Richard Singleton. This transaction is entry number 922 on page 37. On 3 March 1787, he purchased 250 acres on Hintons Creek. This transaction is recorded on pages 249-250 of Deed Book M-V.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County lists "Cap. Jno. Latimor" in the Fifth Company (The Census was compiled by Militia companies). This entry indicates that the original spelling of the family name was "Latimor". His household consisted of two males over 16, two males under 16, three females, and seven slaves.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County was taken by Militia companies. Captain John Latimor's brother, "Frank Latimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves), and his brother-in-law, "Newbery Stocton" (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female), were also in the Fifth Company. The Census also lists "Danl. Latimore" (1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females).

The entry for "Danl. Latimore" appears immediately after the entry for "Frank Latimore", implying Frank and Daniel lived on adjacent farms. There are eight entries between the "Cap. Jno. Latimor" entry and the "Frank Latimore" entry, implying stops at several intermediate farms while collecting the Census data.

Thomas Stockton, Margaret's father, and Samuel Stockton, her uncle, also moved to Rutherford County. It is not clear whether they moved to Rutherford County from Virginia after Francis, John, Daniel, and Newberry moved to Rutherford County or whether they also moved to South Carolina. In any event, two of the three known Lattimore children, John and Daniel, were born in Camden District of Craven County, South Carolina. Rachel was born 19 August 1782 in Rutherford County.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has entries for six "Stocton" familes: Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, and 2 females); Thomas (1 male over16 and 4 females); David (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 5 females); John (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 3 females); Newbery (1 male over 16, male under 16, and 1 female); Davis, Jr. (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 3 females); and Daniel (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female). All are in the Fifth Militia Company, the same company as "John Latimor" and his brothers Frank and Daniel "Latimore".

It is evident from the Census listing that "Stocton" and "Stockton" are equivalent phonetic spellings for the same family name. Samuel Stockton was Jemima's uncle, Thomas Stockton was Jemima's father, Davis (David) was Jemima's cousin, and Newberry was her brother. Davis, Jr., is Davis's son. Only the relationships of John and Daniel are unclear. They could be sons of either Samuel, Thomas, or Davis.

On 8 October 1783, John Lattimore sold his land in South Carolina, and he purchased land on both sides of Duncan's Creek in Rutherford County, North Carolina, on 13 October 1783. Daniel Lattimore, Francis Lattimore, and
Newberry Stockton also moved to Rutherford County from South Carolina. John
and Daniel appear on the 1782 Tax List of Rutherford County, indicating that
John moved to Rutherford County before he sold his land in South Carolina.

Between 1791 and 1798, Francis Lattimore, his wife and family; the Newberry Stockton family; and the Robert Black family migrated to Kentucky, where they settled in Barren County. Robert Black was married to Sarah Lattimore, Margaret's sister. Francis Lattimore was granted 200 acres of land on Beaver Creek in 1798. The Newberry Stockton family probably settled in the same area. Much of the above data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, who is descended from Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/97


Child of MARGARET LATTIMORE and NEWBERRY STOCKTON is:
i. STOCKTON5, b. Bef. 1790, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for STOCKTON:
RESUME: Son of Newberry Stockton and Margaret Lattimore. No data regarding
this child except the 1790 Census for Rutherford County, North Carolina, which
states that the "Newbery Stocton" family consisted of 1 male over 16, 1 male
under 16, and 1 female. The male over 16 is obviously Newberry Stockton, the
female is Margaret Lattimore, and the male under 16 is their first/only child.


6. DANIEL4 LATTIMORE (JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1754 in Prince William, Virginia, and died 12 February 1831 in Jefferson County, Indiana. He married ANN STOCKTON Abt. 1770 in Albemarle County, Virginia, daughter of SAMUEL STOCKTON and PRUDENCE TORBETT. She was born Abt. 1754 in Albemarle County, Virginia, and died 28 March 1838 in Jefferson County, Indiana.

Notes for DANIEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Latimor (Lattimore) was born about 1752 in Prince William
County, Virginia, the son of John Latimor (Lattimore), Jr., and Isabel
Frazier. He was the youngest of their six children: Francis, John, Margaret,
Sarah, Lettie, and Daniel Latimor (Lattimore).

"Latimor", "Latimore", and "Lattimore" are equivalent phonetic spellings of the
same family name. Children learned to spell from their parents, the same way
they learned to talk. Therefore, similarities in spelling are significant until
after Noah Weblster published his "American Spelling Guide" in 1789. "Latimer",
"Lattamore", and "Latemore" are other variants of the same family name.

Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Myrtle Point, Oregon, who is descended from
Daniel Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton, completed an extensive study of the
Lattimore family, entitled: "The Lattimores, A Family History". Her research
revealed that Daniel Latimor's father, named John Latimor, purchased 50 acres
of land in Prince William County, Virginia, from his father, also named John
Latimor, in 1740. Daniel and his brothers and sisters were probably born on
this small farm in Prince William County.

Daniel's mother died before his father, and his father died "quite young"
(before 1761, while he was in his 40s). The will records of Prince William
County have been lost or destroyed. Francis, as the oldest son, probably
enherited the family farm. Since all of the children moved to Albemarle County
between 1760 and 1765, they probably sold the farm in Prince William County to
start over in Albemarle County, Virginia, where Francis married Rachel
Stockton, John married Jemima Stockton, Margaret married Newberry Stockton,
Sarah married Robert Black, and Daniel married Ann Stockton. Daniel Lattimore
and Ann Stockton had six children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel, Rhoda, and
Anne Lattimore.

Mrs. Jenkin's research revealed that Newberry Stockton was granted 100 acres of
land on Meriweather Branch of Pounding Creek in Albemarle County, Virginia, on
15 August 1764; Samuel Stockton, father of Ann Stockton, was granted 150 acres
on branch of South Fork of Mechum River in Albemarle County on 5 June 1765;
and John Lattimore was granted 200 acres on Meriweathers Branch of Pounding
Creek in Albemarle County on 19 September 1765.

Between 1765 and 1770, Francis Latimor, John Latimor, Daniel Latimor, Newberry
Stockton, and several other families migrated to Tryon County, North Carolina,
where Newberry Stockton was granted 300 acres on both sides of Clarks Fork of
Bullock's Creek on 24 December 1770. The land was surveyed for Newberry
Stockton and the plat recorded on 28 November 1768, indicating that the
migration occurred in 1768.

Mrs. Jenkin's research revealed that on 10 November 1770, Daniel Lattimore was
issued warrant #409 by the Tryon County, North Carolina, Court of Claims for
150 acres of land on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek, from Robert Paterson to
George Pots land, including his own present improvements. The mention of
improvements indicates his arrival prior to 1770.

Tryon County, North Carolina, was formed from Mecklenberg County in 1769. The
Eastern boundary was the Catawba River, and the western boundary was the Indian
Line of 1767. At the time, the border between North and South Carolina west
of the Catawba River had not been surveyed. After it was surveyed in 1772,
it was determined that the land that Newberry Stockton and Daniel Lattimore had
had acquired was actually in the Camden District of Craven County, South
Carolina, in what is now York County.

On 26 October 1773, John Latimor purchased 250 acres of land on both sides of
Clark's Fork in Camden District from Ezekial and George Potts, brothers and
heirs to John Potts, deceased. Newberry Stockton was one of the witnesses
signing the deed. This land probably adjoined Newberry Stockton's land, and it
was near, if not adjoining, the 150 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek
where Daniel Lattimore settled. Francis settled in District 96, in what is
now Union County, South Carolina, 20 to 30 miles southwest of his brothers
and brother-in-law.

On 8 October 1783, John Latimor sold his land in South Carolina and moved to
Rutherford County, North Carolina. On 13 October 1785, John Lattimor purchased
land on both sides of Duncan Creek, including the "Lattimore improvements".
Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that both John and Daniel Latimore appear on the
1782 Tax List of Rutherford County. Both John and Daniel Latimore settled on
Duncan's Creek of the First Broad River. Daniel Lattimore was granted 100
acres of land on 6 November 1799, according to Rutherford County Deed Book 15,
pages 10-12.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County was taken by Militia companies. "Frank
Latimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves), "Cap. Jno. Latimor" (2
males over 16, 2 males under 16, three females, and seven slaves), and their
brother-in-law, "Newbery Stocton" (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1
female), were in the Fifth Company. The Census also lists "Danl. Latimore"
(1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females) in the Fifth Company. "Robt.
Black" (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 5 females) and "Jno. Black" (1
male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 5 females) are in the Nineth Company.
Robert and John Black are probably brothers. They have consecutive entries,
indicating they have adjacent farms.

The 1790 Census listings indicate that the heads of six Stocton families were in
the Fifth Militia Company: Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, and 2
females); Thomas (1 male over 16 and 4 females); David (1 male over 16, 3
males under 16, and 5 females); John (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 3
females); Newbery (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female); Davis, Jr.
(1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 3 females); and Daniel Stocton (1 male
over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female). Thomas Stockton was Newberry
Stockton's father. The others are probably Newberry's brothers.

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that Prudence Lattimore married Amos Chitwood on
1 October 1793, John Lattimore married Isabella Carson about 1800, and Jemima
Lattimore married Thomas Jones on 27 March 1806. In 1809, John Lattimore and
his brother-in-law, John Carson, went to Indiana Territory and staked claims on
Graham Creek. John Lattimore returned to Rutherford County, and 1811 the
Daniel Lattimore family and several other Lattimore and Carson families
migrated to Indiana. The Daniel Lattimore family settled in Jefferson County,
while the John Lattimore family settled in Jennings County.

Mrs. Jenkins suggest that slavery was one reason for their move. Daniel
Lattimore was a staunch Presbyterian, and some Presbyterian ministers were
preaching abolitionism at this early date. The 1790 Census Listings show that
Francis and John Latimore were slave holders, but Daniel Latimore had none.
Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois were formed from the Northwest Territories,
established in 1786 by Act of Congress. Indiana attracted many settlers from
the slave states, because the act creating the Northwest Territories
specifically prohibited slavery and involuntary servitude.

In 1811, the Daniel Lattimore family arrived in Jefferson County, Indiana
Territory, which was mostly unclaimed lands and considered to be still in
hostile Indian Territory. Daniel returned to North Carolina and sold his 60
acre tract to Greenbury Massey for $300. On 18 April 1814, Daniel Lattimore
purchase 160 acres of land in the southwest quarter of section 30, township 4,
north of range 9 west, in the Republican township of Kent, from the U.S.
Government in Jefferson, Indiana.

Daniel Lattimore erected a large two story home out of hand made bricks, withwalls 18 inches thick. According to Mrs. Jenkins, the house was still standing
on the road between Deputy and Kent, was well kept, and was being lived in
1982. Daniel Lattimore was listed in the 1815 Tax List of Jefferson County and
in the 1820 U.S. Census.

Daniel Lattimore's married children, as well as the younger children, moved to
Indiana. John Lattimore and his brother-in-law, John Carson, went to Indiana
in 1809 and staked their claims, Daniel Lattimore and his family moved in 1811.
Prudence Lattimore and her husband, Amos Chitwood, and Jemima Lattimore and her
husband, Thomas Jones, also moved to Jefferson County, Indiana. They probably
migrated with the Daniel Lattimore family.

Daniel Lattimore died 12 February 1831, and Ann Stockton died 28 March 1838.
They were probably buried in the farm cemetery, which was abandon and overgrown
with brush. In Mary Hill's book, "Cemetery Records of Jefferson County,
Indiana", she describes this cemetery as: "An abandoned graveyard near Wilson's
Cave, said to have had a church at one time called Ebenezar Church."

On 4 December 1834, the widow and heirs of Daniel Lattimore sold the land to
Zaphaniah LLoyd. The deed was signed by: Ann Lattimore, widow of Daniel;
Amos Chitwood and Prudence, his wife; Thomas Jones and Jemima, his wife;
John Lattimore and Nancy, his wife; Abram McCurry and Rhoda, his wife; Samuel
Lattimore and Polly, his wife. Rhoda and Samuel married in Indiana.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95


Notes for ANN STOCKTON:
REMARKS: Ann Stockton was born about 1754 in Albemarle County, Virginia,
the daughter of Samuel Stockton and Prudence Torbett. She had at least one
brother, Davis Stockton.

About 1770, Ann Stockton married Daniel Lattimore, son of John Lattimore and
Isabel Frazier. They had at least six children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel,
Rhoda, and Anne Lattimore.

Samuel Stockton, father of Ann Stockton, was granted 150 acres on branch of
South Fork of Mechum River in Albemarle County on 5 June 1765; and John
Lattimore, Daniel's older brother, was granted 200 acres on Meriweathers Branch
of Pounding Creek in Albemarle County on 19 September 1765.

Between 1765 and 1770, Daniel Lattimore, his brothers Francis and John, Newberry
Stockton (Ann's cousin), and several other families migrated to Tryon County,
North Carolina, where Newberry Stockton was granted 300 acres on both sides of
Clarks Fork of Bullock's Creek on 24 December 1770. The land was surveyed for
Newberry Stockton and the plat recorded on 28 November 1768, indicating that the
migration occurred in 1768.

On 10 November 1770, Daniel Lattimore was issued warrant #409 by the Tryon
County, North Carolina, Court of Claims for 150 acres of land on Clark's Fork
of Bullock's Creek, from Robert Paterson to George Potts land, including his
own present improvements. The mention of improvements indicates his arrival
prior to 1770.

Tryon County, North Carolina, was formed from Mecklenberg County in 1769. The
Eastern boundary was the Catawba River, and the western boundary was the Indian
Line of 1767. At the time, the border between North and South Carolina west
of the Catawba River had not been surveyed. After it was surveyed in 1772,
it was determined that the land that Newberry Stockton and Daniel Lattimore had
had acquired was actually in the Camden District of Craven County, South
Carolina, in what is now York County.

On 26 October 1773, John Latimor purchased 250 acres of land on both sides of
Clark's Fork in Camden District from Ezekial and George Potts, brothers and
heirs to John Potts, deceased. Newberry Stockton was one of the witnesses
signing the deed. This land probably adjoined Newberry Stockton's land, and it
was near, if not adjoining, the 150 acres on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek
where Daniel Lattimore settled. Francis settled in District 96, in what is
now Union County, South Carolina, 20 to 30 miles southwest of his brothers
and brother-in-law.

On 8 October 1783, John Latimor sold his land in South Carolina and moved to
Rutherford County, North Carolina. On 13 October 1785, John Lattimor purchased
land on both sides of Duncan Creek, including the "Lattimore improvements".
Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that both John and Daniel Latimore appear on the
1782 Tax List of Rutherford County. Both John and Daniel Latimore settled on
Duncan's Creek of the First Broad River. Daniel Lattimore was granted 100
acres of land on 6 November 1799, according to Rutherford County Deed Book 15,
pages 10-12.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County was taken by Militia companies. "Frank
Latimore" (1 male over 16, 6 females, and 5 slaves), "Cap. Jno. Latimor" (2
males over 16, 2 males under 16, three females, and seven slaves), and their
brother-in-law, "Newbery Stocton" (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1
female), were in the Fifth Company. The Census also lists "Danl. Latimore"
(1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females) in the Fifth Company.

"Stockton" and "Stocton" are equivalent phonetic spellings for the same family
name. The 1790 Census listings indicate that the heads of six Stocton families
were in the Fifth Militia Company: Samuel (2 males over 16, 1 male under 16, and
2 females); Thomas (1 male over 16 and 4 females); David (1 male over 16, 3
males under 16, and 5 females); John (1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 3
females); Newbery (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female); Davis, Jr.
(1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 3 females); and Daniel Stocton (1 male
over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female).

Samuel and Thomas Stockton were brothers. Thomas Stockton was Newberry
Stockton's father. The identities of David Stockton and Davis Stockton,
Jr., are not clear. My initial assumption was that "David" Stockton should
have been "Davis" Stockton and that Davis Stockton, Jr., was his son. John and
Daniel are probably Newberry Stockton's sons, named for his wife, Margaret
Lattimore's two brothers, John and Daniel Lattimore.

Samuel Stockton's 20 September 1807 will divided "the remainder of his
moveable property" as follows: one third to his "eldest son", Davis Stockton;
one third to his daughter, Ann Stockton, who was married to Daniel Lattimore;
and one third to his grandsons, Samuel and Thomas Jefferson Stockton. The
words "eldest son" implies he had more than one son. Perhaps, the other sons
died before he wrote his will.

"Rutherford County, North Carolina, Wills and Miscellaneous Records 1783-1868",
by James E. Wooley and Vivian Wooley, published by the Southern Historical
Press, Inc., 1984, has the following entry:

"Page 211. 20 Sept. 1807. I, Samuel Stockton, being now old and infirmed
but of perfect mind and memory. I give to my wife Prudence Stockton the
plantation on which I now live on. Two cows & household furniture during
her life time. I give to my eldest son Davis Stockton all my lands and
tenements at the death of his mother. I give to my only dtr. Ann Lattimore
$20. The remainder of my moveable property to be divided as follows,
namely: one third to my son Davis, one third to my dtr. Ann Lattimore.
The other third to be equally divided between my two grandsons Samuel,
Thomas Jefferson Stockton. I appoint my friends Davis Stockton, Daniel
Lattimore, Prudence Stockton my executors. Wit: --- Ross (jurat), James
Whitindes, Anna Stockton.
Signed: Samuel Stockton"

Although Davis, Jr., was one of Samuel Stockton's grandsons, he was not
mentioned in the will, and he is not listed in the 1810 Census for Rutherford
County. He may have died or moved to Indiana or Tennessee.

The "James Whitindes" signature is probably an error. Samuel Stockton's sister
Elizabeth married William Whitesides, and Elizabeth Whitesides is listed in the
1790 Census for Rutherford County (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1
female). Apparently, her husband had died, and she was listed because she was
a widow. James Whitesides was probably her son. The 1790 Census also has
listings for John and Thomas Whitesides. They are probably Elizabeths sons.

Mrs. Jenkins research revealed that Prudence Lattimore married Amos Chitwood on
1 October 1793, John Lattimore married Isabella Carson about 1800, and Jemima
Lattimore married Thomas Jones on 27 March 1806. In 1809, John Lattimore and
his brother-in-law, John Carson, went to Indiana Territory and staked claims on
Graham Creek. John Lattimore returned to Rutherford County, and 1811 the
Daniel Lattimore family and several other Lattimore and Carson families
migrated to Indiana. The Daniel Lattimore family settled in Jefferson County,
while the John Lattimore family settled in Jennings County.

In 1811, the Daniel Lattimore family arrived in Jefferson County, Indiana
Territory, which was mostly unclaimed lands and considered to be still in
hostile Indian Territory. Daniel returned to North Carolina and sold his 60
acre tract to Greenbury Massey for $300. On 18 April 1814, Daniel Lattimore
purchase 160 acres of land in the southwest quarter of section 30, township 4,
north of range 9 west, in the Republican township of Kent, from the U.S.
Government in Jefferson, Indiana.

Daniel Lattimore erected a large two story home out of hand made bricks, with
walls 18 inches thick. According to Mrs. Jenkins, the house was still standing
on the road between Deputy and Kent, was well kept, and was being lived in
1982. Daniel Lattimore was listed in the 1815 Tax List of Jefferson County and
in the 1820 U.S. Census.

Daniel Lattimore's married children, as well as the younger children, moved to
Indiana. John Lattimore and his brother-in-law, John Carson, went to Indiana
in 1809 and staked their claims, Daniel Lattimore and his family moved in 1811.
Prudence Lattimore and her husband, Amos Chitwood, and Jemima Lattimore and her
husband, Thomas Jones, also moved to Jefferson County, Indiana. They probably
migrated with the Daniel Lattimore family.

Daniel Lattimore died 12 February 1831, and Ann Stockton died 28 March 1838.
They were probably buried in the farm cemetery, which was abandon and overgrown
with brush. In Mary Hill's book, "Cemetery Records of Jefferson County,
Indiana", she describes this cemetery as: "An abandoned graveyard near Wilson's
Cave, said to have had a church at one time called Ebenezar Church."

On 4 December 1834, the widow and heirs of Daniel Lattimore sold the land to
Zaphaniah LLoyd. The deed was signed by: Ann Lattimore, widow of Daniel;
Amos Chitwood and Prudence, his wife; Thomas Jones and Jemima, his wife;
John Lattimore and Nancy, his wife; Abram McCurry and Rhoda, his wife; Samuel
Lattimore and Polly, his wife. Rhoda and Samuel married in Indiana.

The above data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Children of DANIEL LATTIMORE and ANN STOCKTON are:
i. PRUDENCE5 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1771, Tryon County, North Carolina; d. April 1842, Jefferson County, Indiana.

Notes for PRUDENCE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Prudence Lattimore was born about 1771 in Tryon County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton. She was the
oldest of six children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel, Rhoda, and Anne
Lattimore.

On 1 October 1793, Prudence Lattimore married Amos Chitwood, son of James and
Alice Chitwood, in Rutherford County, North Carolina. They had ten children:
Alisa, Joshua, James L., Cynthia Ann, Daniel Lattimore, John, Sarah (Sallie),
Amos Jordan, Sophia, and Maria Chitwood.

The Amos Chitwood family moved from Rutherford County, North Carolina, to
Jefferson County, Indiana. Since the Daniel Lattimore family migrated to
Jefferson County in 1811, the Amos Chitwood family probably went with them.
Prudence's sister Jemima Lattimore married Thomas Jones in 1806, and the Thomas
Jones family also moved to Jefferson County, Indiana.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.
Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


10. ii. JOHN LATTIMORE, b. 01 March 1778, Tryon County, North Carolina; d. 11 September 1859, Jennings County, Indiana.
iii. JEMIMA LATTIMORE, b. 1787, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 30 July 1860, Jefferson County, Indiana.

Notes for JEMIMA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jemima Lattimore was born in 1787 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton. She was the
third of six known children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel, Rhoda, and Anne
Lattimore.

On 27 March 1806, Jemima Lattimore married Thomas Jones in Rutherford County,
North Carolina. They had 13 children: Benjamin, Daniel L., Elener, William,
Prudence, John, Mary, Thomas, Samuel, Jemima, Mary Ann, Francis, and Isabel
Jones.

The Thomas Jones family moved from Rutherford County, North Carolina, to
Jefferson County, Indiana. Since the Daniel Lattimore family migrated to
Jefferson County in 1811, the Thomas Jones family probably went with them.
Jemima's sister Prudence Lattimore married Amos Chitwood on 1 October 1793, and
the Amos Chitwood family also moved to Jefferson County, Indiana.

Benjamin and Daniel were born in Rutherford County, North Carolina. William
and the younger children were born in Indiana. Ellener was born in 1811, the
year the family moved to Indiana. It is unclear whether she was born in North
Carolina or Indiana.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


11. iv. SAMUEL LATTIMORE, b. 06 May 1790, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 10 May 1863, Jennings County, Indiana.
v. RHODA LATTIMORE, b. 1792, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1855, Indiana.

Notes for RHODA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rhoda Lattimore was born in 1792 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton. She was the
fifth of six known children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel, Rhoda, and Anne
Lattimore. The Daniel Lattimore family migrated to Jefferson County, Indiana,
in 1811.

About 1815, she married Abraham McCurry in Indiana. They had four children:
Daniel L., John, Jacob, and Samuel S. McCurry. All of the children were born
in Indiana.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


vi. ANN LATTIMORE, b. 22 January 1800, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 23 September 1881, Jefferson County, Indiana.

Notes for ANN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Ann Lattimore was born 22 January 1800 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton. She was the
youngest of six known children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel, Rhoda, and Anne
Lattimore. The Daniel Lattimore family migrated to Jefferson County, Indiana,
in 1811.

In 1824, Ann Lattimore married Zephaniah Lloyd in Jefferson County, Indiana.
They had nine children: June, Rebecca, Delpha, Oliver, Zephaniah, Maria (or
Marien), Isabel, Elizabeth, and Rhoda Lloyd. All of the children were born in
Jefferson County, Indiana. The sixth child was listed as Maria and female on
the 1850 Census and as Marien and male on the 1860 Census.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.

Generation No. 4

7. JOHN5 LATTIMORE (JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1774 in Camden District, South Carolina, and died 18 June 1833 in McMinn County, Tennessee. He married SUSAN CARPENTER Abt. 1799 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, daughter of SAMUEL CARPENTER and CATHERINE EAKER. She was born 1776 in Tryon County, North Carolina, and died 08 July 1852 in McMinn County, Tennessee.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Lattimore (Latimor) was born in 1774 in Camden District, Craven
County, South Carolina, the son of John Lattimore (Latimor) and Jemima Stockton
(Stocton). He had at least one brother, Daniel, and one sister, Rachel. The
John Lattimore family moved from what is now York County, South Carolina, to
Rutherford County, North Carolina, in 1782.

John Lattimore married Susanna (Susan) Carpenter, daughter of Catherine Eaker
and Samuel Carpenter, in Rutherford County. The date of their marriage is
unknown. Since their oldest known child was born in June 1800, they probably
married in 1799. Susan's sister Sarah married John's brother Daniel, and
"Marriages of Rutherford County, North Carolina 1779 - 1868" lists the
November 3, 1796, marriage of "Daniel Latimore" to "Sary Carpenter".

Susan Carpenter and John Lattimore had at least eleven children: Francis,
Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas Buchanan,
Sarah Lattimore, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other
children.

The 1810 Census for Rutherford County Shows that the John Lattimore household
had one male under 10; one male between 10 and 16; one male between 26 and 45;
three females under 10; and one female between 16 and 26. Francis, who was
born June 15, 1800 is the male between 10 and 16; Jemima, Rachel, and Catherine
are the three males under 10; John is the male between 26 and 45.

The entry in the "Female between 16 and 26" column should have been made in the
"26 to 45" column, since Susan was 34 years old when the census was taken. The
entry in the "Male between 16 and 26" column was probably an error.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County shows that John Lattimore had four sons
under 10 (Daniel, John, Samuel, and Thomas); two sons between 16 and 26
(Francis and one unidentified); three daughters between 10 and 16 (Catherine
Lattimore (Latimor) and Jamima Stockton (Stocton). I don't know when
or where she was born, the names of her parents, or whether she had brothers and
sisters.

After John's father died March 12, 1821, Susan Carpenter and her husband moved
to Telico Plains, McMinn County, Tennessee, with her husband's mother, Jemima
Stockton Lattimore; her husband's sister, Rachel Lattimore, and her husband,
John Hoyle.

John Lattimore died June 18, 1833, in McMinn County, Tennessee. Susan died
July 8, 1853. Both were buried in McMinn County, but about the year 1900,
their remains were moved to the Corntassel Cemetery in Monroe County,
Tennessee.

Most of the above information is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by
Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Mytrle Point, Oregon, a descendant of Daniel
Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for SUSAN CARPENTER:
REMARKS: Susanna (Susan) Carpenter was born in 1776 in Tryon (Cleveland)
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Catherine Eaker and Samuel Carpenter.
Samuel Carpenter was born about 1748. It is believed that he migrated to Tryon
County in 1774. Susan had at least one sister, Sarah (Sallie).

Susan married John Lattimore, son of John Lattimore (Latimor) and Jemima
Stockton, in Rutherford (formerly Tryon) County. The date of their marriage is
unknown. Since their oldest known child was born in June 1800, they probably
married in 1799. Susan's sister Sarah married John's brother Daniel, and
"Marriages of Rutherford County, North Carolina 1779 - 1868" lists the
November 3, 1796, marriage of "Daniel Latimore" to "Sary Carpenter".

Susan Carpenter and John Lattimore had at least eleven children: Francis,
Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas Buchanan,
Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

The 1810 Census for Rutherford County Shows that the John Lattimore household
had one male under 10; one male between 10 and 16; one male between 26 and 45;
three females under 10; and one female between 16 and 26. Francis, who was
born June 15, 1800 is the male between 10 and 16; Jemima, Rachel, and Catherine
are the three males under 10; John is the male between 26 and 45.

The entry in the "Female between 16 and 26" column should have been made in the
"26 to 45" column, since Susan was 34 years old when the census was taken. The
entry in the "Male between 16 and 26" column was probably an error.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County shows that John Lattimore had four sons
under 10 (Daniel, John, Samuel, and Thomas); two sons between 16 and 26
(Francis and one unidentified); three daughters between 10 and 16 (Catherine
Lattimore (Latimor) and Jamima Stockton (Stocton). I don't know when
or where she was born, the names of her parents, or whether she had brothers and
sisters.

After John's father died March 12, 1821, Susan Carpenter and her husband moved
to Telico Plains, McMinn County, Tennessee, with her husband's mother, Jemima
Stockton Lattimore; her husband's sister, Rachel Lattimore, and her husband,
John Hoyle.

John Lattimore died June 18, 1833, in McMinn County, Tennessee. Susan died
July 8, 1853. Both were buried in McMinn County, but about the year 1900,
their remains were moved to the Corntassel Cemetery in Monroe County,
Tennessee.

Most of the above information is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by
Esther Lattimore Jenkins of Mytrle Point, Oregon, a descendant of Daniel
Latimor (Lattimore) and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About SUSAN CARPENTER:
Burial: Monroe County, Tennessee

Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and SUSAN CARPENTER are:
i. FRANCIS6 LATTIMORE, b. 15 June 1800, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. Aft. 1851, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. CATHERINE LATTIMORE, Abt. 1823, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; b. 1800, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 08 January 1844, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for FRANCIS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Francis (Frank) Lattimore was born June 15, 1800, in Rutherford
(now Cleveland) County, North Carolina, the son of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter
and John (red-headed John) Lattimore. He was the oldest of their eleven known
children: Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel,
Thomas Buchanan, Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other
children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Francis Lattimore returned to North Carolina and married his cousin Catherine
Lattimore, daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. They had nine
children: Sarah, Susanna, Rachel Charlotte, John, Daniel, Alvin Joseph, Samuel,
Margaret, and Ulysses Lattimore.

Catherine Lattimore died in 1844. After her death, Francis Lattimore married
Sophia Elam. They had four children: James Scott (Doc), Francis (Frank),
William A., Elizabeth (Lizzie), Columbus Mills, and Lucretia Lattimore.

Francis Lattimore is listed on the tax lists for Cleveland County for 1850 -
1853. The tax list for 1850 indicates he owned 327 acres of land, valued at
$1,600; the list for 1851 shows two properties -- 237 acres valued at $1,600
and 221 acres valued at $800; the tax list for 1852 shows 327 acres valued at
$1,600; and the tax list for 1853 shows two properties - 216 acres valued at
$1,650 and 223 acres valued at $800. He also owned a carriage valued at $75.

On July 12, 1851, Francis gave 4 1/2 acres of land in Lawndale, North Carolina,
to the New Bethel Church. He and Sophia were active in the church.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for CATHERINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Catherine Lattimore was born in 1800 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. She was the
oldest of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah, Joe
C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Catherine Lattimore married Francis (Frank) Lattimore, son of John Lattimore
and Susannah Carpenter. They had nine children: Sarah, Susanna, Rachel
Charlotte (Charlotte), John, Daniel, Alvin Joseph, Samuel, Margaret, and
Ulysses Lattimore. Their marriage is not listed in "Marriages of Rutherford
County, North Carolina 1779-1868" for whatever reason. Frank Lattimore moved
to McMinn County, Tennessee, with his parents in 1821, but returned to
Rutherford County and married Catherine, his cousin.

They probably were married in 1823, because their third child, Charlotte
married David Cline, and the David Cline entry in the 1880 Census for
Cleveland County lists Charlotte's age as 52, indicating that she was born in
1828. Neither Sarah, who married Jimmie Hunt, nor Susanna, who married first
married Peter Beam then married James Linn, is listed in the 1880 Census.

Catherine died in 1844, and Frank Lattimore married Sophia Elam. Frank and
Sophia had six children.

Most of the above data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ii. JEMIMA LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1804, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for JEMIMA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jemima Lattimore was born about 1804, in Rutherford (now Cleveland)
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John
(red-headed John) Lattimore. She was the second their eleven known children:
Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas,
Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Jemima Lattimore married Alford Thompson in McMinn County, Tennessee, on
January 28, 1832.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iii. RACHEL LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1808, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for RACHEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rachel Lattimore was born about 1808, in Rutherford (now Cleveland)
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John
(red-headed John) Lattimore. She was the third of their eleven known children:
Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas,
and Sarah Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Rachel Lattimore married George W. Queener, son of John and Betsey Queener, in
McMinn County, Tennessee, on January 1, 1839. Her brother, Thomas B.
Lattimore, married Elizabeth Queener, daughter of John and Susan Queener,
on January 2, 1840. It appears that George and Elizabeth are brother and
sister, since their fathers have the same name. However, their mothers
have different names. Perhaps they are cousins.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iv. CATHERINE LATTIMORE, b. 1810, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for CATHERINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Catherine Lattimore was born in 1810, in Rutherford (now Cleveland)
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John
(red-headed John) Lattimore. She was the fourth of their eleven known
children: Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel,
Thomas, Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Catherine Lattimore married Samuel Thompson in McMinn County, Tennessee, in
1826. They had seven children: John, born in 1826; Samuel, born in 1828;
Jemima, born in 1830; James, born in 1831; Alfred, born in 1832; Caroline,
born in 1834; and Jackson Thompson, born in 1836.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


v. DANIEL WEBSTER LATIMORE, b. 13 January 1812, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 25 December 1888, Monroe County, Tennessee.

Notes for DANIEL WEBSTER LATIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Webster Latimore was born Janurary 13, 1812, in Rutherford
(now Cleveland) County, North Carolina, the son of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter
and John (red-headed John) Lattimore. He was the fifth of their eleven known
children: Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel,
Thomas, Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Daniel Webster Lattimore dropped one "T" from his surname. Some of his
descendants reverted back to the two "T's"; some have kept only the one.

Daniel Webster Latimore married Margaret McCall in McMinn County, Tennessee.
After their marriage, they moved to Monroe County, Tennessee, where they had
one child: Samuel Carpenter Lattimore, who was born July 14, 1840. I don't
know the names of Margaret McCall's parents. She was born May 24, 1817,
and she died in July 1840, after the birth of her son.

Daniel Webster Latimore married Rebecca Elvira Howard, and they had four
children: John Ruffin, Bettie Jones, Thomas Calloway (Cal), and Susan M.
Lattimore. I don't know the names of Rebecca's parents. She was born
December 12, 1822, in McMinn County, Tennessee, and she died October 25, 1892,
in Monroe County, Tennessee.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


vi. JOHN LATTIMORE, b. 1815, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 1872, Cherokee County, Texas.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Lattimore was born in 1815, in Rutherford (now Cleveland)
County, North Carolina, the son of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John
(red-headed John) Lattimore. He was the sixth of their eleven known children:
Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas,
Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

John Lattimore married Elizabeth Stripling in Benton (now Calhoun) County,
Alabama, on August 9, 1836. They had nine children: Benjamin Daniel, John
Hunter, Susan Elizabeth, Margaret L., Mary Francis, Martha A., James P., Samuel
Herrell, and Helen Hunter Lattimore. I don't Know the names of Elizabeth's
parents. She was born in 1816 in Georgia.

Benjamin Daniel was born in Benton (now Calhoun) County, Alabama, on January
3, 1839; John Hunter was born in Randolph County, Alabama, on January 7, 1843;
Susan Elizabeth, Margaret L., Martha A., James P., and Samuel Herrell were
also born in Randolph County, Alabama, between 1844 and 1856; Helen Hunter was
born in Cherokee County, Texas, in 1859. John Lattimore died in Cherokee
County, Texas, in 1872.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


vii. SAMUEL LATTIMORE, b. 25 December 1816, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 11 April 1883, Sequoyah County, Oklahoma.

Notes for SAMUEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Lattimore was born December 25, 1826, in Rutherford (now
Cleveland) County, North Carolina, the son of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John
(red-headed John) Lattimore. He was the seventh of their nine known children:
Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas,
and Sarah Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Samuel Lattimore married Nancy Starr, daughter of Eziekiel Starr, in McMinn
County, Tennessee, on December 29, 1829. They had six children: Ashy,
Alexander, Eziekiel, Jemima, Matilda, and Susan Lattimore.

Nancy Starr was a Cherokee Indian. In 1832, the United States Government
forced the Cherokee Indians to give up their lands in western North Carolina,
northern Georgia, southeastern Tenneessee, and northeastern Alabama and move to
lands in what is now northeastern Oklahoma. This was part of a broader program
to move the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians west of
the Mississippi in order to open their lands to white settlers.

The Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks, and Seminoles were known as the
five civilized tribes because they had adopted white ways and adopted
Christianity. The Cherokees had learned English, build towns, cleared land, and
settled on farms. Many owned slaves. They claimed their sovereignty in a
written constitution. Nevertheless, white settlers coveted their lands and
demanded their removal. Of some 16,000 Cherokees forced from their homes, some
4,000 perished on the infamous Trail of Tears to Oklahoma. This data is from
the "Historical Atlas of the Unites States", published by the National
Geographic Society in 1988.

The Samuel Lattimore family moved west with others of the Cherokee tribe and
settled in Indian Territory near Fort Gibson in what is now Sequoyah County,
Oklahoma. On December 28, 1833, Samuel Lattimore of Hiwasse, Tennessee,
received commutation allowance for transportation west for himself, wife Nancy,
2 males under 10 years of age, 1 female under 10, 1 male slave, and 2 female
slaves.

When the family arrived on May 16, 1834, there were two males under
ten years of age (Ashy and Alexander), one male between 20 and 50 (Samuel),
one female under 10 (Jemima), and one female between 25 and 50 (Nancy). They
brought one male and one female slave with them. Five people died enroute.
One could have been a female slave. The identities of the other four are
unknown. The notes in "The Lattimores, A Family History", state this data is
from the "Cherokee Emigration Rolls 1817-1835".

A total of 20 persons of the Eziekiel Starr family arrived the same day, with
one slave dying on May 10, 1834. They all settled in the Skin Bayou District,
which became Sequoyah District, Indian Territory, in 1851. The notes in "The
Lattimores, A Family History", state this data is from the "Index To Settlers
Rolls 1851, Skin Bayou District, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, Oklahoma."
Nancy and her six known children are listed.

Samuel Lattimore married Nancy (Nan) Faulkner, and they had five children:
Mary, Nancy, Ezikiel, Calvin Kenneth, and Samuel Lattimore. The names of Nancy
Faulkner's parents are unknown. She was born in Oklahoma (Indian Territory) in
1851, and she died in Sequoah County, Oklahoma, in 1924.

Samuel Lattimore died in what is now Sequoah County, Oklahoma, on April 11,
1883. Oklahoma did not become a state until 1907. The date of his first
wife's death is unknown. Since she was listed in the Indian Rolls for 1851,
she died after 1851. The dates of birth for the children of the second wife
are unknown, excepting the youngest, Samuel Lattimore, who was born in 1883.
The first wife probably died in the late 1860s, and Samuel Lattimore probably
married Nancy Faulkner about 1870.

Most of the above data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History,"by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins, a descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


viii. THOMAS BUCHANAN LATTIMORE, b. 18 June 1818, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 27 October 1890, McMinn County, Tennessee.

Notes for THOMAS BUCHANAN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Thomas Buchanan Lattimore was born June 18, 1818, in Rutherford (now
Cleveland) County, North Carolina, the son of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John
(red-headed John) Lattimore. He was the eighth of their eleven known children:
Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas,
Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Thomas B. Lattimore married Elizabeth Queener, daughter of John and Susan
Queener, on January 2, 1840, in McMinn County, Tennessee. They had five
children: Orlenia L., Susan Elizabeth, Angelina Callie, Beershula C. (Barsh),
and Joseph Martin Lattimore. Elizabeth Queener was born November 8, 1819, and
she died October 14, 1868, in McMinn County, Tennessee.

Thomas B. Lattimore married Preshy Green, daughter of Alexander Green and
Penelope Cobb. They had six children: Parshall, Charles, Mattie, Cora, Horace,
and Thomas J. Lattimore. Preshy Green was born January 1, 1846, and she died
January 3, 1919, in McMinn County, Tennessee. Thomas B. Lattimore died October
27, 1890, in McMinn County, Tennessee.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ix. SARAH LATTIMORE, b. 1820, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for SARAH LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah Lattimore was born in 1820, in Rutherford (now Cleveland)
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John
(red-headed John) Lattimore. She was the ninth of their eleven known
children: Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel,
Thomas, Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Sarah Lattimore married William Firestone. They had two children: Mathias
Nancy and Sarah Ann Firestone. Sarah Lattimore died in McMinn County,
Tennessee, in 1835.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


x. JOSEPH LATTIMORE, b. 1822, McMinn County, Tennessee.

Notes for JOSEPH LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joseph (Bully) Lattimore was born in 1822 in McMinn County,
Tennessee, the son of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John (red-headed John)
Lattimore. He was the tenth of their eleven known children: Francis,
Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas, Sarah,
Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

The nine older children were born in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County, North
Carolina. After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John
Lattimore and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John
Hoyl, and their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee, where Joseph and
Sarah were born. Joseph Lattimore never married.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


xi. SUSAN CAROLINE LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1824, McMinn County, Tennessee.

Notes for SUSAN CAROLINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Susan Lattimore was born about 1824, in McMinn County, Tennessee,
the daughter of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter and John (red-headed John)
Lattimore. She was the youngest of their eleven known children: Francis,
Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel, Thomas, Sarah,
Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other children.

The nine older children were born in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County, North
Carolina. After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John
Lattimore and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John
Hoyl, and their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee, where Joseph and
Susan Lattimore were born. Susan Lattimore married Joseph Cobb.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


8. DANIEL5 LATTIMORE (JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1775 in Camden District, South Carolina, and died 13 December 1833 in Rutherford County, North Carolina. He married SARAH CARPENTER 03 November 1796 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, daughter of SAMUEL CARPENTER and CATHERINE EAKER. She was born 1772 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 19 February 1848 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Lattimore (Latimor) was born in 1775 in Camden District,
Craven County, South Carolina, the son of John Lattimore (Latimor) and Jemima
Stockton (Stocton). He had at least one brother, John, and one sister, Rachel.
The John Lattimore family moved from what is now York County, South Carolina, to
Rutherford County, North Carolina, in 1782. His father's family name is
spelled "Latimor" in the 1790 Census for Rutherford County, North Carolina.

On November 3, 1796, Daniel Lattimore married Sarah (Sallie) Carpenter, the
daughter of Samuel Carpenter and Catherine Eaker, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina. They had nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Jemima,
Rachel, Susannah, Joseph C., Susannah, Daniel Dobbins , and Margaret
Lattimore. A copy of the marriage bond, signed by Daniel Latimore and Samuel
Carpenter, appears on page 372 of "The Shoe Cobler's Kin, Volume I," by Lorena
Schell Eaker.

The inital list of children is from an unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family
In Cleveland County, N.C.", prepared by P. Cleveland Gardner and dated 12 Aug
1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from "The Lattimores, A Family
History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Apparently John Lattimore died intestate. If there had been a will, there
would have been no need for Jemima Stockton, his widow; Daniel Lattimore, his
son; and John Hoyle, his son-in-law; to agree to quit their claims to the
parcel of land given by John Lattimore deceased to his son John Lattimore. The
quit claim was signed April 20, 1821, before Jemima Stockton, John Lattimore
and his wife, and Rachel Lattimore and her husband John Hoyle went to
Tennessee. The quit claim was recorded in Rutherford County on January 13,
1830. A copy of the quit claim is on page 373 of "The Shoe Cobler's Kin,
Volume I," by Lorena Schell Eaker.

The apparent purpose of the quit claim was to give John Lattimore undisputed
title to the land, so that he could transfer title to his brother Daniel. I
don't know when the transfer occurred. Probably John gave the land to his
brother in April 1821, when the quit claim was signed, but the transfer was not
recorded until January 1830, when the quit claim was recorded.

The "Abstract of Land Entries: Rutherford Co., NC, January 1804-April 1826," by
Dr. A. B. Pruitt, has the following entries for Daniel Lattimore. #125 -
October 9, 1804. Thomas Thompson enters 50 acres in Rutherford County on South
side of Hintons Creek. Border: John Latimore, Danl Latimore, & John Smith.
Issued. #252 - July 10, 1805. Daniel Lattimore enters 40 acres in Rutherford
County on South side of Hintons Creek and on Henry Creek. Border: joins his
own line. Issued. #267 - August 9, 1805. Daniel Lattimore enters 60 acres in
Rutherford County on North side of Hintons Creek. Border: joins his entry No.
252 for 40 acres. Issued. #2216 - April 16, 1821. Daniel Lattimore enters 50
acres on waters of Hintons Creek on North side. Border: joins his own lines.
Issued. #2839 (2739) - January 12, 1826. Daniel Lattimore enters 200 acres on
waters of Jumping Run waters of Hintons Creek. Border: John Eliott. Issued by
J. Michal. #3023 (143) - July 9, 1827. Daniel Lattimore enters 30 acres on
Hintons Creek. Border: his own land Robert Wells esquire. Issued. #3451
(571) - November 30, 1829. Daniel Lattimore enters 60 acres on North side of
Hintons Creek. Border: joins his own land and the speculation (land). Issued.
An entry is a claim for vacant or unclaimed land which was technically the
property of the State. If there were no problems, a warrant was issued to the
county surveyor. The warrant and the completed survey were sent to the
Secretary of State. A grant or patent was than issued.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County, North Carolina, has the following entry
entry for "Daniel Latimore": 2 males under 10, 1 male between 10 and 16, 1 male
between 16 and 18, 1 male between 16 and 26, 1 male over 45, 3 females under
10, 1 female between 10 and 16, 1 female between 16 and 26, 1 female between 26
and 45, 6 male slaves, and 3 female slaves.

The 2 males under 10 were Joseph and Daniel Dobbin, the male between 10 and
16 was Samuel, and the male between 16 and 26 was John. The male over 45 wasDaniel. The 3 females under 10 were Susannah, Rachel, and Margaret. The
female between 10 and 16 was Jemima, the female between 16 and 26 was
Catherine, and the female between 26 and 45 was his wife, Sarah.

The following extract of Daniel Lattimore's will appears on page 91 of
"Rutherford County, North Carolina Wills And Miscellaneous Records: 1783-1868"
by James E. Wooley and Vivian Wooley, published in 1984 by Southern Historical
Press, Inc., Easley, South Carolina.

"Page 2. 12 Dec. 1833. Recorded, Jan. Court 1834. I, Daniel Lattimore,
being of sound memory & understanding. After paying my just debts &
funeral charges. I give to my dear beloved wife, Sarah Lattimore, all my
lands where I now live, except 50 acres, excluding the spring building of
my son, John Lattimore, which is his right and proper forever. Also one
negro boy named, Ward, & one negro woman, Nance, also all my stock of
horses, cattle, sheep, hogs. For her to give to Joseph, Dobbin, Susannah,
Rachel & Margaret the five youngest chn, a horse, all my household &
kitchen furniture, farming tools, grain on hand at my decease. I give to
my son, John, $5. I give to my son, Samuel, $5. I give to my dtr.,
Catherine Lattimore, $5. I give to my dtr., Jemimah McEntire, one negro
woman, Nell, & her child, Nance. I give to my dtr., Susannah, one negro
girl named, Jinn. I give to my dtr., Rachel, a negro girl named, Poll.
I give to my dtr., Margaret a negro girl worth $350 to be raised from my
personal estate, when she arrives at 18 yrs. I give to my son, Joseph,
two negro boys, Alston & Nelson, also one half of the plantation where
I now live, at the marriage or death of his mother. I give to my son,
Daniel D. Lattimore 2 negro boys, Sampson & Cudjo, also one half of the
plantation where I now live. I appoint my 2 sons, John & Samuel Lattimore
my executors. Wit: Adam Whisnant, jurat. Thompson Evans, jurat.
Signed: Daniel Lattimore"

The complete text of Daniel Lattimore's will appears on pages 372 and 373 of
"The Shoe Cobler's Kin, Volume I," by Lorena Schell Eaker.

Daniel Lattimore's will was signed on December 12, 1833. He died the following
day and was buried next to his father on the hill north of his father's old
cabin. His father's grave is the oldest marked grave in what is now the
Lattimore Family Cemtery. Daniel Lattimore's grave was the second.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties.

The John Lattimore House on Hinton's Creek was nominated for the National
Register of Historic Places. The nomination form states that Daniel Lattimore
purchased the 250-acre tract on Hinton's Creek from his father, Captain John
Lattimore, on 14 Sep 1798, for the same price that his father paid when he
purchased the tract from William Willis's widow, Margaret, and Isaac Hinton on
3 Mar 1787.

The nomination form also states that Daniel sold 210 acres of his 355 acre
home track to his son John for $500 on 1 October 1824, and the "John Lattimore
House" was not Daniel Lattimore's dwelling because he gave his house and
furniture to his wife Sarah during her widowhood. It was then to go to his
other sons Joseph and Daniel D. Lattimore. The will, which was written the day
before his death, specifically excepted the tract that was previously sold to
his son John.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About DANIEL LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for SARAH CARPENTER:
REMARKS: Sarah (Sallie) Carpenter was born in 1772 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Samuel Carpenter and Catherine Eaker. She had at
least one sister, Susanna.

On November 3, 1796, Sarah Carpenter married Daniel Lattimore, son of John
Lattimore and Jemima Stockton in Rutherford County, North Carolina. They had
nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Joe C., Daniel
Dobbins, Susannah, and Margaret Lattimore.

Original data from an unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland
County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data
from an undated "Applicants Work Sheet" for "United Daughters of the
Confederacy" prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs and given to me in August
1992.

Daniel Lattimore's father, John Lattimore, purchased land on Duncan's Creek in
Rutherford County in October 1785, that he purchased 250 acres on Hinton's Creek
inn March 1787, and that he sold the 250 acres on Hinton's Creek to his son
Daniel in September 1798.

Sarah was born in Rutherford County, North Carolina. The 1790 Census for
Rutherford County lists two "Carpenter" Families"; i.e., "Carpenter, Saml"
(1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, 5 females, and 1 slave) and "Carpenter,
Jos" (1 male over 16 and 3 females). Since Samuel and Joseph Carpenter were
in the 9th militia company, they lived in the same general area. They may
have been related; i.e., brothers or father and son.

Sarah Carpenter and Daniel Lattimore named one of their sons "Joe C.". This
could be a reference to Joseph Carpenter. They also named one of their sons
"Sam", which could be a reference to Samuel Carpenter or to Samuel Lattimore,
or both.

Daniel Lattimore died 13 December 1833, in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County,
North Carolina, and was buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. Sarah
Carpenter died 19 February 1848 in Cleveland County, which was formed from
parts of Lincoln and Rutherford Counties in 1841. She is buried in the
Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


More About SARAH CARPENTER:
Burial: Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of DANIEL LATTIMORE and SARAH CARPENTER are:
i. CATHERINE6 LATTIMORE, b. 1800, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 08 January 1844, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. FRANCIS LATTIMORE, Abt. 1823, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; b. 15 June 1800, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. Aft. 1851, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CATHERINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Catherine Lattimore was born in 1800 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. She was the
oldest of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah, Joe
C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Catherine Lattimore married Francis (Frank) Lattimore, son of John Lattimore
and Susannah Carpenter. They had nine children: Sarah, Susanna, Rachel
Charlotte (Charlotte), John, Daniel, Alvin Joseph, Samuel, Margaret, and
Ulysses Lattimore. Their marriage is not listed in "Marriages of Rutherford
County, North Carolina 1779-1868" for whatever reason. Frank Lattimore moved
to McMinn County, Tennessee, with his parents in 1821, but returned to
Rutherford County and married Catherine, his cousin.

They probably were married in 1823, because their third child, Charlotte
married David Cline, and the David Cline entry in the 1880 Census for
Cleveland County lists Charlotte's age as 52, indicating that she was born in
1828. Neither Sarah, who married Jimmie Hunt, nor Susanna, who married first
married Peter Beam then married James Linn, is listed in the 1880 Census.

Catherine died in 1844, and Frank Lattimore married Sophia Elam. Frank and
Sophia had six children.

Most of the above data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for FRANCIS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Francis (Frank) Lattimore was born June 15, 1800, in Rutherford
(now Cleveland) County, North Carolina, the son of Susanna (Susan) Carpenter
and John (red-headed John) Lattimore. He was the oldest of their eleven known
children: Francis, Jemima, Rachel, Catherine, Daniel Webster, John, Samuel,
Thomas Buchanan, Sarah, Joseph, and Susan Lattimore. There may have been other
children.

After the death of his father, Captain John Lattimore, in 1821, John Lattimore
and his family, his mother, and his sister Rachel, her husband John Hoyl, and
their family, moved to McMinn County, Tennessee.

Francis Lattimore returned to North Carolina and married his cousin Catherine
Lattimore, daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. They had nine
children: Sarah, Susanna, Rachel Charlotte, John, Daniel, Alvin Joseph, Samuel,
Margaret, and Ulysses Lattimore.

Catherine Lattimore died in 1844. After her death, Francis Lattimore married
Sophia Elam. They had four children: James Scott (Doc), Francis (Frank),
William A., Elizabeth (Lizzie), Columbus Mills, and Lucretia Lattimore.

Francis Lattimore is listed on the tax lists for Cleveland County for 1850 -
1853. The tax list for 1850 indicates he owned 327 acres of land, valued at
$1,600; the list for 1851 shows two properties -- 237 acres valued at $1,600
and 221 acres valued at $800; the tax list for 1852 shows 327 acres valued at
$1,600; and the tax list for 1853 shows two properties - 216 acres valued at
$1,650 and 223 acres valued at $800. He also owned a carriage valued at $75.

On July 12, 1851, Francis gave 4 1/2 acres of land in Lawndale, North Carolina,
to the New Bethel Church. He and Sophia were active in the church.

Source: "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins, a
descendant of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ii. JOHN LATTIMORE, b. 16 October 1801, Rutherford County, North Carolina; d. 20 October 1877, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. (1) JAMIMA MCENTIRE; d. Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. (2) ISABELLE CARSON, 08 June 1830, Rutherford County, North Carolina; b. 30 September 1804, Rutherford County, North Carolina; d. 25 July 1875, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John (Big John) Lattimore was born October 16, 1801, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah (Sallie)
Carpenter. He was the second of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel,
Jemima, Susannah, Joseph C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

Big John's father, Daniel Lattimore, owned a great deal of land, including the
250 acres on Hinton's Creek, that he purchased from his father, Captain John
Lattimore, on September 14, 1798. The 250-acre tract on Hinton's Creek was
issued under patent to William Willis in 1771. Captain John Lattimore purchased
the land on March 3, 1786, from Willis's widow, Margaret, and Issac Hinton for
200 pounds current money.

"Abstracts of Land Entries: Rutherford Co, NC January 1804 - April 1826,"
by Dr. A. B. Pruitt, has the following entries for Daniel Lattimore: #125 -
October 9, 1804: Thomas Thompson entered 50 acres on South side of Hintons
creek; borders: John Latimore, Daniel Latimore, and John Smith; issued. #252 -
July 10, 1805: Daniel Lattimore entered 40 acres on South side of Hintons
Creek; borders: joins his own line; issued. #267 - August 9, 1805: Daniel
Lattimore entered 60 acres on North side of Hinton's Creek; borders: joins his
entry No. 252 for 40 acres; issued. #2216 - April 16, 1821: Daniel Latimore
entered 50 acres on waters of Hintons Creek on North side; borders: his own
line; issued. #2839 - Daniel Latimore entered 200 acres on waters of Jumping
run waters of Hintons Creek; border: John Eliott; issued by J. Michal. #3023
(143) - July 9, 1827: Daniel Lattimore entered 30 acres on Hintons Creek;
borders: his own land and Robert Wells esquire; issued. #3451 (571) -
November 30, 1829: Daniel Lattimore entered 60 acres on North side of Hintons
Creek; borders: join his own land and the speculation (land); issued.

Big John's grandfather, Captain John Lattimore, moved from his property on
Duncan's Creek to a log cabin on the north side of Hinton's Creek. Accordingto John L. (Johnie) Lattimore, the current owner of the land surrounding the
Lattimore Family Cemetery, including the land containing Big John's old house
and the pasture where Captain John's cabin once stood, the cabin burned down.
Johnie plowed that land for many years with a mule, and he remembers running
into the stones from the fireplace when he was plowing the field on the east
side of what is now Five Points Road, about half way between Hinton's Creek
and the Lattimore Burying Ground.

Captain John Lattimore died on March 12, 1821, and he was buried on the hill
north of his cabin. His grave is the oldest marked grave in what is now the
Lattimore Family Cemetery. After his death, his widow, Jemima Stockton; his
son, John Lattimore, and his wife; his daughter, Rachel Lattimore, and her
husband, John Hoyl, moved to Tennessee. Big John's father, Daniel Lattimore,
died December 13, 1833, and he was buried next to his father. Big John's cabin
is on the east side of the burying ground, in a grove of cedar trees,
near a spring.

Apparently Captain John Lattimore died intestate. On April 20, 1821, Jemima
Lattimore, Daniel Lattimore, and John Hoyl agreed to quit their claim to a
certain parcel or piece of land given by John Lattimore deceased to his son
John Lattimore. The quit claim, which was witnessed by Robert Wells and James
Chitwood, was recorded in Rutherford County Records on January 13, 1830. There
is no mention of any payment for the quit claim. The apparent purpose of the
quit claim is to give John Lattimore undisputed claim to the land described in
the quit claim, which he then transferred to Daniel Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Lincoln and Rutherford Counties in 1841. Shelby
became the County Seat in 1842. Daniel Lattimore sold fifteen acres containing
a spring and a cabin to Big John in October 1824.

"Abstracts of Land Entries: Rutherford Co, NC", by Dr. A. B. Pruitt, has the
following entries for Big John Lattimore: #3974 (1094) - December 2, 1831:
entered 640 acres on North side of Hintons Creek and on waters of Junipar (or
Jumpor) Run; border: John Lattimore, David Lattimore, John Parker, and
Chambers; issued. #3975 (1095) - December 2, 1831: entered 500 acres on both
sides of Grassy Branch; border: Bartlet Crowder and Thomas Goode; issued.
#4031 (1151) - December 30, 1831: entered 600 acres on waters of Nob Creek;
border: Joseph Wats; issued. The Land Entry Book had "hand-written" entries.
The reference to "David" Lattimore" is an error. There were no "David"
Lattimores, but "Daniel" Lattimore, Big John's father, owned several joining
tracts. "Knob Creek" is the correct spelling of "Nob Creek".

Big John did not receive any land in his father's will. His father sold him
fifteen acres containing a spring and a cabin in October 1824, but his father's
will, dated December 12, 1833, left the rest of his land and his residence to
his wife, Sarah Lattimore, for her life time or until she remarried. At that
time, one half of the land was to go to his son Joseph and the other half was to
go to his son Daniel D. Lattimore. John, Samuel, and Catherine received five
dollars each. This implies they had already received their fair share.

Big John Lattimore married Jemima McEntire, who died and was buried at Zion
Baptist Church. They had no children.

On June 8, 1830, Big John Lattimore married Isabelle Carson, and they had
eleven children: William Carson (Bill), Sarah (Sallie), Daniel (Dan), John L.
(Johnie), Joseph Carson (Joe), Samuel S. (Sam), James H. (Jim), Thomas D.
(Tom), Frank, Audely Martin (Edley), and Mary C. Lattimore.

In "Bridges To The Past", the February 25, 1970, column has the following
newspaper clipping:
"June 18, 1830
MARRIED - In this county on the 8th Inst., on the waters
of Duncan's Creek, by Mr. James McFarland, Esq., John Lattimore
to Isabella C. Carson, second daughter of Col. Wm. Carson,
present high sheriff of said county."

In his April 21, 1913, letter to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, James C. Elliott, who
was a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Caroline Troops, provided
the following comments for her collection of Civil War reminences.

"My dear Madam - We appreciate your patriotic in gathering up the fragments of
Civil War history, the most of which has been lost, and the time of any more
personal meininces will soon have passed. I will begin at home home -- a
write up of my neighbors and school companions. Among those most prominent
are the Lattimore Family, embracing Ten of my School fellows. Uncle Big John
Lattimore furnished Seven boys in the Regular Service. Uncle Big Joe Lattimore
3 sons -- strong, brave, and enthusiastic in the cause to the last."

"Uncle Big John Lattimore was a remarkable man -- Standing 6 ft 4 in. Weight
over 300 lbs. When young he could out - run jump and out lift any man in his
county. And could do as much work chopping wood and cradling grain as two
ordinary men. He could jump further backward than most men could forward.
He used to take the negro men to the cooling grounds, where his average task
was 6 cords of 4 foot wood per day, though so strong and brave, he never struck
a man with his fist. On a few occasions he has picked up a troublesome fellow,
shook him a little, lay him on the ground, and tell him to behave himself, and
he always did. He kept no accounts with his neighbors. Anything he had they
were welcome to "pay back when you are able, if not able, keep it." was his
motto."

"His wife was Isabell Carson, a daughter of the famous Sheriff Billy Carson of
Rutherford County. He lived on a good Creek farm of 1500 acres and owned about
24 negroes. Their children came as follows: William C., Sallie, Daniel, John,
Joseph, Samuel, James, Frank, Thomas D., Audley M. (Edley), and Mary C. At the
beginning of the war William C. had married Lizzie Harris; Sallie, William
Packard; Samuel, Mary Gidney. All others were single and old enough for
war except Edley. William was a Tanner and was detailed to make leather for
the Confederate Government."

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Billy Corbitt's Company in May 1861.
Daniel was made 2nd Lieutenant. They were mustered into the 5th Regiment.
Twelve Month volunteers. Then after reorganization 1862 into 15th Regiment.
Captain Corbett, having been crippled in a railroad wreck, did not serve any
more. Then Judson J. Magness was made Captain and Daniel Lattimore First
Lieutenant. They served from Yorktown to Richmond, 7 days battles, 2nd
Manassas, Sharpsburg and Federickburg, Chancelersburg, etc. When Leroy McAfee
was made Colonel of the 49th Regiment, he got this Cleveland Company
transferred to the 49th Regiment -- which was assigned to Matt Ransom's Brigade
South of James River Department. At Drury's Bluff May 16, 1864, John
Lattimore was shot in the left wrist. I saw him leaving the field. In August
1864, Lieutenant Daniel Lattimore was killed by a long range bullet while
laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast Side of the
Petersburg cemetery where his Company had retired from the Trenches for a days
rest. John Lattimore went on through the nine months siege to Appomattox
Surrender. Samuel Lattimore, visiting these brothers at Yorktown in August
1861, contracted measles, of which he died. Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and
enlisted early from that state. After serving about two years in the Western
armies, was taken prisoner and held 2 years which wrecked his health, and he
died a few years after the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, Thomas D.
as 3rd Lieutenant, and mustered into 34th Regiment. The history of that
Regiment was their history as they were with it from Seven days battles at
Richmond, 2nd Manassas, Sharpesburg, Fredericksburg, Chancelersburg,
Gettysburg, Wilderness, on to siege of Petersburg and to Appomatox. Thomas had
command of the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James
drove a wagon part of the time. At one time, I have not the date, in a hard
fought battle swaying back and forth with heavy loss, the flag of the 34th had
gone down 4 times. The men and officers were scattered and demoralized. Jim
Lattimore caught up the flag and waving it called out, "Here's your flag boys.
Rally to your colors. Rally to your colors." They reformed the firing line
and saved a route. They had fallen back a little under cover of the Ground and
planting the flag staff in the ground while the men would squat to load and
raise up to shoot, Jim would step back a few paces to load and then up to the
flag to shoot. He soon got a bullet through his shoulder and was borne from
the field leaving his colors flying. He got a furlough home and joined the
Baptist Church. But was Soon back and stood to his flag until it went down at
Appomattox. Never to rise again.

"Frank went as a recruit to that Company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the Siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run, and he was with me at Point Lookout, Maryland, until
last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at 18 years old and served in the field
artillery for 18 months up to Appomatox making fine record as a faithful
soldier."

James C. Elliott's letter to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore was published in the August
1994 issue of the Broad River Genealogical Society's quarterly. The footnote
states that the letter was copied from the original "History of the Civil War",
by James C. Elliott, in the North Carolina State Archives.

The Tax Lists of Cleveland County, North Carolina, for 1849, 1850, 1851, and
1852 show that John Lattimore owned 733 acres of land, valued at $2,000. The
tax list for 1849 shows he owned 9 black persons, the tax lists for 1850 and
1851 shows 10 black persons, and the tax list for 1852 shows 11 black
persons. He also owned 1 stud and a carriage valued at $100.

John Lattimore died October 20, 1877, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery near Polkville. Isabella Carson, who was born September 30, 1804, in
Rutherford County, died July 25, 1875, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore
Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
undated "Applicants Work Sheet" for "United Daughters Of The Confederacy"
prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs and given to me in August 1992.
Additional data from Esther Lattimore Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family
History", and from "The Thomas D. Lattimore Family" entry in "The Heritage of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982, written by Rosalynd Nix Gilliatt.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About JOHN LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for JAMIMA MCENTIRE:
REMARKS: First wife of Big John Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore. Buried at
Zion Baptist Church. Data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In
Cleveland County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939.

The names of Jamima McEntire's parents are unknown. The date and place of her
birth are also unknown. She was probably born in Rutherford County, North
Carolina.

The 1790 Census lists three "McEntire" families in the Sixth Company: William
McEntire (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female); James McEntire
(1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females); and Anne McEntire (no males
over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females). Anne McEntire is probably a widow.

Jamima McEntire may be the daughter of James McEntire or Ann McEntire.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


More About JAMIMA MCENTIRE:
Burial: Zion Baptist, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina

Notes for ISABELLE CARSON:
REMARKS: Isabelle Carson was born September 30, 1804, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the daughter of William (Billy) Carson and Mary (Dorcas) Hughey.
She was one of at least four children: Isabella, Elizabeth, Mary Young, and one
unidentified daughter. Isabella married John Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore
and Sarah Carpenter; Elizabeth married Samuel McFarland; Mary Young married John
Kindle Wells; and the unidentified daughter married Reverend Louis McCurry.

William Carson was listed in the 1820 Census for Rutherford County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of 1 male over 45, 3 females between 0 and
10, 1 female between 10 and 16, and 1 female between 16 and 18.

Isabella was born September 30, 1804; therefore, she was the female between 16
and 18. Elizabeth was born in 1809; therefore, she was the female between 10
and 16. Mary Young and the unidentified daughter are two of the three females
under 10. The identity of the other female under 10 is unknown.

William Carson is the male over 45. Apparently, since there is no entry in the
"female over 45" column, there was an error in preparing the census report or
in the preparation of the "published" report.

In "Bridges To The Past", the February 25, 1970, column has the following
newspaper clipping:
"June 18, 1830
MARRIED - In this county on the 8th Inst., on the waters of
Duncan's Creek, by Mr. James McFarlan, Esq., John Lattimore
to Isabella C. Carson, second daughter of Col. Wm. Carson,
present high sheriff of said county."

William Carson died in 1845 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and was
buried in the Price Family Cemetery near the Duncan's Creek Presbyterian
Church. His grave marker indicates that he was 72 years old. Mary Carson died
October 12, 1851. She is also buried in the Price Family Cemetery.

The William Carson family lived in the Duncan's Creek Community, where William
Price owned a large farm. He was also the County Sheriff for 27 years, and he
served one two-year term in the State Legislature.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has entries for "Carson, Walter" (1 male
over 16, 2 males under 16, and 3 females) and "Carson, Danl" (1 male over 16, 2
males under 16, and 2 females) in the same militia company as John, Frank, and
Daniel Lattimore. This implies they were neighbors.

Walter and Daniel Carson are Isabelle's uncles. She also had an uncle, John C.
Carson, who lived on Camp Creek, several miles west of Duncan's Creek. The
Isabella Carson that married her husband's cousin, John Lattimore, son of
Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton, was Isabelle's cousin, the daughter of Walter
and Mary Carson.

Walter Carson was the oldest of the Carson brothers, and William was the
youngest. The cousins, John Lattimore and Isabelle Carson Lattimore, moved to
Indiana in 1811. Walter and Mary Carson and their unmarried children moved to
Indiana in 1815.

An undated clipping of Joe DePriest's, "A Backward Glance" column from the
Shelby Daily Star refers to a letter written to the Cleveland Star by James
Carson Elliott after Johnie Lattimore died in 1905 states that "Johnie's mother
was a daughter of Rutherford County Sheriff Billy Carson, who had come to this
part of the country many years earlier from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

The comment from James Carson Elliott is probably valid because he was
descended from John Carson. The Ancestor Chart for William Martin Elliott,
son of James Carson Elliott and Biddy Gettys, shows an Agnes Carson, who was
born about 1769, married William Gettys. Agnes Carson was one of her father's
sisters.

Information from other sources indicates that John Carson, Isabelle's grand-
father, raised his family in York County, Pennsylvania, and moved to Camden
District, Craven County, South Carolina, now York County, South Carolina
in the fall of 1779; that Walter Carson married in 1781, moved to Rutherford
County, North Carolina, and settled on Duncan's Creek in 1781 or 1782. Daniel
Carson married, moved to Rutherford County, and settled on Duncan's Creek
before the 1790 Census.

William Carson, Isabelle's father, moved to Rutherford County after his father
died in 1790 and lived with his brother Daniel Carson. He served as Sheriff
of Rutherford County from 1798 to 1809 and from 1821 to 1836, and as State
Senator for a two-year term in 1811.

On June 8, 1830, Isabelle Carson married Big John Lattimore, son of
Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. They had eleven children: William Carson
(Bill), Sarah (Sallie), Daniel (Dan), John L. (Little Johnie), Joseph Carson
(Joe), Samuel S. (Sam), James H. (Jim), Thomas D. (Tom), Frank, Audely Martin
(Edley), and Mary C. Lattimore. She was his second wife. His first wife,
Jemima McEntire, died before they had any children.

Isabelle Carson and Big John Lattimore were married in Rutherford County, and
they lived in Rutherford County, on land on Hinton's Creek, that Johnie
purchased from his father. Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln
Counties in 1841, and Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. Their cabin is
near the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Isabelle Carson died July 25, 1875, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery. Big John Lattimore died October 20, 1877, and was buried in the
Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore
Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
undated "Applicants Work Sheet" for "United Daughters Of The Confederacy"
prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs and given to me in August 1992.
Additional data from Esther Lattimore Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family
History", and from "The Thomas D. Lattimore Family" entry in "The Heritage of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982, written by Rosalynd Nix Gilliatt.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


More About ISABELLE CARSON:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

iii. SAMUEL LATTIMORE, b. 1803, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 27 April 1846, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. LUCINDA EVANS, 27 January 1831, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1805.

Notes for SAMUEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Lattimore was born in 1803 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. He was the third
of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah, Joe
C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Samuel Lattimore married Lucinda Evans, and they had eight children: Johnie,
Daniel, Evan, Dulcinia, Dazzie, Louisa, Lucrettia, and Lovesa Lattimore. All
of the children were born in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County, North Carolina.

According to "Marriages of Rutherford County, North Carolina 1779-1868", Samuel
Lattimore and Lucinda Evans were married on January 27, 1831. James Waters was
bondsman.

According to "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins,
Johnie married Anne Penn, Dulcinia married Joseph Williamson, Dazzie married
Nelson Williamson, Louisa married William Moore, and Lovesa never married.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for LUCINDA EVANS:
REMARKS: Lucinda Evans married Samuel Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore and
Sarah Carpenter. The names of her parents and the date and place of
her birth are unknown. According to "Marriages of Rutherford County, North
Carolina 1779-1868", Lucinda Evans and Samuel Lattimore were married on
January 27, 1831. James Waters was bondsman.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County lists only one "Evans" family, i.e., "James Evans". It has 3 males under 10, 1 male between 26 and 45, 2 females between 10 and 16, and one female over 45. It is possible that this is Lucinda Evans's family, that she was one of the females between 10 and 16, that her father died, that her mother married James Waters, and that James Waters was her guardian.

Widows normally remarried, because they acquired nothing more than a "life-
estate" in one-third of the real property. The other two-thirds was normally
willed to the sons. The widow's one-third usually passed to the youngest son
when she died or remarried. Therefore, the widow's new husband was normally
named as guardian for the "orphaned" children. In this manner, the new husband
gained control of the deceased husband's real property.

Lucinda Evans and Samuel Lattimore had eight children: Johnie, Daniel, Evan,
Dulcinia, Dazzie, Louisa, Lucrettia, and Lovesa Lattimore. All of the children
were born in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County, North Carolina.

According to "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins,
Johnie married Anne Penn, Dulcinia married Joseph Williamson, Dazzie married
Nelson Williamson, Louisa married William Moore, and Lovesa never married.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iv. RACHEL LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1805, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. JOHNIE HUNT; b. Abt. 1800.

Notes for RACHEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rachel Lattimore was born about 1805 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. She was the
fourth of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah, Joe
C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Rachel Lattimore married Johnie Hunt. I don't know when or where they were
married, the names of his parents, or whether they had any children.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for JOHNIE HUNT:
REMARKS: Johnie Hunt married Rachel Lattimore, daughter of Daniel Lattimore
and Sara Carpenter. I don't know when or where they married or whether they
had any children. I suspect they were married in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, where the Daniel Lattimore family lived.

I don't know when or where Johnie Hunt was born, the names of his parents, or
whether he had any brothers or sister.

Data from an unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", prepared by P. Cleveland Gardner and dated 12 Aug 1939.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties.
Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


v. JEMIMA LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1810, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. PRIER MCENTIRE, 03 January 1828, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1800.

Notes for JEMIMA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jemima Lattimore was born about 1810 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. She was the
fifth of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah, Joe
C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther LattimoreJenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

On January 3, 1828, Jemima Lattimore married Prier (Pink) McEntire.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for PRIER MCENTIRE:
REMARKS: Prier (Pink) McEntire married Jemima Lattimore, daughter of Daniel
Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter, on January 3, 1828. I have no data regarding
their family.

Original data from unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from "The
Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County has entries for nine "McEntire"
families: Alexander, Aron, Bird, Jemima, Rachel, Rody, William, and two Johns.
The Alexander, Aron, Bird, John, William, and one John McEntire families had
males between 16 and 26. Therefore, further research is required to identify
Pink McEntire's family.

There were three "McEntire" families listed in the 1790 Census. Therefore,
Pink McEntire was probably born in Rutherford County, North Carolina.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


vi. SUSANNAH LATTIMORE, b. 1813, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. Aft. 1880; m. A. M. MARTIN, 31 July 1839, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; b. 1810, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. Aft. 1880, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SUSANNAH LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Susannah (Susan) Lattimore was born in 1810 in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. She was
the sixth of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah,
Joe C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Susan Lattimore married Audley M. (Edly) Martin on July 31, 1839. The 1880
Census for Cleveland County, which was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties
in 1841, has an entry for A. M. Martin. It lists his age as 70, it lists
Susan's age as 67, and it lists one child (J.A., age 21).

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County has seven "Martin" families: James, John,
Richard, Ruben, Thomas, and two Abrahams. The Richard Martin family was the
only family that had a male between the ages of 10 and 16. The Abraham, John,
Richard, and Rubin Martin familes had males between 0 and 10. Further
research is required to identify Edly Martin's parents.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for A. M. MARTIN:
REMARKS: Audley M. (Edly) Martin married Susan Lattimore, daughter of
Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, on
July 31, 1839. I have no data regarding their family.

The 1880 Census for Cleveland County, which was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln
Counties in 1841, has an entry for A. M. Martin. It lists his age as 70, it
lists Susan's age as 67, and it lists one child (J.A., age 21).

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County has seven "Martin" families: James, John,
Richard, Ruben, Thomas, and two Abrahams. The Richard Martin family was the
only family that had a male between the ages of 10 and 16. The Abraham, John,
Richard, and Rubin Martin familes had males between 0 and 10. Further
research is required to identify Edly Martin's parents.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


vii. JOSEPH C. LATTIMORE, b. 27 April 1816, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 29 January 1899, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. LOUISA HANNAH ROBERTSON, Abt. 1841, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; b. 25 November 1818, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 28 May 1907, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOSEPH C. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore was born April 27, 1816, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. He
was the sixth of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima,
Susannah, Joseph C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Big Joe Lattimore married Louisa Hannah Robertson, and they had ten children:
Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A,, John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D.,
William Aaron, Greorge R., Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore. They were probably
married in Rutherford County about 1841. Louisa Robertson was born in
Rutherford County on November 25, 1818.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County has two listings for "Roberston"
families with females under 10 years of age: Cornelius Robertson and
Jonathan Robertson. The Jonathan Robertson listing is on the same page as the
"Daniel Latimore" listing. Therefore, they were probably neighbors.

The Jonathan Robertson family had two males under 10, one male between 16 and
26, one male between 26 and 45 (Jonathan), four females under 10, two females
between 10 and 16, two females between 16 and 26, and one female between 26 and
45 (Mrs. Robertson).

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 325
acres of land valued at $650.

Joseph C. Lattimore died in Cleveland County, North Carolina, on January 29,
1899. He is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, Louisa Hannah
Robertson, died on May 28, 1907. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery. The name on her tombstone is "Hannah Louisa Lattimore".

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About JOSEPH C. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for LOUISA HANNAH ROBERTSON:
REMARKS: Louisa Hannah Robertson was born in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, on November 25, 1818. The 1820 Census for Rutherford County has
two listings for "Robertson" families with females under 10 years of age:
Cornelius Robertson and Jonathan Robertson. The Jonathan Robertson listing is
on the same page as the "Daniel Latimore" listing. Therefore, they were
probably neighbors.

The Jonathan Robertson family had two males under 10, one male between 16 and
26, one male between 26 and 45 (Jonathan), four females under 10, two females
between 10 and 16, two females between 16 and 26, and one female between 26 and
45 (Mrs. Robertson).

Louisa Hannah Robertson married Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore, son of Daniel
Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. They had ten children: Jessie R., Samuel
Julius A., John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron,
George R., Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore. They were probably married in
Rutherford County about 1841.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 325
acres of land valued at $650.

Joseph C. Lattimore died in Cleveland County, North Carolina, on January 29,
1899. He is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, Louisa Hannah
Robertson, died on May 28, 1907. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery. The name on her tombstone is "Hannah Louisa Lattimore".

The initial data came from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The
Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional
data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About LOUISA HANNAH ROBERTSON:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

viii. DANIEL DOBBINS LATTIMORE, b. 10 August 1818, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 27 February 1904, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT, Abt. 1847, Cleveland County, North Carolina; b. 16 January 1826, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 10 April 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL DOBBINS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Dobbins Lattimore was born August 10, 1818, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. He
was the eighth of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima,
Susannah, Joseph C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Daniel Dobbins Lattimore married Mary Forbis Elliott, daughter of John Crenshaw
Elliott and Mary Donoho, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, about 1847. They
had five children: Charles B., Virginia, Jackson E., Susan Louise, and Walter
Slade Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. D. D.
Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 125
acres of land valued at $400. In 1852, he owned 212 acres valued at $400. He
also owned a silver watch. He was also listed as agent for the S. Lattimore
heirs and their 100 acres of land valued at $100.

"Dobisto" D. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. He
was 62, his wife Mary F. was 50, his daughter Virginia was 29, and his daughter
Susan was 26.

D. D. Lattimore died February 27, 1904, in Cleveland County, and was buried in
the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, who was born January 16, 1826, died
April 10, 1882. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore
Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd Hansen and from "The
Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About DANIEL DOBBINS LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Mary Forbis Elliott was born January 16, 1826 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, the daughter of John Crenshaw Elliott and Mary Donoho/Donaho. She was the youngest of their ten children: Susan, Elizabeth Donoho, Nancy, William Martin, John Paxton, Thomas F., Edward Donaho, James Crenshaw, Andrew Jackson, and Mary Forbis Elliott.

Mary Elliott married Daniel Dobbins Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, about 1847. They had five children: Charles B., Virginia, Jackson E., Susan Louise, and Walter Slade Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. D. D. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 125 acres of land valued at $400. In 1852, he owned 212 acres valued at $400. He also owned a silver watch. He was also listed as agent for the S. Lattimore heirs and their 100 acres of land valued at $100.

"Dobisto" D. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. He was 62, his wife Mary F. was 50, his daughter Virginia was 29, and his daughter Susan was 26.

D. D. Lattimore died February 27, 1904, in Cleveland County, and was buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, who was born January 16, 1826, died April 10, 1882. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd Hansen and from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/96.


More About MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

ix. MARGARET LATTIMORE, b. 27 March 1820, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 18 February 1879; m. JOHN HOYL PEELER, 23 April 1840, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; b. 17 February 1816, North Carolina; d. 04 May 1894, Bates County, Missouri.

Notes for MARGARET LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Margaret Lattimore was born March 27, 1820, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. She was
the youngest of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima,
Susannah, Joe C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

On April 23, 1840, John Hoyl Peeler married Margaret C. Lattimore, daughter of
Daniel Lattimore. They had eight children, who were born in the following
order: David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March,
Sarah Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler.

John Hoyl Peeler was born February 17, 1816, in North Carolina, the
son of Barnabas Peeler and Sarah Hoyl. He was the oldest of their nine
children, who were born in the following order: John Hoyl, Peter, Andrew,
Frances, Elizabeth, David Hoyl, Alfred Graves, Margaret Elizabeth, and Sarah
Elmina Peeler.

He was named for his mother's brother, Reverand John Hoyl, who married Rachel
Lattimore, daughter of John Lattimore and Jamima Stockton.

John Hoyl Peeler and his family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates
County, Missouri, near Appleton City, where he stayed until his death.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for JOHN HOYL PEELER:
REMARKS: John Hoyl Peeler was born February 17, 1816, in North Carolina, the
son of Barnabas Peeler and Sarah Hoyl. He was the oldest of their nine
children, who were born in the following order: John Hoyl, Peter, Andrew,
Frances, Elizabeth, David Hoyl, Alfred Graves, Margaret Elizabeth, and Sarah
Elmina Peeler.

He was named for his mother's brother, Reverand John Hoyl, who married Rachel
Lattimore, daughter of John Lattimore and Jamima Stockton.

On April 23, 1840, John Hoyl Peeler married Margaret C. Lattimore, daughter of
Daniel Lattimore. They had eight children, who were born in the following
order: David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March,
Sarah Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler.

John Hoyl Peeler and his family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates
County, Missouri, near Appleton City, where he stayed until his death.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


9. RACHEL5 LATTIMORE (JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 19 August 1782 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 27 October 1827. She married JOHN HOYL 08 February 1798, son of JOHN HOYL and MARGARET KESTNER. He was born 06 May 1776 in Gaston County, North Carolina, and died 12 February 1829 in Athens, Tennessee.

Notes for RACHEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rachel Lattimore (Latimor) was born on August 19, 1782, in
Rutherford County, now Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of John
Lattimore (Latimor) and Jemima Stockton (Stocton). She had at least two
brothers, John and Daniel Lattimore (Latimor), and she may have had one sister.
"Latimor" is the spelling of her father's family name in the 1790 Census of
Rutherford County, North Carolina.

Rachel Lattimore married Reverand John Hoyl on February 8, 1798. They had
ten children: Margaret, Thomas Lattimore, Jemima, Levi Clark, John III, Sarah,
Susan, David Lattimore, Adam Clark, Daniel Hilliard, and M. Narcissa Hoyl.

After the death of her father in 1821, Rachel and her husband, accompanied by
her mother Jemima Stockton Lattimore, and her brother John Lattimore and his
wife Susan Carpenter, moved from Rutherford County, North Carolina, to Telico
Plains, Tennessee. Data from Reverand John Hoyl entry (#60) in "Peiter Heyl And
His Descendants" by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker and unpublished paper, "The Lattimore
Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Notes for JOHN HOYL:
RESUME: Married Rachel Lattimore, daughter of John and Jemima Lattimore of
Rutherford County, on 8 Feb 1798. They lived in Rutherford County until 1822,
when they moved to East Tennessee. He died at his home, "Pine Grove", near
Athens, Tennessee. His entry (#60) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendents", by
Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker, identifies him as "Reverand John Hoyl". Rachel died
27 Oct 1827, and John Hoyl married a "Miss Smith" on 12 Feb 1829. He had no
children by the second wife.


Children of RACHEL LATTIMORE and JOHN HOYL are:
i. MARGARET6 HOYL, b. 24 July 1799, North Carolina; d. 30 December 1888.

Notes for MARGARET HOYL:
RESUME: According to her entry (#310) in "Peiter Heyl And Her Descendents", by
Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker, she married Thomas Price Wells and they had eight
children. Refer to the entry for the names and dates of birth of her children.


ii. THOMAS LATTIMORE HOYL, b. 20 February 1802; d. 03 August 1871.

Notes for THOMAS LATTIMORE HOYL:
RESUME: Married Hannah Fagan 26 Oct 1825. The names and dates of birth of
their children are listed in his entry (#311) in "Peiter Heyl And His
Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.


iii. JEMIMA HOYL, b. 03 May 1804, North Carolina; d. 16 March 1869.

Notes for JEMIMA HOYL:
RESUME: Married Thomas W. Mastin in 1824. The names of their children are
listed in her entry (#312) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth
Hoyle Rucker.


iv. LEVI CLARK HOYL, b. 24 August 1806, North Carolina.

Notes for LEVI CLARK HOYL:
RESUME: Married Martha Henry in 1826. Moved to Mississippi in 1848. His
entry (#313) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker,
states he had five children and his family was living in Boonville, MS.


v. JOHN HOYL, b. 08 May 1809.

Notes for JOHN HOYL:
RESUME: His entry (#314) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth
Hoyle Rucker, states he married Lucy Creswell and provides no other data.


vi. DAVID LATTIMORE HOYL, b. 02 January 1814, North Carolina.

Notes for DAVID LATTIMORE HOYL:
RESUME: Married Katherine Ligon of South Carolina and they had four children.
After her death, he married Mrs. Catherine Cleveland Johnson, daughter of
Benjamin Cleveland of Georgia. She had one daughter from her first marriage,
who married one of David Lattimore Hoyl's sons from his first marriage.
According to his entry (#317) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by
Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker, he was a prominent planter in Pontotoc County,
Mississippi.


vii. SUSAN HOYL, b. 28 May 1816, North Carolina.

Notes for SUSAN HOYL:
RESUME: Second wife of Thomas Hardaway Jones, widower with six children, whose
first wife, Margaret Harriet Hoyl, was her first cousin. Thomas Hardaway
Jones was born 8 Feb 1779 and died 4 Oct 1877. He moved to Lincoln Count,
North Carolina, from Dinwiddie County, Virginia, when he was about 16. He
taught school, worked for Andrew Hoyl in the mercantile trade, and was deputy
sheriff before he moved to Gwinnett County Georgia, and acquired a fortune in
the mercantile trade. The names of her children are listed in her entry (#316)
in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.


viii. DANIEL HILLIARD HOYL, b. 30 April 1819.

Notes for DANIEL HILLIARD HOYL:
RESUME: Married Anna Ervine in the home of his brother David Lattimore Hoyl at
Tupelo, Mississippi. According to his entry (#319) in "Peiter Heyl And His
Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker, he is buried in Academy Cemetery,
near Blue Mountain, Miss.


ix. MARGARET NARCISSA HOYL, b. 06 March 1824.

Notes for MARGARET NARCISSA HOYL:
RESUME: Married William Mayfield, 17 Dec 1850. The names and dates of birth
of their children are listed in her entry (#320) in "Peiter Heyl And His
Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.


x. ADAM CLARK HOYL, b. 12 November 1831.

Notes for ADAM CLARK HOYL:
RESUME: Married Susan Ligon and they had five children. No other data is
provided in his entry (#318) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth
Hoyle Rucker.


10. JOHN5 LATTIMORE (DANIEL4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 01 March 1778 in Tryon County, North Carolina, and died 11 September 1859 in Jennings County, Indiana. He married ISABELLA CARSON Abt. 1800 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, daughter of WALTER CARSON and MARY. She was born 27 July 1782 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 16 February 1831 in Jennings County, Indiana.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Lattimore was born on 1 March 1778 in Tryon County, North
Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton. He was the
Second of six children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel, Rhoda, and Anne
Lattimore. The Daniel Lattimore family moved to Rutherford County, North
Carolina, about 1782.

About 1800, John Lattimore married Isabella Carson, the daughter of Walter and
Mary Carson, in Rutherford County, North Carolina. They had ten children:
Mary Ann, Daniel L., Walter C., John O., Samuel S., Isabella C., Ann, Louisa,
William M., and Jemima Lattimore.

John Lattimore and his brother-in-law, John Carson, went to Indiana Territory
in 1809 and staked claims on Graham Creek. John Lattimore returned to North
Carolina and

Carolina. The Amos Chitwood family moved from Rutherford County, North Carolina,
to
Jefferson County, Indiana, about 1809. The Daniel Lattimore family also moved
to Jefferson County, Indiana, about the same time. It is not clear which
family moved first, or whether they moved at the same time.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


More About JOHN LATTIMORE:
Burial: Jennings County, Indiana

Notes for ISABELLA CARSON:
REMARKS: Isabella Carson was born in Rutherford County, North Carolina, on
July 27, 1782, the daughter of Walter and Mary Carson. She was one of at least
nine children: Isabella; John; William; Walter, Jr.; James Porter; Felix W.;
Mary (Polly); Daniel C.; and Louisa A. Carson.

According to the "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, Isabella Carson married John Lattimore, eldest son of Daniel Lattimore
and Ann Stockton, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, about 1800. They had
ten children: Mary Ann, Daniel L., Walter C., John Oliver, Samuel S., Isabella
C., Ann McFarland, Louisa, William M., and Jemima Carson.

In 1809, John Lattimore and his brother-in-law, John Carson, went to Indiana
Territory, staked claims on Graham Creek, and returned to North Carolina. John
Lattimore and his family moved to what is now Jennings County, Indiana, in 1811,
arriving there in September.

The John "Latemore" family is listed in the 1810 Census for Rutherford County,
Rutherford County, North Carolina. According to the census, their household
consisted of 1 male between 16 and 26, one female under 10, and one female
between 26 and 45. This is incorrect. Since John Lattimore was born in 1778,
he was 32. There should have been 1 male between 26 and 45. Apparently, the
census taker put the "1" in the "16 to 26" column instead of the "26 to 45"
column, since there were no males between "16 and 26". There should have been
3 males in the "0 to 10" column, since there were three sons under 10.

According to "The History Of The Carson Race", written by an unnamed member of
the Carson family about 1889, using data from letters that had been passed
down through several generations, Daniel, Mary, Walter, and John Oliver
were born in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and Isabella, Ann McFarland,
Louisa, William, and Jemima Carson were born in Indiana.

John Lattimore's father, brother (Samuel), and four sisters (Prudence, Jemima,
Rhoda, and Anne) and their families also migrated to Indiana. His father,
Daniel Lattimore, settled in Jefferson County, about 20 miles south of John and
Isabella Lattimore.

Isabella Carson Lattimore's father (Walter Carson), brothers (William, Walter
(Jr.), Felix, Daniel, and James P. Carson), and sisters (Mary Mitchell and
Louisa Graham) and their families also migrated to Indiana. In "The
Lattimores, A Family History", Esther Lattimore Jenkins states that the
Lattimores and the Carsons were Presbyterians, and that many Presbyterians were
opposed to slavery, and they moved from North Carolina to Indiana Territory,
where slavery was prohibited.

According to "The Lattimores, A Family History", a log church was built near
the present day Graham church, and the first session meeting of the church on
Graham Creek was held on August 10, 1817. Among the charter members were: John
Lattimore and family, Walter Carson and family, James Mitchel and wife, and
Thomas Graham and family. John Lattimore and Thomas Graham were the first
elders of the church.

Isabella Carson Lattimore died February 16, 1831, in Jennings County, Indiana.
On April 10, 1832, John Lattimore married Nancy Stites. John Lattimore died
September 11, 1859. John and Isabella Lattimore are buried in the Graham
Church cemetery. There were four children from John Lattimore's second
marriage: Joseph M., James M., Nancy A., and Martha M. Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and ISABELLA CARSON are:
i. DANIEL L.6 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1802, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL L. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel L. Lattimore was born about 1802 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of nine
children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland, Louisa,
William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


ii. MARY ANN LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1804, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY ANN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mary Ann Lattimore was born about 1804 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of
nine children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland,
Louisa, William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


iii. WALTER LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1806, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for WALTER LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Walter Lattimore was born about 1806 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of nine
children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland, Louisa,
William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


iv. JOHN OLIVER LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1808, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN OLIVER LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Oliver Lattimore was born about 1808 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of nine
children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland, Louisa,
William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


v. ISABELLA LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1812, Jennings County, Indiana.

Notes for ISABELLA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Isabella Lattimore was born about 1812 in Jennings County,
Indiana, the daughter of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of
nine children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland,
Louisa, William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


vi. ANN MCFARLAND LATTIMORE, b. 1814, Jennings County, Indiana.

Notes for ANN MCFARLAND LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Ann McFarland Lattimore was born about 1814 in Jennings County,
Indiana, the daughter of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of
nine children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland,
Louisa, William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


vii. LOUISA LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1816, Jennings County, Indiana.

Notes for LOUISA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Louisa Lattimore was born about 1816 in Jennings County,
Indiana, the daughter of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of
nine children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland,
Louisa, William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


viii. WILLIAM LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1818, Jennings County, Indiana.

Notes for WILLIAM LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Lattimore was born about 1818 in what is now Jennings County,
Indiana, the son of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of nine
children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland, Louisa,
William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


ix. JEMIMA LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1820, Jennings County, Indiana.

Notes for JEMIMA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jemima Lattimore was born about 1820 in Jennings County,
Indiana, the daughter of John Lattimore and Isabella Carson. He was one of
nine children: Daniel, Mary, Walter, John Oliver, Isabella, Ann McFarland,
Louisa, William, and Jemima Lattimore.

Original data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins
Lattimore. Additional data from "The History of the Carson Race", written by
an unnamed member of the Carson family about 1900 and published in the February
1986 "Bulletin of the Genealogical Society of Old Tryon County".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/95.


11. SAMUEL5 LATTIMORE (DANIEL4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 06 May 1790 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 10 May 1863 in Jennings County, Indiana. He married MARY (POLLY) PRAGUE HOUSTON Abt. 1785. She was born Abt. 1790 in Virginia, and died Aft. 1828.

Notes for SAMUEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Lattimore was born on 6 May 1790 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton. He was the second of
six known children: Prudence, John, Jemima, Samuel, Rhoda, and Anne Lattimore.
The Daniel Lattimore family migrated to Jefferson County, Indiana, in 1811.

About 1825, Samuel Lattimore married Mary (Polly) Poague Houston. This was
Mary's second marriage. She had two sons, William and James Houston, from her
first marriage. Samuel Lattimore and Mary Poague Houston had one son, Samuel
Allen Lattimore, who was born 31 May 1828 in Union County, Indiana.

On 14 August 1828, Samuel Lattimore and his wife, Mary, of Union County,
Indiana, sold 100 acres of land in Jennings County, Indiana, to Thomas Berry.

Samuel Lattimore was a private in the first battalion, 6th Regiment of Indiana
Militia. On 16 May 1812, he was a volunteer among a small detachment assigned
to patrol the frontier north of Madison and to build a block house, which was
later referred to as Buchanan's Station.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Notes for MARY (POLLY) PRAGUE HOUSTON:
REMARKS: Mary (Polly) Poague was born between 1780 and 1790 in Virginia.
About 1825, she married Samuel Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore and Ann
Stockton. This was Mary's second marriage. She had two sons, William and
James Houston, from her first marriage. Samuel Lattimore and Mary Poague
Houston had one son, Samuel Allen Lattimore, who was born 31 May 1828 in Union
County, Indiana.

On 14 August 1828, Samuel Lattimore and his wife, Mary, of Union County,
Indiana, sold 100 acres of land in Jennings County, Indiana, to Thomas Berry.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Child of SAMUEL LATTIMORE and MARY HOUSTON is:
i. SAMUEL ALLEN6 LATTIMORE, b. 31 May 1828, Union County, Indiana; d. 17 February 1913.

Notes for SAMUEL ALLEN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Allen Lattimore was born 31 May 1828 in Union County, Indiana,
the son of Samuel Lattimore and Mary (Polly) Poague Houston. He was their only
child. However, he had two half-brothers, William and James Houston, from
his mother's first marriage.

On 18 July 1853, Samuel Allen Lattimore married Ellen Frances Larrabee. They
had five known children: Rose, Alida, Marion, Eleanor, and Florence Lattimore.
Rose was born in Green Castle, Indiana, on 3 September 1854; Marion was born
in New York; Eleanor was born in Rochester, New York, on 28 March 1874; and
Florence was born in New York in 1876.

Samuel Allen Lattimore was a professor at Asbury (now DePauw) University in
Indiana and at Genessa College. It was also acting president, University of
Rochester, New York, and a Chemist for New York State Board of Health.

The above data is from the "Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins, a descendant on Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton.

In November 1936, Miss Alida Lattimore of Putnamsville, New York, sent Mrs.
E. B. Lattimore of Shelby, N.C., a letter written by Samuel Lattimore to his
step-son, William Houston, about 1854, relating what he knew about his
Lattimore heritage. This is the letter relating that three Lattimore brothers,
Daniel, Samuel, and John, landed in Philadelphia from Ireland in 1690; that
the brothers separated in Philadelphia; and John Lattimore went to Virginia.
He also related that his father, Daniel Lattimore, was the youngest of his
family and that his brother had two brothers, Francis and John, and three
sisters, Margaret, Sarah, and Lettie.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/95.


Generation No. 5

12. JOHN6 LATTIMORE (DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 16 October 1801 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and died 20 October 1877 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married (1) JAMIMA MCENTIRE. She died in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina. He married (2) ISABELLE CARSON 08 June 1830 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, daughter of WILLIAM CARSON and MARY HUGHEY. She was born 30 September 1804 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and died 25 July 1875 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John (Big John) Lattimore was born October 16, 1801, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah (Sallie)
Carpenter. He was the second of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel,
Jemima, Susannah, Joseph C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

Big John's father, Daniel Lattimore, owned a great deal of land, including the
250 acres on Hinton's Creek, that he purchased from his father, Captain John
Lattimore, on September 14, 1798. The 250-acre tract on Hinton's Creek was
issued under patent to William Willis in 1771. Captain John Lattimore purchased
the land on March 3, 1786, from Willis's widow, Margaret, and Issac Hinton for
200 pounds current money.

"Abstracts of Land Entries: Rutherford Co, NC January 1804 - April 1826,"
by Dr. A. B. Pruitt, has the following entries for Daniel Lattimore: #125 -
October 9, 1804: Thomas Thompson entered 50 acres on South side of Hintons
creek; borders: John Latimore, Daniel Latimore, and John Smith; issued. #252 -
July 10, 1805: Daniel Lattimore entered 40 acres on South side of Hintons
Creek; borders: joins his own line; issued. #267 - August 9, 1805: Daniel
Lattimore entered 60 acres on North side of Hinton's Creek; borders: joins his
entry No. 252 for 40 acres; issued. #2216 - April 16, 1821: Daniel Latimore
entered 50 acres on waters of Hintons Creek on North side; borders: his own
line; issued. #2839 - Daniel Latimore entered 200 acres on waters of Jumping
run waters of Hintons Creek; border: John Eliott; issued by J. Michal. #3023
(143) - July 9, 1827: Daniel Lattimore entered 30 acres on Hintons Creek;
borders: his own land and Robert Wells esquire; issued. #3451 (571) -
November 30, 1829: Daniel Lattimore entered 60 acres on North side of Hintons
Creek; borders: join his own land and the speculation (land); issued.

Big John's grandfather, Captain John Lattimore, moved from his property on
Duncan's Creek to a log cabin on the north side of Hinton's Creek. Accordingto John L. (Johnie) Lattimore, the current owner of the land surrounding the
Lattimore Family Cemetery, including the land containing Big John's old house
and the pasture where Captain John's cabin once stood, the cabin burned down.
Johnie plowed that land for many years with a mule, and he remembers running
into the stones from the fireplace when he was plowing the field on the east
side of what is now Five Points Road, about half way between Hinton's Creek
and the Lattimore Burying Ground.

Captain John Lattimore died on March 12, 1821, and he was buried on the hill
north of his cabin. His grave is the oldest marked grave in what is now the
Lattimore Family Cemetery. After his death, his widow, Jemima Stockton; his
son, John Lattimore, and his wife; his daughter, Rachel Lattimore, and her
husband, John Hoyl, moved to Tennessee. Big John's father, Daniel Lattimore,
died December 13, 1833, and he was buried next to his father. Big John's cabin
is on the east side of the burying ground, in a grove of cedar trees,
near a spring.

Apparently Captain John Lattimore died intestate. On April 20, 1821, Jemima
Lattimore, Daniel Lattimore, and John Hoyl agreed to quit their claim to a
certain parcel or piece of land given by John Lattimore deceased to his son
John Lattimore. The quit claim, which was witnessed by Robert Wells and James
Chitwood, was recorded in Rutherford County Records on January 13, 1830. There
is no mention of any payment for the quit claim. The apparent purpose of the
quit claim is to give John Lattimore undisputed claim to the land described in
the quit claim, which he then transferred to Daniel Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Lincoln and Rutherford Counties in 1841. Shelby
became the County Seat in 1842. Daniel Lattimore sold fifteen acres containing
a spring and a cabin to Big John in October 1824.

"Abstracts of Land Entries: Rutherford Co, NC", by Dr. A. B. Pruitt, has the
following entries for Big John Lattimore: #3974 (1094) - December 2, 1831:
entered 640 acres on North side of Hintons Creek and on waters of Junipar (or
Jumpor) Run; border: John Lattimore, David Lattimore, John Parker, and
Chambers; issued. #3975 (1095) - December 2, 1831: entered 500 acres on both
sides of Grassy Branch; border: Bartlet Crowder and Thomas Goode; issued.
#4031 (1151) - December 30, 1831: entered 600 acres on waters of Nob Creek;
border: Joseph Wats; issued. The Land Entry Book had "hand-written" entries.
The reference to "David" Lattimore" is an error. There were no "David"
Lattimores, but "Daniel" Lattimore, Big John's father, owned several joining
tracts. "Knob Creek" is the correct spelling of "Nob Creek".

Big John did not receive any land in his father's will. His father sold him
fifteen acres containing a spring and a cabin in October 1824, but his father's
will, dated December 12, 1833, left the rest of his land and his residence to
his wife, Sarah Lattimore, for her life time or until she remarried. At that
time, one half of the land was to go to his son Joseph and the other half was to
go to his son Daniel D. Lattimore. John, Samuel, and Catherine received five
dollars each. This implies they had already received their fair share.

Big John Lattimore married Jemima McEntire, who died and was buried at Zion
Baptist Church. They had no children.

On June 8, 1830, Big John Lattimore married Isabelle Carson, and they had
eleven children: William Carson (Bill), Sarah (Sallie), Daniel (Dan), John L.
(Johnie), Joseph Carson (Joe), Samuel S. (Sam), James H. (Jim), Thomas D.
(Tom), Frank, Audely Martin (Edley), and Mary C. Lattimore.

In "Bridges To The Past", the February 25, 1970, column has the following
newspaper clipping:
"June 18, 1830
MARRIED - In this county on the 8th Inst., on the waters
of Duncan's Creek, by Mr. James McFarland, Esq., John Lattimore
to Isabella C. Carson, second daughter of Col. Wm. Carson,
present high sheriff of said county."

In his April 21, 1913, letter to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, James C. Elliott, who
was a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Caroline Troops, provided
the following comments for her collection of Civil War reminences.

"My dear Madam - We appreciate your patriotic in gathering up the fragments of
Civil War history, the most of which has been lost, and the time of any more
personal meininces will soon have passed. I will begin at home home -- a
write up of my neighbors and school companions. Among those most prominent
are the Lattimore Family, embracing Ten of my School fellows. Uncle Big John
Lattimore furnished Seven boys in the Regular Service. Uncle Big Joe Lattimore
3 sons -- strong, brave, and enthusiastic in the cause to the last."

"Uncle Big John Lattimore was a remarkable man -- Standing 6 ft 4 in. Weight
over 300 lbs. When young he could out - run jump and out lift any man in his
county. And could do as much work chopping wood and cradling grain as two
ordinary men. He could jump further backward than most men could forward.
He used to take the negro men to the cooling grounds, where his average task
was 6 cords of 4 foot wood per day, though so strong and brave, he never struck
a man with his fist. On a few occasions he has picked up a troublesome fellow,
shook him a little, lay him on the ground, and tell him to behave himself, and
he always did. He kept no accounts with his neighbors. Anything he had they
were welcome to "pay back when you are able, if not able, keep it." was his
motto."

"His wife was Isabell Carson, a daughter of the famous Sheriff Billy Carson of
Rutherford County. He lived on a good Creek farm of 1500 acres and owned about
24 negroes. Their children came as follows: William C., Sallie, Daniel, John,
Joseph, Samuel, James, Frank, Thomas D., Audley M. (Edley), and Mary C. At the
beginning of the war William C. had married Lizzie Harris; Sallie, William
Packard; Samuel, Mary Gidney. All others were single and old enough for
war except Edley. William was a Tanner and was detailed to make leather for
the Confederate Government."

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Billy Corbitt's Company in May 1861.
Daniel was made 2nd Lieutenant. They were mustered into the 5th Regiment.
Twelve Month volunteers. Then after reorganization 1862 into 15th Regiment.
Captain Corbett, having been crippled in a railroad wreck, did not serve any
more. Then Judson J. Magness was made Captain and Daniel Lattimore First
Lieutenant. They served from Yorktown to Richmond, 7 days battles, 2nd
Manassas, Sharpsburg and Federickburg, Chancelersburg, etc. When Leroy McAfee
was made Colonel of the 49th Regiment, he got this Cleveland Company
transferred to the 49th Regiment -- which was assigned to Matt Ransom's Brigade
South of James River Department. At Drury's Bluff May 16, 1864, John
Lattimore was shot in the left wrist. I saw him leaving the field. In August
1864, Lieutenant Daniel Lattimore was killed by a long range bullet while
laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast Side of the
Petersburg cemetery where his Company had retired from the Trenches for a days
rest. John Lattimore went on through the nine months siege to Appomattox
Surrender. Samuel Lattimore, visiting these brothers at Yorktown in August
1861, contracted measles, of which he died. Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and
enlisted early from that state. After serving about two years in the Western
armies, was taken prisoner and held 2 years which wrecked his health, and he
died a few years after the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, Thomas D.
as 3rd Lieutenant, and mustered into 34th Regiment. The history of that
Regiment was their history as they were with it from Seven days battles at
Richmond, 2nd Manassas, Sharpesburg, Fredericksburg, Chancelersburg,
Gettysburg, Wilderness, on to siege of Petersburg and to Appomatox. Thomas had
command of the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James
drove a wagon part of the time. At one time, I have not the date, in a hard
fought battle swaying back and forth with heavy loss, the flag of the 34th had
gone down 4 times. The men and officers were scattered and demoralized. Jim
Lattimore caught up the flag and waving it called out, "Here's your flag boys.
Rally to your colors. Rally to your colors." They reformed the firing line
and saved a route. They had fallen back a little under cover of the Ground and
planting the flag staff in the ground while the men would squat to load and
raise up to shoot, Jim would step back a few paces to load and then up to the
flag to shoot. He soon got a bullet through his shoulder and was borne from
the field leaving his colors flying. He got a furlough home and joined the
Baptist Church. But was Soon back and stood to his flag until it went down at
Appomattox. Never to rise again.

"Frank went as a recruit to that Company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the Siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run, and he was with me at Point Lookout, Maryland, until
last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at 18 years old and served in the field
artillery for 18 months up to Appomatox making fine record as a faithful
soldier."

James C. Elliott's letter to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore was published in the August
1994 issue of the Broad River Genealogical Society's quarterly. The footnote
states that the letter was copied from the original "History of the Civil War",
by James C. Elliott, in the North Carolina State Archives.

The Tax Lists of Cleveland County, North Carolina, for 1849, 1850, 1851, and
1852 show that John Lattimore owned 733 acres of land, valued at $2,000. The
tax list for 1849 shows he owned 9 black persons, the tax lists for 1850 and
1851 shows 10 black persons, and the tax list for 1852 shows 11 black
persons. He also owned 1 stud and a carriage valued at $100.

John Lattimore died October 20, 1877, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery near Polkville. Isabella Carson, who was born September 30, 1804, in
Rutherford County, died July 25, 1875, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore
Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
undated "Applicants Work Sheet" for "United Daughters Of The Confederacy"
prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs and given to me in August 1992.
Additional data from Esther Lattimore Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family
History", and from "The Thomas D. Lattimore Family" entry in "The Heritage of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982, written by Rosalynd Nix Gilliatt.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About JOHN LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for JAMIMA MCENTIRE:
REMARKS: First wife of Big John Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore. Buried at
Zion Baptist Church. Data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In
Cleveland County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939.

The names of Jamima McEntire's parents are unknown. The date and place of her
birth are also unknown. She was probably born in Rutherford County, North
Carolina.

The 1790 Census lists three "McEntire" families in the Sixth Company: William
McEntire (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 1 female); James McEntire
(1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females); and Anne McEntire (no males
over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females). Anne McEntire is probably a widow.

Jamima McEntire may be the daughter of James McEntire or Ann McEntire.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


More About JAMIMA MCENTIRE:
Burial: Zion Baptist, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina

Notes for ISABELLE CARSON:
REMARKS: Isabelle Carson was born September 30, 1804, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the daughter of William (Billy) Carson and Mary (Dorcas) Hughey.
She was one of at least four children: Isabella, Elizabeth, Mary Young, and one
unidentified daughter. Isabella married John Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore
and Sarah Carpenter; Elizabeth married Samuel McFarland; Mary Young married John
Kindle Wells; and the unidentified daughter married Reverend Louis McCurry.

William Carson was listed in the 1820 Census for Rutherford County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of 1 male over 45, 3 females between 0 and
10, 1 female between 10 and 16, and 1 female between 16 and 18.

Isabella was born September 30, 1804; therefore, she was the female between 16
and 18. Elizabeth was born in 1809; therefore, she was the female between 10
and 16. Mary Young and the unidentified daughter are two of the three females
under 10. The identity of the other female under 10 is unknown.

William Carson is the male over 45. Apparently, since there is no entry in the
"female over 45" column, there was an error in preparing the census report or
in the preparation of the "published" report.

In "Bridges To The Past", the February 25, 1970, column has the following
newspaper clipping:
"June 18, 1830
MARRIED - In this county on the 8th Inst., on the waters of
Duncan's Creek, by Mr. James McFarlan, Esq., John Lattimore
to Isabella C. Carson, second daughter of Col. Wm. Carson,
present high sheriff of said county."

William Carson died in 1845 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and was
buried in the Price Family Cemetery near the Duncan's Creek Presbyterian
Church. His grave marker indicates that he was 72 years old. Mary Carson died
October 12, 1851. She is also buried in the Price Family Cemetery.

The William Carson family lived in the Duncan's Creek Community, where William
Price owned a large farm. He was also the County Sheriff for 27 years, and he
served one two-year term in the State Legislature.

The 1790 Census for Rutherford County has entries for "Carson, Walter" (1 male
over 16, 2 males under 16, and 3 females) and "Carson, Danl" (1 male over 16, 2
males under 16, and 2 females) in the same militia company as John, Frank, and
Daniel Lattimore. This implies they were neighbors.

Walter and Daniel Carson are Isabelle's uncles. She also had an uncle, John C.
Carson, who lived on Camp Creek, several miles west of Duncan's Creek. The
Isabella Carson that married her husband's cousin, John Lattimore, son of
Daniel Lattimore and Ann Stockton, was Isabelle's cousin, the daughter of Walter
and Mary Carson.

Walter Carson was the oldest of the Carson brothers, and William was the
youngest. The cousins, John Lattimore and Isabelle Carson Lattimore, moved to
Indiana in 1811. Walter and Mary Carson and their unmarried children moved to
Indiana in 1815.

An undated clipping of Joe DePriest's, "A Backward Glance" column from the
Shelby Daily Star refers to a letter written to the Cleveland Star by James
Carson Elliott after Johnie Lattimore died in 1905 states that "Johnie's mother
was a daughter of Rutherford County Sheriff Billy Carson, who had come to this
part of the country many years earlier from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

The comment from James Carson Elliott is probably valid because he was
descended from John Carson. The Ancestor Chart for William Martin Elliott,
son of James Carson Elliott and Biddy Gettys, shows an Agnes Carson, who was
born about 1769, married William Gettys. Agnes Carson was one of her father's
sisters.

Information from other sources indicates that John Carson, Isabelle's grand-
father, raised his family in York County, Pennsylvania, and moved to Camden
District, Craven County, South Carolina, now York County, South Carolina
in the fall of 1779; that Walter Carson married in 1781, moved to Rutherford
County, North Carolina, and settled on Duncan's Creek in 1781 or 1782. Daniel
Carson married, moved to Rutherford County, and settled on Duncan's Creek
before the 1790 Census.

William Carson, Isabelle's father, moved to Rutherford County after his father
died in 1790 and lived with his brother Daniel Carson. He served as Sheriff
of Rutherford County from 1798 to 1809 and from 1821 to 1836, and as State
Senator for a two-year term in 1811.

On June 8, 1830, Isabelle Carson married Big John Lattimore, son of
Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. They had eleven children: William Carson
(Bill), Sarah (Sallie), Daniel (Dan), John L. (Little Johnie), Joseph Carson
(Joe), Samuel S. (Sam), James H. (Jim), Thomas D. (Tom), Frank, Audely Martin
(Edley), and Mary C. Lattimore. She was his second wife. His first wife,
Jemima McEntire, died before they had any children.

Isabelle Carson and Big John Lattimore were married in Rutherford County, and
they lived in Rutherford County, on land on Hinton's Creek, that Johnie
purchased from his father. Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln
Counties in 1841, and Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. Their cabin is
near the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Isabelle Carson died July 25, 1875, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery. Big John Lattimore died October 20, 1877, and was buried in the
Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore
Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
undated "Applicants Work Sheet" for "United Daughters Of The Confederacy"
prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs and given to me in August 1992.
Additional data from Esther Lattimore Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family
History", and from "The Thomas D. Lattimore Family" entry in "The Heritage of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982, written by Rosalynd Nix Gilliatt.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


More About ISABELLE CARSON:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and ISABELLE CARSON are:
17. i. WILLIAM CARSON7 LATTIMORE, b. 23 September 1832, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 13 October 1883, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
18. ii. SARAH (SALLIE) LATTIMORE, b. 14 December 1833, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 13 June 1911, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.
iii. DANIEL LATTIMORE, b. 1835, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 24 August 1864, Petersburg, Chesterfield Cty, Virginia.

Notes for DANIEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel (Dan) Lattimore was born in 1835 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. He was
the third of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah (Sallie); Daniel (Dan);
John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam), James H. (Jim); Thomas
(Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

An unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", by P.
Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939, states that Daniel Lattimore was a
2nd Lieutenant in Company B, 49th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, and that
he was killed in the Civil War.

The James Carson Elliott summary states that Daniel and Johnie enlisted in
Captain Billy Corbitt's Company in May 1861, and that Daniel was made 2nd
Lieutenant. They were mustered into the 5th Regiment as twelve-month
volunteers. After the reorganization in 1862, their company was in the
15th Regiment.

Daniel Lattimore was made First Lieutenant after Captain Corbitt was crippled
in a train wreck and Judson J. Magness was made Captain. His summary also
states that Daniel and Johnie served from Yorktown to Richmond, in the Seven
Days Battles at Richmond, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Frederickburg, and
Chancellorsville, and so forth. When Leroy McAfee was made Colonel of the
49th Regiment, he got this Cleveland County company transferred to the 49th
Regiment, which was assigned to Matt Ransom's Brigade South of James River
Department.
Daniel Lattimore was killed during the siege of Petersburg. I assume that he
was buried in one of the military cemeteries near the battlefield. He never
married.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About DANIEL LATTIMORE:
Burial: Chesterfield Cty, Virginia

19. iv. JOHN L. LATTIMORE, b. 30 September 1836, Rutherford County, North Carolina; d. 03 June 1905, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
v. JOSEPH CARSON LATTIMORE, b. 19 March 1838, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 09 June 1870, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. DORCUS MCFARLAND; b. 13 May 1849, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 13 February 1920, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOSEPH CARSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joseph Carson (Joe) Lattimore was born March 19, 1838, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle
Carson. He was the fifth of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah (Sallie);
Daniel (Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H.
(Jim); Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

An unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", by P.
Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939, states that Joe Carson Lattimore was a
Private in Company C, 55th Regiment North Carolina Infantry, and that he was
wounded and taken prisoner at Gettsburg.

The 55th N.C. was part of Davis's Brigade, Heth's Division, at Gettysburg. On
July 3, 1862, the 55th Regiment was with Pettigrew's Division during "Pickett's
Charge". Pettigrew was on Pickett's left, and the 55th was on Pettigrew's
right, meaning the 55th was going up the middle. Since Pickett's Charge was
repulsed and this was the middle of the battle, it is not surprising that Joe
Carson Lattimore was wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg.

Joseph Carson Lattimore married Dorcas McFarland, and they had two children:
Robert Lee and Sara Elizabeth Lattimore. Joe Lattimore died June 9, 1870, and
was buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. After his death, Dorcas married
Joe's cousin, John Bynum Lattimore.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About JOSEPH CARSON LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for DORCUS MCFARLAND:
REMARKS: John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore was born October 8, 1851, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise
Hannah Robertson. He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A.,
John Bynum, Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink, Joseph Lane, and Caroline
Lattimore. The first seven children are listed in chronological order of the
birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink, Joseph Lane, and
Caroline Lattimore.

Dorcus McFarland married John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore, son of Joseph C. (Big
Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson, in Cleveland County, about 1873,
and they had five children: Julius Gaff (Gaff), Orange J., William Carson, Mary,
and Luna Lattimore.

This was Dorcus McFarland's second marriage. Her first marriage was to Joseph
C. Lattimore, son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. Joseph C.
Lattimore, who was born March 19, 1838, died June 9, 1870. John Bynum Lattimore
and Dorcus McFarland probably married about 1873.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and
his son Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and
Luzee 10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of
Joseph C. Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

John Bynum Lattimore died March 2, 1928, and his wife, who was born May 13,
1849, died February 13, 1920.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


vi. SAMUEL S. LATTIMORE, b. 21 September 1839, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. September 1862, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. MARY GIDNEY.

Notes for SAMUEL S. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel S. Lattimore was born September 21, 1839, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. He
was the sixth of eleven children: William Carson (Bill); Sarah (Sallie); Daniel
(Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H. (Jim);
Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at
Yorktown, Virginia, contracted measles, returned home, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

According to the James Carson Elliott letter, Sam Lattimore died of measles
contracted in Yorktown, Virginia, while visiting Dan and Johnie.

According to "The Lattimores, A Family History", Sam Lattimore married Mary
Lucinda Gidney on December 23, 1858, and they had three children: Mary, John,
and Caroline (Callie) Lattimore. Callie married John Brown.

Samuel Lattimore is buried in the Mount Harmony Methodist Church cemetery in
Cleveland County, North Carolina. The grave marker indicates that "S. S.
Lattimore and his two infants" are buried there. The grave marker indicates
his date of birth was September 21, 1839, and that he died in September 1862.

As indicated above, he died of measles. Since two of the children (Mary and
and John) are buried with Samuel Lattimore, they probably died about the same
time. Perhaps they died from measles contracted from their father.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland
County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 6/95.


More About SAMUEL S. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Mt. Harmony Ch., Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MARY GIDNEY:
REMARKS: Mary Gidney married Sam Lattimore, son of John Lattimore and
Isabel Carson. I don't know when or where they were married, and I don't
know whether they had any children.

I don't know when or where Mary Gidney was born, the names of her parents,
or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.",
by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.

vii. JAMES H. LATTIMORE, b. 08 March 1841, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 09 February 1920, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. JANE STROWD.

Notes for JAMES H. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: James H. (Jim) Lattimore was born March 8, 1841, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. He
was the sixth of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah (Sallie); Daniel
(Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H. (Jim);
Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

An unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", by P.
Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939, states that Daniel Lattimore was a
2nd Lieutenant in Company B, 49th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, and that
he was killed in the Civil War.

Jim Lattimore was a Private in Company F, 34th Regiment, North Carolina
Infantry. The 34th Regiment was at Chancellorsville, and it was part of Scales
Brigade, Pender's Division, Hill's Corp, at Gettysburg, in July 1862.

Jim Lattimore married Jane Stroud, daughter of William B. Stroud. They had
three children: Pantha Virginia; John William; and Mary Catherine Lattimore.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


Notes for JANE STROWD:
REMARKS: Jane Strowd married James H, "Jim", Lattimore, son of John Lattimore
and Isabel Carson. I don't know when or where they were married, and I don't
know whether they had any children.

I don't know when or where Jane Strowd was born, the names of her parents,
or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.",
by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


viii. THOMAS D. LATTIMORE, b. 25 November 1843, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 15 September 1911, Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. MATILDA BEAM.

Notes for THOMAS D. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Thomas D. (Tom) Lattimore was born November 25, 1843, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle
Carson. He was the eight of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah (Sallie);
Daniel (Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H.
(Jim); Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

According to "The Thomas D. Lattimore Family" entry in "He Heritage Of
Cleveland County, Volume I - 1982", written by Roaslynd Nix Gilliatt, Tom
Lattimore married Lettie Matilda (Tildy) Beam, daughter of Joshua Beam and
Susan Abeline Heavner, in 1871. They had seven children: Hattie Lee; Everett
Beam; John Joshua; Wade Stough; Thomas William; Samuel Nelson; and Susan Pearl
Lattimore. Tom was a veteran of the Civil War where he was a lieutenant of
Company F in the 34th Regiment in the General Pender-Scales Brigade. He wrote
the history of his regiment for Clark's "History of the Civil War". He was a
popular and efficient Clerk of Superior Court of Cleveland County for
twenty-two years. He was one of the leaders in the religious, social, and
political life of the county, serving twenty-five years as superintendent of
the First Baptist Church Sunday School, and nearly as long as treasurer of the
King's Mountain Association. Tom Lattimore died September 15, 1911, and was
buried in Sunset Cemetery in Shelby. His wife Matilda died May 15, 1923, and
was buried by her husband.
Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About THOMAS D. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Sunset Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MATILDA BEAM:
REMARKS: Matilda Beam married Tom Lattimore, son of John Lattimore and
Isabel Carson. I don't know when or where they were married, and I don't
know whether they had any children.

I don't know when or where Matilda Beam was born. She was the daughter of
Colonel Joshua Beam. I don't know her mother's name, or whether she had
any brothers or sisters.

Data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.",
by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


20. ix. FRANCIS LATTIMORE, b. 12 July 1844, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 04 April 1924.
21. x. AUDLEY MARTIN LATTIMORE, b. 30 November 1845, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 25 October 1931, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
xi. MARY C. LATTIMORE, b. 28 August 1848, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 21 March 1876, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY C. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mary C. Lattimore was born August 28, 1848, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of John Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. She was the
youngest of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah (Sallie); Daniel (Dan);
John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H. (Jim); Thomas
D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

Mary Lattimore never married. She was twenty seven when she died on March 21,
1876. She is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About MARY C. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

13. SAMUEL6 LATTIMORE (DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1803 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 27 April 1846 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married LUCINDA EVANS 27 January 1831 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina. She was born Abt. 1805.

Notes for SAMUEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Lattimore was born in 1803 in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. He was the third
of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima, Susannah, Joe
C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Samuel Lattimore married Lucinda Evans, and they had eight children: Johnie,
Daniel, Evan, Dulcinia, Dazzie, Louisa, Lucrettia, and Lovesa Lattimore. All
of the children were born in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County, North Carolina.

According to "Marriages of Rutherford County, North Carolina 1779-1868", Samuel
Lattimore and Lucinda Evans were married on January 27, 1831. James Waters was
bondsman.

According to "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins,
Johnie married Anne Penn, Dulcinia married Joseph Williamson, Dazzie married
Nelson Williamson, Louisa married William Moore, and Lovesa never married.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for LUCINDA EVANS:
REMARKS: Lucinda Evans married Samuel Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore and
Sarah Carpenter. The names of her parents and the date and place of
her birth are unknown. According to "Marriages of Rutherford County, North
Carolina 1779-1868", Lucinda Evans and Samuel Lattimore were married on
January 27, 1831. James Waters was bondsman.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County lists only one "Evans" family, i.e., "James Evans". It has 3 males under 10, 1 male between 26 and 45, 2 females between 10 and 16, and one female over 45. It is possible that this is Lucinda Evans's family, that she was one of the females between 10 and 16, that her father died, that her mother married James Waters, and that James Waters was her guardian.

Widows normally remarried, because they acquired nothing more than a "life-
estate" in one-third of the real property. The other two-thirds was normally
willed to the sons. The widow's one-third usually passed to the youngest son
when she died or remarried. Therefore, the widow's new husband was normally
named as guardian for the "orphaned" children. In this manner, the new husband
gained control of the deceased husband's real property.

Lucinda Evans and Samuel Lattimore had eight children: Johnie, Daniel, Evan,
Dulcinia, Dazzie, Louisa, Lucrettia, and Lovesa Lattimore. All of the children
were born in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County, North Carolina.

According to "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins,
Johnie married Anne Penn, Dulcinia married Joseph Williamson, Dazzie married
Nelson Williamson, Louisa married William Moore, and Lovesa never married.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Children of SAMUEL LATTIMORE and LUCINDA EVANS are:
i. JOHNIE7 LATTIMORE.

Notes for JOHNIE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sam Lattimore married a Miss Evans. Conductor Johnie Lattimore and
Mrs. Lou Schenek are their children.

Data from unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.",
by P. Gardner Cleveland, dated 12 Aug 1939.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


ii. SCHENCK.

Notes for SCHENCK:
REMARKS: Sam Lattimore married a Miss Evans. Conductor Johnie Lattimore and
Mrs. Lou Schenek are their children.

Data from unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.",
by P. Gardner Cleveland, dated 12 Aug 1939.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


14. JOSEPH C.6 LATTIMORE (DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 27 April 1816 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 29 January 1899 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married LOUISA HANNAH ROBERTSON Abt. 1841 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina. She was born 25 November 1818 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 28 May 1907 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOSEPH C. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore was born April 27, 1816, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. He
was the sixth of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima,
Susannah, Joseph C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Big Joe Lattimore married Louisa Hannah Robertson, and they had ten children:
Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A,, John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D.,
William Aaron, Greorge R., Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore. They were probably
married in Rutherford County about 1841. Louisa Robertson was born in
Rutherford County on November 25, 1818.

The 1820 Census for Rutherford County has two listings for "Roberston"
families with females under 10 years of age: Cornelius Robertson and
Jonathan Robertson. The Jonathan Robertson listing is on the same page as the
"Daniel Latimore" listing. Therefore, they were probably neighbors.

The Jonathan Robertson family had two males under 10, one male between 16 and
26, one male between 26 and 45 (Jonathan), four females under 10, two females
between 10 and 16, two females between 16 and 26, and one female between 26 and
45 (Mrs. Robertson).

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 325
acres of land valued at $650.

Joseph C. Lattimore died in Cleveland County, North Carolina, on January 29,
1899. He is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, Louisa Hannah
Robertson, died on May 28, 1907. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery. The name on her tombstone is "Hannah Louisa Lattimore".

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About JOSEPH C. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for LOUISA HANNAH ROBERTSON:
REMARKS: Louisa Hannah Robertson was born in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, on November 25, 1818. The 1820 Census for Rutherford County has
two listings for "Robertson" families with females under 10 years of age:
Cornelius Robertson and Jonathan Robertson. The Jonathan Robertson listing is
on the same page as the "Daniel Latimore" listing. Therefore, they were
probably neighbors.

The Jonathan Robertson family had two males under 10, one male between 16 and
26, one male between 26 and 45 (Jonathan), four females under 10, two females
between 10 and 16, two females between 16 and 26, and one female between 26 and
45 (Mrs. Robertson).

Louisa Hannah Robertson married Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore, son of Daniel
Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. They had ten children: Jessie R., Samuel
Julius A., John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron,
George R., Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore. They were probably married in
Rutherford County about 1841.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 325
acres of land valued at $650.

Joseph C. Lattimore died in Cleveland County, North Carolina, on January 29,
1899. He is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, Louisa Hannah
Robertson, died on May 28, 1907. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery. The name on her tombstone is "Hannah Louisa Lattimore".

The initial data came from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The
Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional
data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About LOUISA HANNAH ROBERTSON:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of JOSEPH LATTIMORE and LOUISA ROBERTSON are:
i. JESSIE R.7 LATTIMORE, b. 29 May 1842, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 30 January 1866, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JESSIE R. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jessie R. Lattimore was born May 29, 1842, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson.
He was the oldest of their ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A., John
Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink,
and Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Jessie R. Lattimore served in the Civil War. He was a Private in Company F,
34th North Carolina Regiment.

Jessie Lattimore died on January 30, 1866. He is buried in the Lattimore
Family Cemetery. He never married.

Most of the above data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About JESSIE R. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

ii. SAMUEL LATTIMORE, b. 1845, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SAMUEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Lattimore was born in 1845 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson.
He was the second of their ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A.,
John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R.,
Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Samuel Lattimore married a "Lane". I have no data regarding her or her family.
Since Samuel Lattimore is not listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County;
he probably moved west after the Civil War.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


22. iii. JULIUS A. LATTIMORE, b. 1848, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 1899, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
23. iv. JOHN BYNUM LATTIMORE, b. 08 October 1851, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 02 March 1928, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
v. SARAH CAROLINE LATTIMORE, b. 10 December 1853, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 21 February 1926, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SARAH CAROLINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah Caroline (Caroline) Lattimore was born December 10, 1853, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore
and Louise Hannah Robertson. She was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel,
Julius A., John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron,
Greorge R., Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore. The first eight children are
listed in the order of their birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth
dates for Pink and Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Caroline Lattimore married D. Bedford. I don't know whether they had any
children. Caroline died February 21, 1926, and was buried in the Lattimore
Family Cemetery.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About SARAH CAROLINE LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

vi. CICERO D. LATTIMORE, b. 08 March 1856, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 02 March 1864, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CICERO D. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Cicero D. Lattimore was born March 8, 1856, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah
Robertson. He was near the middle of their ten children: Jessie R., Samuel,
Julius A., John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron,
George R., Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Cicero Lattimore died on March 2, 1864. He is buried in the Lattimore Family.
Family Cemetery.

Most of the data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About CICERO D. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

24. vii. WILLIAM AARON LATTIMORE, b. 13 July 1858, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 30 September 1932, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
viii. PINK LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1860, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for PINK LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Pink Lattimore was born about 1860 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson.
He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A., John Bynum, Sarah
Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink, and Joseph Lane
Lattimore. The first eight children are listed in order of the birth dates. I
have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink and Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Pink Lattimore never married. Since he is not listed in the 1880 Census for
Cleveland County, he probably moved west after the Civil War.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ix. JOE LANE LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1860, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOE LANE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joe Lane Lattimore was born about 1860 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson.
He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A., John Bynum, Sarah
Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink, and Joseph Lane
Lattimore. The first eight children are listed in order of the birth dates. I
have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink and Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Joe Lane Lattimore married Ada Boyd. Since he is not listed in the 1880 Census
for Cleveland County, he probably moved west after the Civil War.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


25. x. GEORGE R. LATTIMORE, b. 29 April 1864, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 28 October 1942, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

15. DANIEL DOBBINS6 LATTIMORE (DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 10 August 1818 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 27 February 1904 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT Abt. 1847 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, daughter of JOHN ELLIOTT and MARY DONOHO. She was born 16 January 1826 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 10 April 1882 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL DOBBINS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Dobbins Lattimore was born August 10, 1818, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. He
was the eighth of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima,
Susannah, Joseph C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

Daniel Dobbins Lattimore married Mary Forbis Elliott, daughter of John Crenshaw
Elliott and Mary Donoho, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, about 1847. They
had five children: Charles B., Virginia, Jackson E., Susan Louise, and Walter
Slade Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. D. D.
Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 125
acres of land valued at $400. In 1852, he owned 212 acres valued at $400. He
also owned a silver watch. He was also listed as agent for the S. Lattimore
heirs and their 100 acres of land valued at $100.

"Dobisto" D. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. He
was 62, his wife Mary F. was 50, his daughter Virginia was 29, and his daughter
Susan was 26.

D. D. Lattimore died February 27, 1904, in Cleveland County, and was buried in
the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, who was born January 16, 1826, died
April 10, 1882. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore
Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd Hansen and from "The
Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About DANIEL DOBBINS LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Mary Forbis Elliott was born January 16, 1826 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, the daughter of John Crenshaw Elliott and Mary Donoho/Donaho. She was the youngest of their ten children: Susan, Elizabeth Donoho, Nancy, William Martin, John Paxton, Thomas F., Edward Donaho, James Crenshaw, Andrew Jackson, and Mary Forbis Elliott.

Mary Elliott married Daniel Dobbins Lattimore, son of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, about 1847. They had five children: Charles B., Virginia, Jackson E., Susan Louise, and Walter Slade Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. D. D. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County Tax List for 1850. He owned 125 acres of land valued at $400. In 1852, he owned 212 acres valued at $400. He also owned a silver watch. He was also listed as agent for the S. Lattimore heirs and their 100 acres of land valued at $100.

"Dobisto" D. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. He was 62, his wife Mary F. was 50, his daughter Virginia was 29, and his daughter Susan was 26.

D. D. Lattimore died February 27, 1904, in Cleveland County, and was buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, who was born January 16, 1826, died April 10, 1882. She is also buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from P. Cleveland Gardner's unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd Hansen and from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/96.


More About MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of DANIEL LATTIMORE and MARY ELLIOTT are:
26. i. CHARLES B.7 LATTIMORE, b. 12 August 1848, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 05 January 1935, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
ii. VIRGINIA LATTIMORE, b. August 1849, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. ROBERT WELLS; b. Abt. 1837.

Notes for VIRGINIA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Virginia Lattimore was born in August 1849 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Dobbins Lattimore and Mary Forbis Elliott. She
was the second of their five children: Charles B., Virginia, Jackson E.,
Susan Louise (Susan), and Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore.

"Dobisto" D. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. He
was 62, his wife Mary F. was 50, his daughter Virginia was 29, and his daughter
Susan was 26.

Virginia Lattimore married Robert Wells.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for ROBERT WELLS:
REMARKS: Robert Wells married Virginia Lattimore, daughter of Daniel Dobbins
Lattimore and Mary F. Elliott. I don't know when or where he was born, the
names of his parents, or whether he had any brothers or sisters. Not only
that, I don't know whether they had any children.

Data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd Hensen.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


iii. JACKSON E. LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1851, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 02 August 1892, Texas.

Notes for JACKSON E. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jackson E. Lattimore was born in Rutherford County, North Carolina,
the son of Daniel Dobbins Lattimore and Mary F. Elliott. He was the third of
their five children: Charles B., Virginia, Jackson E., Susan Louise, and
Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore.

Data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd Hensen.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


iv. SUSAN LOUISE LATTIMORE, b. 09 June 1854, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 12 November 1942, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SUSAN LOUISE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Susan Louise (Susan) Lattimore was born June 9, 1854, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Dobbins Lattimore and Mary
Forbis (Mary) Elliott. She was the fourth of their five children: Charles B.,
Virginia, Jackson E., Susan Louise (Susan), and Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore.

"Dobisto" D. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. He
was 62, his wife Mary F. was 50, his daughter Virginia was 29, and his daughter
Susan was 26.

Susan Lattimore never married. She died on November 12, 1942.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


27. v. WALTER SLADE LATTIMORE, b. 21 July 1858, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 26 February 1924, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

16. MARGARET6 LATTIMORE (DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 27 March 1820 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 18 February 1879. She married JOHN HOYL PEELER 23 April 1840 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, son of BARNABAS PEELER and SARAH HOYL. He was born 17 February 1816 in North Carolina, and died 04 May 1894 in Bates County, Missouri.

Notes for MARGARET LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Margaret Lattimore was born March 27, 1820, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Lattimore and Sarah Carpenter. She was
the youngest of nine children: Catherine, John, Samuel, Rachel, Jemima,
Susannah, Joe C., Daniel Dobbins, and Margaret Lattimore.

The initial list of brothers and sisters was from P. Cleveland Gardner's
unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", dated 12
Aug 1939. The list was modified to incorporate data from Esther Lattimore
Jenkins book, "The Lattimores, A Family History".

On April 23, 1840, John Hoyl Peeler married Margaret C. Lattimore, daughter of
Daniel Lattimore. They had eight children, who were born in the following
order: David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March,
Sarah Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler.

John Hoyl Peeler was born February 17, 1816, in North Carolina, the
son of Barnabas Peeler and Sarah Hoyl. He was the oldest of their nine
children, who were born in the following order: John Hoyl, Peter, Andrew,
Frances, Elizabeth, David Hoyl, Alfred Graves, Margaret Elizabeth, and Sarah
Elmina Peeler.

He was named for his mother's brother, Reverand John Hoyl, who married Rachel
Lattimore, daughter of John Lattimore and Jamima Stockton.

John Hoyl Peeler and his family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates
County, Missouri, near Appleton City, where he stayed until his death.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for JOHN HOYL PEELER:
REMARKS: John Hoyl Peeler was born February 17, 1816, in North Carolina, the
son of Barnabas Peeler and Sarah Hoyl. He was the oldest of their nine
children, who were born in the following order: John Hoyl, Peter, Andrew,
Frances, Elizabeth, David Hoyl, Alfred Graves, Margaret Elizabeth, and Sarah
Elmina Peeler.

He was named for his mother's brother, Reverand John Hoyl, who married Rachel
Lattimore, daughter of John Lattimore and Jamima Stockton.

On April 23, 1840, John Hoyl Peeler married Margaret C. Lattimore, daughter of
Daniel Lattimore. They had eight children, who were born in the following
order: David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March,
Sarah Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler.

John Hoyl Peeler and his family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates
County, Missouri, near Appleton City, where he stayed until his death.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Children of MARGARET LATTIMORE and JOHN PEELER are:
i. DAVID7 PEELER, b. 03 April 1845, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DAVID PEELER:
REMARKS: David Peeler was born April 3, 1845, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore. He was the
oldest of their eight children, who were born in the following order: David,
John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March, Sarah Louise,
Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon, Alfred March, and
Daniel Barnabas Peeler died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


ii. JOHN FRANCIS PEELER, b. 11 June 1848, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN FRANCIS PEELER:
REMARKS: John Francis Peeler was born June 11, 1848, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore. He was the
second of their eight children, who were born in the following order: David,
John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March, Sarah Louise,
Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon, Alfred March, and
Daniel Barnabas died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


iii. SAMUEL NAPOLEON PEELER, b. 08 June 1850, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SAMUEL NAPOLEON PEELER:
REMARKS: Samuel Napoleon Peeler was born June 8, 1850, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore. He was
the third of their eight children, who were born in the following order: David,
John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March, Sarah Louise,
Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon, Alfred March, and
Daniel Barnabas Peeler died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


iv. CAMERON CAMILLUS PEELER, b. 20 October 1852, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CAMERON CAMILLUS PEELER:
REMARKS: Cameron Camillus Peeler was born October 20, 1852, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore.
He was the fourth of their eight children, who were born in the following order:
David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March, Sarah
Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon, Alfred
March, and Daniel Barnabas Peeler died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


v. ALFRED MARCH PEELER, b. 10 January 1855, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for ALFRED MARCH PEELER:
REMARKS: Alfred March Peeler was born January 10, 1855, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore.
He was the fifth of their eight children, who were born in the following order:
David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March, Sarah
Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon, Alfred
March, and Daniel Barnabas Peeler died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


vi. SARAH LOUISE PEELER, b. 23 October 1857, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SARAH LOUISE PEELER:
REMARKS: Sarah Louise Peeler was born October 23, 1857, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore.
She was the sixth of their eight children, who were born in the following
order: David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March,
Sarah Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon,
Alfred March, and Daniel Barnabas Peeler died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


vii. DANIEL BARNABAS PEELER, b. 04 August 1860, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL BARNABAS PEELER:
REMARKS: Daniel Barnabas Peeler was born August 4, 1860, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore.
He was the seventh of their eight children, who were born in the following
order: David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March,
Sarah Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon,
Alfred March, and Daniel Barnabas Peeler died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


viii. WILLIAM MCCOY PEELER, b. 22 December 1861, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for WILLIAM MCCOY PEELER:
REMARKS: William McCoy Peeler was born December 22, 1861, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John Hoyl Peeler and Margaret C. Lattimore.
He was the youngest of their eight children, who were born in the following
order: David, John Francis, Samuel Napoleon, Cameron Camillus, Alfred March,
Sarah Louise, Daniel Barnabas, and William McCoy Peeler. Samuel Napoleon,
Alfred March, and Daniel Barnabas Peeler died young.

The John Hoyl Peeler family moved to Illinois in 1869; then to Bates County,
Missouri, near Appleton City.

Data from John Hoyl Peeler entry (#366) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants",
by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Generation No. 6

17. WILLIAM CARSON7 LATTIMORE (JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 23 September 1832 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 13 October 1883 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married RUTH CAROLINE HARRIS Abt. 1864 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She was born 1848 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 01 December 1933 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for WILLIAM CARSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Carson (Bill) Lattimore was born September 23, 1832, in
Rutherford County, North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and
Isabelle Carson. He was the oldest of eleven children: William Carson (Bill);
Sarah (Sallie); Daniel (Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S.
(Sam); James H. (Jim); Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C.
Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

William Carson Lattimore married Ruth Caroline (Callie) Harris, daughter of
Robert W. and Phoebe Harris. They had ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink),
Texana, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.
Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


More About WILLIAM CARSON LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for RUTH CAROLINE HARRIS:
REMARKS: Ruth Caroline (Callie) Harris was born in 1848 in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Robert W. and Phoebe Harris.

About 1864, Callie Harris married William Carson (Bill) Lattimore, son of
John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. They had ten children: Daniel
Pink (Pink), Texana, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie),
Miller, Mallie, Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


Children of WILLIAM LATTIMORE and RUTH HARRIS are:
i. DANIEL PINK8 LATTIMORE, b. 10 August 1865, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 15 December 1947, York County, South Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL PINK LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Pink (Pink) Lattimore was born August 10, 1865, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth
Caroline (Callie) Harris. He was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink),
Texana, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


ii. TEXANNA LATTIMORE, b. 28 March 1867, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 04 August 1940, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for TEXANNA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Texanna Lattimore was born March 28, 1867, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth
Caroline (Callie) Harris. She was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink),
Texanna, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


iii. JOSEPH TURNER LATTIMORE, b. 1870, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOSEPH TURNER LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joseph Turner (Joe) Lattimore was born in 1870, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth
Caroline (Callie) Harris. He was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink),
Texana, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


iv. EUGENIA LATTIMORE, b. 1874, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Notes for EUGENIA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Eugenia Lattimore was born in 1874 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth Caroline
(Callie) Harris. She was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink), Texanna,
Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie, Bessie,
Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


v. WILLIAM GRAY LATTIMORE, b. 27 December 1875, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 29 November 1954, Gutherie, Logan County, Oklahoma.

Notes for WILLIAM GRAY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Gray (Willie) Lattimore was born December 27, 1875, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and
Ruth Caroline (Callie) Harris. He was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink),
Texana, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


vi. MILLER LATTIMORE, b. 1876, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MILLER LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Miller Lattimore was born in 1876 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth Caroline
(Callie) Harris. He was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink), Texana,
Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


vii. MALLIE LATTIMORE, b. 1877, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MALLIE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mallie Lattimore was born in 1877 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth Caroline
(Callie) Harris. She was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink), Texanna,
Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie, Bessie,
Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Mallie never married.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


viii. BESSIE LATTIMORE, b. October 1879, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for BESSIE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Bessie Lattimore was born in October 1879 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth Caroline
(Callie) Harris. She was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink), Texanna,
Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie, Bessie,
Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Bessie never married.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


ix. ROBERT BANDY LATTIMORE, b. 23 March 1881, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 13 February 1960, Spartenburg Co., South Carolina.

Notes for ROBERT BANDY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Robert Bandy (Bob) Lattimore was born March 23, 1881, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth
Caroline (Callie) Harris. He was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink),
Texana, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


x. DOCK PALMER LATTIMORE, b. 26 March 1888, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 07 July 1939, Halifax County, North Carolina.

Notes for DOCK PALMER LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Dock Palmer Lattimore was born March 26, 1888, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of William Carson (Bill) Lattimore and Ruth
Caroline (Callie) Harris. He was one of ten children: Daniel Pink (Pink),
Texana, Joseph Turner (Joe), Eugenia, William Gray (Willie), Miller, Mallie,
Bessie, Robert Bandy (Bob), and Dock Palmer Lattimore.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North
Carolina. His household consisted of: William Lattimore, age 47; Caroline, age
32; Daniel, age 15; Texana, age 12; Joesph, age 10; Eugenia, age 6; Willie, age
4; Mallie, age 3; and Bessie (born in October), age 4/12.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


18. SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE (JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 14 December 1833 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 13 June 1911 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina. She married WILLIAM MARION PACKARD. He was born 11 July 1827 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 09 August 1884 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for SARAH (SALLIE) LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore was born December 14, 1833, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the daughter of John Lattimore and Isabelle Carson.
She was the second of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah (Sallie);
Daniel (Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H.
(Jim); Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

Sallie Lattimore married William Marion Packard about 1852, and they had
thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine,
William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R., Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Sallie Lattimore died June 13, 1911, in Rutherford County, and William Packard,
who was born July 11, 1827, in Rutherford County, died August 9, 1884, in
Rutherford County. Both are buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery in
Cleveland County.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About SARAH (SALLIE) LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for WILLIAM MARION PACKARD:
REMARKS: William Marion Packard was born July 11, 1827, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina. I don't know the names of his parents or whether he had any
brothers or sisters.

William Packard married Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore, daughter of John Lattimore
and Isabel Carson, about 1852, in Cleveland County, North Carolina. They had
thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine,
William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R., Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

William Packard died August 9, 1884, in Rutherford County. His wife died June
13, 1911. Both are buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery in Cleveland
County.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About WILLIAM MARION PACKARD:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of SARAH LATTIMORE and WILLIAM PACKARD are:
28. i. JOHN ZADOCK8 PACKARD, b. 07 December 1853, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 02 August 1892, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
ii. MARY PACKARD, b. 1855, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY PACKARD:
REMARKS: Mary Packard was born in 1855, in Rutherford County, North Carolina,
the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore.
She was the second of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Mary Packard married Julius Fortune.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


iii. MARTHA PACKARD, b. 1856, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for MARTHA PACKARD:
REMARKS: Martha (Tump) Packard was born in 1856, in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore.
She was the third of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Martha Packard married Frank McClurd.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


29. iv. RACHEL EMILINE PACKARD, b. 31 May 1858, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 26 September 1941, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
v. ELIZA PACKARD, b. 1860, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for ELIZA PACKARD:
REMARKS: Eliza Packard was born in 1860, in Rutherford County, North Carolina,
the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore.
She was the fifth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Eliza Packard married Sam McCarter.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


30. vi. JOSEPHINE PACKARD, b. 1862, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 27 May 1890, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
vii. WILLIAM LEGRANDE PACKARD, b. 17 November 1863, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 15 September 1923, Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for WILLIAM LEGRANDE PACKARD:
REMARKS: William LeGrande (Lee) Packard was born November 17, 1863, in
Rutherford County, North Carolina, the son of William Marion Packard and Sarah
(Sallie) Lattimore. He was the seventh of thirteen children: John Zadock,
Mary, Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus,
Julia, James R., Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

When he was twenty-four, Lee Packard went to Major Schenck's factory at
Cleveland Mills and applied for work. He was put to work in the woods getting
out bills of lumber. He then became a general utility man around the mill.
After several years, he became superintendent of the new mill at Lawndale.
Later, he was superintendent at the Henrietta Mill and the Haynes Mill at
Avondale.

Lee Packard married Jennie Farris of Texas, who was a school teacher in
Lawndale while he was working at the mill there. They had two children. The
oldest married George Shuford and they lived in Cliffside. The other was
Jennie Lee Packard, who lived in Shelby.

After his retirement, Lee Packard lived on North Morgan Street in Shelby. He
died on September 17, 1923, of a heart attack at his home. Memorial services
were held the the First Baptist Church.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins; and from the "William LeGrande Packard" entry in "The
Heritage of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Jack Shuford.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


31. viii. DORCUS PACKARD, b. 06 May 1866, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 08 November 1952, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
32. ix. JULIA (JULIE) PACKARD, b. 12 October 1867, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; d. 27 April 1948.
x. JAMES R. PACKARD, b. 1868, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for JAMES R. PACKARD:
REMARKS: James R. Packard was born in 1868, in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the son of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore.
He was the tenth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Knox, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

James R. Packard married Lola Hicks.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


xi. JULIUS PACKARD, b. 14 February 1873, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for JULIUS PACKARD:
REMARKS: Julius Packard was born February 14, 1873, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the son of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore.
He was the eleventh of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Knox, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Julius Packard married Etta Towry.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


xii. KNOX PACKARD, b. 27 November 1876, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for KNOX PACKARD:
REMARKS: Knox Packard was born November 22, 1876, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the son of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore.
He was the twelth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Knox, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Knox Packard married first Callie McCarter, then Minnie Morris.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


xiii. MINNIE PACKARD, b. 14 August 1878, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. JULIUS BENJAMIN GOLD; b. 18 September 1874, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1944.

Notes for MINNIE PACKARD:
REMARKS: Minnie Packard was born August 14, 1878, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie)
Lattimore. She was the youngest of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary,
Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus,
Julia, James R., Julius, Knox, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Minnie Packard married Benjamin (Ben) Gold, son of William Fortune Gold and
Margaret Gordon Elliott.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


Notes for JULIUS BENJAMIN GOLD:
REMARKS: Julius Benjamin, "Ben", Gold was born September 18, 1874, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Williamson Fortune, "Min", Gold and Margaret
Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. He was the fourth of their nine children: John
Milton; Laura; Julia; Julius Benjamin, "Ben"; Martha, "Mattie"; Thomas Jackson;
Minnie Etta, "Minnie"; Charles Fortune; and George Elliott Gold.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from the "Williamson Fortune "Min" Gold Family" entry
in "The Heritage Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Stuart M.
Caudill.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revison: 8/94.
Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott.


19. JOHN L.7 LATTIMORE (JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 30 September 1836 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and died 03 June 1905 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married NANCY AMIRITA GOLD 1869 in Cleveland Court, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina, daughter of DANIEL GOLD and MARGARET JENKINS. She was born 04 November 1841 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and died 25 May 1906 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN L. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John L., (Johnie) Lattimore was born September 30, 1836, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. He was the fourth of eleven children: William Carson (Bill); Sarah (Sallie); Daniel (Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H. (Jim); Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery, which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at 18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina Troops.

An unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939, states that Daniel Lattimore was a 2nd Lieutenant in Company B, 49th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, and that he was killed in the Civil War.

The James Carson Elliott summary states that Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Billy Corbitt's Company in May 1861, and that Daniel was made 2nd Lieutenant. They were mustered into the 5th Regiment as twelve-month volunteers. After the reorganization in 1862, their company was in the 15th Regiment.

Daniel Lattimore was made First Lieutenant after Captain Corbitt was crippled in a train wreck and Judson J. Magness was made Captain. His summary also states that Daniel and Johnie served from Yorktown to Richmond, in the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Frederickburg, and Chancellorsville, and so forth. When Leroy McAfee was made Colonel of the 49th Regiment, he got this Cleveland County company transferred to the 49th Regiment, which was assigned to Matt Ransom's Brigade South of James River Department.

Johnie Lattimore was a Private in Company B, 49th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate States Army. He served from the formation of the company in Polkville in May 1861 until the close of the war in April 1865. His service is recorded in the "Roster of North Carolina Troops" at Cleveland County Court House, Shelby, North Carolina, Volume III.

In 1869, Johnie Lattimore married Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold, daughter of Daniel Gold and Margaret Jenkins and sister of Dr. Griffin Gold. They had
seven children: John Daniel; Lula; Margaret Catherine; Samuel Carson, "Sam";
Matt Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matilda; and Joe Clarence Lattimore. Sallie
died when whe was three. The others married and raised families.

John Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North Carolina. His household consisted of: John Lattimore, age 44; Nancy, age 38; John, age 19; Lula, age 8; Margaret, age 6; Samuel, age 4; and Mathew, age 2. Since John was born September 14, 1870, he was 9 year old, not 19, as indicated in the Census listing.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from "Applicants Work Sheet" for "United Daughters of the Confederacy" prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs; an unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939; and the National Register of Historic Places Inventory -- Nomination Form for the John Lattimore House.

An undated clipping from the Shelby Daily Star "A Backward Glance" column with Joe DePriest's byline, refers to a letter that James Carson Elliott wrote The Cleveland Star shortly after "Johnie" Lattimore died in 1905. The following data has been extracted from the clipping.

"The passing of Johnie Lattimore recalls to our mind the organization of Captain W.S. Corbett's Company at Polkville in May 1861," Elliott began. "Harvey D. Cabaniss was elected first lieutenant, Daniel Lattimore, second, an Irishman, Harim, 3rd." And old Johnie, of course, stood among the ranks of the 84 men who joined the 5th Regiment, North Carolina Veterans, Confederate States of America.

"And Johnie Lattimore: I knew him for over 50 years, Elliott wrote. We went to school together, grew up in the same neighborhood, hunted foxes together. In all that time, including the two years in the war, "we can say of him that we never knew him guilty of the smallest act that violated the Golden Rule, wrote Elliott. "His life measured up to Robert Louis Stevenson's creed: 'To be honest, to be kind, to earn a little, to spend a little less...'".

Drury's Bluff, May 1864: Johnie falls to the ground wounded. Elliott saw his friend "leaving the field with a mimie ball lodged in his wrist, in that memorable battle in which Buttler was driven from his strongly entrenched position back to Bermuda Hundred." Johnie Lattimore rejoined his company in time for the battle of The Crater on July 30 and General Matt Ramson yelling: "Boys, let's make one more charge and all die together." He wept like a child when deterred by officers, Elliott recollected.

Elliott and others in the company were captured and taken to Point Lookout Prison where the future poet and novelist Sidney Lanier was also a captive. After the war, Corbett and Crawford Durham opened a store in Shelby and offered Johnie Lattimore a job as clerk. "Captain Corbett knows I can't sell goods," said Johnie. "He just wants me for company."

Johnie's mother was a daughter of Rutherford County Sheriff Billy Carson, who had come to this part of the country many years earlier from Gettysburg,
Pennsylvania.

They buried Johnie in the Lattimore cemetery beside his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, who carried a British musketball received in the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1789. "Johnnie Lattimore fought a good fight in peace as well as war." Elliott concluded. He kept the faith and has gone to his reward, leaving to his children the richest legacy--a good name."

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County, N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


More About JOHN L. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for NANCY AMIRITA GOLD:
REMARKS: Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold was born November 4, 1841, in Rutherford (now Cleveland) County, North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Pleasant Gold and Margaret Jenkins. She was the oldest of their ten children: Mary Parmelia; Nancy Amirita, "Nancy"; Martha Jane; Benjamin Jenkins; Frances Sarah; Daniel Christopher; William Milton; Margaret Malindy; Griffin Miller; and Ann Emaline Gold. The Daniel Pleasant Gold family lived in Cleveland County, North Carolina, which was cut from Lincoln and Rutherford Counties in 1842.

About 1869, Nancy Gold married John L., "Johnie", Lattimore, son of John Lattimore and his second wife, Isabel Carson. They had seven children: John Daniel; Lula; Margaret Catherine; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Mathew Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida; and Joe Clarence Lattimore. Sallie died when she was three. The others married and raised families.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore; his Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold; and Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Applicants Work Sheet" for "United Daughters of the Confederacy", prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs, and from the "Daniel Gold and Frances Griffin Gold" entry in "The Heritage Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


More About NANCY AMIRITA GOLD:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and NANCY GOLD are:
33. i. JOHN DANIEL8 LATTIMORE, b. 14 September 1870, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 08 October 1943, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
34. ii. LULA LATTIMORE, b. 13 February 1872, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
35. iii. MARGARET CATHERINE LATTIMORE, b. 24 December 1873, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
36. iv. SAMUEL CARSON LATTIMORE, b. 28 January 1876, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 01 December 1935, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
37. v. MATT RANSOM LATTIMORE, b. 21 May 1878, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 17 July 1954, Kingfisher, Oklahoma.
vi. SALLIE MATIDA LATTIMORE, b. 19 August 1880, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 1883, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SALLIE MATIDA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sallie Matida, "Sallie", Lattimore was born August 19, 1880, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. She was one of their seven children: John Daniel, "John Daniel"; Lula; Margaret Catherine, "Katie"; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Matt Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida, "Sallie"; and Joe Clarence, "Joe". Sallie died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


38. vii. JOE CLARENCE LATTIMORE, b. 28 May 1884, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 30 March 1945.

20. FRANCIS7 LATTIMORE (JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 12 July 1844 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 04 April 1924. He married EDITH AMELIA CHITWOOD. She was born 06 December 1852, and died 20 February 1925 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for FRANCIS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Francis (Frank) Lattimore was born July 12, 1844 in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. He
was the nineth of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah (Sallie); Daniel
(Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam); James H. (Jim);
Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C. Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

According to "The Francis (Frank) Lattimore Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County, Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Guy Lattimore, Frank
Lattimore married Edith Chitwood, daughter of William Chitwood and Sarah
Magness. They had thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie R.;
Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin (Edley); Sarah Isabella; John;
Rachel Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood (Will); and
Guy Lattimore.

Frank Lattimore was a Private in Company F, 34th Regiment, North Carolina
Infantry. He enlisted April 10, 1864, at Camp Holmes, North Carolina. He
was captured at Petersburg on April 2, 1865, and imprisioned at Point Lookout,
Maryland, where he was released on June 29, 1865, on taking the oath of
Allegience to the Unites States. His residence at that time was Cleveland
County, North Carolina.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


Notes for EDITH AMELIA CHITWOOD:
REMARKS: Edith Amelia Chitwood was born December 6, 1852, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of William Chitwood and Sarah Magness. She was
one of at least five children: Julia; Aphia; Eliza; Elizabeth; and Eda.
According to the 1860 Census for Cleveland County, William Chitwood was a
37-year old farmer with real property valued at $1,200 and personal property
valued at $2,386. He was born in North Carolina. His wife, Sarah, was 32
years old, and shee was born in North Carolina. They had the following
children: Julia, age 12; Aphia, age 11; Eliza, age 9; Elizabeth, age 8; and
Eda, age 7.

Edith Chitwood married Frank Lattimore, son of John Lattimore and Isabel
Carson, on February 19, 1874. They had thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion
Carson; Jessie R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella;
Rachel Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and
John Lattimore.

Frank Lattimore died April 4, 1924. Edith Chitwood died February 20, 1925.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from "The
Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


Children of FRANCIS LATTIMORE and EDITH CHITWOOD are:
i. MARGARET J.8 LATTIMORE, b. 11 March, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MARGARET J. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Margaret J. Lattimore was born March 11, 18__, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith
Amelia Chitwood. She was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson;
Jessie R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel
Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John
Lattimore.

Margaret Lattimore married Doctor H. R. Sherrill, son of J. T. Sherrill. They
adopted one child: Franklin Thomas Sherrill, who was born February 10, 1932, in
Kansas City, Missouri.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


ii. GUY LATTIMORE, b. 24 July, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for GUY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Guy Lattimore was born July 24, 18__ in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia
Chitwood. He was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie
R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel Louise
(Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John Lattimore.

Guy Lattimore married Gertrude Burnett on October 27, 1926. They had four
children: William; Marion Everett; Phillis Ray; and Franklin Chitwood
Lattimore.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


iii. GEORGIA E. LATTIMORE, b. 12 December 1874, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for GEORGIA E. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Georgia E. Lattimore was born December 12, 1874, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith
Amelia Chitwood. She was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson;
Jessie R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel
Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John
Lattimore.

Georgia E. Lattimore married Reverand I. D. Harrill, son of William Harrill, on
December 6, 1896. They had three children: William Bunyan; Franklin Hugh; and
Edith Jane Harrill.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


iv. MARION CARSON LATTIMORE, b. 08 July 1876, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 10 April 1893.

Notes for MARION CARSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Marion Carson Lattimore was born July 8, 1876, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia Chitwood.
He was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie R.; Mattie
Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel Louise (Ray);
Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John Lattimore.

Marion Carson Lattimore died April 10, 1893. He was unmarried.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


v. JESSIE R. LATTIMORE, b. 24 December 1877, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 15 June 1879, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JESSIE R. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Jessie R. Lattimore was born December 24, 1877, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia Chitwood.
He was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie R.; Mattie
Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel Louise (Ray);
Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John Lattimore.

Marion Carson Lattimore died June 15, 1879, before he was two years old.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


vi. MATTIE LEE LATTIMORE, b. 10 April 1879, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 30 April 1934, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MATTIE LEE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mattie Lee Lattimore was born April 10, 1879, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia
Chitwood. She was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson;
Jessie R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel
Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John
Lattimore.

Mattie Lee Lattimore died April 30, 1934. She was unmarried.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


vii. ALPHA ELIZABETH LATTIMORE, b. 20 February 1881, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for ALPHA ELIZABETH LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Alpha Elizabeth Lattimore was born February 20, 1881, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith
Amelia Chitwood. She was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson;
Jessie R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel
Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John
Lattimore.

Alpha Elizabeth Lattimore married E. C. Bullard. They had two children:
Margaret Maxine and Wilma Rae Bullard.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


viii. AUDLEY MARTIN LATTIMORE, b. 21 November 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for AUDLEY MARTIN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Audley Martin Lattimore was born November 21, 1882, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia
Chitwood. He was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie
R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel Louise
(Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John Lattimore.

Audley Martin Lattimore married Bessie Cabiness on September 2, 1908.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


ix. SARAH ISABELLA LATTIMORE, b. 30 October 1884, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 02 August 1968, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SARAH ISABELLA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah Isabella Lattimore was born October 30, 1884, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith
Amelia Chitwood. She was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson;
Jessie R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel
Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John
Lattimore.

Sarah Isabella Lattimore married William C. Packard.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


x. RACHEL LOUISE LATTIMORE, b. 24 April 1887, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 03 May 1957.

Notes for RACHEL LOUISE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rachel Louise (Ray) Lattimore was born April 24, 1887, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith
Amelia Chitwood. She was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson;
Jessie R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel
Louise (Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John
Lattimore.

Ray Lattimore married Frances B. Stevenson. He was born February 28, 1883.

Frank Stevenson died March 2, 1957. Ray Lattimore died May 3, 1957.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


xi. FRANKLIN BRUCE LATTIMORE, b. 16 April 1889, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 09 November 1946, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for FRANKLIN BRUCE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Franklin Bruce Lattimore was born April 16, 1889 in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia
Chitwood. He was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie
R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel Louise
(Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John Lattimore.

Franklin Bruce Lattimore married Blanche Burns on March 19, 1925. Blanche
Burns was born in Rutherford County, North Carolina.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


39. xii. WILLIAM CHITWOOD LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1895, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
xiii. JOHN LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1927, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Lattimore was born about 1927 in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Francis (Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia
Chitwood. He was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie
R.; Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel Louise
(Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John Lattimore.

John Lattimore never married.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


21. AUDLEY MARTIN7 LATTIMORE (JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 30 November 1845 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 25 October 1931 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married MARY HAMRICK.

Notes for AUDLEY MARTIN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Audley Martin (Edley) Lattimore was born November 30, 1845, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of John (Big John) Lattimore and
Isabelle Carson. He was the tenth of eleven children: William Carson; Sarah
(Sallie); Daniel (Dan); John L. (Johnie); Joe Carson (Joe); Samuel S. (Sam);
James H. (Jim); Thomas D. (Tom); Frank; Audley M. (Edley); and Mary C.
Lattimore.

The John Lattimore family lived on a large farm on Hinton's Creek. Cleveland
County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and Shelby became
the county seat in 1842. Big John Lattimore's log house is down the hill from
the Lattimore Family Cemetery, which is on the east side of Five Points Road,
about half way between Hinton's Creek and Five Points, roughly two miles
northwest of Polkville and fifteen miles northwest of Shelby.

Local tradition maintains that all nine sons of Big John Lattimore were
actively involved in Confederate service. William operated the family tannery,
which supplied leather for harness, saddles, and shoes for the army.

Daniel and Johnie enlisted in Captain Corbett's Company in May 1861, and Daniel
was made 2nd Lieutenant. Daniel was killed in August 1864 by a long range
bullet while laying under his tent fly reading his Bible in the Northeast side
of the Petersburg Cemetery where his Company had retired from the trenches for
a days rest. Johnie Lattimore was shot in the left wrist at Drury's Bluff on
May 16, 1864. He went on through the nine months siege of Petersburg to the
surrender at Appomattox. Samuel Lattimore visited Daniel and Johnie at Yorktown
in August 1861, contracted measles, and died.

Joseph Lattimore was in Texas and enlisted early from that state. After
serving about two years in the Western armies, he was taken prisoner and held
prisoner for two years, which wrecked his health. He died a few years after
the war, leaving a widow and two children.

James and Thomas D. Lattimore joined Captain A. G. Water's Company, which was
mustered into the 34th Regiment. Thomas D. was 3rd Lieutenant. They were with
the 34th Regiment from the Seven Days Battles at Richmond, through 2nd Manassas,
Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness
Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and on to Appomattox. Thomas had command of
the Litterbearers of his Brigade during last years of war. James drove a wagon
part of the time.

Frank went as a recruit to that company and fought through the Wilderness and
through the siege of Petersburg up to the 25th of March, when he was taken
prisoner on Hatcher's Run. He was a prisoner with James Carson Elliott at
Point Lookout, Maryland, until the last of June 1865. Audley M. went out at
18 years old and served in the field artillery (10th Artillery) for 18 months
up to Appomattox, making a fine record as a faithful soldier.

This summary of civil war service is from an April 21, 1913, letter from James
Carson Elliott to Mrs. J. J. Lattimore, who was collecting fragments of Civil
War history. James Carson Elliott, who was a nephew and neighbor of Big John
Lattimore, served as a Private in Company F, 56th Regiment, North Carolina
Troops.

According to an undated newspaper clipping, Edley Lattimore served in Company C,
10th Artillery, Poague's Battalion, from January 1864, when 17 year-olds were
called up, until the end of the war. He served around Richmond and Petersburg,
and he returned home 21 April 1865.

Edley Lattimore moved to the Lattimore area when the Southern Railroad was
being built through that section. He oversaw a force of laborers during the
of laborers in construction of the railroad. Later the Seaboard Railroad was
built, and the railroads crossed at what became the town of Lattimore. Edley
became the station agent for the Seaboard, and in this capacity, he was known
as "captain". The town was named in his honor.

According to "The Audley Martin Lattimore Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County, Volume I - 1982", written by Mary Agnes Lattimore, Audley
Lattimore was only seventeen years of age when he went to war in January
1864. He was a member of Company C, 10th Artillery, Poague's Battalion. His
service was around Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia, in the last fifteen
months of the conflict. He came home April 21, 1865, and soon married Mary Jane
Hamrick, daughter of Wright Hamrick and Ellen Peeler. He helped to rebuild a
devastated section that finally became the Town of Lattimore.

He was Commander of Cleveland County Confederate Veterans, Pension Board
Chairman, and a civic leader in general. He attended the Confederate Soldiers
reunions as long as he was able. He enjoyed talking about the war. The town of
Lattimore was named for him and his brother Jim, who settled there after the
war. Besides being a farmer, he was the first depot agent when the railroads
came, and was named the first mayor of the town. His favorite sport was
hunting. He was a Baptist, ad deacon, a Sunday School teacher and Sunday School
Superintendent. He loved to sing.

Audley (Edley) Lattimore married Mary Jane Hamrick, daughter of Wright Hamrick
and Ellen Peeler, on February 25, 1869, and they had seven children: Iby
Elminer (Ellie); Joseph Pinkney (Pink); Sarah Adda (Addie); Susan Ceora
(Susan); John Broadus (Broadus); Thomas Jefferson (Thomas); and William Festus
(Festus) Lattimore.

Audley died October 25, 1931, in Cleveland County, and was buried in the
Lattimore Baptist Church Cemetery, Lattimore, North Carolina. His wife, Mary
Jane Hamrick, died March 4, 1914, in Cleveland County.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
"The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About AUDLEY MARTIN LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MARY HAMRICK:
REMARKS: Mary Hamrick married Audley Martin, "Edley", Lattimore, son of John
Lattimore and Isabel Carson. I don't know when or where they were married.

According to an undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", they had seven children: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

I don't know when or where Mary Hamrick was born, the names of her parents, or
whether she had any brothers or sisters.

The Edley Lattimore family lived at Lattimore, North Carolina, where Edley
was the station agent for the Seaboard Railroad for twenty years, retiring in
1930 to looking after his farming interests. Mary Hamrick Lattimore died in
1914. Edley died in October 1931.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


Children of AUDLEY LATTIMORE and MARY HAMRICK are:
i. ELLIE8 LATTIMORE.

Notes for ELLIE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Ellie Lattimore was the daughter of Audley Martin, "Edley",
Lattimore and Mary Hamrick. She was one of seven children.

According to an undated 1931 newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", the seven children were: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


ii. J. PINK LATTIMORE.

Notes for J. PINK LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: J. Pink Lattimore was the son of Audley Martin, "Edley",
Lattimore and Mary Hamrick. He was one of seven children.

According to an undated 1931 newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", the seven children were: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


iii. LATTIMORE.

Notes for LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mrs. A. M. Hamrick was the daughter of Audley Martin, "Edley",
Lattimore and Mary Hamrick. She was one of seven children.

According to an undated 1931 newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", the seven children were: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


iv. LATTIMORE.

Notes for LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mrs. L. V. Lee was the daughter of Audley Martin, "Edley",
Lattimore and Mary Hamrick. She was one of seven children.

According to an undated 1931 newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", the seven children were: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


v. J. BROADUS LATTIMORE.

Notes for J. BROADUS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: J. Broadus Lattimore was the son of Audley Martin, "Edley",
Lattimore and Mary Hamrick. He was one of seven children.

According to an undated 1931 newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", the seven children were: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


vi. TOM J. LATTIMORE.

Notes for TOM J. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Tom J. Lattimore was the son of Audley Martin, "Edley",
Lattimore and Mary Hamrick. He was one of seven children.

According to an undated 1931 newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", the seven children were: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.
Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


vii. W. F. LATTIMORE.

Notes for W. F. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: W. F. Lattimore was the son of Audley Martin, "Edley", Lattimore
and Mary Hamrick. He was one of seven children.

According to an undated 1931 newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head of
Confederates, Dies", the seven children were: Miss Ellie and J. Pink
Lattimore, who lived with Edley at Lattimore; Mrs. A. M. Hamrick of Shelby;
Mrs. L. V. Lee of Shelby; J. Broadus Lattimore of Lattimore; Tom J. Lattimore
of Macon, Georgia; and W. F. Lattimore, who died in 1920.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from an
undated newspaper clipping, "A. M. Lattimore, Head Of Confederates, Dies",
containing Edley Lattimore's obituary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


22. JULIUS A.7 LATTIMORE (JOSEPH C.6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1848 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 1899 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married ALPHA CHITWOOD Abt. 1876 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She was born 1848, and died 1901.

Notes for JULIUS A. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Julius A. Lattimore was born in 1848 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah
Robertson. He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A., John
Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink,
and Joseph Lane Lattimore. The first eight children are listed in order of the
birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink and Joseph Lane
Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Julius Lattimore married Alpha Chitwood, and they had four children: Thomas,
Nora, Fannie, and Mae Lattimore. Thomas married Marsha Chitwood, Nora married
an "Elliott", Fannie married a "Price", and Mae married Edward Covington.

Julius A. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 30; his wife Affa was 29; his daughter Nora was 3; and
his daughter Fanny was 1.

Julius Lattimore died in 1899, and his wife, who was born in 1848, died in
1901. Both are buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About JULIUS A. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for ALPHA CHITWOOD:
REMARKS: Alpha Chitwood was born in 1848. I don't know with certainty the
names of her parents or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Alpha Chitwood married Julius A. Lattimore, son of Joseph C. Lattimore and
Louis Hanna Robertson. They had four children: Thomas, Nora, Fannie, and Mae
Lattimore.

There was only one Chitwood family listed on the Tax Lists for Cleveland
County, North Carolina, in 1850; i.e., William Chitwood, who owned 300 acres
of land, valued at $500. The tax list was prepared by militia companies. He
was in Captain Andrew Jackson Elliott's militia company, the same militia
company as Joseph C. Lattimore, indicating the Chitwoods and Lattimores were
neighbors.

The William Chitwood family is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County.
William Chitwood was 58, his wife Sarah was 52, his daughter Elizabeth was 29,
and his son Jesse was 17. In 1848, when Alpha was born, William would have
been 26, and Sarah would have been 20. Therefore, Alpha Chitwood is probably
the daughter of William and Sarah Chitwood, and she had at least one sister,
Elizabeth, and one brother, Jesse.

Alpha Chitwood died in 1901. Julius Lattimore died in 1899. Both are buried
in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

The initial data was from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About ALPHA CHITWOOD:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of JULIUS LATTIMORE and ALPHA CHITWOOD are:
i. NORA8 LATTIMORE, b. 1877, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for NORA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Nora Lattimore was born about 1877 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Julius A. Lattimore and Alpha Chitwood. She was
the oldest of four children: Nora, Fannie, Mae, and Thomas.

Julius A. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 30; his wife Affa was 29; his daughter Nora was 3; and
his daughter Fanny was 1.

Nora Lattimore married an "Elliott".

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ii. FANNIE LATTIMORE, b. 1879, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for FANNIE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Fannie Lattimore was born about 1879 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Julius A. Lattimore and Alpha Chitwood. She was
the second of four children: Nora, Fannie, Mae, and Thomas.

Julius A. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 30; his wife Affa was 29; his daughter Nora was 3; and
his daughter Fanny was 1.

Fannie Lattimore married a "Price".

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iii. MAE LATTIMORE, b. Aft. 1880, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MAE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mae Lattimore was born after 1880 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Julius A. Lattimore and Alpha Chitwood. She was
the third or fourth of four children: Nora, Fannie, Mae, and Thomas.

Julius A. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 30; his wife Affa was 29; his daughter Nora was 3; and
his daughter Fanny was 1.

Mae Lattimore married Edward Covington.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iv. THOMAS LATTIMORE, b. Aft. 1880, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for THOMAS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Thomas Lattimore was born after 1880 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of Julius A. Lattimore and Alpha Chitwood. He was
the third or fourth of four children: Nora, Fannie, Mae, and Thomas.

Julius A. Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 30; his wife Affa was 29; his daughter Nora was 3; and
his daughter Fanny was 1.

Thomas Lattimore married Marsha Chitwood.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


23. JOHN BYNUM7 LATTIMORE (JOSEPH C.6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 08 October 1851 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 02 March 1928 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married DORCUS MCFARLAND Abt. 1873 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She was born 13 May 1849 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 13 February 1920 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN BYNUM LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore was born October 8, 1851, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise
Hannah Robertson. He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A.,
John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R.,
Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore. The first eight children are listed in order
of their birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink and
Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

John Bynum Lattimore married Dorcus McFarland, and they had five children:Julius Gaff (Gaff), Orange J., William Carson, Mary, and Luna Lattimore. This
was Dorcus McFarland's second marriage. Her first marriage was to Joseph C.
Lattimore, son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. Joseph C.
Lattimore, who was born March 19, 1838, died June 9, 1870. John Bynum Lattimore
and Dorcus McFarland probably married about 1873.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and
his son Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and
Luzee 10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of
Joseph C. Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

John Bynum Lattimore died March 2, 1928, and his wife, who was born May 13,
1849, died February 13, 1920.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for DORCUS MCFARLAND:
REMARKS: John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore was born October 8, 1851, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise
Hannah Robertson. He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A.,
John Bynum, Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink, Joseph Lane, and Caroline
Lattimore. The first seven children are listed in chronological order of the
birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink, Joseph Lane, and
Caroline Lattimore.

Dorcus McFarland married John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore, son of Joseph C. (Big
Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson, in Cleveland County, about 1873,
and they had five children: Julius Gaff (Gaff), Orange J., William Carson, Mary,
and Luna Lattimore.

This was Dorcus McFarland's second marriage. Her first marriage was to Joseph
C. Lattimore, son of John (Big John) Lattimore and Isabelle Carson. Joseph C.
Lattimore, who was born March 19, 1838, died June 9, 1870. John Bynum Lattimore
and Dorcus McFarland probably married about 1873.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and
his son Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and
Luzee 10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of
Joseph C. Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

John Bynum Lattimore died March 2, 1928, and his wife, who was born May 13,
1849, died February 13, 1920.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and DORCUS MCFARLAND are:
i. JULIUS GAFF8 LATTIMORE, b. 12 July 1874, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 28 June 1953, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JULIUS GAFF LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Julius Gaff (Gaff) Lattimore was born July 12, 1874, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore and Dorcus
McFarland. He was the oldest of their five children: Julius Gaff (Gaff),
Orange J. (Orange), William Carson, Mary, and Luna Lattimore. This was his
mother's second marriage. He had a step-brother, Robert Lee Lattimore, and a
step-sister, Sarah Elizabeth Lattimore, from her marriage to Joseph C. (Joe
Carson) Lattimore.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The entry
indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and his son
Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and Luzee
10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of Joseph C.
Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

Gaff Lattimore married Sarah Ada Stockton, and they had one son: Robert Carson
Lattimore.

Gaff Lattimore died June 28, 1953, in Cleveland County. His wife died October
22, 1949, in Cleveland County.

Original data from unpublished paper "The Lattimore Family In Cleveland County,
N.C.", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated 12 Aug 1939. Additional data from
descendants of John L. Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


ii. ORANGE J. LATTIMORE, b. 03 November 1878, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 14 August 1960, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for ORANGE J. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Orange J. (Orange) Lattimore was born November 3, 1878, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore and Dorcus
McFarland. He was the second of their five children: Julius Gaff (Gaff),
Orange J. (Orange), William Carson, Mary, and Luna Lattimore. This was his
mother's second marriage. He had a step-brother, Robert Lee Lattimore, and a
step-sister, Sarah Elizabeth Lattimore, from her marriage to Joseph C. (Joe
Carson) Lattimore.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The entry
indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and his son
Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and Luzee
10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of Joseph C.
Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

Orange Lattimore married Ura Hunt. They had no children.

Orange Lattimore died August 14, 1960, in Cleveland County. His wife, who was
born January 22, 1888, died May 13, 1960, in Cleveland County.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iii. MARY LATTIMORE, b. Aft. 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mary Lattimore was born after 1882, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore and Dorcus McFarland.
She was the fourth or fifth of their five children: Julius Gaff (Gaff),
Orange J. (Orange), William Carson, Mary, and Luna Lattimore. This was her
mother's second marriage. She had a step-brother, Robert Lee Lattimore, and a
step-sister, Sarah Elizabeth Lattimore, from her marriage to Joseph C. (Joe
Carson) Lattimore.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The entry
indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and his son
Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and Luzee
10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of Joseph C.
Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

Mary Lattimore married Ed Sumner.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iv. LUNA LATTIMORE, b. Aft. 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for LUNA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Luna Lattimore was born after 1882, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore and Dorcus McFarland.
She was the fourth or fifth of their five children: Julius Gaff (Gaff),
Orange J. (Orange), William Carson, Mary, and Luna Lattimore. This was her
mother's second marriage. She had a step-brother, Robert Lee Lattimore, and a
step-sister, Sarah Elizabeth Lattimore, from her marriage to Joseph C. (Joe
Carson) Lattimore.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The entry
indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and his son
Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and Luzee
10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of Joseph C.
Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


v. WILLIAM CARSON LATTIMORE, b. 01 April 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 15 March 1951.

Notes for WILLIAM CARSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Carson Lattimore was born April 1, 1882, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of John Bynum (Bynum) Lattimore and Dorcus
McFarland. He was the third of their five children: Julius Gaff (Gaff),
Orange J. (Orange), William Carson, Mary, and Luna Lattimore. This was his
mother's second marriage. He had a step-brother, Robert Lee Lattimore, and a
step-sister, Sarah Elizabeth Lattimore, from her marriage to Joseph C. (Joe
Carson) Lattimore.

Bynum Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The entry
indicates he was 34; his wife Dorcas was 31; his son Gaffney was 6; and his son
Orange was 2. The entry also lists two other children: Robert 13, and Luzee
10. They are the son, Robert Lee, and daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, of Joseph C.
Lattimore and Dorcas McFarland.

William Carson Lattimore married Ruth Yelton. They had one child: J. B.
Lattimore, who died January 30, 1949.

William Carson Lattimore died March 15, 1951.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


24. WILLIAM AARON7 LATTIMORE (JOSEPH C.6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 13 July 1858 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 30 September 1932 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married MARY DONOHO ELLIOTT 17 January 1878 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, daughter of ANDREW ELLIOTT and SARAH DOGGETT. She was born 02 June 1858 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 24 July 1936 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for WILLIAM AARON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Aaron (William) Lattimore was born July 13, 1858, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson. He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A., John Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink, and Joseph Lane Lattimore. The first eight children are listed in order of their birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink and Joseph Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned 325 acres of land valued at $650.

William Aaron Lattimore married Mary Donoho Elliott, daughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott and Sarah Ann Doggett, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, on January 17, 1878. They had eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). They also adopted Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The entry indicates he was 21; his wife Mary was 21; and his son Andrew was 1.

William Lattimore died September 30, 1932, and his wife, who was born June 21, 1858, died July 24, 1936.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for MARY DONOHO ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Mary Donoho Elliott was born June 2, 1858, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott and Sarah Ann Doggett.
She was the second of their eight children: Coleman Doggett, Mary Donoho,
Susan Frances, James Reinhart, Margaret Elizabeth, Sarah Caroline, Dorcas
Catherine, and Andrew Jackson Elliott.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

Mary Donoho Elliott married William Aaron Lattimore, son of Joseph C. (Big Joe)
Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, on
January 17, 1878. They had eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth
Lee (Lizzie), Epsie Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus
(George), Roy Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna),
William Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). They also
adopted Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

William Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. The
entry indicates he was 21; his wife Mary was 21; and his son Andrew was 1.

William Lattimore died September 30, 1932, and his wife, who was born June 21,1858, died July 24, 1936.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.
Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Children of WILLIAM LATTIMORE and MARY ELLIOTT are:
i. JOSEPH ANDREW8 LATTIMORE, b. 11 February 1879, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 17 June 1955, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. CARRIE MAE WHITAKER.

Notes for JOSEPH ANDREW LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joseph Andrew (Andrew) Lattimore was born February 11, 1879,
in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. He was the oldest of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). He also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Andrew Lattimore married Carrie Mae Whitaker, daughter of John Vestat Whitaker
and Carolyn Waller.

Andrew Lattimore died June 17, 1955, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and
his wife, who was born October 6, 1887, in Savannah, Georgia, died January 27,
1958, in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for CARRIE MAE WHITAKER:
RESUME: Married Andrew Lattimore, son of William Aaron Lattimore and Mary
Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


ii. ELIZABETH LEE LATTIMORE, b. 27 September 1880, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 13 January 1963, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. DAVIE MOORE.

Notes for ELIZABETH LEE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie) Lattimore was born September 27, 1880, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. She was the second of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). She also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Lizzie Lattimore married Mallard Davis Moore, son of General Marion Moore
and Vestie Victoria Hamrick, on March 16, 1899, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina. They had eight children: Halys Guy, Buren Rea, Jessie Lou, Howard
Milton, William Eubert, Joe Lane, Mary Lee, and George Carroll Moore.

Lizzie Lattimore died January 13, 1963, in Cleveland County, North Carolina.
Her husband, who was born on July 17, 1868, in Boiling Springs, North Carolina,
died June 15, 1935, in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for DAVIE MOORE:
RESUME: Married Lizzie Lattimore, daughter of William Aaron Lattimore and Mary
Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


iii. EPSIE LOUISE LATTIMORE, b. 30 March 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 1957; m. WILLIAM G. HARRIS.

Notes for EPSIE LOUISE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Epsie Louise (Epsie) Lattimore was born March 30, 1882, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. She was the third of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). She also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Epsie Lattimore married William G. Harris, son of William Decater Harris and
Sarah Etta Waters, on November 29, 1905, in Rutherford County, North Carolina.
They had four children: William Melvin, Mabel Louise, Inez, and J. Banard
Harris.

Epsie Lattimore died in 1957. Her husband, who was born November 19, 1869,
died June 29, 1957.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for WILLIAM G. HARRIS:
RESUME: Married Epsie Lattimore, daughter of William Aaron Lattimore and Mary
Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


iv. SARAH CASSANDRA LATTIMORE, b. 11 January 1884, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 27 January 1954, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. JOE MILLER.

Notes for SARAH CASSANDRA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah Cassandra (Robbie) Lattimore was born January 11, 1884, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. She was the fourth of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). She also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Robbie Lattimore married Joseph Henry Miller, son of Humphrey Miller and Mary
Washington Harris, on December 27, 1905, in Mars Hill, North Carolina. They
had two children: Joseph Henry, Jr., and Mary Virginia Miller.

Robbie Lattimore died January 27, 1954, in Rutherford County, North Carolina.
Her husband died May 9, 1916, in Rutherford County, North Carolina.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for JOE MILLER:
RESUME: Married Sarah C. Lattimore, daughter of William Aaron Lattimore and
Mary Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn
by Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


v. GEORGE FESTUS LATTIMORE, b. 27 November 1885, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 20 November 1953, Kings Mountain, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. EVELYN WHITE, 04 September 1923, Hertford, North Carolina; b. 1896; d. 13 October 1971, Edenton, North Carolina.

Notes for GEORGE FESTUS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: George Festus (George) Lattimore was born November 27, 1885,
in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. He was the fifth of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). He also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

George Lattimore married Evelyn White, daughter of Robert Timothy White
and Sarah Rebecca Laydes, on September 4, 1923, in Hertford, North Carolina.

George Lattimore died November 20, 1953, in Kings Mountain, North Carolina,
and his wife, who was born in 1896, died October 13, 1971, in Edenton, North
Carolina.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for EVELYN WHITE:
REMARKS: Evelyn White was born in 1896, the daughter of Robert Timothy White
and Sarah Rebecca Laydes. I don't know where she was born or whether she had
any brothers or sisters.

Evelyn White married George Festus (George) Lattimore, son of William Aaron
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott, on September 4, 1923, in Hertford, North
Carolina. I don't know whether they had any children.

Evelyn White died October 13, 1971, in Edenton, North Carolina. Her husband,
George Lattimore died November 20, 1953, in Kings Mountain, North Carolina.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


vi. ROY REINHARDT LATTIMORE, b. 29 November 1887, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 07 October 1888, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for ROY REINHARDT LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Roy Reinhardt (Roy) Lattimore was born November 29, 1887,
in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. He was the sixth of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). He also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Roy Lattimore died October 7, 1888, before his first birthday.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


vii. SAMUEL CUSTER LATTIMORE, b. 12 October 1890, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 25 May 1966, Columbia, South Carolina; m. MARY ABBORGOTTI.

Notes for SAMUEL CUSTER LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Custer (Samuel) Lattimore was born October 12, 1890,
in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. He was the seventh of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). He also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Samuel Lattimore married Mary Albergoth, daughter of Tally McKeown Albergoth
and Eula Shepherd, on August 4, 1926, in Blackburg, South Carolina. They had
one child: W. A. Lattimore, who was born October 30, 1927, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina. He married Peggie Bennett Neel on April 14, 1956.

Samuel Lattimore died May 25, 1966, in Columbia, South Carolina. Mary
Albergoth was born August 4, 1890, in Blackburg, South Carolina.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for MARY ABBORGOTTI:
RESUME: Married Samuel Lattimore, son of William Aaron Lattimore and May
Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


viii. MARY EDNA LATTIMORE, b. 05 June 1893, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. M. ORR CRAWFORD.

Notes for MARY EDNA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mary Edna (Edna) Lattimore was born June 5, 1893, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Aaron (William) Lattimore
and Mary Donoho Elliott. She was the eighth of their eleven children:
Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie Louise (Epsie),
Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy Reinhard (Roy),
Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William Aaron, Eugene Bynum
(Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel) Lattimore. She also had an adopted
sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Edna Lattimore married Robert Orr Crawford, son of John Crawford and Mary Emily
Whitesides, on June 27, 1923, in Cleveland County, North Carolina. They had
one child: Robert Orr Crawford, Jr., who was born April 5, 1928, in Gaston
County, North Carolina.

Edna Lattimore's husband, Robert Crawford, died July 18, 1958, in Gaston County,
North Carolina. Her son, Robert Crawford, Jr., died the same date in Gaston
County, North Carolina. Perhaps, they died in an automobile accident. The
main highway from Cleveland County to Charlotte runs through Gaston County.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for M. ORR CRAWFORD:
RESUME: Married Edna Lattimore, daughter of William Aaron Lattimore and Mary
Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


ix. WILLIAM AARON LATTIMORE, b. 27 June 1895, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 19 September 1916.

Notes for WILLIAM AARON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Aaron (William) Lattimore was born June 27, 1895,
in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of William Aaron (William)
Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. He was the nineth of their eleven
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie
Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy
Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William
Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). He also had
an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

William Lattimore never married. He died on September 19, 1916.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


x. EUGENE BYNUM LATTIMORE, b. 18 June 1897, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. CHARLOTTE BEVERLY.

Notes for EUGENE BYNUM LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Eugene Bynum (Eugene) Lattimore was born June 18, 1897, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of William Aaron (William) Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott. He was the tenth of their eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie Louise (Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy Reinhardt (Roy), Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William Aaron, Eugene Bynum (Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel). He also had an adopted sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Eugene Lattimore married Charlotte J. Beverly, daughter of Thomas Jefferson Beverly and Ella Myra Oula, on December 24, 1936, in Cleveland County, North Carolina. They had one child: Beverly Eugene Lattimore, who was born on February 20, 1948, in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married Pamelia Knox on June 18, 1970.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for CHARLOTTE BEVERLY:
RESUME: Married Eugene Lattimore, son of William Aaron Lattimore and Mary
Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


xi. ETHEL ESTELLE LATTIMORE, b. 09 January 1900, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. PRESTON COOK.

Notes for ETHEL ESTELLE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Ethel Estelle (Ethel) Lattimore was born January 9, 1900, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Aaron (William) Lattimore
and Mary Donoho Elliott. She was the youngest of their eleven children:
Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie Louise (Epsie),
Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy Reinhard (Roy),
Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William Aaron, Eugene Bynum
(Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel) Lattimore. She also had an adopted
sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Ethel Lattimore married Preston Newton Cook, son of Eli J. Cook and Lottie May
Gilbert, on January 2, 1921, in Cleveland County, North Carolina. They had
had one child: Preston Newton Cook, Jr., who was born January 21, 1926, in
Daytonia Beach, Florida.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for PRESTON COOK:
RESUME: Married Ethel Lattimore, daughter of William Aaron Lattimore and Mary
Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


xii. DOROTHY BEATRICE KISER LATTIMORE, b. 27 May 1915, Gaston County, North Carolina; d. 1950; m. BROUGHTON MCGINNIS.

Notes for DOROTHY BEATRICE KISER LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Dorothy Beatrice (Dorothy) Kiser Lattimore, the adopted daughter of
William Aaron (William) Lattimore and Mary Donoho Elliott, was born May 27,
1915, in Gaston County, North Carolina. Her adopted parents already had
eleven children: Joseph Andrew (Andrew), Elizabeth Lee (Lizzie), Epsie Louise
(Epsie), Sarah Cassandra (Sarah), George Festus (George), Roy Reinhard (Roy),
Samuel Custer (Samuel), Mary Edna (Edna), William Aaron, Eugene Bynum
(Eugene), and Ethel Estelle (Ethel) Lattimore. She also had an adopted
sister, Dorothy Beatrice Kiser.

Dorothy Lattimore married Broughton McGinnis, son of James W. McGinnis and
Margaret Humphries, on April 16, 1933, in Gaffney, South Carolina. They had
three children: Frances Hildegarde, Kathryn M., and Sandra A. McGinnis.

Dorothy Lattimore died in 1950. Her husband, who was born August 27, 1914, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, died January 7, 1950, in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for BROUGHTON MCGINNIS:
RESUME: Married Dorothy Lattimore, daughter of William Aaron Lattimore and
Mary Donoho Elliott. No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree drawn
by Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


25. GEORGE R.7 LATTIMORE (JOSEPH C.6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 29 April 1864 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 28 October 1942 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married DORCUS PACKARD Abt. 1890 in North Carolina, daughter of WILLIAM PACKARD and SARAH LATTIMORE. She was born 06 May 1866 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 08 November 1952 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for GEORGE R. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: George R. Lattimore was born April 29, 1864, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah
Robertson. He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A., John
Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink,
and Joseph Lane Lattimore. The first eight children are listed in order of
their birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink and Joseph
Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

George R. Lattimore married Dorcus Packard, and they had three children: Boyd
L., Vera. amd Ruby Lattimore.

George R. Lattimore died October 28, 1942, and his wife, who was born May 6,
1866, died November 8, 1952. Both are buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About GEORGE R. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for DORCUS PACKARD:
REMARKS: Dorcus Packard was born May 6, 1866, in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sally) Lattimore.
She was the eighth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William Legrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Know, and Minnie Packard.

Dorcus Packard married George R. Lattimore, son of Joseph C. (Big Joe)
Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson, and they had three children: Boyd L.,
Vera. amd Ruby Lattimore.

The William Packard and the Joseph Lattimore families lived in the same general
area, although on opposite side of the county line. Joseph Lattimore and
Sallie Lattimore were cousins. Sallie's sister Rachel married Walter
Lattimore, her sister Josephine married Grif Gold, and her sister Minnie
married Ben Gold. Nancy Gold married John L. Lattimore.

George R. Lattimore died October 28, 1942, and was buried in the Lattimore
Family Cemetery. Dorcas Packard died November 8, 1952, and was buried in the
Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About DORCUS PACKARD:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of GEORGE LATTIMORE and DORCUS PACKARD are:
40. i. BOYD L.8 LATTIMORE, b. 25 July 1894, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 09 August 1986, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
ii. VERA LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1896, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for VERA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Vera Lattimore was born about 1896 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of George R. Lattimore and Dorcus Packard. She was one
of three children: Boyd L., Vera, and Ruby Lattimore.

Vera Lattimore married Everett Spurling, son of Monroe Spurling and Catherine
Williams.

Most of the above is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins. John L. Lattimore, who knew Vera Lattimore, stated in May
1995 that Vera Lattimore married Everett Spurling, the brother of Essie
Spurling, who married Boyd L. Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iii. RUBY LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1896, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for RUBY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Ruby Lattimore was born about 1896 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of George R. Lattimore and Dorcus Packard. She was one
of three children: Boyd L., Vera, and Ruby Lattimore.

I have no data regarding Ruby Lattimore, except that she married Edward
Cline.

Most of the above is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


26. CHARLES B.7 LATTIMORE (DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 12 August 1848 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 05 January 1935 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married MARTHA JANE JACKSON. She was born Abt. 1840.

Notes for CHARLES B. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Charles B. Lattimore was born August 12, 1848, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Daniel Dobbins Lattimore and Mary F. Elliott. He was
the first of their five children: Charles B., Virginia, Jackson E., Susan
Louise (Susan), and Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore.

The Daniel Dobbins Lattimore family lived in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
which was cut from Rutherford County in 1841.

Charles B. Lattimore married Martha Jane Jackson on September 10, 1872, and
they had at least two children: Mary Nixon (Mamie) Lattimore, who married
Charles C. Whisnant, and Sallie P. Lattimore.

Charles Lattimore is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County. He was
32, his wife Martha J. was 33 his daughter Mary W was 4, and his daughter
Sallie P. was 2.

Charles Lattimore died January 5, 1935, in Cleveland County, and was buried in
the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, who was born March 20, 1847, in York
County, South Carolina, died March 2, 1928, in Cleveland County, and was buried
in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About CHARLES B. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MARTHA JANE JACKSON:
\REMARKS: Martha Jane Jackson married Charles Lattimore, son of Daniel Dobbins
Lattimore and Mary F. Elliott. They had at least one child, Mary Lattimore,
who married Charles C. Whisnant, and their daughter Fannie Whisnant, married
John Paxton Elliott, son of Thomas Forbis Elliott and Rebecca Belle Hoyle.
The Charles Lattimore family lived in Cleveland County, North Carolina, which
was cut from Rutherford County in 1841.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hensen. Additional data from John Paxton Elliott entry (#13506) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Child of CHARLES LATTIMORE and MARTHA JACKSON is:
41. i. MARY8 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1873, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

27. WALTER SLADE7 LATTIMORE (DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 21 July 1858 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 26 February 1924 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married RACHEL EMILINE PACKARD Abt. 1883 in North Carolina, daughter of WILLIAM PACKARD and SARAH LATTIMORE. She was born 31 May 1858 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 26 September 1941 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for WALTER SLADE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore was born July 21, 1858, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Dobbins Lattimore and Mary Forbis
(Mary) Elliott. He was the fifth of their five children: Charles B., Virginia,
Jackson E., Susan Louise (Susan), and Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore.

The Daniel Dobbins Lattimore family lived in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
which was cut from Rutherford County in 1841.

Walter Lattimore married Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard, daughter of William
Marion Packard and Sarah Carpenter Lattimore, about 1883, and they had six
children: Burgin M., Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy M., Daniel Dobbins
(Dobb), and Claudia Lattimore.

Walter Lattimore died February 26, 1924, in Cleveland County, and was buried
in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, who was born May 31, 1898, died
September 26, 1941, in Cleveland County, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About WALTER SLADE LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for RACHEL EMILINE PACKARD:
REMARKS: Rachel Emeline (Rachel) Packard was born May 31, 1858, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah
(Sallie) Lattimore. She was the fouth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary,
Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia,
James R., Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Rachel Packard married Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore, son of Daniel Dobbins
Lattimore and Mary Forbis (Mary) Elliott, about 1883, and they had six
children: Burgin M., Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy M., Daniel Dobbins
(Dobb), and Claudia Lattimore.

Rachel Packard died September 26, 1941, and Walter Lattimore, who was born July
21, 1858, died February 26, 1924. Both died in Cleveland County and were
buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins; from an August 1993 listing from the computerized "Elliott
History" prepared by James Robert Palmer of Columbia, South Carolina; and
from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About RACHEL EMILINE PACKARD:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of WALTER LATTIMORE and RACHEL PACKARD are:
42. i. BURGIN M.8 LATTIMORE, b. 25 November 1884, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 05 February 1947, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
43. ii. LEROY JACKSON LATTIMORE, b. 04 July 1886, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 31 May 1943.
44. iii. OLA MYRTLE LATTIMORE, b. 04 February 1888, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 30 March 1966.
iv. LUCY MATILDA LATTIMORE, b. 23 September 1889, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 24 November 1966, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for LUCY MATILDA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Lucy Matilda (Lucy) Lattimore was born September 23, 1889, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Walter Slade (Walter)
Lattimore and Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard. She was the fourth of their
six children: Burgin M., Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy M., Daniel
Dobbins (Dobb), and Claudia Lattimore.

Lucy, Dobb, and Claudia Lattimore were school teachers. At one time all three
taught at New House School.

Lucy Lattimore never married. She died November 24, 1996, and was buried in
the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About LUCY MATILDA LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

45. v. DANIEL DOBBIN LATTIMORE, b. 14 April 1891, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 07 October 1965, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
46. vi. CLAUDIA LATTIMORE, b. 07 July 1894, Cleveland County, North Carolina.


Generation No. 7

28. JOHN ZADOCK8 PACKARD (SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 07 December 1853 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 02 August 1892 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married SUSAN FRANCES ELLIOTT, daughter of ANDREW ELLIOTT and SARAH DOGGETT. She was born 23 October 1860 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 28 December 1918 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN ZADOCK PACKARD:
REMARKS: John Zadock Packard was born December 7, 1853, in Rutherford County,
North Carolina, the son of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sallie) Lattimore.
He was the oldest of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

John Z. Packard married Susan Frances (Fannie) Elliott, daughter of Andrew
Jackson Elliott and Sarah Ann Doggett.

A Forest City newspaper clipping, "Notes On Interesting Local Family Cemetery",
dated 6 Jan 1971, states John Z. Packard is buried in the Elliott Family
and gives the dates of birth and death.

Original data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About JOHN ZADOCK PACKARD:
Burial: Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for SUSAN FRANCES ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Susan Frances, "Fannie", Elliott was born October 23, 1860, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott and
Sarah Ann Doggett. She was the third of their eight children: Coleman
Doggett, Mary Donoho, Susan Frances, James Reinhart, Margaret Elizabeth, Sarah
Caroline, Dorcas Catherine, and Andrew Jackson Elliott.

Susan Frances Elliott married John Z. Packard, son of William Packard and
Sallie Lattimore.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hensen. Additional data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by
Mary Gordon Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.

A Forest City newspaper clipping, "Notes On Interesting Local Cemetery",
dated 6 Jan 1971, states she is buried in Elliott Cemetery.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


More About SUSAN FRANCES ELLIOTT:
Burial: Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of JOHN PACKARD and SUSAN ELLIOTT are:
i. SARAH9 PACKARD.

Notes for SARAH PACKARD:
RESUME: Granddaughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott. Married Davie Dodd. No data
except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott using
data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


ii. DORCUS PACKARD.

Notes for DORCUS PACKARD:
RESUME: Granddaughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott. Married Lawson Blanton. No
data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott
using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


iii. LILLIAN PACKARD.

Notes for LILLIAN PACKARD:
RESUME: Granddaughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott. Married William Whitaker.
No data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


iv. BUNA PACKARD.

Notes for BUNA PACKARD:
RESUME: Granddaughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott. Married Will McBrayer. No
data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott
using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


v. WILLIE PACKARD.

Notes for WILLIE PACKARD:
RESUME: Granddaughter of Andrew Jackson Elliott. Married Tom Stamey. No data
except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott using
data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


vi. JOHNYE PACKARD.

Notes for JOHNYE PACKARD:
RESUME: Grandson of Andrew Jackson Elliott. Married J. Datha Elliott. No
data except Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott
using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore.


29. RACHEL EMILINE8 PACKARD (SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 31 May 1858 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 26 September 1941 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married WALTER SLADE LATTIMORE Abt. 1883 in North Carolina, son of DANIEL LATTIMORE and MARY ELLIOTT. He was born 21 July 1858 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 26 February 1924 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for RACHEL EMILINE PACKARD:
REMARKS: Rachel Emeline (Rachel) Packard was born May 31, 1858, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah
(Sallie) Lattimore. She was the fouth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary,
Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia,
James R., Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Rachel Packard married Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore, son of Daniel Dobbins
Lattimore and Mary Forbis (Mary) Elliott, about 1883, and they had six
children: Burgin M., Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy M., Daniel Dobbins
(Dobb), and Claudia Lattimore.

Rachel Packard died September 26, 1941, and Walter Lattimore, who was born July
21, 1858, died February 26, 1924. Both died in Cleveland County and were
buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins; from an August 1993 listing from the computerized "Elliott
History" prepared by James Robert Palmer of Columbia, South Carolina; and
from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About RACHEL EMILINE PACKARD:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for WALTER SLADE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore was born July 21, 1858, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Dobbins Lattimore and Mary Forbis
(Mary) Elliott. He was the fifth of their five children: Charles B., Virginia,
Jackson E., Susan Louise (Susan), and Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore.

The Daniel Dobbins Lattimore family lived in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
which was cut from Rutherford County in 1841.

Walter Lattimore married Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard, daughter of William
Marion Packard and Sarah Carpenter Lattimore, about 1883, and they had six
children: Burgin M., Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy M., Daniel Dobbins
(Dobb), and Claudia Lattimore.

Walter Lattimore died February 26, 1924, in Cleveland County, and was buried
in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. His wife, who was born May 31, 1898, died
September 26, 1941, in Cleveland County, and was buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About WALTER SLADE LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children are listed above under (27) Walter Slade Lattimore.

30. JOSEPHINE8 PACKARD (SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1862 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 27 May 1890 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married GRIFFIN MILLER GOLD 07 November 1883 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, son of DANIEL GOLD and MARGARET JENKINS. He was born 12 December 1859 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 02 July 1929 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOSEPHINE PACKARD:
REMARKS: Rachel Emeline (Rachel) Packard was born May 31, 1858, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah
(Sallie) Lattimore. She was the fouth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary,
Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia,
James R., Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Josephine Packard married Dr. Griffin Miller (Griff) Gold, son of Daniel
Pleasant Gold and Margaret Jenkins. They had four children: Willie Mae, Bertha
Fannie, Thomas Byron (Tom), and Mary C. Gold. Josephine Packard died May 27,
1890, and was buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Dr. Gold lived in northwestern Cleveland County, a few miles east of the
Rutherford County line. He practiced medicine for forty-eight years in
Cleveland and Rutherford counties.

After Josephine Packard's death, Dr. Gold married Ola Frances, "Ottie", Mooney,
daughter of Issac Mooney and Mary Lucinda Peeler. There were three children
from the second marriage: Benjamin, "Ben"; Nancy Blanche, "Blanche"; and Lois
Floe, "Lois", Gold.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hansen. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins; from an August 1993 listing from the computerized "Elliott
History" prepared by James Robert Palmer of Columbia, South Carolina; and
from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


More About JOSEPHINE PACKARD:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for GRIFFIN MILLER GOLD:
REMARKS: Griffin Miller, "Griffin", Gold was born December 12, 1859, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Pleasant Gold and Margaret
Jenkins. He was the ninth of their ten children: Mary Parmelia, "Mary"; Nancy
Amirita; Martha Jane, "Martha"; Benjamin Jenkins, "Ben"; Frances Sarah,
"Frances"; Daniel Christopher, "Dan"; William Milton; Margaret Malindy;
Griffin Miller, "Griffin"; and Ann Emaline Gold. The Daniel Pleasant Gold
family lived in Cleveland County, North Carolina, which was cut from Lincoln and
Rutherford Counties in 1842.

Griffin attended medical college in Atlanta, Georgia, and Baltimore, Maryland.
He practiced in Rutherford and Cleveland counties for forty-eight years and was
a well liked and successful doctor. Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold remembers him as a
fairly large, white-haired, nice looking fellow who was jovial and had a kind
expression on his face.

On November 7, 1883, Dr. Griffin Gold married Josephine Packard, and they had
four children: Willie Mae; Bertha Fannie; Thomas Byron, "Tom"; and Mary C.
Gold.

On April 6, 1893, Dr. Griffin Gold married Ola Frances, "Ollie", Mauney,
daughter of Isaac Mauney and Mary Lucinda Peeler. They had three children:
Benjamin, "Ben"; Nancy Blanche, "Blanche"; and Lois Floe, "Lois", Gold. They
lived in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Original data from Mary Lucinda Peeler and Ottie Mauney entries (#1766 and
5936) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker.
Additional data from Part IV of "Three Mauney Families", by Bonnie Mauney
Summers (Mrs. F. R.), Kings Mountain, North Carolina, 1967. Additional data
from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore; Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold; and Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold
Family" and the "Daniel Gold and Frances Griffin Gold" entries in "The
Heritage Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan)
Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


More About GRIFFIN MILLER GOLD:
Burial: Sunset Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of JOSEPHINE PACKARD and GRIFFIN GOLD are:
47. i. WILLIE MAE9 GOLD, b. 1884, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
48. ii. BERTHA FANNIE GOLD, b. 1886, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
49. iii. THOMAS BYRON GOLD, b. 28 December 1887, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 1945, Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
50. iv. MARY C. GOLD, b. 1889, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

31. DORCUS8 PACKARD (SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 06 May 1866 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 08 November 1952 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married GEORGE R. LATTIMORE Abt. 1890 in North Carolina, son of JOSEPH LATTIMORE and LOUISA ROBERTSON. He was born 29 April 1864 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 28 October 1942 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DORCUS PACKARD:
REMARKS: Dorcus Packard was born May 6, 1866, in Rutherford County, North
Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah (Sally) Lattimore.
She was the eighth of thirteen children: John Zadock, Mary, Martha (Tump),
Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William Legrande (Lee), Dorcus, Julia, James R.,
Julius, Know, and Minnie Packard.

Dorcus Packard married George R. Lattimore, son of Joseph C. (Big Joe)
Lattimore and Louise Hannah Robertson, and they had three children: Boyd L.,
Vera. amd Ruby Lattimore.

The William Packard and the Joseph Lattimore families lived in the same general
area, although on opposite side of the county line. Joseph Lattimore and
Sallie Lattimore were cousins. Sallie's sister Rachel married Walter
Lattimore, her sister Josephine married Grif Gold, and her sister Minnie
married Ben Gold. Nancy Gold married John L. Lattimore.

George R. Lattimore died October 28, 1942, and was buried in the Lattimore
Family Cemetery. Dorcas Packard died November 8, 1952, and was buried in the
Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About DORCUS PACKARD:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for GEORGE R. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: George R. Lattimore was born April 29, 1864, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Joseph C. (Big Joe) Lattimore and Louise Hannah
Robertson. He was one of ten children: Jessie R., Samuel, Julius A., John
Bynum, Sarah Caroline (Caroline), Cicero D., William Aaron, George R., Pink,
and Joseph Lane Lattimore. The first eight children are listed in order of
their birth dates. I have no data regarding the birth dates for Pink and Joseph
Lane Lattimore.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841. Joseph
C. Lattimore is listed in the Cleveland County tax lists for 1850. He owned
325 acres of land valued at $650.

George R. Lattimore married Dorcus Packard, and they had three children: Boyd
L., Vera. amd Ruby Lattimore.

George R. Lattimore died October 28, 1942, and his wife, who was born May 6,
1866, died November 8, 1952. Both are buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Initial data from Andrew Jackson Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott using data compiled by Mrs. Charlotte B. Lattimore. Additional data
from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About GEORGE R. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children are listed above under (25) George R. Lattimore.

32. JULIA (JULIE)8 PACKARD (SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 12 October 1867 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina, and died 27 April 1948. She married ROBERT LAFAYETTE ELLIOTT, son of JOHN ELLIOTT and SARAH BEAM. He was born 21 May 1866 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 21 October 1925 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JULIA (JULIE) PACKARD:
REMARKS: Julia (Julie) Packard was born October 12, 1867, in Rutherford
County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Marion Packard and Sarah
(Sallie) Lattimore. She was the nineth of thirteen children: John Zadock,
Mary, Martha (Tump), Rachel, Eliza, Josephine, William LeGrande (Lee), Dorcus,
Julia, James R., Julius, Know, and Minnie.

Cleveland County was cut from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties in 1841, and
Shelby became the County Seat in 1842. The Lattimore farm was on Hinton's Creek
near the boundary between Cleveland and Rutherford Counties. The Packard
family lived a few miles to the southwest, in eastern Rutherford County.

Julia Packard married Robert Lafayette (Robert) Elliott, son of John Paxton
Elliott and Sarah (Sallie) Beam. She was Robert Elliott's second wife. He had
one child, Erie Elliott, from his marriage to Jennie Montgomery. Julia
Packard and Robert Elliott had one child, Foster Elliott.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


Notes for ROBERT LAFAYETTE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Robert Lafayette Elliott, "Robert", was born May 21, 1866, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of John Paxton Elliott and Sarah
"Sallie" Beam. He was the youngest of their ten children: Christopher Beam,
Mary Donoho, Margaret Gordon, Thomas Forbis, Oliver Beam, Ann Elizabeth, Sarah Susan, John Daniel, Andrew Jackson, and Robert Lafayette Elliott.

About 1884, Robert Elliott went to Texas, where he worked on the railroad, building and repairing water tanks. In 1890, he married Jennie Montgomery, daughter of John G. Montgomery and Ann Stockton, who had moved to Texas from Mississippi with Stephen F. Austin's original colony of 300 settlers in 1824. Robert Elliott and Jennie Montgomery had one child, Erie Elliott. Jennie died when Erie was seventeen months old, and Robert Elliott returned to Cleveland County and lived with his brother Tommy's family. Tommy's wife, Belle, took care of Erie, and Robert worked in the tannery.

Later, Robert married Julie Packard, and they bought a farm and built a house on land adjoining the Thomas Elliott property. Robert and Julie had one child, Foster Elliott.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from "The Children Of John Paxton and Sarah Beam Elliott" entry in "The Heritage Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mary Gordon Elliott.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 7/94.


Child of JULIA PACKARD and ROBERT ELLIOTT is:
i. FOSTER9 ELLIOTT, b. 04 August 1896; d. 07 January 1936; m. LOIS FLOE GOLD, Abt. 1920; b. 1899, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for FOSTER ELLIOTT:
RESUME: Grandson of John Paxton Elliott and Sarah (Sallie) Beam. Son of
Robert Lafayette Elliott and Julie Packard. Original data from John Paxton
Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data provided
by Mary Gordon Elliott.


Notes for LOIS FLOE GOLD:
REMARKS: Lois Floe, "Floe", Gold was born in 1899, near Lawndale, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Dr. Griffin Miller, "Griff",
Gold and Ola Frances, "Ollie", Mauney. She was the second of their three
children: Benjamin, "Ben"; Nancy Blanche, "Blanche"; and Lois Floe, "Lois",
Gold. This was her father's second marriage. She had three step sisters and
one step brother from her father's marriage to Josephine Packard: Willie Mae;
Bertha Fannie; Thomas Byron, "Tom"; and Mary C. Gold.

Lois Gold married Foster Elliott. They had two infants.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


33. JOHN DANIEL8 LATTIMORE (JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 14 September 1870 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 08 October 1943 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married VERTIE IRENE MOONEY 14 November 1895 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, daughter of ISAAC MOONEY and MARY PEELER. She was born 17 February 1874 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 31 January 1950 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN DANIEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore was born September 14, 1870, the son of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold, He was the oldest of their seven children, four boys and three girls, born in the following order: John Daniel, "John Daniel"; Lula; Margaret Catherine; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Mathew Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida, "Sallie"; and Joe Clarence, "Joe". Sallie died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

John Daniel was born and raised on his father's farm on Hinton's Creek, northwest of Polkville, North Carolina. He married Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mauney, daughter of Issac Mauney and Mary Lucinda, "Mary", Peeler on November 14, 1895. They had ten children, eight girls and two boys, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee; Fay Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. They also had an infant who was born on Feburary 6, 1909, and died on the same day. Louise and Johnie Johnny were twins.

His obituary states that John Daniel Lattimore was a prominent farmer of the Polkville section of Cleveland County, a member of the Big Springs Baptist Church, and a deacon for 27 years. Like most of the farmers of his time and area, he had two or three mules for farming, two or three cows for milk, a flock of chickens, and some hogs. He had a garden and a few fruit (apple and pear) trees. Cotton was his cash crop, but he also grew corn and some grain for feed. The farm buildings included a cotton shed, corn crip, blacksmith shop, chicken house, smoke house, and barn that he built by himself, except for some help in erecting the beams for the roof.

John Daniel died on October 8, 1943. Services were conducted at the Big Springs Baptist Church, and he was buried on October 9, 1943, in the Lattimore Family Cemetery on Five Points Road, north of Hinton's Creek, on part of the old John Lattimore farm northwest of Polkville. His wife, Vertie Mooney Lattimore, died on January 31, 1950, and was buried next to his husband in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Jenkins Lattimore, and from conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About JOHN DANIEL LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for VERTIE IRENE MOONEY:
REMARKS: Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mooney was born February 17, 1874, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Isaac Mooney and Mary Lucinda Peeler. She was one of their seven children: Horace O.; Ora Frances, "Ottie"; Vertie Irene, "Vertie"; Peter Marvin, "Marvin"; Lealon; Blanche; and Thomas Burton Mooney. I am not certain of the order in which they were born.

Her father was a farmer, who lived near Lawndale, North Carolina. He served in the Civil War as a Private, Company F, 34th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry. He was wounded at Chancellorsville on September 17, 1861. Her great great grandfather, Jacob Muni, Mooney, or Mauney, Senior, immigrated from Germany in 1750.

Isaac Mooney is listed in the 1880 Census for Cleveland County, North Carolina. His household consisted of Isaac Mooney, age 39; Mary, age 33; Horace, age 12; Frances (f), age 8; Verty, age 6; and Marrin (Marvin), age 2.

On November 14, 1895, Vertie Mooney married John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore, son of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. They had nine children, seven girls and two boys, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. They also had an infant that was born on February 6, 1909, and died the same day. Louise and Johnie were twins.

The 1900 Cleveland County Census has an entry for John D. Lattimore. He was a farmer who was born in September 1870, he was 29 years old, and had been married for 5 years. The typed version indicates that his wife's name was "Verdie", that she was born in April 1874, that she was 26 years old, that she had been married for 5 years, and that she had 2 children, who were still living. The two children were Lula, who was born in January 1896, and Macy, who was born in October 1899.

Her mother, Mary Lucinda Peeler, was a descendant of pioneer Peter Hoyle. The data in her entry (#1766) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker, is sketchy. The "I. Vertie Mauney" entry (#5937) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants" states she married "Donald" Lattimore and lives near Lattimore, North Carolina. In fact, she married "John Daniel" Lattimore and lived near Polkville.

The Isaac Mauney entry in "Three Mauney Families", by Bonnie Mauney Summers, gives Vertie Mauney's date of birth and death and lists John Daniel Lattimore as her husband. The birth year, "1884", is an error. If true, she would have been only 11 years old when she married in 1895.

An "Applicants Work Sheet" for the "United Daughters of the Confederacy" prepared by Barbara Louise Beaman Higgs, lists her birth date as February 17, 1874, date of marriage as November 14, 1895; and date of death as January 31, 1950. This data is considered extremely reliable because Barbara Beaman had access to the most reliable family data, including her mother Lousie Lattimore Beaman (Vertie Mooney's daughter).

An undated newspaper clipping reported that funeral services were scheduled for the Big Springs Baptist church near Hollis and that she was to be buried in the Lattimore family cemetery near Polkville. I have visited the Lattimore Cemetery and Vertie Mooney and her husband, John Daniel Lattimore, are buried there. The name on her marker is "Vertie Mooney Lattimore". I also visited the Mooney Family Cemetery, and found that her father's name is spelled "Mooney" on his grave marker; however, her brother's name is spelled "Mauney".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About VERTIE IRENE MOONEY:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of JOHN LATTIMORE and VERTIE MOONEY are:
51. i. LULA9 LATTIMORE, b. 09 January 1897, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 02 December 1963, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma.
ii. MACIE LATTIMORE, b. 02 October 1899, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 23 July 1990, Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. HUGH P. COVINGTON, 01 August 1928, North Carolina; b. 04 September 1887, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1965, Polkville, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for MACIE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Macie Lattimore was born October 2, 1899, on her father's farm near Polkville, North Carolina, the daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mooney. She was the second of their nine children, seven girls and two boys, born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee, "Clara"; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnie were twins. Clara died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Macie grew up on her father's farm, attended local schools, and became a school teacher. She married Hugh B. Covington, who was also a school teacher. They had no children.

They taught school at Kings Mountain, North Carolina, for many years, where Macie taught first grade while Hugh was the principal. They maintained their home in Polkville while they were teaching, and they lived in Polkville after their retirment in 1963.

Macie died on July 23, 1990. She and her husband are buried in the Polkville Methodist Church cemetery.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About MACIE LATTIMORE:
Burial: Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for HUGH P. COVINGTON:
REMARKS: Hugh P. Covington, "Hugh", was born September 4, 1887. I have no
data regarding his family. However, there are a number of Covingtons in
the Polkville section of Cleveland County.

Hugh married Macie Lattimore, daughter of John Daniel Lattimore, "John Daniel",
and Vertie Irene Mauney Lattimore, "Vertie", on August 1, 1928. They had no
children. Hugh was a school teacher, and Macie was also a school teacher.
They taught school at Kings Mountain, North Carolina, for many years, where
Macie taught first grade, and Hugh was the principal.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 8/93.


More About HUGH P. COVINGTON:
Burial: Polkville, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina

iii. CLARA FEE LATTIMORE, b. 12 January 1902, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 10 August 1902, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CLARA FEE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Clara Fee, "Clara", Lattimore, born January 12, 1902, on her father's farm near Polkville, North Carolina, was the daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mooney. She was the third of their nine children, seven girls and two boys, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee, "Clara"; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnie were twins. Clara died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Clara died on August 10, 1902, when she was almost ten months old. She is buried in the Lattimore family cemetery near Polkville, North Carolina.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About CLARA FEE LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

iv. FAYE RHEA LATTIMORE, b. 22 August 1903, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 15 January 1994, Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, North Carolina; m. JOSEPH D. LEATHERMAN, 22 July 1934, North Carolina; b. Abt. 1903; d. 04 March 1978, Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina.

Notes for FAYE RHEA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Faye Rhea, "Rhea", Lattimore was born on August 22, 1903, on her father's farm near Polkville, North Carolina, the daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mauney. She was
the fourth of their nine children, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee, "Clara"; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnie were twins. Clara died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Rhea and her older sisters attended Elliott's School, a one-room school west of Polkville, through the seventh grade. She then attended Piedmont High School, a private boarding school just outside of Lawndale. She transferred to Boiling Springs High School, the Baptist boarding school in Boiling Springs.

After high school, Rhea worked at Stamey's Store, in Fallston. Stamey's sold everything from hardware and farm equipment, to groceries and clothing. Rhea was in charge of the ladies department.

Rhea married Joseph D., "Joe", Leatherman on July 22, 1934. They had no children. They both worked in the insurance business in Lenoir, North
Carolina. Rhea was a good salesperson, selling more than Joe.

Joe died March 4, 1978, and was buried in Lenoir, North Carolina. After his death, Rhea went to live in the Baptist Retirement Home in Asheville, North Carolina. In her later years she was transferred to the Baptist Retirement Home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Rhea died January 15, 1994, and she was buried with her husband in Lenoir, North Carolina.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from Louise Lattimore Beaman, her sister, and conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About FAYE RHEA LATTIMORE:
Burial: 22 January 1994, Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina

Notes for JOSEPH D. LEATHERMAN:
REMARKS: On July 22, 1934, Joseph D., "Joe", Leatherman married Faye Rhea,
"Rhea", Lattimore, daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie
Irene, "Vertie", Mauney. They had no Children.

I don't know when or where Joe Leatherman was born, the names of his parents,
or whether he had any brothers or sisters.

According to Johnie Lattimore, his brother-in-law, Joe Leatherman was from
Lincoln County, North Carolina, and he met Rhea while she was working at
Stamey's store in Falston, North Carolina. Falston is in eastern Cleveland
County, about 15 miles west of Lincolnton, the county seat of Lincoln County.

Joe Leatherman and his wife were in the insurance business in Lenoir, North
North Carolina. Joe died March 4, 1978. Rhea died January 15, 1994. Both are
buried in Lenoir, North Carolina.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from Louise Lattimore
Beaman and from conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About JOSEPH D. LEATHERMAN:
Burial: Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina

52. v. MARY NANCY LATTIMORE, b. 07 August 1906, Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 1992, Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, North Carolina.
vi. LATTIMORE, b. 06 February 1909, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 06 February 1909, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: The infant son of John Daniel Lattimore and Vertie Mooney Lattimore is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. The grave marker indicates that he was born on February 6, 1909, and that he died the same day. He is buried near his mother, father, and sister (Clara Fee).

His birth and death are also recorded in the family record.

Data is from personal observation of grave marker at the Lattimore Cemetery in July 1995 and inspection of the family record in September 1995.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 9/95.


More About LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

53. vii. ORA BLANCHE LATTIMORE, b. 22 May 1910, Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
54. viii. SARAH LOUISE LATTIMORE, b. 02 May 1913, Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
55. ix. JOHN L. LATTIMORE, b. 02 May 1913, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 12 November 1999, Cleveland County, North Carolian.
x. FRANK CARSON LATTIMORE, b. 30 October 1915, Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 18 December 1992, Rutherfordton, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. PAULINE GRIGG, 15 February 1951, North Carolina; b. 29 November 1923.

Notes for FRANK CARSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore was born on October 30, 1915, on his father's farm near Polkville, North Carolina, the son of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mauney. He was the youngest of their nine children, seven girls and two boys, born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnny"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnny were twins. Clara died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Frank married Pauline Grigg on 11 Jan 1968. They owned and lived on the John Daniel Lattimore farm on Five Points Road, south of Hinton's Creek, near Polkville, North Carolina. They had no children. Frank worked in the textile mills until his retirement.

The following is from a newspaper clipping provided by Mary Gordon Elliott:

"Polkville -- Frank Carson Lattimore, 77, of 3957 Five Points Road, died Friday, Dec. 18, 1992, at White Oak Manor in Rutherfordton. He was retired from Cleveland Mills and was a farmer. He was a member of Big Springs Baptist Church and a member of the church brotherhood and Sunday school.

His parents, the late J.D. Lattimore and the late Vertie Mauney Lattimore, preceded him in death. Surviving are his wife, Pauline Grigg Lattimore of the home; a brother, Johnny Lattimore of Polkville; three sisters, Rhea Leatherman of Winston-Salem, Blanche Carpenter of Concord, and Louise Beaman of Greensboro.

Services will be conducted by the Rev. Phil Bailey Sunday at 2 p.m. at Big Springs Baptist Church. The body will lie in state from 1:30-2 p.m. Burial will be in the Lattimore family cemetery. The family will receive friends today from 7-8:30 p.m. at Stamey's Funeral Home. Memorials may be made to Big Springs Baptist Church, Route 1, Ellenboro, 28040."

Frank had been in poor health for several years and had been living at White Oak Manor, a nursing home, for several years.

Origina data from "Sketch of John L. Lattimore", dated 11 Jan 1968, by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, his sister. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


More About FRANK CARSON LATTIMORE:
Burial: 20 December 1992, Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for PAULINE GRIGG:
REMARKS: Pauline Griggs married Frank Carson Lattimore, son of John Daniel
Lattimore and Vertie Mauney.


34. LULA8 LATTIMORE (JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 13 February 1872 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married (1) T. A. DIXON 25 January 1894 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He was born Abt. 1870, and died Abt. 1900 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married (2) C. A. HAMRICK 15 December 1904 in North Carolina. He was born Abt. 1870 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for LULA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Lula Lattimore was born February 13, 1872, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. She was one of their seven children: John Daniel, "John Daniel"; Lula; Margaret Catherine; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Matt Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida, "Sallie"; and Joe Clarence, "Joe". Sallie died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Lula Lattimore was born and raised on her father's farm on Hinton's Creek, northwest of Polkville, North Carolina. On January 25, 1894, she married T. A. Dixon. They had three children: Ila Maude, "Ila"; Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt"; and Vera Catherine, "Vera", Dixon. After T. A. Dixon died, Lula married C. A. Hamrick December 15, 1904, and they had one child: Clara Etta Hamrick, who died in infancy.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for T. A. DIXON:
RESUME: Son-in-law of John L. Lattimore and Nancy Gold.

REMARKS: On January 25, 1894, T. A. Dixon married Lula Lattimore, daughter of
John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. They had three
children: Ila Maude, "Ila"; Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt"; and Vera Catherine, "Vera",
Dixon. After T. A. Dixon died, Lula married C. A. Hamrick December 15, 1904,
and they had one child: Clara Etta Hamrick, who died in infancy.

I don't know when or where T. A. Dixon was born, the names of his parents, or
whether he had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for C. A. HAMRICK:
REMARKS: On December 15, 1904, C. A. Hamrick married Lula Lattimore, daughter
of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. They had one
child, Clara Etta Hamrick, who died in infancy.

Lula Lattimore had three children from her first husband, T. A. Dixon: Ila
Maude, "Ila"; Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt"; and Vera Catherine, "Vera", Dixon.

I don't know when or where C. A. Hamrick was born, the names of his parents, or
whether he had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Children of LULA LATTIMORE and T. DIXON are:
56. i. ILA MAUDE9 DIXON, b. December 1894, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1960, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
ii. HOYT CARSON DIXON, b. March 1896, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 1961, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for HOYT CARSON DIXON:
REMARKS: Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt", Dixon was born in March 1896, the son of T. A.
Dixon and Lula Lattimore. He was one of three children: Ila Maude, "Ila";
Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt"; and Vera Catherine, "Vera", Dixon.

Hoyt Dixon graduated from Southern Dental College in Atlanta, Georgia, and
served as a dentist in Shelby, North Carolina, for many years. He was a
bachelor and died in 1961.

Data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss
Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


iii. VERA CATHERINE DIXON, b. 09 December 1898, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for VERA CATHERINE DIXON:
REMARKS: Vera Catherine, "Vera", Dixon was born in December 9, 1898, the
daughter of T. A. Dixon and Lula Lattimore. She was one of three children: Ila
Maude, "Ila"; Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt"; and Vera Catherine, "Vera", Dixon.

Vera Dixon graduated from Meredith College, Raleigh, North Carolina; taught
history at Thomasville High School for over 25 years, and worked off a Master's
Degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She lived in
Shelby, North Carolina, after her retirement.
Data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss
Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Child of LULA LATTIMORE and C. HAMRICK is:
iv. CLARA ETTA9 HAMRICK, b. Abt. 1906, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CLARA ETTA HAMRICK:
REMARKS: Clara Etta Hamrick was the daughter of C. A. Hamrick and Lula
Lattimore. She was their only child, and she died in infancy.

Lula Lattimore had three children from her first husband, T. A. Dixon: Ila
Maude, "Ila"; Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt"; and Vera Catherine, "Vera", Dixon.

I don't know when Clara Etta Hamrick was born or when she died.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


35. MARGARET CATHERINE8 LATTIMORE (JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 24 December 1873 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married FRANK CABANISS 24 December 1896 in North Carolina, son of MONTCALM CABANISS and ELIZABETH ELLIOTT. He was born 1865 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 1939.

Notes for MARGARET CATHERINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Margaret Catherine, "Katie", Lattimore was born December 24, 1873, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. She was one of their seven children: John Daniel, "John Daniel"; Lula; Margaret Catherine, "Katie"; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Matt Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida, "Sallie"; and Joe Clarence, "Joe". Sallie died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Katie Lattimore was born and raised on her father's farm on Hinton's Creek, northwest of Polkville, North Carolina. On December 24, 1896, she married Frank Cabiness. They had six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L., Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".
Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for FRANK CABANISS:
REMARKS: Frank Cabaniss was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the
son of Montcalm Cabaniss and Elizabeth Elliott. He was the ninth of their
nine children: Willie Minor; Essley E.; William A.; Joe T.; Parmelia Jane;
Charles; Thomas Poole; Mary Elizabeth; and Frank Cabaniss.

I am not sure when he was born. The entry in "The Heritage Of Cleveland
County: Volume I - 1892", says he was born in 1860. However, this conflicts
with other data in the entry. If he was born in 1860, he would be the twin of
his brother Thomas Poole, who was born in 1860. If he was born in 1860, he
would not be younger than his sister Mary Elizabeth, who was born in 1863. I
have assumed that he was in fact the youngest and that he was born in 1865.

On December 24, 1896, Frank Cabaniss married Margaret Catherine, "Katie",
Lattimore, the daughter of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita,
"Nancy", Gold. They had six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L.,
Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from "The Cabaniss Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", which was written by Mrs. Robert
Hawkins.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 7/94.


Children of MARGARET LATTIMORE and FRANK CABANISS are:
i. ALMA9 CABINESS, b. 03 October 1897, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for ALMA CABINESS:
REMARKS: Alma Cabiness was born October 3, 1897, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Katie",
Lattimore. She was one of their six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L.,
Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabaniss.

Alma Cabiness was still single in 1968.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel
Lattimore.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


ii. FRAY MILDRED CABINESS, b. 05 June 1899, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. February 1930, North Carolina.

Notes for FRAY MILDRED CABINESS:
REMARKS: Fray Mildred Cabiness was born June 5, 1899, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Katie",
Lattimore. She was one of their six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L.,
Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

Fray Mildred Cabiness died in February 1930.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel
Lattimore.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


57. iii. JOHNNIE L. CABINESS, b. 30 April 1904, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
58. iv. ATHEL FRANKLIN CABINESS, b. 26 June 1907, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
59. v. GEORGE GOLD CABINESS, b. 19 July 1909, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
60. vi. JAMES EVERETTE CABINESS, b. 14 September 1912, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

36. SAMUEL CARSON8 LATTIMORE (JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 28 January 1876 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 01 December 1935 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT 12 September 1900, daughter of THOMAS ELLIOTT and REBECCA HOYLE. She was born 17 July 1882 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 31 December 1965 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SAMUEL CARSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Samuel Carson, "Sam", Lattimore was born January 28, 1876, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. He was one of their seven children: John Daniel, "John Daniel"; Lula; Margaret Catherine, "Katie"; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Matt Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida, "Sallie"; and Joe Clarence, "Joe". Sallie died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Sam Lattimore grew up on his father's farm. On September 12, 1900, he married Mary Forbis, "Mary", Elliott, daughter of Thomas Forbis, "Tommy", Elliott and Rebecca Belle, "Belle", Hoyle. They had four children: Thomas Elliott, "Tom"; twin son and daughter, who died the same day they were born; and John Carson Lattimore, who died when he was two years old.

Their oldest son, Tom Lattimore, graduated from North Carolina State College at Raleigh in the class of 1924, married Margaret Nichols, and held a textile position in Kershaw, South Carolina, until his death in July 1931. Tom and Margaret had one child, Mary Jean Lattimore, who married Ray Floyd. Mary Jean enherited the Sam Lattimore farm from her grandmother, remodeled and modernized the old house, and sold several acres to her son Alston Ray, "Al", Floyd, Jr., and his wife for their new home.

On April 30, 1932, Samuel Lattimore sold a tract of land containing nine-tenths acres, more or less, which includes the old Lattimore famility cemetery, to Frank Lattimore, son of John Daniel Lattimore, Trustee for the Lattimore Burying Ground Association, and his Succeors, for One Dollar and other valuable consideration. The deed is recorded in the Office of Register of Deeds of Cleveland County, North Carolina, Book 4-C, page 309.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from "Peiter Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; a "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, one of his granddaughters, dated 11 Jan 1968; an unpublished paper, "The Lattimore Family in Cleveland County, North Carolina", by P. Cleveland Gardner, dated August 12, 1939, and conversations with descendants of Thomas Forbes Elliott and John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


More About SAMUEL CARSON LATTIMORE:
Burial: Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Mary Forbis, "Mary", Elliott was born on July 17, 1882, on her father's farm in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Thomas Forbis, "Tommy", Elliott and Rebecca Bell, "Bell", Hoyle. She was the third of their eleven children, who were born in the following order: Susan Ola, "Susan"; Sarah Tressia, "Sally"; Mary Forbis, "Mary"; Margaret Gordon, "Mag"; Julia Ann, "Julia"; Alice Hoyle, "Alice"; John Paxton, "John"; William Christopher, "William"; Florence Belle, "Florence"; Virginia Wells, "Ginny"; and Rebecca Belle, "Belle".

On January 17, 1904, Mary's mother died after giving birth to Belle. In 1908, four years later, her father married Carrie Withrow, daughter of Jason Withrow and Lou Sweezy. Mary has a half-brother, Valentine Jason Elliott, "Val", from her father's second marriage.

On September 12, 1900, Mary married Samuel Carson, "Sam", Lattimore, son of John L. Lattimore and Nancy Gold. They had four children: Thomas Elliott, "Tom"; twin son and daughter who died the same day they were born; and John Carson, "John", Lattimore. John died when he was three years old.

Tom graduated from North Carolina State College at Raleigh, married Margaret Nichols, and had one child: Mary Jean Lattimore. Tom died on July 7, 1931, his widow remarried. Although Mary Jean lived with her mother and stepfather in Polkville, she lived near her grandmother. and they came very close.

Sam Lattimore was a farmer. Sam and Mary lived on their farm near Polkville, which had been in the Lattimore family for over 150 years. After Sam died on December 1, 1935, Mary continued to live on the farm. After her marriage to Ray Floyd, Mary Jean and her husband lived with her grandmother and Ray assumed responsibility for running the farm. Mary Jean inherited the farm after her grandmother's death.

Mary grew up on her father's farm, which was in Number 8 township, near Polkville, about 12 miles northwest of Shelby, the county seat. She had many relatives in the area, including the descendants of Martin Elliott, who fought in the Revolution and moved to North Carolina from Virginia in 1806, and his son, John Crenshaw Elliott, Mary's great grandfather, who purchased 1300 acres on Hinton's Creek in 1809, in what was then Rutherford County. After John Crenshaw Elliott died, his wife deeded the community an acre for the school and an acre for the church.

According to Ola Elliott Bowman, Mary Elliott Lattimore (her aunt) died from cancer of the digestive tract. According to her grave marker in the Lattimore Family cemetery, she died on December 31, 1965.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from Mary Forbis Elliott entry (#13502) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Macie Lattimore Covington; from conversations with descendents of Thomas Forbes Elliott; and from visits to the Elliott Family Cemetery.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 6/01.

More About MARY FORBIS ELLIOTT:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of SAMUEL LATTIMORE and MARY ELLIOTT are:
61. i. THOMAS ELLIOTT9 LATTIMORE, b. 28 June 1901, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 07 July 1931, North Carolina.
ii. NONE LATTIMORE, b. 01 June 1902, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 01 June 1902, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for NONE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: A twin son and a twin daughter were born June 1, 1902, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, to Samuel Carson, "Sam", Lattimore and Mary Forbis, "Mary", Elliott. They died the same day. They were the second and third of their four children: Thomas Elliott, "Tom"; a twin son, a twin daughter, and John Carson, "John", Lattimore. John died when he was three years old. There are no grave markers in the Lattimore Family Cemetery for the twins born on June 1, 1902, or for the son who died September 21, 1908.

Data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Macie Lattimore Covington.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 6/01.

iii. JOHN CARSON LATTIMORE, b. 09 October 1905, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 21 September 1908, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN CARSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Carson Lattimore was born October 9, 1905, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Samuel Carson, "Sam", Lattimore and Mary Forbis, "Mary", Elliott. He was the fourth of their four children: Thomas Elliott, "Tom"; a twin son; a twin daughter; and John Carson Lattimore. The twins died the day they were born. John Carson died when he was three years old. There are no grave markers for John Carson or for the twins in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from Thomas Forbes Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from Mary Forbis Elliott entry (#13502) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Macie Lattimore Covington; and from conversations with descendents of Thomas Forbes Elliott and John L. Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 6/01.

37. MATT RANSOM8 LATTIMORE (JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 21 May 1878 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 17 July 1954 in Kingfisher, Oklahoma. He married MARGARET GORDON ELLIOTT 10 August 1904, daughter of THOMAS ELLIOTT and REBECCA HOYLE. She was born 24 September 1884 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 29 June 1974 in Kingfisher, Kingfisher Cnty, Oklahoma.

Notes for MATT RANSOM LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore was born May 21, 1878, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore
and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. He was one of their seven children: John
Daniel, "John Daniel"; Lula; Margaret Catherine, "Katie"; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Matt Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida, "Sallie"; and Joe Clarence, "Joe". Sallie died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Matt Lattimore grew up on his father's farm. On August 10, 1904, he married Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott, daughter of Thomas Forbis, "Tommy", Elliott and Rebecca Belle, "Belle", Hoyle. They had six children: Johnnie L., "Johnnie"; Nancy Belle; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas Susan, "Susie"; William Griffin, "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine, "Skeet", Lattimore.

On December 10, 1910, Matt Lattimore, his wife, and four children boarded the train and moved from North Carolina to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, where he farmed. Later, he moved to Osage County, Oklahoma. After selling the Osage County stock farm in 1928, he moved to Menard, Texas. In 1929, he leased a sheep ranch in Terrell County, Texas, 35 miles from Sanderson. In 1932, the family moved to Sanderson, where he worked for other ranchers, clearing cactus from pasture land, until he retired after World War II. He moved to Kingfisher, Oklahoma, in 1954, to be near his son, Dr. Frank C. Lattimore.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from "Peiter Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; a "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, one of his granddaughters, dated 11 Jan 1968; "Terrell County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo, Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L. Lattimore.

The following is from Vertie Belle Elliott's "notes", dated November 19, 1990, of conversations with her Mother and Father at Vian, Oklahoma, in 1954.

In response to questions regarding why the Lattimores and Elliotts moved to Oklahoma, her Father, William C. Elliott, stated, "It all began in 1909 when floods washed away all the crops and Uncle Matt and Aunt Mag Lattimore packed up lock, stock and barrell and headed West to Texas from North Carolina. They got to Crowders (a small town about 7 miles south of Gastonia, North Carolina) and met up with somebody by the name of Magness (Mag's sisters Alice and Florence married Bob and Judd Jones, and their mother was a Magness), who advised Uncle Matt to get farm land southwest of Oklahoma City. So they settled on the Johnson Ranch, 8 miles east of Minco. Vertie Belle's notes state that she did not know whether or not Uncle Matt owned the land. In August 1993, Aunt Belle, Mag's sister, said they didn't.

They left there about 1921 and went to Foraker (in Osage County, about 20 miles northwest of Pawhuska, the county seat). Vertie Belle remembers the Lattimore family stopping in Minco on their way to Texas.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


More About MATT RANSOM LATTIMORE:
Burial: Kingfisher, Oklahoma

Notes for MARGARET GORDON ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott was born on September 24, 1884, on her father's farm in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Thomas Forbis, "Tommy", Elliott and Rebecca Bell, "Bell", Hoyle. She was the fourth of their eleven children, who were born in the following order: Susan Ola, "Susan"; Sarah Tressia, "Sally"; Mary Forbis, "Mary"; Margaret Gordon, "Mag"; Julia Ann, "Julia"; Alice Hoyle, "Alice"; John Paxton, "John"; William Christopher, "William"; Florence Belle, "Florence"; Virginia Wells, "Ginny"; and Rebecca Belle, "Belle", Elliott.

On January 17, 1904, Mag's mother died after giving birth to Belle. In 1908, four years after her mother's death, her father married Carrie Withrow, daughter of Jason Withrow and Lou Sweezy. Mag had a half-brother, Valentine Jason Elliott, "Val", from her father's second marriage.

On August 10, 1904, Mag married Matt Ransom Lattimore, also of Cleveland County. They moved from North Carolina to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, in December 1910, where they farmed. Later they moved to Osage County, where they had a stock farm. In 1928, they moved to Terrell County, Texas, in 1928. After Matt retired, they moved to Kingfisher, Oklahoma, where their son Frank was a medical doctor. Mag died in Kingfisher on 29 Jun 1974, lacking three months of being 90 years of age.

Mag and Matt had six children, who were born in the following order: John L., "Johnny"; Nancy Belle, "Nancy"; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas Susan, "Susie"; William Griffin, "Griffin" or "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine, "Skeet", Lattimore. Four of the children were born in North Carolina. The other two were born in Oklahoma.

Mag grew up on her father's farm, which was in Number 8 township, near Polkville, about 12 miles northwest of Shelby, the county seat. She had many relatives in the area, including the descendants of Martin Elliott, who fought in the Revolution and moved to North Carolina from Virginia in 1806, and his son, John Crenshaw Elliott, Mag's great grandfather, who purchased 1300 acres on Hinton's Creek in 1809, in what was then Rutherford County.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from Margaret Gordon Elliott entry (#13503) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968; "Terrell County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo, Texas; from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L. Lattimore; and visits to the Elliott and Lattimore Family Cemeteries.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 7/95.


More About MARGARET GORDON ELLIOTT:
Burial: Kingfisher, Kingfisher Cnty, Oklahoma

Children of MATT LATTIMORE and MARGARET ELLIOTT are:
i. JOHN L.9 LATTIMORE II, b. 25 June 1905, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN L. LATTIMORE II:
REMARKS: Johnnie L., "Johnnie", Lattimore was born June 25, 1905, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and Margaret
Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. He was the first of their six children: Johnnie L.,
"Johnny"; Nancy Belle, "Nancy"; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas Susan, "Susie";
William Griffin, "Griffin" or "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine, "Skeet",
Lattimore. Four of the children were born in North Carolina. The other two
were born in Oklahoma.

The Matt Lattimore family moved to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, in
December 1910. Later they moved to Osage County, Oklahoma, where Matt
Lattimore had a stock farm. In 1928, the family moved to Terrell County,
Texas.

After graduating from high school, Johnnie ranched in Terrell County for three
years, then moved back to Oklahoma. He served in World War II. After the war,
he ranched near Pryor, Oklahoma, where he raised Black Angus cattle. He never
married.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Margaret Gordon Elliott entry (#13503) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch
of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven
Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968; "Terrell
County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San
Angelo, Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


ii. NANCY BELLE LATTIMORE, b. 09 December 1906, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. ROY BLAIR DOYLE; b. Abt. 1906.

Notes for NANCY BELLE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Nancy Belle, "Nancy", Lattimore was born December 9, 1906, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore
and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. She was the second of their six children:
Johnnie L.,"Johnny"; Nancy Belle, "Nancy"; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas
Susan, "Susie"; William Griffin, "Griffin" or "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine,
"Skeet", Lattimore. Four of the children were born in North Carolina. The
other two were born in Oklahoma.

The Matt Lattimore family moved to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, in
December 1910. Later they moved to Osage County, Oklahoma, where Matt
Lattimore had a stock farm. In 1928, the family moved to Terrell County,
Texas.

Nancy Lattimore taught school in Texas. She married Ray Blair Doyle, and they
lived in Monahans, Texas.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Margaret Gordon Elliott entry (#13503) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch
of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven
Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968; "Terrell
County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San
Angelo, Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Notes for ROY BLAIR DOYLE:
REMARKS: Roy Blair, "Roy", Doyle married Nancy Belle, "Nancy", Lattimore,
daughter of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott.
Nancy was a school teacher in Texas. I don't know whether they had any
children.

I don't know when or where Roy Doyle was born, the names of his parents, or
whether he had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife,
Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Terrell County Texas,
Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo,
Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


iii. FRANK CORNWELL LATTIMORE, b. 14 March 1908, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. LA VELLE WALKER, 03 December 1936, Oklahoma; b. Abt. 1908.

Notes for FRANK CORNWELL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Frank Cornwell, "Frank", Lattimore was born March 14, 1908, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and
Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. He was the third of their six children:
Johnnie L., "Johnny"; Nancy Belle, "Nancy"; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas
Susan, "Susie"; William Griffin, "Griffin" or "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine,
"Skeet", Lattimore. Four of the children were born in North Carolina. The
other two were born in Oklahoma.

The Matt Lattimore family moved to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, in
December 1910. Later they moved to Osage County, Oklahoma, where Matt
Lattimore had a stock farm. In 1928, the family moved to Terrell County,
Texas.

Frank Lattimore graduated from the University of Oklahoma Medical School and
practiced medicine in Kingfisher, Oklahoma, for over 40 years. He served as an
army doctor in the European Theater during World War II, and he wa one of the
founding fathers and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Community Hospital
in Kingfisher. He married La Velle Walker.

The following resume, dated August 15, 1983, was prepared by Frank C. Lattimore,
M.D., in response to a request by Kathleen Elliott Lambert and included in the
pamphlet prepared by Charlies Elliott for the "Annual Reunion of the Martin
Elliott Clan", Polkville, N.C., August 27, 1983.

"Frank Cornwell Lattimore was born near Polkville, North Carolina in 1908, to
Matt R. and Margaret Gordone Elliott Lattimore. He is one of six children.

Matt and "Mag" moved to Kingfisher, Oklahoma in 1954 from Sanderson, Texas to
make their home. My father passed away on July 27th of the same year at the
age of 76. My mother passed away on June 29, 1974, lacking three months of
being 90 years of age.

I am a namesake of Frank Cornwell. We visited in Shelby in 1956, and he gave
me a $5.00 gold piece which I still have and cherish.

The 6 children of the family are: John L. Lattimore, Pryor, Oklahoma; Nancy
Belle Lattimore Doyle, Monahans, Texas; I am the next in line - then Dorcas Sue
Lattimore, Plain, Texas; Margaret Catherine Lattimore Christopher, Wright City,
Oklahoma.

I was graduated from the Oklahoma School of Medicine in 1932. Following 2
years of internship and residency in the practive of rural medicine, I came to
Kingfisher, Oklahoma to practice. I have been here since with the exception of
42 months during the Second World War.

Kingfisher and Kingfisher County have always been especially good and kind to
me. I always tried to reciprocate.

I worked, with many others, to build the Kingfisher Community Hospital which
was completed in 1948. In 1952, with 2 other physicians, a clinic was built.

This is a quote from the local newspaper in 1974: HE FOUND TIME "Frank
Lattimore was recognized for his outstanding civic service in the Chamber of
Commerce and the development foundation at the Chamber's meeting last week.
The honor is well deserved and comes after a long period of continued service
(he was chamber president a number of years ago). Professional people often
find it difficult to be active in civic affairs but Dr. Lattimore, among
others, has demonstrated that where there is a will there is a way".

In 1956, we took mother and visited Aunt Florence and Uncle Jud Jones and the
other kin. Before we left, Aunt Mary Lattimore told us she had always promised
herself that the first of Matt and "Mag's" children to visit there would get
the old Lattimore clock. It is on our living room wall, still working, and is
a treasured antique.

I hope your reunion this year will be a special one for all of your.

Sincerely,

Frank C. Lattimore"

A picture of Dr. Frank and his wife, La Velle Lattimore, and the following item
in appeared in the same pamphlet.

"Dr. Lattimore Honored by Medical Associations

Frank C. Lattimore, M.D. was honored by the Oklahoma State Medical Association
with a lifetime membership at the Kingfisher County Medical Association's annual
meeting and party at the Timber Lodge Monday night.

A plaque was presented to Dr. Lattimore by Stephen R. Arthurs, M.D.,
president of the Kingfisher County Medical Association.

Dr. Lattimore has been a family doctor in Kingfisher since 1934. He
graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 1932, and after completing two
years of postgraduate work there, he came to Kingfisher on Aug. 20, 1934 -- his
first day of practice.

He's been here ever since, with the exception of 42 months he spent overseas
during the second world war.

"I retired on Nov. 1, 1977. If I could have a new lease on it, I would," he
said.

"Kingfisher is the most fantastic city I know of, " he said.

"When I told that to my wife, she said when I lived in Norman and in Oklahoma
City while I was going to school I just existed, but since I've move here to
Kingfisher I've really lived, " Dr. Lattimore said."

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Margaret Gordon Elliott entry (#13503) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch
of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven
Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968; "Terrell
County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San
Angelo, Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Notes for LA VELLE WALKER:
REMARKS: La Velle Walker married Frank Cornwell, "Frank", Lattimore, son
of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. They
lived in Kingfisher, Oklahoma. I don't know whether they had any children.

I don't know when or where La Velle Walker was born, the names of her parents,
or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife,
Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Terrell County Texas,
Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo,
Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


iv. DORCAS SUSAN LATTIMORE, b. 30 August 1909, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. WILLIAM E. NOLAN, 23 June 1944, Texas; b. Abt. 1909; d. Bef. 1968.

Notes for DORCAS SUSAN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Dorcas Susan, "Susie", Lattimore was born August 30, 1909, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore
and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. She was the third of their six children:
Johnnie L.,"Johnny"; Nancy Belle, "Nancy"; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas
Susan, "Susie"; William Griffin, "Griffin" or "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine,
"Skeet", Lattimore. Four of the children were born in North Carolina. The
other two were born in Oklahoma.

The Matt Lattimore family moved to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, in
December 1910. Later they moved to Osage County, Oklahoma, where Matt
Lattimore had a stock farm. In 1928, the family moved to Terrell County,
Texas.

Susie Lattimore taught school in Texas. On June 23, 1944, she married William
E. Nolan, and they lived in Kermit, Texas., after her marriage. Her husband was
deceased in 1968.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Margaret Gordon Elliott entry (#13503) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch
of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven
Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968; "Terrell
County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San
Angelo, Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Notes for WILLIAM E. NOLAN:
REMARKS: William E. Nolan married Dorcas Susan, "Susie", Lattimore, daughter
of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. They
lived in Kermit, Texas. I don't know whether they had any children.

I don't know when or where William E. Nolan was born, the names of his parents,
or whether he had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife,
Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Terrell County Texas,
Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo,
Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


62. v. WILLIAM GRIFFIN LATTIMORE, b. 23 August 1911, Grady County, Oklahoma.
vi. MARGARET CATHERINE LATTIMORE, b. 09 April 1913, Grady County, Oklahoma; m. RICHARD CHRISTOPHER; b. Abt. 1913.

Notes for MARGARET CATHERINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Margaret Catherine, "Skeet", Lattimore was born April 9, 1913, in
Grady County, Oklahoma, the daughter of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore
and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. She was the sixth of their six children:
Johnnie L.,"Johnny"; Nancy Belle, "Nancy"; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas
Susan, "Susie"; William Griffin, "Griffin" or "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine,
"Skeet", Lattimore. Four of the children were born in North Carolina. The
other two were born in Oklahoma.

The Matt Lattimore family moved to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, in
December 1910. Later they moved to Osage County, Oklahoma, where Matt
Lattimore had a stock farm. In 1928, the family moved to Terrell County,
Texas.

Skeet Lattimore graduated from high school in Sanderson, Texas, and, after
attending the University of Texas for two years, she taught school in Dryden,
Texas, for several years. After obtaining a degree in home economics, she
taught in Sanderson. Later she was Home Demonstration Agent in Hudspeth and
Calberson Counties, in Texas. She married Richard Christopher, and they live
in Oklahoma.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Margaret Gordon Elliott entry (#13503) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch
of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven
Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968; "Terrell
County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San
Angelo, Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Notes for RICHARD CHRISTOPHER:
REMARKS: Richard Christopher married Margaret Catherine, "Skeet", Lattimore,
daughter of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott.
Margaret was a school teacher in Texas. Later, they ranched near Wright City,
Oklahoma. I don't know whether they had any children.

I don't know when or where Richard Christopher was born, the names of his
parents, or whether he had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife,
Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Terrell County Texas,
Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo,
Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


38. JOE CLARENCE8 LATTIMORE (JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 28 May 1884 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 30 March 1945. He married (1) GEORGIA MCFARLAND Abt. 1910 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She died September 1916. He married (2) ANNIE ELMORE 19 July 1919. She was born Abt. 1890.

Notes for JOE CLARENCE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joe Clarence, "Joe", Lattimore was born May 28, 1884, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. He was one of their seven children: John Daniel, "John Daniel"; Lula; Margaret Catherine, "Katie"; Samuel Carson, "Sam"; Matt Ransom, "Matt"; Sallie Matida, "Sallie"; and Joe Clarence, "Joe". Sallie died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Joe Lattimore grew up on his father's farm. About 1910, he married Georgia McFarland. They had two children: James Clarence, "James", and Sue Frances Lattimore. Georgia McFarland died in September 1916, and, July 19, 1919, Joe Lattimore married Annie Elmore. They had two children: Donald Gold and Joe Lyons Lattimore.

Joe Lattimore served with the U.S. Army Air Corps in Europe during World War II.

Joe Lattimore died March 30, 1945.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for GEORGIA MCFARLAND:
REMARKS: Georgia McFarland married Joe Clarence, "Joe", Lattimore, the son
of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. They had
two children: James Clarence, "James", and Sue Frances Lattimore.

I don't know when or where Georgia McFarland was born, the names of her
parents, or whether she had any brothers or sisters. She died in September
1916.

On July 19, 1919, Joe Lattimore married Annie Elmore. They had two children:
Donald Gold and Joe Lyons Lattimore.

Joe Lattimore died March 30, 1945.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for ANNIE ELMORE:
REMARKS: On July 19, 1919, Annie Elmore married Joe Clarence, "Joe", Lattimore,
the son of John L., "Johnie", Lattimore and Nancy Amirita, "Nancy", Gold. They
had Donald Gold and Joe Lyons Lattimore. This was Joe Lattimore's second
marriage. His first wife, Georgia McFarland, died in September 1916. He had
two small children from his first marriage: James Clarence, "James", and Sue
Frances Lattimore.

I don't know when or where Annie Elmore was born, the names of her parents,
or whether she had any brothers or sisters. She died in September
1916.

Joe Lattimore died March 30, 1945.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Children of JOE LATTIMORE and GEORGIA MCFARLAND are:
i. JAMES CLARENCE9 LATTIMORE, b. 23 September 1911, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 15 February 1949.

Notes for JAMES CLARENCE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: James Clarence, "James", Lattimore was born September 23, 1911, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Joe Clarence, "Joe", Lattimore and
Georgia McFarland. He was one of their two children: James Clarence, "James",
and Sue Frances Lattimore.

Georgia McFarland died in September 1916, and their father married Annie Elmore
July 19, 1919. There were two children from the second marriage: Donald Gold
and Joe Lyons Lattimore.

James Lattimore served in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific during World War II.
He was still single when he died February 15, 1949.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


ii. SUE FRANCES LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1913, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for SUE FRANCES LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sue Frances Lattimore was the daughter of Joe Clarence, "Joe",
Lattimore and Georgia McFarland. She was one of their two children: James
Clarence, "James", and Sue Frances Lattimore.

Georgia McFarland died in September 1916, and their father married Annie Elmore
July 19, 1919. There were two children from the second marriage: Donald Gold
and Joe Lyons Lattimore.

Sue Lattimore married "Jiggs" Goforth, and they had one child. They were
living in Forest City, North Carolina, in 1968.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Children of JOE LATTIMORE and ANNIE ELMORE are:
iii. DONALD GOLD9 LATTIMORE, b. 02 April 1922, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. MARGARET KISTLER, 1950; b. Abt. 1922.

Notes for DONALD GOLD LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Donald Gold Lattimore was born April 2, 1922, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Joe Clarence, "Joe", Lattimore and Annie Elmore.
He was one of their two children: Donald Gold and Joe Lyons Lattimore.

Donald had a half-brother and a half-sister from his father's marriage to
Georgia McFarland. Georgia died in September 1916, leaving to small
children: James Clarence, "James", and Sue Frances Lattimore.

Donald Lattimore served in the infantry in Europe during World War II and was
wounded on the Siegfried Line. He graduated from college in Atlanta, Georgia,
with a degree in Engineering. He married Margaret Kistler.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for MARGARET KISTLER:
REMARKS: In 1950, Margaret Kistler married Donald Gold Lattimore, son of
Joe Clarence, "Joe", Lattimore and Annie Elmore. I don't know whether they had
any children.

I don't know when or where Margaret Kistler was born, the names of her parents,
or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


iv. JOE LYONS LATTIMORE, b. 23 April 1924, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. CATHERINE BAKER; b. Abt. 1924.

Notes for JOE LYONS LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joe Lyons, "Joe", Lattimore was born April 23, 1924, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Joe Clarence, "Joe", Lattimore and Annie
Elmore. He was one of their two children: Donald Gold and Joe Lyons Lattimore.

McFarland. Georgia died in September 1916, leaving two small children: James
Clarence, "James", and Sue Frances Lattimore.

Joe Lattimore served with the U.S. Army Air Corps in Europe during World War
II. He married Catherine Baker. I don't know whether they had any children.
They were living in Charlotte in 1968.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for CATHERINE BAKER:
REMARKS: Catherine Baker married Joe Lyons Lattimore, son of Joe Clarence,
"Joe", Lattimore and Annie Elmore. I don't know whether they had any children.
They were living in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1968.

I don't know when or where Catherine Baker was born, the names of her parents,
or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Data from unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy
Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington,
dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


39. WILLIAM CHITWOOD8 LATTIMORE (FRANCIS7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1895 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married SARAH ALPHA ELLIOTT 01 August 1922 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, daughter of OLIVER ELLIOTT and VIRGINIA STOCKTON. She was born 11 October 1897 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 03 August 1971.

Notes for WILLIAM CHITWOOD LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Chitwood Lattimore was born on June 29th, the son of Francis
(Frank) Lattimore and Edith Amelia Chitwood. The year of his birth was about
1895. He was one of thirteen children: Georgia E.; Marion Carson; Jessie R.;
Mattie Lee; Alpha Elizabeth; Audley Martin; Sarah Isabella; Rachel Louise
(Ray); Franklin Bruce; Margaret J.; William Chitwood; Guy; and John Lattimore.

William Chitwood Lattimore married Sarah Alpha Elliott, daughter of Oliver Beam
Elliott and Virginia Ann Stockton, August 1, 1922. They had one child: James
Gordon Lattimore, who was born December 30, 1934.

Data from Oliver Beam Elliott and Virginia Ann Stockton family tree prepared by
Mary Gordon Elliott and from "The Lattimores, A Family History," by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for SARAH ALPHA ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Sarah Alpha Elliott, "Alpha", was born October 11, 1897, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Oliver Beam Elliott,
"Oliver", and Virginia Ann Stockton, "Ann". She was the third of their seven
children: Ophelia Scott, "Ophelia"; an infant son who lived only two days;
Sarah Alpha, "Alpha"; Oliver Paxton, "Paxton"; Frank Donoho, "Frank"; Robert
William, "Robert"; and Mary Gordon Elliott.

Oliver Elliott purchased the John Paxton Elliott homeplace and farm on Hinton's
Creek, and the family lived in the house that John Paxton Elliott built in 1840
from December 1895 until Oliver built a new house in 1902. Since the barn and
pasture was near the spring and there was a good well, the new house was
located near the old house.

Alpha Elliott attended Hollis Elementary School and Asheville Normal And
Collegiate Institute. She taught at Piedmont Elementary School, Mt. Vernon
Elementary School in Rutherford County, and Glenwood Elementary Schools in
McDowell County, North Carolina.

On August 1, 1922, Alpha Elliott married William Chitwood Lattimore. They had
one child: James Gordon Lattimore. Alpha Elliott Lattimore died August 3, 1971.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from "Oliver Beam Elliott" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", which was written by Mary Gordon Elliott,
and the Oliver Beam Elliott family group record provided by Mary Gordon
Elliott in June 1994.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 7/94.


Child of WILLIAM LATTIMORE and SARAH ELLIOTT is:
63. i. JAMES GORDON9 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1924.

40. BOYD L.8 LATTIMORE (GEORGE R.7, JOSEPH C.6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 25 July 1894 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 09 August 1986 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married ESSIE SPURLING 19 September 1923 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, daughter of MONROE SPURLING and CATHERINE WILLIAMS. She was born 03 August 1897.

Notes for BOYD L. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Boyd L. Lattimore was born July 25, 1894, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of George R. Lattimore and Dorcus Packard. He was the oldest
of their three children: Boyd L., Vera, and Ruby Lattimore.

Boyd Lattimore married Essie Spurling, daughter of Monroe Spurling and
Catherine Williams, September 19, 1923, in Cleveland County. They had three
children: Joseph E. (Joe), Catherine, and Boyd L., Junior, Lattimore.

Boyd Lattimore died August 9, 1986, and his wife died March 4, 1979. Both are
buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Most of the above is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About BOYD L. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for ESSIE SPURLING:
REMARKS: Essie Spurling was born August 3, 1897, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Monroe Spurling and Catherine Williams. She was one
of at least two children: Essie and Everett.

Essie Spurling married Boyd L. Lattimore, son of George R. Lattimore and Dorcus
Packard, on September 19, 1923, in Cleveland County. They had three children:
Joseph E. (Joe); Catherine; and Boyd L., Junior, (Boyd), Lattimore.

Most of the above is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Children of BOYD LATTIMORE and ESSIE SPURLING are:
i. JOSEPH E.9 LATTIMORE, b. 20 August 1925, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOSEPH E. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Joseph E. (Joe) Lattimore was born August 20, 1925, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Boyd L. Lattimore and Essie Spurling. He
was the oldest of their three children: Joseph E. (Joe), Catherine, and Boyd
L, Junior, Lattimore.

Most of the above is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ii. CATHERINE LATTIMORE, b. 31 March 1927, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CATHERINE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Catherine Lattimore was born March 31, 1927, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Boyd L. Lattimore and Essie Spurling. She
was the second of their three children: Joseph E. (Joe), Catherine, and Boyd
L, Junior, Lattimore.

Most of the above is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iii. BOYD L. LATTIMORE, JR., b. 11 November 1939, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for BOYD L. LATTIMORE, JR.:
REMARKS: Boyd L. Lattimore, Junior, was born November 11, 1939, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Boyd L. Lattimore and Essie Spurling. He
was the youngest of their three children: Joseph E. (Joe), Catherine, and Boyd
L, Junior, Lattimore.

Most of the above is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther
Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


41. MARY8 LATTIMORE (CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1873 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married CHARLES C. WHISNANT, son of ADAM WHISNANT and JANIE WILLIAMS. He was born Abt. 1865 in Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mary "Mamie" Lattimore was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
the daughter of Charles Lattimore and Martha Jane Jackson. I don't know
whether she had any brothers or sisters. The Charles Lattimore family lived in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, which was cut from Rutherford County in 1841.

Mary Lattimore, "Mamie", married Charles C. Whisnant, "Charlie", son of Adam
Whisnant and Janie Williams. They had nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie
Jackson, Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas
Dargen, Reba Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hensen. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family
tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for CHARLES C. WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Charles C. Whisnant, "Charlie", was born in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of Adam Whisnant and Janie Williams. I don't know whether he
had any brothers or sisters.

Charlie Whisnant married Mary Lattimore, "Mamie", daughter of Charles Lattimore
and Martha Jane Jackson. They had nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie
Jackson, Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas
Dargen, Reba Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Original data from John Crenshaw Elliott family tree prepared by Angie Boyd
Hensen. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family
tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Children of MARY LATTIMORE and CHARLES WHISNANT are:
64. i. NIXON LATTIMORE9 WHISNANT, b. 20 May 1893, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
65. ii. FANNIE JACKSON WHISNANT, b. 22 November 1894, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina; d. 20 July 1984, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.
66. iii. PRUDENCE VIRGINIA WHISNANT, b. 25 February 1898, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
67. iv. HERSHEL CHARLES WHISNANT, b. 08 June 1900, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
v. HATTIE SUE WHISNANT, b. 14 February 1903, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for HATTIE SUE WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Hattie Sue Whisnant was born February 14, 1903, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. She
was the fifth of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson,
Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


68. vi. MATTIE ELLA WHISNANT, b. 10 June 1905, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
69. vii. THOMAS DARGEN WHISNANT, b. 15 May 1907, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
70. viii. REBA BLANTON WHISNANT, b. 18 October 1910, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 25 April 1995, Hickory, Catawba County, North Carolina.
71. ix. EDNA BLANCHE WHISNANT, b. 18 January 1914, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

42. BURGIN M.8 LATTIMORE (WALTER SLADE7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 25 November 1884 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 05 February 1947 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married ANNE EVERETT Abt. 1925. She was born 15 October 1899 in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina, and died 06 January 1950 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for BURGIN M. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Burgin M. Lattimore was born November 25, 1884, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore and Rachel Emiline
(Rachel) Packard. He was the oldest of their six children: Burgin M., Leroy
Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy Matilda (Lucy)., Daniel Dobbins (Dobb), and
Claudia Lattimore.

Burgin Lattimore married Anne Everett, and they had two children: Rachel
and Lucy Ann Lattimore. Rachel married William Jimolka. Lucy Ann, who was
born February 16, 1931, died August 21, 1931, and was buried in the Lattimore
Family Cemetery.

Anne Everett, who was born October 15, 1899, in Raleigh, North Carolina, died
January 6, 1950. She is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

After his first wife's death, Burgin Lattimore married H. Gatling, who was born
in 1916.

Burgin Lattimore died February 5, 1947, in Cleveland County, North Carolina.
He is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Most of the data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About BURGIN M. LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for ANNE EVERETT:
REMARKS: Anne Everett was born October 15, 1899, in Raleigh, North Carolina.
I don't know the names of her parents or whether she had any brothers or
sisters.

Anne Everett married Burgin M. Lattimore, son of Walter Slade (Walter)
Lattimore and Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard. They had two children: Rachel
and Lucy Ann Lattimore. Rachel married William Jimolka. Lucy Ann, who was
born February 16, 1931, died August 21, 1931, and was buried in the Lattimore
Family Cemetery.

Anne Everett died January 6, 1950. She is buried in the Lattimore Family
Cemetery. After her death, Burgin Lattimore married H. Gatling, who was born
in 1916.

Burgin Lattimore died February 5, 1947, in Cleveland County, North Carolina.
He is buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About ANNE EVERETT:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of BURGIN LATTIMORE and ANNE EVERETT are:
i. RACHEL9 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1929, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for RACHEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rachel Lattimore was born about 1929 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Burgin M. Lattimore and Rachel Emiline (Rachel)
Packard. She was one of two children: Rachel and Lucy Ann Lattimore. Lucy
died in infancy. Rachel married William Jimolka.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ii. LUCY ANN LATTIMORE, b. 16 February 1931, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 21 August 1931, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for LUCY ANN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Lucy Ann Lattimore was born February 16, 1931, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Burgin M. Lattimore and Rachel Emiline (Rachel)
Packard. She was one of two children: Rachel and Lucy Ann Lattimore. Lucy
died August 21, 1931, and was buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery. Rachel
married William Jimolka.

Most of the data is from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


More About LUCY ANN LATTIMORE:
Burial: Lattimore Cmtry, Cleveland County, North Carolina

43. LEROY JACKSON8 LATTIMORE (WALTER SLADE7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 04 July 1886 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 31 May 1943. He married SUZANNA FRIB April 1912. She was born 27 November 1881, and died 29 February 1960.

Notes for LEROY JACKSON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Leroy Jackson (Leroy) Lattimore was born July 4, 1886, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore and Rachel
Emiline (Rachel) Packard. He was the second of their six children: Burgin M.,
Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy Matilda (Lucy)., Daniel Dobbins (Dobb),
and Claudia Lattimore.

Leroy Lattimore married Suzanna Frib, in April 1912. They had only one child:
John Daniel Lattimore, who was adopted.

Leroy Lattimore died May 31, 1943. His wife died February 29, 1960.

Most of the data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for SUZANNA FRIB:
REMARKS: Suzanna Frib was born November 27, 1881. I don't know where she was
born, the names of her parents, or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Suzanna Frib married Leroy Lattimore, son of Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore
and Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard, in April 1912. They had only one child:
John Daniel Lattimore, who was adopted.

Leroy Lattimore died May 31, 1943. His wife died February 29, 1960.

Most of the data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Child of LEROY LATTIMORE and SUZANNA FRIB is:
i. JOHN DANIEL9 LATTIMORE, b. 12 April 1924.

Notes for JOHN DANIEL LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John Daniel Lattimore was born April 12, 1924. He was adopted by

Leroy Jackson (Leroy) Lattimore and Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard. He was
their only child.

Most of the data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


44. OLA MYRTLE8 LATTIMORE (WALTER SLADE7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 04 February 1888 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 30 March 1966. She married BENJAMIN P. JENKINS 29 May 1915, son of LAWSON JENKINS and ELLEN PHILBRICK. He was born 05 July 1888, and died 17 May 1968.

Notes for OLA MYRTLE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Ola Myrtle Lattimore was born February 4, 1888, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore and Rachel
Emiline (Rachel) Packard. She was the third of their six children: Burgin
M., Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy M., Daniel Dobbins (Dobb), and
Claudia Lattimore.

Ola Myrtle Lattimore married Benjamin P. Jenkins, son of Lawson S. Jenkins and
Ellen Philbrick, on May 29, 1915. They had three children: Benjamin P.,
Junior; Rachel E.; and Walter L. Jenkins.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for BENJAMIN P. JENKINS:
REMARKS: Benjamin P. Jenkins was born July 5, 1888, the son of Lawson S.
Jenkins and Ellen Philbrick.

Benjamin Jenkins married Ola Myrtle Lattimore, daughter of Walter Slade
(Walter) Lattimore and Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard, on May 29, 1915. They
had three children: Benjamin P., Junior; Rachel E.; and Walter L. Jenkins.

Ola Myrtle Lattimore, who was born February 4, 1888, died March 30, 1966.
Benjamin Jenkins died May 17, 1968.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Children of OLA LATTIMORE and BENJAMIN JENKINS are:
i. BENJAMIN P.9 JENKINS, JR., b. 09 October 1916, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for BENJAMIN P. JENKINS, JR.:
REMARKS: Benjamin P. Jenkins, Junior, was born October 9, 1916, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Benjamin P. Jenkins and Ola Myrtle
Lattimore. He was the oldest of three children: Benjamin P., Junior; Rachel
E.; and Walter L. Jenkins.

Benjamin Jenkins married Lucille Ward.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


ii. RACHEL E. JENKINS, b. 20 October 1918, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for RACHEL E. JENKINS:
REMARKS: Rachel E. Jenkins was born October 20, 1918, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Benjamin P. Jenkins and Ola Myrtle
Lattimore. She was the second of three children: Benjamin P., Junior; Rachel
E.; and Walter L. Jenkins.

Rachel Jenkins married John Mathew Marrney on January 29, 1938.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


iii. WALTER L. JENKINS, b. 23 April 1920, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for WALTER L. JENKINS:
REMARKS: Walter L. Jenkins was born April 23, 1920, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Benjamin P. Jenkins and Ola Myrtle Lattimore.
He was the youngest of three children: Benjamin P., Junior; Rachel E.;
and Walter L. Jenkins.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


45. DANIEL DOBBIN8 LATTIMORE (WALTER SLADE7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 14 April 1891 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 07 October 1965 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married NANCY BLANCHE GOLD September 1933 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, daughter of GRIFFIN GOLD and OLA MOONEY. She was born 31 December 1896 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL DOBBIN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Dobbins (Dobb) Lattimore was born April 14, 1891, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore and Rachel
Emiline (Rachel) Packard. He was the fifth of six children: Burgin M., Leroy
Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy M., Daniel Dobbins (Dobb), and Claudia
Lattimore.

Dobb Lattimore married Nancy Blanche (Blanche) Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin
Miller (Griff) Gold and Ola Frances (Ottie) Mooney, September 1933. They had
two children: Daniel Gold (Daniel), and Nancy Frances (Nancy) Lattimore.

Dobb Lattimore was a farmer as well as a school teacher. Blanche was also a
school teacher. At one time they both taught at New House School, and Dobb's
sisters, Miss Lucy and Miss Claudia, also taught there.

Dobb was also County Commissioner. He was a great influence in getting
electricity (Rural Electrification Administration) in rural areas.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for NANCY BLANCHE GOLD:
REMARKS: Nancy Blanche (Blanche) Gold was born December 31, 1896, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Dr. Griffin Miller (Griff) Gold and
Ola Frances (Ottie) Mooney. She was the second of their three children:
Benjamin (Ben), Nancy Blanche (Blanche), and Lois Floe (Lois) Gold. This
was her father's second marriage. She had three step sisters and one step
brother from her father's marriage to Josephine Packard: Willie Mae, Bertha
Fannie, Thomas Byron (Tom), and Mary C. Gold.

Blanche Gold married Daniel Dobbin (Dobb) Lattimore, and they had two
children: Daniel Gold (Daniel), and Nancy Frances (Nancy) Lattimore.
Blanche and Dobb Lattimore were school teachers. At one time, Blanche,
Dobb, and his two sisters, Miss Lucy and Miss Claudia, taught at New
House School. Dobb was also a farmer and County Commissioner.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


Children of DANIEL LATTIMORE and NANCY GOLD are:
72. i. DANIEL GOLD9 LATTIMORE II, b. 10 January 1933, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
ii. NANCY FRANCES LATTIMORE, b. 10 September 1935, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for NANCY FRANCES LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Nancy Frances (Nancy) Lattimore was born September 10, 1935, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Dobbin (Dobb),
Lattimore and Nancy Blanche (Blanche) Gold. She was the second of their two
childrend: Daniel Dobbin (Daniel) and Nancy Frances (Nancy) Lattimore. Dobb
Lattimore was a farmer and a school teacher. Blanche was also a school teacher.

Nancy Lattimore married Harold Dean Queen, and they had three children: Nancy
Carol (Carol); Virginia Lynn; and William Harrill Queen. Harold Queen died
November 11, 1967, in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He is buried in the
Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


46. CLAUDIA8 LATTIMORE (WALTER SLADE7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 07 July 1894 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married LAWSON FAY JENKINS 31 May 1922, son of LAWSON JENKINS and ELLEN PHILBRICK. He was born 03 January 1897, and died 21 January 1966.

Notes for CLAUDIA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Claudia Lattimore was born July 7, 1894, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Walter Slade (Walter) Lattimore and Rachel Emiline
(Rachel) Packard. She was the youngest of their six children: Burgin M.,
Leroy Jackson (Leroy), Ola Myrtle, Lucy Matilda (Lucy), Daniel Dobbins (Dobb),
and Claudia Lattimore.

Lucy, Dobb, and Claudia Lattimore were school teachers. At one time all three
taught at New House School.

Claudia Lattimore married Lawson Fay Jenkins, son of Lawson S. Jenkins and
Ellen Philbrick, on May 31, 1922. They had one child: Lawson Fay Jenkins,
Junior, who was born July 9, 1924, in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Notes for LAWSON FAY JENKINS:
REMARKS: Lawson Fay Jenkins was born January 3, 1897, the son of Lawson S.
Jenkins and Ellen Philbrick.

Lawson Jenkins married Claudia Lattimore, daughter of Walter Slade (Walter)
Lattimore and Rachel Emiline (Rachel) Packard. They had one child, Lawson
Fay Jenkins, Junior, who was born July 9, 1924, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.


Child of CLAUDIA LATTIMORE and LAWSON JENKINS is:
i. LAWSON FAY9 JENKINS, JR., b. 09 July 1924, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for LAWSON FAY JENKINS, JR.:
REMARKS: Lawson Fay Jenkins, Junior, was born July 9, 1924, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Lawson Fay Jenkins and Claudia Lattimore.
He was their only child.

Lawson Jenkins married Nellie Wilson Bradford on August 6, 1946.

Data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/95.

Generation No. 8

47. WILLIE MAE9 GOLD (JOSEPHINE8 PACKARD, SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1884 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married ALLEN RAMSEY Abt. 1905 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He was born Abt. 1884.

Notes for WILLIE MAE GOLD:
REMARKS: Willie Mae Gold was born in 1884 in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
the daughter of Dr. Griffin Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. She
was the oldest of their four children: Willie Mae; Bertha Fannie; Thomas Byron,
"Tom"; and Mary C. Gold. She had one step brother and two step sisters from
her father's second marriage to Ola Frances, "Ottie", Mauney: Benjamin,
"Ben"; Nancy Blanche, "Blanche"; and Lois Floe, "Lois", Gold.

Willie Mae Gold married Allen Ramsey. Their daughter Josephine married Floyd
Cline of Falston.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Notes for ALLEN RAMSEY:
REMARKS: Allen Ramsey married Willie Mae Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin Miller,
"Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had one daughter, Josephine, who
married Floyd Cline of Falston.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Child of WILLIE GOLD and ALLEN RAMSEY is:
i. JOSEPHINE10 RAMSEY, b. Abt. 1910, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOSEPHINE RAMSEY:
REMARKS: Allen Ramsey married Willie Mae Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin Miller,
"Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had one daughter, Josephine, who
married Floyd Cline of Falston.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


48. BERTHA FANNIE9 GOLD (JOSEPHINE8 PACKARD, SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1886 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married FRANK CLINE Abt. 1910 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He was born Abt. 1886.

Notes for BERTHA FANNIE GOLD:
REMARKS: Bertha Fannie Gold was born in 1886 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Dr. Griffin Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine
Packard. She was the second of their four children: Willie Mae; Bertha Fannie;
Thomas Byron, "Tom"; and Mary C. Gold. She had one step brother and two step
sisters from her father's second marriage to Ola Frances, "Ottie", Mauney:
Benjamin, "Ben"; Nancy Blanche, "Blanche"; and Lois Floe, "Lois", Gold.

Bertha Fannie Gold married Frank Cline, and they had two children: Inez, who
married Johnny Elmore, and Cleve Cline, who died young.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Notes for FRANK CLINE:
REMARKS: Frank Cline married Bertha Fannie Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin
Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had two children: Inez, who
married Johnny Elmore, and Cleve Cline, who died young.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Children of BERTHA GOLD and FRANK CLINE are:
i. INEZ10 CLINE, b. Abt. 1912, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for INEZ CLINE:
REMARKS: Frank Cline married Bertha Fannie Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin
Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had two children: Inez, who
married Johnny Elmore, and Cleve Cline, who died young.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


ii. CLEVE CLINE, b. Abt. 1915, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CLEVE CLINE:
REMARKS: Frank Cline married Bertha Fannie Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin
Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had two children: Inez, who
married Johnny Elmore, and Cleve Cline, who died young.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


49. THOMAS BYRON9 GOLD (JOSEPHINE8 PACKARD, SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 28 December 1887 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 1945 in Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married EMMA DORCAS GREENE 29 August 1922. She was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for THOMAS BYRON GOLD:
REMARKS: Thomas Byron, "Tom", Gold was born in December 28, 1887, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, near Cleveland Mills (now Lawndale), the son of Dr.
Griffin Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. He was the third of their
four children: Willie Mae; Bertha Fannie; Thomas Byron, "Tom"; and Mary C. Gold.
He had one step brother and two step sisters from his father's second marriage
to Ola Frances, "Ottie", Mauney: Benjamin, "Ben"; Nancy Blanche, "Blanche"; and
Lois Floe, "Lois", Gold.
Tom Gold graduated from North Carolina Medical College in Charlotte, studied
medicine in New York and in England, and practiced medicine in Lawndale and
Shelby, North Carolina.

On June 12, 1912, Dr. Tom Gold married Emma Dorcos Greene, daughter of J.
Francis and Alice Price Greene of New House, North Carolina. They had two
children: Thomas Byron Gold, Jr., and Jeremaine Edon Gold.

On September 14, 1917, Dr. Tom Gold enlisted in the Army and served with the
Allied Expeditionary Force during World War I as a Lieutenant in the Medical
Corps from May 11, 1918 until July 20, 1919. He was awarded the Distinguished
Service Cross. The citation reads as follows:

"Thomas B. Gold, 1st Lieutant
Medical Corps -- 119 Infantry

For extra ordinary heroism in action near Busingy France, October 9, 1918,
and Manzinhien, France, October 18, 1918. During the attack of October 9th,
he established his aid post in a road side shrine up with the front line,
where he again gave treatment until the heavy fire of enemy forced him to
withdraw. During the advance, of October (18-19) he established another
front line post under enemy fire and thus save the lives of many of the
troops."

After the war, Dr. Tom Gold returned to Shelby, where he specialized in Eye,
Nose, and Throat until his death in 1945. Dr. Tom Gold, his wife, and son,
Thomas, Jr., are buried at Sunset Cemetery in Shelby.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" and the "Thomas Byron Gold,
M.D. and Family" entries in "The Heritage Of Cleveland County: Volume I -
1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


More About THOMAS BYRON GOLD:
Burial: Sunset Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for EMMA DORCAS GREENE:
REMARKS: Emma Dorcas Greene was the daughter of J. Francis Greene and Alice
Price of New House, North Carolina. On June 12, 1912, she married Dr. Thomas
Byron, "Tom", Gold, son of Dr. Griffin Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine
Packard. They had two children: Thomas Byron Gold, Jr., and Jeremaine Edon
Gold.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Children of THOMAS GOLD and EMMA GREENE are:
73. i. THOMAS BYRON10 GOLD, JR., b. 10 October 1914, Cleveland County, North Carolina; d. 21 July 1964.
74. ii. JEREMAINE EDON GOLD, b. Abt. 1916, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

50. MARY C.9 GOLD (JOSEPHINE8 PACKARD, SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 1889 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married L. J. COOPER Abt. 1910 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He was born Abt. 1889.

Notes for MARY C. GOLD:
REMARKS: Mary C. Gold was born in 1889 in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of Dr. Griffin Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine
Packard. She was the youngest of their four children: Willie Mae; Bertha
Fannie; Thomas Byron, "Tom"; and Mary C. Gold. She had one step brother and two
step sisters from her father's second marriage to Ola Frances, "Ottie", Mauney:
Benjamin, "Ben"; Nancy Blanche, "Blanche"; and Lois Floe, "Lois", Gold.

Mary C. Gold married L. J., "Fate", Cooper, and they had two children: Arnold
and Ruth Cooper.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Notes for L. J. COOPER:
REMARKS: L. J., "Fate", Cooper married Mary C. Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin
Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had two children: Arnold and
Ruth Cooper.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Children of MARY GOLD and L. COOPER are:
i. ARNOLD10 COOPER.

Notes for ARNOLD COOPER:
REMARKS: L. J., "Fate", Cooper married Mary C. Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin
Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had two children: Arnold and
Ruth Cooper.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


ii. RUTH COOPER.

Notes for RUTH COOPER:
REMARKS: L. J., "Fate", Cooper married Mary C. Gold, daughter of Dr. Griffin
Miller, "Griff", Gold and Josephine Packard. They had two children: Arnold and
Ruth Cooper.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


51. LULA9 LATTIMORE (JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 09 January 1897 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 02 December 1963 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. She married WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT 17 January 1915 in Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina, son of THOMAS ELLIOTT and REBECCA HOYLE. He was born 15 November 1892 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 04 July 1977 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma.

Notes for LULA LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Lula, "Lula", Lattimore was born on January 9, 1897, on her father's farm in Cleveland County, North Carolina, near Polkville, which is about 12 miles northwest of Shelby, the county seat. She was the daughter of John Daniel "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mooney and the oldest of nine children, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee, "Clara"; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank". Louise and Johnie are twins. Clara died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Lula was born at home at 3:20 p.m. on Saturday January 9, 1897. The attending physician was Dr. Palmer. According to his record book, he was paid $5.00 for his services. His record book also shows that she broke her arm on April 9, 1904, and he was paid $1.35 for setting the bone. According to the same record book, Macie was born Saturday October 2, 1899, at 9:45 a.m., and Rhea was born Saturday August 23, 1903, at 11:30 p.m. He was also paid $5.00 for delivering Rhea. Her sister Blanche said that Lula broke her arm after climbing out on a limb of an apple tree and jumping off.

Lula grew up on the John Daniel Lattimore farm on Hinton's Creek, which had been in the family since her great great grandfather, John Lattimore, who moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, in October 1783 and settled on Duncan's Creek. He had been living in South Carolina on Clark's Fork of Bullock's Creek, south of Kings Mountain, and had served in the South Carolina Militia during the Revolutionary War. On March 3, 1787, he purchased 250 acres of land on Hinton's Creek from the widow of William Willis.

Her grandfather, John L. Lattimore, lived on the farm on the north side of their farm, and her Uncle, Sam Lattimore, lived on the farm on the south side. There were a number of other Lattimore families, who were related, in the area. Her grandfather, Issac Mooney, lived on a farm about five miles east of their farm.

Lula attended the Elliott School, a one-room, one-teacher school about one mile west of Polkville, near the Elliott church. The children attended school when they could be spared from the farm; i.e., from the end of cotton-picking season in October until the beginning of the planting season in March. School started at 8:00 a.m. and ended at 4:00 p.m. The children had to walk school, and, since she was the oldest, she had more responsibilities at home, and she had to help her younger sisters get ready and walk to school.

On 8/22/93, her sister Blanche recalled that the Elliott School was the same size as the Elliott Church. It had a large wood stove in the middle of the room, two rows of desks on each side of the stove, a blackboard at the front of the room, and a cloakroom at the rear. They only had three subjects: reading, spelling, and arithmetic. The students were not broken up into "grades". Instead they had sets of books, the students worked individually at their desks, and they graduated when they completed all of the books. The books provided the equivalent of a seventh grade education. Some students completed the books in seven years, while others completed them sooner or took longer.

Their were no public schools until Fairview School was established and the Elliott School closed in 1922. There were two private academies in the area, Boiling Springs (now Gardner Webb) and Piedmont, near Lawndale. Her sisters Macie and Rhea went to Piedmont, and Nancy and Louise went to Boiling Springs. Blanche went to Hollis one year and to the consolidated school in Polkville her senior year. Johnie, Louise, and Frank went to Polkville High School. Lula didn't go to Piedmont because she was anxious to get married.

Lula married William C., "William", Elliott, son of Thomas Forbis, "Tommmy", Elliott and Rebecca Bell, "Bell", Hoyle, on January 17, 1915. Her sister Macie said that had always enjoyed visiting the "Tommy Elliotts", who lived about two miles south of the John Daniel Lattimores, and that Lula and William "got interested" in each other when she was fourteen, but they waited until she was eighteen to get married. Her uncle, Sam Carson, "Sam", Lattimore, who lived on the next farm, had married William's sister, Mary Forbis, "Mary", Elliott. Also, another uncle, Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore had married another sister, Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott.

There were other connections because the Lattimores had settled in the area after the Revolution, and the Elliotts had moved to North Carolina from Virginia in 1807. Lula is descended from John Lattimore, who was born in Virginia, served in the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War, and settled on Duncan's Creek after the Revolution. He married Jamima Stockton, and they had three children: Daniel, John, and Rachel Lattimore. Lula is descended from Daniel.

Daniel Lattimore married Sarah Carpenter, and they had nine children: Catherine, Daniel Dobbin, Margaret, Joe C., Rachel, Sam, Susie, John, and Jamima Lattimore. Lula is descended from John. John married Isabel Carson, and they had eleven children: William, Joe Carson, Daniel Dobbins, Sallie, John L., James H., Sam, Frank, Thomas D., Mary C., and Audely Martin. Most of the sons served in the Civil War. The town of Lattimore, North Carolina, was named for Audely, because he was the station master when they built the railroad through the town. Lula is descended from John L.

John L. Lattimore married Nancy Amirita Gold, and they had seven children: John Daniel, Lula, Margaret Catherine, Samuel Carson, Matt Ransom, Sallie Matida, and Joe Clarence. Lula is descended from John Daniel. Many of these ancestors are buried in the Lattimore Family Cemetery, on the hill on the north side of Hinton's Creek. Lula's brother Johnnie owns the farm on the north side of Hinton's Creek, including the old John L. Lattimore house and the cemetery, and Pauline Lattimore, her brother Frank's widow, owns the farm on the south side, including the John Daniel Lattimore house.

Lula and William had twelve children, born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen"; William C., Jr., "Billie" or "Bill"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae, "Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or "A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

William was four years older than Lula. He had gone to Florida for his health in 1911, returned to North Carolina, than gone to Oklahoma, where Matt and Mag Lattimore had moved after the 1909 floods. After he regained his health, William went to work in the livery stable in Minco. At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and Doc. Gold went to Oklahoma to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was in poor health and not expected to live very long. William returned to North Carolina and his father died in June 1914, he remained in North Carolina after his father's death, and he married Lula in January 1915.

In his biographical notes, written in November 1954, William remembers they married on a rainy Sunday afternoon. Lula's sister Macie remembers William coming for Lula in a buggy with two mules. His sister Belle also remembers him hitching up two mules to a buggy, they were married at the preacher's house in Polkville, and the preacher came out to the buggy to perform the ceremony, so that Lula would not get wet.

William's father owned a flour, corn, and shingle mill and a four-room house on Hinton's Creek, about four miles west of the John Daniel Lattimore house, across the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis. After they were married, they lived in the four-room house and William operated the mill until it was washed out in the Big Flood of 1916.

William's sister Belle thought they were very happy together until the flood. She remembers them coming to visit in a little red Buick that William had acquired. The chassis was bare except for the two seats and the gas tank. It was so exciting, because nobody except their Uncle Bob Elliott and two other men in the township owned cars.

The Charlotte Observer reported a hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast and caused unprecended floods that disrupted railroad, telegraph, and telephone communications. In his notes, William remembers the heavy rains started on the 14th; the mill was washed out on the 16th; Lula went into labor; and his oldest daughter, Kathleen, was born prematurely on the morning of the 17th. The heavy rains didn't end until the 18th.

According to Kathleen's birth certificate, she was born at 1 a.m., and the attending physician was L. V. Lee, M.D. They were living at Route 1, Hollis, North Carolina. William was 23, his occupation was "Miller", and Lula was 19. Kathleen, who was born two and a half months premature, wasn't expected to live. They fed her with the blatter from a fountain pen, used Williams's handkerchiefs for diapers, put her in the oven to keep her warm.

After they lost everything in the flood, William took a night millers job at the Colfax Milling Company in Ellenboro, about nine miles south of Hollis. After he worked there a short time, the doctor told him that he had miller's tuberculosis or an abcessed lung and that he would have to quit the milling business. In September 1916, he returned to Oklahoma, to "cut leather" (make and repair harness). In December 1916, William went to work at "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco, and Lula and Kathleen came to Oklahoma from North Carolina on the train, accompanied by William's sister Susan, who carried Kathleen, who was still a tiny baby, on a pillow.

The railroad museum in Old Fort, North Carolina, has a "Southern Railways" map, and it shows the rather circuitous route that they traveled. They caught the "local" in Lattimore, that went through Shelby to Blacksburg, South Carolina, about 15 miles south of Shelby. In Blacksburg, they caught the "main liner" to Atlanta, where they changed to the train to Birmingham; Sheffield, Alabama, (south of Florence); and Memphis. In Memphis, they changed to the "Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific", which ran through North Little Rock, Arkansas; McAlister, Oklahoma; and Oklahoma City.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, Lula and William moved to Chickasha, about eighteen miles south of Minco, where William worked at Barton Brothers Garage, operated by Emmett and Earl Barton. They lived at 216 South Eighth Street.

Lula was so pleased that Kathleen had grown to "normal" size, that she kept the card showing the results of the doctors examination, height: 33 inches; weight: 23 pounds; and age: one year and 11 months old. Kathleen has the card in her collection of memorabilia. William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie", was born at Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, Kathleen's second birthday.

In December 1918, after B. Wall bought out Bennet & Son, the family moved back to Minco, where William worked for B. Wall at the "The Brick Garage" on Main Street. They bought the house at Burt and Railroad Streets, next to the B. Wall house, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, they bought the lots across the street for a garden and a large cow pasture.

In 1923, William sold 20 acres of land from his father's estate, and they fixed up the house. In August 1924, William got sick while working on a tractor and had to quit the automobile business. In May 1925 he enlisted in Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard with the rank of Sergeant, where he was caretaker mechanic, responsible for taking care of
of the armory and the old World War I army trucks and other National Guard
Equipment. The armory was in the old Brick Garage on Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

Vertie, Ann, John, Frank, and the rest of the children were born in Minco in the house at Burt and Railroad Streets. They all started school in Minco, and Kathleen, Bill, Vertie, Ann, John, and Judy graduated from Minco High School. Frank graduated from Abilene High School; Charles and Mary Lee from Killeen High School; and Faye, James, and Aaron from Vian High School.

In 1929 they remodeled the house and built a new barn, chicken house, and coal house. As long as they lived in Minco, they always had a garden and kept a milk cow and a flock of chickens. The older boys milked the cows, and the younger ones herded them from the pasture to milking lot in the evening and back to the pasture in the morning, under Lula's direction.

Bill and John played football, basketball, and baseball while they were in high school, and Ann played clarinet in the band. Frank, Charles, and Aaron delivered newspapers. The family attended the Baptist Church.

Kathleen, Bill, Vertie, and Ann went away to college after they graduated from high school. Kathleen started teaching after she finished college. Bill joined the National Guard after he completed Junior College, was mobilized with the National Guard, went to Officers Candidate School, and was commissioned in the Quartermaster Corps. Vertie worked at Borden General Hospital in Chickasha after she graduated from college. John joined the Navy after he graduated from high school.

William was mobilized with the National Gurad in September 1940. Although he was able to come home about once a month, responsibility for managing the household fell on Lula. In April 1942, William was transferred to Camp Barkley, Texas, near Abilene. Housing was scarce in Abilene, but he was able to rent a house on Buffalo Gap highway, south of Wylie, convenient to Camp Barkley. Most of the ranch had been taken over by the Army for an artillery range, but the house was available, and the family moved there in August 1942. The Wylie school bus picked up the children and brought them home. The family also attended church services at Wylie. In April 1943, the ranch was sold, and the family moved to Abilene, where they remained until after the war ended.

Although William was home every night, he left early in the morning, and he he worked late. After all, there was a war on. Bill was in the Army Air Corps in England, John was on a cruiser in the Pacific, and Frank was on a landing ship in the Pacific. Vertie was working in an Army hospital, and Ann was working at Camp Barkley. Kathleen was teaching school in Oklahoma. There were still six children living at home and attending Abilene High School, South Junior High School, or Central Elementary School.

World War II ended in August 1945; the family moved back to Minco in October 1945; and Bill, John, and Frank returned from the war. Bill enrolled at the University of Oklahoma at Norman, and John and Frank enrolled at Murray State College at Tishomingo. Kathleen took a job in Oklahoma City, and Ann returned to college. Vertie remained in Chickasha, until 1947, when she took a job in Oklahoma City. They all came home for the holidays and frequently for weekends. Although Bill, Ann, and Judy married, it remained a close knit family with Lula the focus.

William remained at Camp Barkley until it closed and he was transferred to Camp Hood, Texas, near Killeen. He was able to come home about once a month, until he arranged for housing on the base, and the family moved to Camp Hood in March 1947. They lived in an apartment in a converted barracks at 40th Street and Battalion Avenue. An Army bus took the older children to Killeen where they attended Killeen High School. The younger children went to school on the base.

Lula had more time to read, write letters, and rest at Camp Hood. There were only five children living at home, and they were all in school. Charles graduated from high school in May 1948 and went away to college, the University of Missouri at Columbia. It was peacetime, and William had more time to help with the shopping and other family activities. They also began to discuss their plans for retirement.

William bought a stock farm in Eastern Oklahoma, retired from the Army in May 1949, and moved the family to the farm. Mary Lee married after she graduated from high school in May 1949, so there were only three children still living at home: Faye, James, and Aaron. They had to improvise while the new house was being built, there was lots of hard work, and it was a new way of life that including milking cows, working in the garden, and building fences.

Faye, James, and Aaron were active in school activities, and the family regularly attended church services in Vian. The older children came home for for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and other holidays and frequently for weekends. Faye graduated from high school in May 1951 and married a local boy. James graduated from high school in May 1952 and went away to college. Aaron graduated from high school in May 1953 and joined the Air Force.

In 1954 William suffered a stroke after driving a tractor in the hot sun. The stroke ended his farming activities. Lula took good care of William, and he made a remarkable recovery. He took up painting as therapy, and he took a correspondence course in radio and television repair. Eventually, he resumed driving. Lula and William continued to live on the farm until 1963, when the the farm was sold and they moved to Oklahoma City to be near Vertie, Ann, John, and Judy, who lived in Oklahoma City, and Kathleen, who lived about 70 miles southwest of Oklahoma City.

Lula died of a heart attack and stroke in December 1963. Although the children were scattered, they all reached her bedside before she expired. Bill was living in Virgina, Frank and James in Louisiana, Charles in California, and Faye in Missouri. Services were conducted in Oklahoma City, and she was buried in the Elliott plot in Evergreen Cemetery in Minco. Having lived there for 24 years, she always thought of Minco as her home, and she wanted to be buried there.

Her oldest son, Bill, was buried next to her when he died of leukemia in May in May 1975, and William was buried on the other side when he died from prostrate cancer in July 1977, after several years of failing health. There is space for Bill's wife, Vertie, John, Caroline, and others who have indicated they want to be buried in the family plot at Minco. Even now, Lula is keeping her family together.

SOURCES: Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; biographical notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed to family members by Vertie Elliott; newspaper clippings and other memorabilia collected by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; conversations at the William C. Elliott family reunion in July 1993; and conversations at the
Elliott Family reunion in August 1993.

The "Mooney" family name is sometimes spelled "Mauney". The original spelling was "Muni", according to the passenger list for the ship Phoenix, which arrived in Philadelphia on August 28, 1750, from Rotterdam, which contains the following names: Jacob Muni, Jr.; Christian Muni; Jacob Muni, Senr.; Condrad Muni; and Andreas Muni. Some descendants changed their family name to Mauney and others chose Mooney. "Mooney" appears on Vertie Mooney's marriage certificate and on her grave marker. "Mooney" also appears on her father's grave marker in the 1880 Census listing.

Data Compiled and Edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 7/95


More About LULA LATTIMORE:
Burial: Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma

Notes for WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: William Christopher, "William", Elliott was born on November 15, 1892, on his father's farm in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Thomas Forbis, "Tommy", Elliott and Rebecca Bell, "Bell", Hoyle. He was the eighth of eleven children, who were born in the following order: Susan Ola, "Susan"; Sarah Tressia, "Sarah"; Mary Forbis, "Mary"; Margaret Gordon, "Mag"; Julia Ann, "Julia"; Alice Hoyle, "Alice"; John Paxton, "John"; William Christopher, "William"; Florence Belle, "Florence"; Virginia Wells, "Ginny"; and Rebecca Belle, "Belle", Elliott.

On January 17, 1904, William's mother died shortly after giving birth to Belle. In 1908, four years after his mother's death, his father married Carrie Withrow, daughter of Jason Withrow and Lou Sweezy. William has a half brother, Valentine Jason Elliott, "Val", from his father's second marriage.

The family lore includes many stories about Tommie Elliott's pack of hounds. In his autobiographical notes, William adds to this lore, relating that his father had planned to go fox hunting with Joe Blanton, Walter Lattimore, and Charles Lattimore on the Old Sweezy place; that his father had to send Jesse Stockton, a hired hand, to Cousin Walter's with the hounds because his father had to stay home; and that his father got a son instead of a fox that night.

William grew up on his father's farm, which was in Number 8 township, near Polkville, about 12 miles northwest of Shelby, the county seat. He had many relatives in the area. Martin Elliott, who fought in the Revolution, moved to North Carolina from Virginia in 1806, and his son, John Crenshaw Elliott, William's great grandfather, purchased 1300 acres on Hinton's Creek in 1809. After John Crenshaw died, his wife deeded the community an acre for the school and an acre for the church. The acre for the school was adjacent to the acre for the church.

John Crenshaw had six sons: William Martin, John Paxton, Thomas F., Edward Donoho, Andrew Jackson, and James Finch Elliott; and four daughers: Susan, Elizabeth Donoho, Nancy, and Mary F. Elliott. William was descended from John Paxton, who had six sons: Christopher Beam, Thomas Forbis, Oliver Beam, John Daniel, Andrew Jackson, and Robert Lafayette Elliott; and four daughters: Mary Donoho, Margaret Gordon, Ann Elizabeth, and Susan Elliott.

John Crenshaw and many of his descendants are buried in the Elliott family cemetery about two miles west of Polkville. The descendants of John Crenshaw Elliott have a family reunion at the Elliott Church about one mile west of Polkville on the Saturday preceding the fourth Sunday in August.

The family secretary posts the family trees on the side of the church; the cousins share their potluck picnic lunch; discuss family business, including operation of the Elliott Cemetery and maintenance of the Elliott Church; renew family ties; and refer to the family trees when they want to trace relationships with the many cousins.

According to William's autobiographical notes, written in November 1954, the Thomas Forbis Elliott farm had 140 acres more or less, containing two branches, four good springs, the family's house, seven small houses for the families of hired men, and a tanyard. In his notes, he states that it was a large house with plenty of room and that it was a good warm house for the time. Although it had a fire place in every room and it had a water pump in the kitchen.

William and the other children went to the one-room, one-teacher Elliott School when the children could be spared from the farm; i.e., from the end of the cotton-picking season in October until the beginning of the planting season in March. School started at 8:00 a.m. and closed at 4:00 p.m. He had to walk two or more miles to school. In his autobiographical notes, he writes that he was fortunate in that he had older sisters and a brother to help him get to school, because November, December, January, and February are not always sunny and warm, and it was possible to get water bound, since they had to cross the creek on a foot log.

The Lattimore children, including Lula, Macie, Rhea, and Nancy, also attended the Elliott School. Blanche attended it until Fairview school opened in 1922 and the Elliott School closed. On 8/22/93 Blanche related that the Elliott school building was just west of the Elliott church and it was the same size as the Elliott Church. She said there was a large wood stove in the middle of the room, two rows of desks on each side of the stove, and a blackboard at the front of the room. They hung their coats at the back of the room.

They only had three subjects: reading, spelling, and arithmetic. She didn't have history or English classes until she started school at Fairview. There were no "grades". There were sets of books, and when a student completed all of the books, the student had completed the equivalent of the 7th grade. Some students completed them in less than seven years, others took longer.

Although the students were required to recite from time to time, they normally studied at their desks at their own pace. On the days that they were scheduled to recite, they sat on the benches in front of the front row of desks and waited their turn to recite. They normally wrote on tablets.

On 9/21/93, his sister, Belle Coble, related that there were no public schools until Fairview School opened in 1922. The were two private academies in the area: Boiling Springs (now Garner Webb) and Piedmont, near Lawndale. William went to Piedmont. He dropped out because he had a hoarse voice, and he went to Callahan, Florida, near Jacksonville, where he worked on the Sauls farm, where they grew pecans and scuppernong grapes.

Although they had church services only once a month, the preachers made up for it with long sermons. Some of the preachers talked for two hours. In his autobiographical notes, William wrote that his father always said that a preacher should be able to deliver a sermon in an hour to an hour and a quarter. Everybody said that Cousin Bob Hoyle, a Methodist preacher, and Cousin Abe Dixon, a Baptist preacher, were the best preachers, because they laid their watches on their Bibles when they started to preach, and they seldom talked for more than half an hour, which was about the time it took him to go to sleep.

William worked on the farm and in his father's tannery. He also helped make harness; worked in the commissary; and traded harness, hides, wool, dry goods, tobacco, and produce from wagons. His sisters said that he never liked farming and that his big complaint was that cotton and corn didn't grow in the shade.

In his notes, he said the tanyard consisted of a tan shop, Beam house, Can house, hide house, two bark sheds, two lime vats, two bathing pools, four coloring vats, and a number of tanning vats. A vat is a hole in the ground four feet deep, four feet wide, and eight feet long, lined with mortar. A pool is eight feet wide, four feet deep, and eight feet long.

The tanyard was some distance from the house, because the process stinks. First, the skins are washed and dipped in a lime solution to loosen the hair. Then the flesh is cut from the underside of the skin, which is spread on a rounded board, called a beam. Then the skins are soaked in liquid containing tannic acid, a brew that is chemically very much like strong tea. The tannic acid comes from the bark of certain trees, including oak and hemlock trees. After tanning, the leather is split and shaved to an even thickness. The leather is then soaked in a solution of dyes. After it comes out of the dying (coloring) vats, the leather is drained and run through a wringer to take out the excess water and wrinkles. The skin is then tacked on a big board to dry. It stretches flat and firm as it dries. After it dries, the rough edges and the tack holes are trimmed. The leather is then "finished" according to the way it is to be used. For example, sole leather is packed firm and solid under a roller.

According to his notes, after the hides were tanned, the leather was worked up in the shop where collars, bridles, liners, and full sets of buggy, wagon, and plow harness were made, as well as saddles for men and side saddles for women. Least, as well as last, they made shoes for the family and leggins for men, and there was always a bunch of whips to be plated. The collar stuffing shop was a house apart from the rest as they used wheat straw to stuff collars, and it was a fire hazard.

The Commissary was a kind of store where the kept the books and such supplies as fat back, corn meal, flour, salt, coffee, and tobacco (plug twist and smoking), both sacked and bulk. There were also dry goods, including jeans, hickory shirting, factor white cloth, and calico. Kathleen Elliott Lambert has the old journal where they recorded the business transactions.

Cleveland County is on the East side of the Appalachian Mountains. In the spring they took the wagons on the road and traded leather goods for wool, which was taken to a mill to be washed, carded, and spun into yarn. In the summer they took the wagons into the mountains and traded for feathers, wool, and hides. In the fall they got the wool yarn from the mill where they had taken wool in the spring, and they went into the mountains to trade for cabbages, apples, chestnuts, and meat. In the winter the wagons went south and east to trade for cloth goods, coffee, and tobacco.

On 9/21/93, William's brother Val related that their father bought and sold other farms and had various business interests. Val said they had two wagons, one traded in South Carolina and the other in North Carolina. He also said the mill was a combination saw, shingle, corn, and wheat meal. The milling of corn and wheat was seasonal activity, while the milling of lumber and shingles was year-round activities. Val also related that he was much younger than William, and the school year had been extended by the time he started to school. School started in July, closed in August for cotton-picking season, and resumed in October, after the cotton was picked.

In 1911, William went to Florida for his health and lived with the Sauls family. His health got worse, rather than better, and he went back to North Carolina in March 1912. In September 1912, he went to Oklahoma, stayed with his sister Margatet, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore. After he regained his health, he got a job at the livery stable (in Minco), which was owned by Johnson and Wall.

Mag and Matt had packed up lock, stock, and barrel and headed west to Texas after the 1909 floods washed away all the crops. On 8/21/93, William's sister Belle Coble recalled her brother John and her cousin Coleman Elliott went to Oklahoma on the train with Mag and Matt to help with the children. John stayed a year, but Coleman returned in six months. A friend had advised Matt to get farmland southwest of Oklahoma City. They took the advice and settled on the Johnson Ranch, eight miles northeast of Minco. Belle recalled Matt and Mag boarding the train in Lattimore. She also stated that Matt and Mag did not own the land when they were living on the Johnson Ranch.

At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and Doc Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father could not live very long. William returned to North Carolina, and his father died in June 1914.

William remained in North Carolina and married Lula, "Lula", Lattimore, the daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mooney on January 15, 1915. In his autobiographical notes, he remembers it as a rainy Sunday afternoon. Macie, "Macie", Lattimore Covington, Lula's sister, remembered William coming for Lula in a buggy with two mules. Belle Coble recalls William hitching two mules up to a buggy. They were married at the preacher's house in Polkville, and the preacher came out to the buggy to perform the ceremony. The preacher didn't want Lula to get wet. Belle recalls William and Lula living at the Elliott house for the rest of the winter. In the spring, they moved to the mill house.

William's father owned a flour, corn, shingle, and lumber mill and a four-room house about a mile up Hinton's Creek from the John Daniel Lattimore house, near the Thomas Forbis Elliott house and tanyard. After their marriage, they lived in the house, and William operated the mill until it was washed away in the Big Flood of July 1916.

William's sister Belle thought they were very happy together until the flood. She remembers them coming to visit in a little red Buick that William had acquired. The chassis was bare except for two seats and the gas tank. It was so exciting, because nobody except their Uncle Bob Elliott and two other men in their township owned cars.

The Charlotte Observer reported five dead, eighteen missing, and disruption of railway, telegraph, and telephone communications after a hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast and caused the worst floods ever known in the area. In his November 1954 autobiographical notes, William recalled the heavy rains started on the 14th of July; the mill washed out on the 16th; Lula went into labor; and his oldest daughter, Kathleen, was born on the morning of the 17th. The heavy rains didn't end until the 18th.

Kathleen's birth certificate lists their address as Route 1, Hollis, North Carolina. According to the birth certificate, William was 23, his occupation was "Miller", Lula was 19, and the attending physician was L. V. Lee, M.D. Kathleen, who was born two and a half months premature, wasn't expected to live. They fed her with the blatter from a fountain pen, used her father's handerkchiefs for diapers, and put her in the oven to keep her warm.

According to his notes, he took a night millers job for the Colfax Milling Company in Ellenboro, about nine miles south of Hollis, after they lost everything in the flood. He worked there for a short time, and then he was told by his doctor that he had miller's tuberculosis or an abcessed lung and that he would have to quit the milling business.

He returned to Oklahoma in September 1916 to "cut leather" (make and repair harness. In December 1916, Lula and Kathleen came to Oklahoma on the train, accompanied by William's sister Susan, who carried Kathleen, who was still a tiny baby, on a pillow, and William started work at the "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco. This was the beginning of a long association with the B. Wall family.

The Railroad Museum at Old Fort, North Carolina, has an old Southern Railways route map. According to the map, they caught the "Southern Railways" local in Lattimore and traveled through Shelby to Blacksburg, South Carolina, where they changed trains, getting on the main liner from Charlotte to Atlanta. They changed trains, catching one that went through Birmingham and Sheffield (south of Florence) to Memphis, where they changed to the "Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific", which went through North Little Rock, Arkansas, and McAlister, Oklahoma, to get to Oklahoma City.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, William accepted a job as a mechanic in Chickasha at Barton Brothers Garage, operated by Emmett and Earl Barton. The job offer came from Earl Barton, who was dating one of B. Wall's daughters. The family moved from Minco to 216 South Eighth Street in Chickasha. His oldest son, William C., Junior, "Billie" as a child and "Bill" as an adult, was born in the Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, Kathleen's second birthday.

In December 1918, after B. Wall bought out Bennet & Son, the family moved back to Minco, and William went to work for B. Wall in what was then "The Brick Garage" on Main Street. Later, he acquired an interest in the garage. William purchased the house at Burt and Railroad Streets, next to the B. Wall house, and on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

His third child, Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B.", named for her grandmothers, Vertie Mauney and Belle Hoyle, was born in November 1921. His fourth child, Annie Lou, "Ann", was born in October 1923, the same year he sold 20 acres of land from his father's estate and fixed up the house. According to his autobiographical notes, he got sick while working on a tractor in August 1924 and had to give up automobile work.

On January 10,1924, Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, moved to Minco, under the command of Captain Thomas W. Brown. The next year he was employed as caretaker mechanic, responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment. The armory was in the old brick garage on Main Street. The new armory was built as a WPA project in 1936. According to his discharge certificate, William enlisted in the National Guard on May 23, 1925, as caretaker mechanic, with the rank of sergeant. His November 1954 notes state that the physical examination was waived for the good of the service. His discharge certificate indicates that he was discharged on May 26, 1928. Kathleen has his discharge certificate.

Throughout his adult life he made up for his limited formal education thru self study and by taking correspondence courses, including courses on automobile repair and other subjects. His specialty was overhauling carburetors, replacing sparkplugs and points, and adjusting the timing as necessary to tune the engine. He also took correspondence courses for the National Guard. He was one of the first people in Minco to have a radio receiver, having built a crystal set. Vertie recalls the excitement of listening to country music with headsets. She also recalls her father telling her that he had attended classes in the same classroom that she had taken an accounting class at OCW, Oklahoma College for Women, in Chickasha.

His biograhical notes state that he resigned his job with the National Guard to try research work, with C. W., "Charlie", Lindsay; B. Wall; and Kirk Woodworth as his financial backers. Charlie Lindsay was the local agent for the Rock Island Railroad; B. Wall ran the local Ford garage and had farming interests; and Kirk Woodworth ran the local hardware store. B. Wall's given name was "Brun", but he was always called "B. Wall". Even his tombstone says "B. Wall".

During this period William developed and patented a number of products, notably water pump control equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal water well in Minco. Although they had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which marketed this type of equipment, they never made any money off the patents. He was doing business as the "Elliott Manufacturing Company", and Kathleen Elliott Lambert has one of his business cards. He also developed equipment to convert coal stoves to burn kerosene. He installed one in the living room stove in the house in Minco, and it was much appreciated on cold mornings.

Patent Number 1789620, "Liquid-Pressure Controls and Dampening Devices", was issued to William C. Elliott on January 20, 1931. The application for this patent, serial number 265,495, filed on March 28, 1928, described his invention, a device for starting and stopping electrically driven pumps supplying water to elevated tanks or standpipes.

Patent Number 1780179, "Adjustable High and Low Pressure Switch Alarms", was issued to William C. Elliott and Earl S. Henry on November 4, 1930. The application for this patent, serial number 290,237, filed on July 3, 1928, described their invention, a device for adjustable alarms for electric switches controlled and operated by the pressure of oil, liquids or gases, and are especially adapted for use for alarms and for starters and stoppers of various devices in which electric circuit breakers can be used.

Patent Number 1855880, "Pulsating Pressure Stabilizers", was issued to William C. Elliott on April 26, 1932. The application for this patent, serial number 408,084, filed on November 18, 1929, described his invention, a device for stabilizing the pressure in gauges and in automatic pressure governing means, upon a pump line.

The data regarding these patents was copied from the patents, which were given to me on 8/11/93 by Vertie Elliott for review and transmittal to William Christopher Elliott, III. The documentation for each patent consisted of the patent with an impressive cover with signatures, seals, and ribbons; a drawing of the device; and a technical description of the invention; and a copy of the contents of the Patent Office file with a file wrapper.

His second son, John Thomas, "J.T.", who was named for his grandfathers, John Daniel Lattimore and Thomas Forbis Elliott, was born in January 1925; his third son, Frank Wall, "Frank", was born in February 1927; and his fourth daughter, Julia Mae, "Judy", was born in November 1928. Frank is a common Lattimore family name. The "Wall" was for B. Wall. Julia is a common family name. The "Mae" is for a family friend.

In 1929, he remodeled the house and made it modern; i.e., modern electrical wiring and light fixtures, modern bathroom with hot and cold running water, and modern kitchen with an electric range and oven. He also rejoined the National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties.

According to his discharge certificate, which is in Kathleen Elliott Lambert's possession, he enlisted in the National Guard on November 1, 1929, as caretaker mechanic with the rank of Master Sergeant. According to his biographical notes, he passed the physical when he enlisted. He remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized on September 16, 1940.

As caretaker mechanic, his duties included maintenance of the building and the equipment in the old armory in the old Brick Garage on Main Stree, including old World War I FWD trucks, until the new armory was constructed in 1936 and the old trucks were replaced with modern 4-wheel drive trucks and command cars. He made frequent trips to checkup on the construction of the new armory, which was constructed by the Works Project Administration (WPA). He also made trips to the armory in Chickasha and to Oklahoma National Guard headquarters in Oklahoma City. As caretaker mechanic, he was a civilian employee of the War Department.

As the senior noncommissioned officer, he was responsible for administrative matters, including preparing the schedules for the weekly drills, the annual two-week training periods at Fort Sill, and other activities. Since he was the only full-time employee, he routinely received the mail, read it, decided what action was required, and prepared an appropriate response for the Captain's signature. In the process, he became an expert in military regulations and procedures as well as operation and maintenance of the equipment.

His son Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy", was born in March 1930; his daughter Mary Lee, "Mary Lee", was born in June 1931; his daughter Lula Faye, "Faye", was born in August 1932; his son James Emmett, "James" or "Jim", was born in April 1934; and his son Aaron Cornwell, "A.C." or "Aaron", was born in May 1935. "Charles", "Mary", and "James" are common Elliott and Lattimore family names. "Lattimore" is Lula's family name. "Lee", "Faye", and "Emmett" are names in honor of friends.

Although Aaron was named for the attending physician, Dr. Aaron Little of Minco, and Dr. Frank Cornwell Lattimore of Kingfisher, who was called to assist, "Aaron" is a common Lattimore family name, and both the Elliotts and the Lattimores are related to the Cornwell family. Dr. Frank Lattimore was William's nephew, the son of his sister Margaret, "Mag", Lattimore. He was Lula's cousin, the son of her Uncle Matt Lattimore.

All of the children started to school in Minco, and Kathleen, Bill, Vertie, Ann, J. T., and Judy graduated from Minco High School. Frank graduated from Abilene High School; Charles and Mary Lee from Killeen High School; and Faye, James, and Aaron from Vian High School. Bill and J.T. played basketball, baseball, and football in high school, and Ann played clarinet in the school band. Frank and Charles delivered newspapers.

William continued his research activities in his spare time, developing and patenting miniature field artillery pieces. The spring powered miniatures were designed to fire ball bearings at miniature targets in a sand box 20 feet away, using a scale of one inch to 10 yards.

The miniature guns and targets allowed field artillery officers to look at the miniature targets through their regular field artillery sights, observe the impacting "shells", and order the "fire" to be moved up or down and right or left, using conventional field artillery fire control procedures. The "single barrel" version allowed them to practice "spotting fire" from individual field artillery pieces, and the "four barrel" version allowed them to spot fire for artillery batteries.

He demonstrated the miniature field artillery pieces at Fort Sill and, in 1939, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The demonstrations were well received because neither the National Guard nor the Regular Army could afford to use "live" ammunition for training in peacetime.

The 1930s were tough years, and it wasn't just the depression. After several years of drought, Oklahoma was part of the "Dust Bowl". In the fall, the blowing dust was so bad that they kept the windows closed, even on hot days, to keep out the blowing dust. Many farmers abandon their farms, packed up, and moved to California in hopes of finding a better life. Fortunately, William had a "good Government job" with a regular pay check.

Although they didn't have much time for leisure activities, William had joined the Masonic Lodge, and Lula was a member of the Eastern Star. Lula went to church regularly, and encouraged the children to do so. William occasionally played dominos with his friends, but most of the time he was busy at the armory or taking care of things around the house. Their little free time was spent listening to the radio and reading.

William liked fine cars. Although he could never afford a new one, he liked to work on them. He kept banker's car tuned up, and, when the banker bought a new car, William usually managed to buy the old one. In the early '30s he had a 1928 Lincoln town car, later he acquired a 1935 Hudson Terraplane, then he got the banker's 1937 Chrysler Imperial, which he drove until the new cars came out after the war, and he acquired a 1939 Lincoln Zephyr.

Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, and the Russians invaded Poland on September 17th. After Poland was partitioned, the Russians forced Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania to accede to their demands, and then attacked Finland. After Finland capitulated and the Germans invaded Norway and Denmark, England and France entered the war. The Germans invaded the Netherlands and Belgium in May 1940 and started their drive for the Channel. France fell in June, and the Battle of Britain started in August 1940. It was evident that the United States would sooner or later enter the war.

Congress passed the Selective Service Act, which was signed on September 16, 1940, authorizing the first peacetime military conscription in American History. In addition to drafting men for one year's service, the National Guard was mobilized. The local unit was mobilized as Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery Battaltion, 45th Division, with 16 officers and noncommissioned officers (including one Captain, one First Lieutenant, two Second Lieutenants, an attached Master Sergeant, one First Sergeant, one Technical Sergeant, two Staff Sergeants, four Sergeants, and three Corporals); 12 Privates First Class; 24 Privates; and 34 Recruits. The unit moved to Fort Sill, about 60 miles south southwest of Minco, and remained there until after Pearl Harbor, except for maneuvers at Camp Polk, Louisiana, in 1941, when the Army experimented with its evolving war plans and tactics.

William became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United States with date of rank of November 1, 1929, upon mobilization. There were very few Master Sergeants, the highest enlisted rank, in each Division. William had this rank because he was the "Battalion Motor Sergeant", attached to Service Battery. Normally, the "First Sergeant" is the senior noncommissioned officer in field artillery batteries and infantry companies. After the unit arrived in Fort Sill, William operated the motor pool.

His son Bill joined the unit with the rank of Private shortly before it was mobilized and was promoted to Corporal after the division arrived at Fort Sill, the complement was increased from 42 to 76, and they were authorized additional noncommissioned officers. Bill was promoted to Sergeant when the original Supply Sergeant was discharged. Father, son, and most of the division spent the winter of 1940-41 in tents. The family remained in Minco. Since it was so close, father and son got three-day passes and came home about once a month.

In April 1942, William was transferred to Camp Barkley, Texas, about 15 miles southwest of Abilene. Bill went to Officers Candidate School at Camp Lee, Virginia; was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps upon graduation in May 1942; and was assigned to duty with the Army Air Corps.

The family moved to Texas in August 1942, initially living in a ranch house about 10 miles south of Abilene. Most of the ranch had been taken over by the Army for use as an artillery range. The house was on Buffalo Gap highway, south of Wylie, convenient to Camp Barkley. In April 1943, the ranch was sold, and the family moved to Abilene. The children attended schools at

More About WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT:
Burial: Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma

Children of LULA LATTIMORE and WILLIAM ELLIOTT are:
i. VIRGINIA KATHLEEN10 ELLIOTT, b. 17 July 1916, Rutherford Cnty, North Carolina; m. DENZILLE LEON LAMBERT, 01 March 1947; b. 23 June 1919, Sterling, Commanche County, Oklahoma.

Notes for VIRGINIA KATHLEEN ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Virginia Kathleen Elliott, "Kathleen", was born on July 17, 1916, in
Rutherford County, North Carolina, the daughter of William Christopher Elliott,
"William", and Lula Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". She was the oldest of twelve
children, six boys and six girls, who were born in the following order:
Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen"; William C., Jr., "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie
Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T.";
Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae, "Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy";
Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and
Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or "A.C.". All lived to middle or old age. Kathleen
has always been called "Kathleen", never Virginia.

Kathleen grew up in Minco and graduated from Minco High School. She learned
to sew by making doll clothes by hand, and then she learned how to make them
on the sewing machine. She was making all her own clothes by the time she was
in eighth grade, and she did much of the family's sewing, making everything
from tot's clothing to wool jackets for her brothers and sisters.

When she was in the 7th or 8th grade, Kathleen started working at Markle's
Grocery, cleaning and filling candy cases twice a week and getting paid in
candy that delighted her siblings. As her work increased, she got money too.

The stock market crashed in 1929, and the country was in the midst of the
depression while she was in high school. Her sewing not only conserved the
family's limited resources, but she also brought in money or its equivalent
(credit) when Dad brought home shirts that needed altering (sleeves) for Mr.
Clayton to sell in his drygoods (clothing) store.

Kathleen graduated from high school in 1934, in the middle of the depression.
She wanted to go to college, and it became possible when B. Wall called the
School Superintendent, Professor J. E. Perry, and he called M. A. Nash,
President of Oklahoma College for Women (OCW), now the University of the
Sciences and Arts of Oklahoma, at Chickasha, and he arranged for Kathleen to be
admitted to the college. Kathleen worked for room and board; received a college
loan; and with $2.50 to $5.00 a month from home for bus fare ($0.05 each way)
and incidentals, completed her first three years at OCW.

In her senior year, she moved to a room near friends and nearer the campus,
obtained another loan, and got a National Youth Administration (NYA) funded
college office job. She also took a job cooking and cleaning for a young
couple. She graduated in 1938.

The depression continued, jobs were scarce, and, after graduating from college,
she was lucky to become the business teacher at Sterling at $90.00 per month for
seven months. State scale was $80.00. The extra $10.00 was for helping in the
office. Since Sterling was a small farming town, the school system shutdown in
the fall while the students helped pick the cotton crop. Kathleen started work
when classes resumed.

She taught typing, shorthand, and bookkeeping. The first year she lived in the
front bedroom of the Methodist parsonage. The second and third years she lived
in the house of one of the teachers. One year she went to Galveston, Texas, on
the school bus with the seniors on their "Class Trip".

In February 1940, Kathleen resigned at Sterling to teach at Mooresville, North
Carolina, a good mill town near Charlotte. Mooresville is in Iredell County,
which was cut from Rowan County, one of the counties in the wooded rolling hill
country where the Elliotts and Lattimores settled in the Eighteenth Century.
She taught business courses; i.e., typing, shorthand, and bookkeeping. Her
second year, the seniors chartered a bus for their class trip to Washington,
D.C., and Kathleen went with them.

That summer Kathleen and another teacher worked for a lumber brokerage in
Statesville, about fifteen miles north of Mooresville. When a job opened at
Kings Mountain, nearer her grandparents and other kin, she took it. One
weekend in 1942, Kathleen and a friend took the bus to Camp Lee, Virginia, to
see her brother Bill graduate from Officers Candidate School and get his
Commission as a Second Lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps.

She returned to Oklahoma in the fall of 1942 to teach at Mangum High School and
Junior College, in the "short grass county" in the southwestern part of the
state. At Mangum, she worked the school terms plus two weeks in the office.
She also worked four weeks during the summers at Mangum Motors as a bookkeeper.
These were war years, and she assisted with the food and gas rationing
programs. Her memories of the period include the fire that destroyed a store
and some apartments, including hers; her roommate eloping and going to Rhode
Island; and her boss, Elmer Fraker, becoming Adjutant of the American Legion
for the State of Oklahoma.

In June 1945, she moved to Oklahoma City and signed on as private secretary to
the State Adjutant of the American Legion, working for her former boss. Life
as a full-time secretary in Oklahoma City, the state capital, was certainly
different from teaching high school in a small town. She had a very nice
apartment on the bus route between downtown Oklahoma City and the Capitol.

At work, she learned enough journalism to write copy, proofread, and perform
other tasks for the Oklahoma Legionnaire. She made many trips to the newspaper
offices printing it. Some were in El Reno, Norman, and the City. She worked
at Legion Conventions in the City, Tulsa, and Chicago; and she also assisted
with work at Boys' State, held at the School for Deaf at Sulphur; took notes at
some pardon, parole, and correction board meetings; and took notes at meetings
at the Federal Reformatory in El Reno.

On March 1, 1947, Kathleen married Denzille Leon Lambert, "Denzille", a native
of Sterling. He had joined the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) during the
depression and the drought that turned Oklahoma into part of the "dust bowl" and
forced so many from the state to go to California in search of a better life.
After working in Arizona, Oklahoma, and Wyoming, Denzille returned to Sterling
to finish high school. After graduation in 1941, he got a job as a bricklayer,
and was offered an opportunity to attend Oklahoma Agricultual and Mechanical
(A&M) College, now Oklahoma State University, at Stillwater, under a National
Youth Administration (NYA) program.

After he got his draft notice, Denzille enrolled in the National Defense
Industrial Training School program, and on November 14, 1941, he completed 320
hours of aircraft sheet-metal courses, including riveting, blueprint reading,
band forming, and small parts assembly, at North American Aviation in Dallas,
Texas. He then worked for Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation in San
Diego, California, until April 1944, when he was inducted into the U.S. Army,
at Oklahoma City; shipped to Fort Smith, Arkansas; and assigned to Camp Fanning
at Tyler, Texas, for infantry training. He was then shipped to Fort Ord,
California, where he was assigned to duty with the 40th Infantry Division,
and sent to the Philipplines, where he participated in mopping up operations on
Mindanao and the Leyte and Panay operations. After Japan surrendered in August
1945, he was shipped to Korea with the occupation forces.

Denzille's sister died in January 1946, and he came home from Korea on emergency
leave. He subsequently reenlisted and was assigned to duty at Fort Meade,
Maryland. Kathleen and Denzille were married on March 1,1947, while Denzille
was on leave. After they were married, Denzille served with the Army of
Occupation in Japan, and Kathleen continued to live in Oklahoma City and work
for the American Legion.

In the fall of 1949, Denzille returned to Oklahoma on leave, they bought their
first car, and they moved to Tacoma, Washington, where Denzille was assigned
to duty at Fort Lewis. Their home was a motel cabin. It was a cold winter
with over 44 inches of snow.

Denzille's enlistment ended in April 1950, and they returned to Oklahoma and
settled in Elgin. Denzille found work at Lawton and started looking for a
farm. He found one near Elgin and bought it in October 1950. Kathleen was
lucky. Elgin needed a business teacher, and she took the job. It lasted 29
years, ending when she retired in 1979, after 36 years of teaching and over four
years of secretarial work.

Although she taught high school classes for so many years, she had requests to
to teach at a business college and at a North Carolina Junior College, to work
for the University of Oklahoma Alumni Secretary, and to be the secretary of a
college president. She also had requests to teach where she had taught.

She did some graduate work, attended many workshops, participated in the first
Aerospace Workshop for Oklahoma teachers at OSU, which included bus trips or
flights to the American Airlines maintenance and overhaul facilities in Tulsa;
Aero Commander, Beech, Cesna, and Boeing manufacturing facilities in Wichita,
Kanasas; the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Center at Will
Rogers Field in Oklahoma City; the National Aeronauctics and Space
Administration (NASA) Manned Space Flight Center in Houston, Texas; The
Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsille, Alabama; and the U.S. Air Force
Armament Development and Test Center at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. She
participated in business teachers activities at the county and district level
and served four years as district representative in the state organization.
These activities helped her and her students.

The abstract on their farm indicates a widow, Addie Stephens, made a final
payment ($205.20) to A. W. Maxwell, U.S. Receiver, who sent it to the Land
Grant Office. The United States, pursuant to Act of Congress 20th of May 1867,
granted her the tract .... 160 acres. The grant was signed for President Wm. H.
Taft by Secretary M.W. Yound and by H. W. Sanford, Recorder of General Land
Office. Patent #98330.

B. R. Brindley and wife Matila became the owners of the property in October
1915, and Kathleen and Denzille bought it from their heirs, a son and his wife,
Robert E. and Eunice Brindley, of Miami, Arizona, in October 1950.

Denzille chose a hill top for their home site; purchased a house; had it moved
to the site; and had a well drilled, power connected, and alterations made.
They moved into the house on April 29, 1951.

Denzille built a dairy barm, purchased a few registered Brown Swiss cows, and
established a "Grade A" dairy. He spent the next 25 years building a herd
of registered Brown Swiss with a national reputation, evidenced by the wide
interest and attention in the dairy industry when Denzille retired in 1975
and the cows were sold at public auction.

Their farm was surrounded by oil drilling rigs during the 1982 "boom". They
even had a rig on the farm, they drilled, and they hit gas at about 23,000 feet.
However, the boom turned into a "bust" when the world market for crude oil
collapsed. Although the well was eventually connected to the gas main, they
never realized any significant royalties. However, it was an exciting period
for Commanche County. At one time Kathleen and Denzille could see dozens of oil
rigs from their house. Five years later, they were all gone. The gas may still
be there, but it is unlikely that anyone will drill for it until there is
another energy crisis.

They have deep roots in Elgin, and they hope to continue to enjoy living on the
farm for many more years, evidenced by the recent alterations and improvements
to their house. Their latch string is still out, as they enjoy sharing
"country" with their many friends and relatives.

Her mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where the
Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. Her father came
to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health and stayed with his sister Margaret, "Mag",
and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who had moved to Oklahoma in 1909 and settled
on the Johnson Ranch, about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he regained
his health, her father worked in a livery stable in Minco "cutting leather"
(making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and Doc. Gold
came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told him that his father was in poor
health and was not expected to live much longer. After his father died in
June 1914, her father remained in North Carolina and married Lula Lattimore
in January 1915.

After her parents were married, her father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that her grandfather Elliott had owned, and
they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were
four miles up Hinton's Creek from her grandfather Lattimore's house, just over
the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

Kathleen attended a family reunion in North Carolina in 1940, where she was
approached by an old gentleman, who said, "I know who you are. You are John
Daniel's granddaughter, born the year of The Big Flood." The gentleman was
referring to John Daniel Lattimore, Kathleen's grandfather, and to the flood
of July 1916.

The Charlotte Observer on July 17, 1916, reported five dead and eighteen
missing from floods in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia after a
hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast and the unprecedented rains caused the
worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway, telegraph, and
telephone communications.

In his autobiograhical notes, written in November 1954, her father remembers
the heavy rains started on July 14th; the mill was washed out on the 16th;
Lula went into labor; and his daughter, Kathleen, was born on the morning
of the 17th. The rains didn't end until the 18th.

Kathleen, who was born two and a half months premature, and wasn't expected
to live. She was born at home, as were most babies in those days. Her
father's handkerchiefs became her diapers, she was fed with a fountain pen
tube, and they put her in the oven to keep her warm.

After the floods washed out her father's flour mill, he worked in a flour mill
in Ellenboro, North Carolina, for several months; was told by his doctor that
he had miller's tuberculosis or an abcessed lung; and he quit the milling
business. In September 1916, her father return to Oklahoma for his health. In
December he started work at the "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco,
and Kathleen and her mother came to Oklahoma from North Carolina on the train,
accompanied by her father's sister Susan, who carried Kathleen, who was still
a tiny baby, on a pillow.

In January 1917, after Johnson and Wall sold out to Bennet & Son, the Elliott
family moved to Chickasha, about 20 miles south of Minco, where her father took
a job as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage, operated by Emmett and Earl
Barton. The family lived at 216 South Eighth Street in Chickasha. Her mother
was so elated when the Chickasha doctor said that Kathleen was a "normal"
two-year old (i.e., Age: 1 year 11 months, Height: 33 inches, Weight: 23 pounds)
that she kept the card, which is in Kathleen's possession. Her brother Bill was
born in Chickasha on her second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet and Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and her father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. He later acquired an interest in the garage. Her
father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next to
the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he
purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow posture.

Her sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and her sister Ann was born in
October 1923. In 1923, her father sold 20 acres of land from his father's
estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, her father got sick from the
heat while working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and the next year her father was employed as caretaker mechanic,
responsible for maintenance of the armory and equipment, with the rank of
Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garage on Main
Street. The new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, her father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although they had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which
markets this type of equipment, they never made any money off the patents. He
was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of his
business cards.

In 1929, her parents remodeled and modernized their house, and her father
rejoined the National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the
rank of Master Sergeant. He remained in the National Guard until it wasmobilized in September 1940. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to
Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, 45th Division,
and her father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United States. He
remained on active duty until he retired in May 1949.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in
"Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiographical
notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed to family
members by Vertie Elliott; newspapers clippings and other memorabilia collected
by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; and conversations with Kathleen Elliott Lambert,
Denzille Lambert, and others at the William C. Elliott family reunionn in July
1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


Notes for DENZILLE LEON LAMBERT:
RESUME: Son of Jacob Lee Lambert and Lizzie Mae Guest. Married Virginia
"Kathleen" Elliott on March 1, 1947, at Lawton, Oklahoma. Served in the U.S.
Army during World War II and during the immediate post-war years. Dairy farmer
in Oklahoma, near Fletcher, for over 25 years.


75. ii. WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT, JR., b. 17 July 1918, Chickasha, Grady County, Oklahoma; d. 08 May 1975, Annandale, Fairfax County, Virginia.
iii. VERTIE BELLE ELLIOTT, b. 12 November 1921, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.

Notes for VERTIE BELLE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Vertie Belle Elliott, "Vertie" or "V.B.", was born on November 12,
1921, at Minco, Oklahoma, the daughter of William Christopher Elliott,
"William", and Lula Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". She was the third of twelve
children, six boys and six girls, who were born in the following order:
Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen"; William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie
Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T.";
Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae, "Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy";
Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and
Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or "A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Vertie started to grade school in September 1926, graduated from the 8th grade
in May 1936, and from Minco High School in May 1939. She entered the Oklahoma
College for Women (OCW), now the University of the Sciences and Arts of
Oklahoma, at Chickasha. She received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Commerce
on May 4, 1943. She also received a teaching degree, having minored in
education.

Upon graduation, she was employed at the U.S. Army's Borden General Hospital in
Chickasha, graduating in the morning, interviewing with the Adjutant in the
afternoon, starting work the same day, and being paid for the day. She was
employed continuously at Borden General until August 1946, when the hospital
closed.

In August 1946, she went to North Carolina to get acquained with the Elliotts
and Lattimores. While visiting her cousin Mary Belle Jones at Whiteville,
she attended an Eastern Star Meeting and was offered a position teaching
school. Her qualifications: Descendant of Good Families, Member of Eastern
Start, and, lastly, a Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Business. She
told them she would go home for Christmas and be back for the second semester.
However, she caught the flu while visiting her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. J.
Leatherman, in Lenoir, and called the School Superintendent and told him thatshe was going home to "God's Country - Never to leave it again".

After returning to Oklahoma, she was employed by Universal CIT (UCIT) Credit
Corporation Accounting Division from January 1947 to September 1947 and by
Erwin-Wasey Adjusting Agency from October 1947 to October 1949. From October
1949 to December 1986, she was employed by a local accounting firm that went
through several permutations; i.e., C.C. Wilson, Certified Public Accountant
(C.P.A.) when she joined the firm; then Gus J. Karey, C.P.A.; and finally,
Karey, McCloud, and Day, C.P.A., when she retired. However, she continued
to work for several years during "tax season". Although she moved up from
secretary to office manager, she kept the same wooden-back secretarial chair.
Vertie enjoys reading, cross word puzzles, and playing bridge and other card
games. She is a member of the Baptist Church. She is de facto secretary of
the Descendants of William Christopher and Lula Lattimore Elliott.

Her mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where the
Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. Her father came
to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, originally staying with his sister Mag and
her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909 and settled on the
Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he regained his
health, her father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting leather"
(making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and Doc.
Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was in
poor health and would not live much longger. William returned to North
Carolina, and his father died in June 1914. After his death, William remained
in North Carolina and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After her parents were married, her father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that her grandfather Elliott had owned, and
they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were
four miles up Hinton's Creek from her grandfather Lattimore's house, just over
the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916 and the unprecedented
rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway,
telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the
floods, and her sister Kathleen was born prematurely the next morning.

Her father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten
miles south of Hollis. In September 1916, her father returned to Oklahoma. In
December 1916, her mother and her sister Kathleen, accompanied by her Aunt Susan
Elliott, came to Oklahoma on the train, and her father started working for
"Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson and Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family
moved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where her father worked
as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. Her brother Bill was born at
Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, her sister Kathleen's second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet & Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and her father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. Later, her father acquired an interest in the garage.
Her father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next
to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, hepurchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

Vertie was born in November 1921, and her sister Ann was born in October 1923,
the year her father sold 20 acres of land from his father's estate and fixed up
the house. In August 1924, her father got sick while working on a tractor and
had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and her father was employed as caretaker mechanic, responsible
for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment, with the rank of
Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garage on
Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, her father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although he had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which
marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He
was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of his
business cards.

Her brother John was born in January 1925, her brother Frank was born in
February 1927, and her sister Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, her
parents remodeled and modernized their house, and her father rejoined the
National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the rank of
Master Sergeant.

Her father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September
1940, the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law,
responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium and the
Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of
France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about
60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, 45th
Division, and her father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United
States. Her father remained on active duty until he retired in May 1949.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in
"Peiter Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiograhical
notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed by Vertie
Elliott to family members; newspapers clippings and other memorabilia collected
by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; and conversations at the William C. Elliott family
reunion in July 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


76. iv. ANNIE LOU ELLIOTT, b. 15 October 1923, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
77. v. JOHN THOMAS ELLIOTT, b. 04 January 1925, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
78. vi. FRANK WALL ELLIOTT, b. 01 February 1927, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
79. vii. JULIA MAE ELLIOTT, b. 29 November 1928, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
80. viii. CHARLES LATTIMORE ELLIOTT, b. 20 March 1930, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
81. ix. MARY LEE ELLIOTT, b. 29 June 1931, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
82. x. LULA FAYE ELLIOTT, b. 17 August 1932, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
83. xi. JAMES EMMETT ELLIOTT, b. 03 April 1934, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.
84. xii. AARON CORNWELL ELLIOTT, b. 21 May 1935, Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma.

52. MARY NANCY9 LATTIMORE (JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 07 August 1906 in Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 1992 in Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, North Carolina. She married PAUL SPURGON GIBBS 28 October 1933. He was born Abt. 1905, and died 1965 in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY NANCY LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Mary Nancy, "Nancy", Lattimore was born on August 7, 1906, on her father's farm near Polkville, North Carolina, the daughter of John Daniel "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mauney. She was the fifth of their nine children, seven girls and two boys, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee, "Clara"; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche", Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L.,
"Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnie were twins.

Nancy was named for her two grandmothers, Mary Peeler Mooney, and Nancy Gold Lattimore. Since there were several other Mary Lattimores, including her aunt, who lived on the next farm, she was called Nancy.

Nancy Lattimore attended Elliott's Church School from first through sixth grade. All of the children walked to school, which was about two miles from the John Daniel Lattimore home. The Elliott Church School was a one-room, one-teacher school where classes were held when the children could be spared from the farm; i.e., from the end of cotton-picking season in October until the beginning of planting season in March. School started at 8:00 a.m. and closed at 4:00 p.m.

She attended seventh and eighth grades at Fairview School, the first public school, which was about a mile northwest of Polkville. At Fairview, she played basketball on the outdoor dirt court. After finishing eighth grade at Fairview, she attended Boiling Springs Baptist Boarding School.

After graduating from high school at Boiling Springs, Nancy entered nurses training at Rutherford Hospital in Rutherfordton, North Carolina. After graduation, she worked as a private duty nurse until she saved enough money to go to Woman's Hospital in New York to take post-graduate obstetric and gynecology courses. She was there for a number of years and became the head of one of the departments at Woman's Hospital.

Nancy returned to North Carolina to marry her high school sweetheart, Paul Carson Gibbs, who was manager of a Pender food store. After their marriage on October 28, 1933, they lived in a number of places, including Polkville, Troy, Charlotte, Whiteville, and Rockingham, where their two sons, Paul Carson Gibbs and James Stephen Gibbs, were born.

Paul Gibbs died in 1965 and was buried in Rockingham.

Nancy was about 50 when Paul died. She went to Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem and took a refresher course, and then she went back to nursing. For 10 years she worked in the hospital in Laurinburg, North Carolina, about 20 miles southeast of Rockingham.

After she became disabled, Nancy went into a nursing home in Kernersville, North Carolina, between Greensboro and Winston-Salem. Later, she moved to a nursing home in Winston-Salem, where she died in 1992. She was buried in Rockingham with her husband.

An undated newspaper clipping states that she was survived by her sons, Paul Gibbs of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and James Stephens Gibbs of Marietta, Georgia.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from Louise Lattimore Beaman, her sister, and from conversations with other descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About MARY NANCY LATTIMORE:
Burial: Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina

Notes for PAUL SPURGON GIBBS:
REMARKS: I don't know when or where Paul Gibbs was born, the names of his
parents, or whether he had any brothers or sisters. I am not sure of his
middle name. One source indicates his full name was Paul Spurgon Gibbs, and
another states it was Paul Carson Gibbs.

Paul Gibbs attended high school at Boiling Springs Baptist Boarding School in
Boiling Springs, North Carolina, where he met Mary Nancy, "Nancy", Lattimore,
daughter of John Daniel Lattimore and Vertie Irene Mooney Lattimore.

After graduation from high school, Nancy Lattimore entered nurses training at
Rutherford Hospital in Rutherfordton, North Carolina; worked as a private duty
nurse and saved money for post-graduate courses at Woman's Hospital in New
York; completed post-graduate training in obstetrics and gynecology; and became
the head of one of the departments at Woman's Hosptial.

According to Johnie Lattimore, his brother-in-law, Paul Gibbs was from
Polkville, North Carolina, and that he worked in the Stamey's store inPolkville after he graduated from high school.

After Paul Gibbs became the manager of the Stamey's store in Polkville, he
married Nancy Lattimore, daughter of John Daniel Lattimore and Vertie Mooney
Lattimore. After their marriage on October 28, 1933, they lived in a
number of places, including Polkville, Troy, Charlotte, Whiteville, and
Rockingham, where their two sons, Paul Carson Gibss and James Stephen Gibbs,
were born.

Paul Gibbs died in 1965 and was buried in Rockingham.

Nancy was about 50 when Paul died. She went to Baptist Hospital in
Winston-Salem and took a refresher course, and then she went back to nursing.
For 10 years she worked in the hospital in Laurinburg, North Carolina, about 20
miles southeast of Rockingham.

After she became disabled, Nancy went into a nursing home in Kernersville,
North Carolina, between Greensboro and Winston-Salem. Later, she moved to a
nursing home in Winston-Salem, where she died in 1992. She was buried in
Rockingham with her husband.

An undated newspaper clipping states that she was survived by her sons,
Paul Gibbs of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and James Stephens Gibbs of
Marietta, Georgia.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from Louise
Lattimore Beaman, her sister, and from conversations with other descendants of
John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


More About PAUL SPURGON GIBBS:
Burial: Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina

Children of MARY LATTIMORE and PAUL GIBBS are:
i. PAUL CARSON10 GIBBS, b. 25 November 1938, Rockingham, North Carolina.

Notes for PAUL CARSON GIBBS:
REMARKS: Paul Carson Gibbs was born November 25, 1938, in Rockingham, North
Carolina, the son of Paul Spurgon Gibbs and Mary Nancy Lattimore. He was one
of two children: Paul Carson and James Stephen Gibbs. The Paul Spurgon Gibbs
family lived in Rockingham, North Carolina, where Paul Gibbs managed the
Penders food store.

Paul Carson Gibbs was in the insurance business for a while. He didn't like
office work, so he became an independent private investigator. He and his
wife, Avis, have two children: Stephen and Barbara. They live in Kernersville,
North Carolina.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from Louise
Lattimore Beaman, his aunt, and from conversations with other descendants of
John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


ii. JAMES STEPHEN GIBBS, b. 18 December 1943, Rockingham, North Carolina.

Notes for JAMES STEPHEN GIBBS:
REMARKS: James Stephen Gibbs was born December 18, 1943, in Rockingham, North
Carolina, the son of Paul Spurgon Gibbs and Mary Nancy Lattimore. He was one
of two children: Paul Carson and James Stephen Gibbs. The Paul Spurgon Gibbs
family lived in Rockingham, North Carolina, where Paul Gibbs managed the
Penders food store.

James Gibbs is in the insurance business. He and his wife, Gwen, have one
daughter, Laura. They live in Atlanta, Georgia.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from Louise
Lattimore Beaman, his aunt, and from conversations with other descendants of
John Daniel Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/95.


53. ORA BLANCHE9 LATTIMORE (JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 22 May 1910 in Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married ROY SAMUEL CARPENTER 21 December 1934, son of JAMES CARPENTER and VERTIE PRUETT. He was born 14 September 1910 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 20 May 1995 in Concord, Cabarrus County, North Carolina.

Notes for ORA BLANCHE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Ora Blanche, "Blanche", Lattimore was born May 22, 1910, on her father's farm near Polkville, North Carolina, the daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene Mauney, "Vertie", Lattimore. She is the sixth of their nine children, seven girls and two boys, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara Fee, "Clara"; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnie were twins.

Blanche Lattimore completed grades 1 through 3 at the Elliott School near Polkville, grades 4 through 8 at Fairview School near Polkville, the 9th grade at Belwood Consolidated School, the 10th grade at Hollis, and the 11th grade at Polkville High School. In those days, there were 11, not 12, years of elementary and high school. While she was in school, she liked to participate in drama.

After graduating from high school, Blanche attended Asheville Normal College, received a teaching certificate, and taught school for several years.

Blanche married Roy Samuel, "Roy", Carpenter, son of John Gordon Carpenter and Vertie Pruitt Carpenter, on December 21, 1934. They had one son, David Ronald, "Ronnie", Carpenter.

Roy worked in a service station until he started his own re-cap and tire business. After World War II started, Roy sold the business and joined
the Army. He enlisted on May 5, 1942, in Headquarters & Service Company, 2nd
Battalion, 302nd Ordnance Regiment, a specialized group of mechanics, engineers, draftsmen, accountants, bakers, electricians, construction men, and others with experience in mechanical repair and associated fields. Because of his experience, he was enlisted at Camp Sutton at Monroe, North Carolina, twenty miles southeast of Charlotte, with the rank of Technical Sergeant (T-5).

After basic training at Camp Sutton, his battalion went to Camp Pickett at Blackstone, Virginia, for further training. In December 1942, his battalion went to Fort Dix, New Jersey, the staging point for troops going overseas. In January 1943, he sailed for North Africa.

On January 25, 1943, Roy's battalion arrived in Casablanca, North Africa, where he set up a tire service center. After the Germans in North Africa surrendered in May 1943, the Allied forces invaded Sicily in June 1943 and the Italian mainland in September 1943. Roy's unit also moved to Italy, where the Italians surrendered in September 1943, the Germans in Italy did not surrender until May 2, 1945, only a few days before the overall German surrender, May 8, 1945.

Blanche worked as a secretary in a textile plant for a year and a half while Roy was overseas. The textile plant made material for the military.

After the war ended in Europe, Roy was scheduled to go to Japan. However, they dropped the atomic bombs, and the Japanese surrendered in August 1945. Roy was discharged, and he was home for Thanksgiving.

After the war, Roy operated an automobile tire store in Concord, North Carolina. Blanche worked in the store, doing office work, until their son was born in 1947. After Ronnie started to school, she resumed her work in the store.

They live in Concord after they retired. Blanche's hobbies include bridge.

Roy died on May 20, 1995, and his remains are in the Mausoleum at Carolina Memorial Park in Concord, North Carolina, near those of his son, Ronnie, who died November 10, 1994.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from an Individual Data sheet prepared by Blanche Lattimore Carpenter in September 1993 and conversations with Blanche in August 1993 and in June and November 1995.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 12/95.


Notes for ROY SAMUEL CARPENTER:
REMARKS: Samuel Roy, "Roy", Carpenter was born September 14, 1910, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of John Gordon Carpenter and Vertie
Etta Pruitt Carpenter. He was the oldest of their six children: Roy Samuel,
"Roy"; Ralph Bennett, "Ralph"; John Wayne; Yates; George Grady, "Grady"; and
Carl Gordon, "Carl", Carpenter.

The John Gordon Carpenter family lived on the father's, grandfather's, and
great grandfather's homeplace on Knob Creek near Carpenter's Knob in
northeastern Cleveland County. His grandparents were charter members of
Carpenter's Grove Baptist Church. After he completed elementary and high
schools in Cleveland County, Roy attended Mars Hill College, a Baptist college
north of Asheville, then worked in a service station until he started his own
re-cap and tire business.

On December 21, 1934, Roy Carpenter married Ora Blanche, "Blanche", Lattimore,
daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie",
Mooney Lattimore. They had one son, David Ronald, "Ronnie", Carpenter.

After World War II started, the Army used the National Automobile Dealers
Association to find men with experience and skill in mechanical repair and
associated fields for the 302nd Ordnance Regiment. Roy Carpenter was one of the
men selected.

When he arrived at the Fairgrounds near Monroe, North Carolina, twenty miles
southeast of Charlotte, on May 5, 1942, he was enlisted in Headquarters &
Service Company, 2nd Battalion, 302nd Ordnance Regiment with the rank of
Technical Sergeant (T-5), placed on a bus, and taken to nearby Camp Sutton,
which was nothing more than a pine grove, for basic training.

Since there were no facilities, their first task was to set up their tents, so
they would have a place to sleep. Since there were no uniforms for the first
week, they their civilian clothes. According to Blanche, Roy wore a business
suit, and his suit, shoes, and so on were ruined.

Since his battalion was made up of mechanics, engineers, draftsmen, accountants,
bakers, electricians, construction men, and other skilled workmen, they had the
talent to layout and build their section of the base. In August 1942, a
detachment was sent to Camp Forrest at Tullahoma, Tennesse, to set up a camp.
According to Blanche, Roy didn't go, because he had a car and he gave the
officers and others rides to and from Charlotte.

On October 5, 1942, his unit moved to Camp Pickett at Blackstone, Virginia, for
further training. On November 29, 1942, they started preparing for their
move to Fort Dix, New Jersey, the staging base for troops going overseas.
They arrived in Fort Dix on December 7, 1942, and, after spending Christmas and
New Years in Fort Dix, they left Fort Dix on January 13, 1943, taking the train
to Jersey City, New Jersey, and the ferry to Staten Island. They sailed on
January 14, 1943, on the S.S. John Erickson, formerly a Swedish luxury liner,
for North Africa.

There were 2,000 men on the ship. Although he was a sergeant, Roy volunteered
for KP (kitchen police), because you got three good meals every day, you got
fresh water showers, and time passes more quickly. Troop ships are always
crowded. They stack the bunks four or five or even six high, just as long as
there is 18 inches between them. Sometimes they have more troops than bunks,
so they sleep in shifts. There is never enough fresh water for daily showers,
except for "food service" personnel.

Usually privates are assigned to KP, and their job is to help the cooks prepareand serve food, clean up the kitchen and mess areas, empty and clean garbage
cans, etc. Peeling potatoes and washing cafeteria trays and silverware is
rather menial, but the savy soldiers soon migrate to the choice jobs, serving
the food, keeping order in the chow line, and supervising the menials.

They sailed in a convoy that was escorted by battleships as well as destroyers
and destroyer escorts. One night the ship brokedown, and the rest of the
convoy and all the escorts sailed on, leaving them alone to face the German
submarine threat. Fortunately, the crew was able to fix the problem, and they
rejoined the convoy the next morning. The ship arrived in Casablanca, Moracco,
on January 25, 1943, and they disembarked on January 26th.

In August 1942, an Allied Headquarters was established in London for Operation
Torch, the code name for the Allied invastion of French North Africa, with
General Dwight Eisenhower as overall commander. The land forces consisted of
the British First Army and the U.S. II Corps. The first landings took place on
November 8, 1942, and by the morning of November 11, 1942, Algiers, Oran, and
Casablanca were in Allied hands. The French troops, acting under orders from
the Vichy ("Free French") government, offered some resistance.

On November 11, 1942, all hostilities between the Allies and the French in
Algeria and Morocco ceased, and on the following day, Admiral Jean Francois
Darlan, the French High Commissioner in North Africa, handed over the French
territories to the Allies. Meanwhile, the Axis forces in Tunisia were being
heavily reenforced by air and through the ports of Bizerte and Tunis. The
Allied advance in Tunisia was halted by Axis counterattacks in the area of
Mdejez-el-Beb on December 11, 1942. On December 24, the already complicated
political situation between the Allies and the French was complicated by the
assassination of Admiral Darlan.

During January 1943, both the Allied forces (U.S., English, and French) under
Eisenhower and the Axis forces (German and Italian) under Field Marshall
Rommel, confined themselves to local operations and attempted to build up
sufficient strength for a decisive operation. It was during this period that
Roy's unit arrived in Casablanca.

When Roy's unit arrived in North Africa, which was in the European, African,
and Middle Eastern Theater (EAMET) of operation, Casablanca was the major port
for supplies for the Allied forces, because it was accessible from the Atlantic
and it was out of range of Axis aircraft. Ordnance battalions normally
receive, store, and issue ammunition and weapons. Roy's was different,
its major operational function was vehicle assembly.

Some vehicles were shipped two to a crate, so they set up a Twin Unit Plant
(TUP) that assembled units, mounted bodies, tuned the motors, and then
lubricated, tested, and serviced the vehicles for immediate use. They also
had a Single Unit Plant (SUP) for jeeps, weapons carriers, and other smaller
vehicles. Roy set up and operated the tire shop. In addition, to the soldiers,
they used local workers.

On February 14, Axis forces launched a powerful attack against the U.S. II
Corps, which, heavily outnumbered, was driven back about 40 miles between Faid
Pass in the north and Gafsa in the south. Kasserine and Sbeital were captured,
and the enemy, advancing up Kasserine Pass, threatened the important centers of
Tebess and Thala. This advance was serious, for it endangered some of the
Allied forward airfields. By February 23, the advance of the Axis forces had
been halted, and between February 26 and March 3, the Axis forces were driven
back to approximately their original positions.

Meanwhile, the British Eighth Army, under General Montgomery, made rapid
progress after its victory at El Alamein, capturing Tobruk on November 12,
1942, Bengahzi on Novembeer 20, Tripoli on January 23, 1943, Mareth on March
20, and Gabes on March 29. On April 6, Wadi Akarit was attacked, and the
following day troops of the Eighth Army made contact with the Allies advancing
in Tunisia. The Allied forces regrouped in mid-April to prepare for the final
blow in Northern Tunisia. The main attack the British First Army and the U.S.
Corps began on May 4, with the First Army drive directed at Tunis and the II
Corps drive directed on Bizerte. The assaulting forces were supported by a
powerful force of aircraft, and the attack was preceded by a heavy artillery
bombardment.

The Axis defense cracked on May 6, and the following day the Allied forces
entered Tunis and Bizerte. On May 13, all Axis forces laid down their arms in
surrender. About 240,000 prisoners were taken, including 125,000 Germands and
Colonel General Von Arnim, the German commander in Tunis. Field Marshall
Rommell escaped. With the surrender, no German or Italian forces in arms
remained in Africa.

While he was in North Africa, Roy was admitted to an Army field hospital,
suffering from pneumonia. While he was in the hospital, he ran into his
brother-in-law, Johnie Lattimore, who was in the same hospital for treatment
for bacterima (blood poisoning). According to Johnie, the field hospital was
just a group of tents, which sounds primitive, but it was more sanitary than
any of the available buildings. North Africa was notorious for its filthy
living conditions. According to Johnie, he sailed from Oran to England on a
British freighter, and Roy sailed from Oran to Italy on an American freighter.

The Allies decided to invade Sicily after the conquest of North Africa to make
the Mediterranean safe for Allied shipping. The 15th Army Group, consisting of
the U.S. Seventh Army under General Patton and the British Eighth Army under
General Montgomery, landed in Sicily on July 10, 1943. The Allied invasion
force consisted of about 3,000 ships and craft carrying about 140,000 men,
covered by powerful naval and air forces. By July 22, British Commonwealth
forces had advanced northward to the foothills of Mount Etna, while American
troops had overrun the western part of the island, capturing Agrigento and
Palermo. By August 17, all Axis resistance in Sicily had ceased. Axis killed,
wounded, and prisoners numbered about 164,000.

Immediately after the fighting in Sicily ended, planning began for the invasion
of the Italian mainland. On September 3, the Eighth Army crossed the Strait of
Messina at Reggio di Callabria and advanced rapidly northward against light
opposition. On September 8, General Eisenhowere announced that a military
armistice between the Allies and the Italian government had been signed on
September 3. However, German troops had replaced Italian troops, and the war
continued. On September 9, the Fifth Army began landing at Salerno. The
Germans made furious counterattacks on the 12th, but the Fifth and Eighth
Armies were able to link forces on September 16th. Troops of the Fifth Army
occupied Naples on October 1. By October 12, the Allies had established a
reasonably solid front across the Italian Peninsula and were advancing slowly
northward. The Germans in Italy did not surrender until May 2, 1945, only a
few days before the overall German surrender on May 8, 1945.

On October 6, 1943, Roy's 2nd Battalion, 302nd Ordnance Regiment was
redesignated the 605th Ordnance Base Armament Maintenance Battalion, and, on
October 27, 1943, the battalion left for Bizerte, via Rabat and Meknes.
Enroute, their destination was changed to Oran. On November 13, 1943, the
battalion embarked in the USS Charles Carrol, and on November 17, 1943, they
arrived in Naples, Italy's biggest port, where they set up operations.

In addition to setting up the TUP and SUP, they operated the Fiat Garage,
performing maintenance and service on motor transport. They also set up Roy's
tire shop and an engine overhaul shop. On February 5, 1945, his unit received
the following citation with the Meritorious Service Unit Plaque. The citation
was signed by Brigadier General Francis H. Oxx and published under General
Order Number 47.

"Citation for Meritorious Service Unit Plaque"

"605 Ordnance Base Armament Maintenance Battalion for superior performance of
exceptionally difficult tasks and outstanding devotion to duty in the
Peninsular Base Section during the period 1 April to 1 June 1944. This
Battalion operating Peninsular Base Section Ordnance Base Shop Number 7
established an outstanding production record during this period. Even though
faced with the necessity of having to manufacture large quantities of the parts
needed, the 605th Ordnance Base Armament Maintenance Battalion repaired and
rebuilt a large number of items, including the repair of small arms, artillery,
fire control instruments, tubes, and the repair and rebuilding of engines,
heavy units, tires, and combat vehicles. The superior performance of difficult
tasks and the initiative and ingenuity demonstrated in overcoming every
obstacle presented reflects great credit upon this unit and conforming the
highest standard of the military service.

Official - Headquarters Peninsular Base Section"

According to the unit history, it assembled 34,635 units of equipment.

After the war ended in Europe, Roy was scheduled to go to Japan. However, they
dropped the atomic bombs, and the Japanese surrendered in August 1945. Roy
was discharged, and he was home for Thanksgiving.

After the war, Roy owned and operated Nu-Tred Tire Service at 558 Church Street
in Concord, North Carolina. Blanche worked in the store, doing office work,
until their son was born in 1947. After Ronnie started to school, she resumed
her work in the store.

Roy enjoyed big game hunting and deep sea fishing. He shot a large black bear
during a hunting trip in Canada and had it made into a rug. He shot one moose,
two carabou, and an elk in Alaska and had their heads mounted. He also had the
head of a deer that he shot in Wyoming mounted. Other trophies included a large
sailfish and a tarpon that he caught off the Florida coast.

He was a member of First Presbyterian Church in Concord, Stokes Masonic Lodge,
Oasis Shrine Temple in Charlotte, and the American Legion.

Roy died on May 20, 1995, funeral services were conducted at Carolina Memorial
Park Chapel in Concord, and his remains were entombed at Carolina Memorial
Park Mausoleum, near those of his son, Ronnie, who died November 10, 1994.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from an Individual
Data sheet prepared by Blanche Lattimore Carpenter in September 1993, his
obituary, and conversations with Blanche. His war time service is from a
program for a reunion of the 605th Ordnance Battalion.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 12/95.


More About ROY SAMUEL CARPENTER:
Burial: Concord, Cabarrus County, North Carolina

Child of ORA LATTIMORE and ROY CARPENTER is:
i. DAVID RONALD10 CARPENTER, b. 01 April 1947, Concord, Cabarrus County, North Carolina; d. 10 November 1994, Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, North Carolina.

Notes for DAVID RONALD CARPENTER:
REMARKS: David Ronald, "Ronnie", Carpenter was born April 1, 1947, in
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, the son of Roy Samuel, "Roy", Carpenter and
Ora Blanche, "Blanche", Lattimore. He was their only child.

Ronnie grew up in Concord, North Carolina, where his father owned and operated
an automobile tire store. After Ronnie started to school, his mother worked in
the office at the store. Ronnie attended elementary school and two years of
high school in Concord before transferring to Fishburne Military School in
Waynesboro, Virginia, where he was an officer in the Colonel Young Brigade.
He graduated from Fishburne in 1965.

Ronnie took up archery when he was 14, and won numerous trophies in local and
regional competition. He also competed in national tournaments in Chicago and
in California. He won a trophy in Chicago, but not in California, where he came
in sixth. He gave up the sport when he transferred to Fishburne, where he
lettered in basketball and track the two years he was there. He also played
played tennis and was in the marching band, where he played the snare drums.

He attended Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina, where he majored in
history and social studies, was a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, and
was voted Outstanding Senior. He was also drum major in the marching band all
four years at Lenoir Rhyne. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree when he
graduated in 1969. After graduation, he taught high school history and social
studies at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

In 1970, Ronnie enlisted in the North Carolina National Guard, completed two
months active duty for training at Fort Bragg, and was a member of Headquarters
and Headquarters (HQ & HQ) Troop Armor, 1st Squadron, 196th Cavalry (CAV),
at Concord, North Carolina. He stayed in this unit until he completed his
six years of obligated service and was discharged in 1976, commuting from
the University of South Carolina and, later, from Myrtle Beach, to attended
monthly drill sessions. The unit was redesignated the 196th Transportation
Battalion. His discharge certificate, dated 29 Jan 1976, states that David
Ronald Carpenter, PFC (Private First Class) (E-3), service number 246-70-7617,
HHD (Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment), 196th Trans BN (Transportation
Battalion), received an Honorable Discharge from the Army National Guard of
North Carolina and as a reserve of the Army.

After teaching one year, he decided to go to graduate school, enrolled at the
University of South Carolina, joined Kappa Alpha fraternity, and majored in
guidance counselling. Upon graduation, he received a Master of Science Degree
and returned to Myrtle Beach, where he became an Assistant Principal and
Guidance Counsellor.

After thirteen years in Myrtle Beach, he ran for the School Board and in
November 1992 was elected to the Horry County School Board from District 1.
After retiring from teaching, he remained active in the National Education
Association.

Ronnie was actively involved with the University of South Carolina as a member
of the Carolina Alumni Association and as a Full Scholarship Donor to the
Gamecock Club. He served as Horry County president of the Carolina Alumni
Association and of the Gamecock Club. Ronnie was also a member of American
Legion Post 172 and a captain of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

He was also a member of Stokes Masonic Lodge, the Mytrle Beach Shrine Club, and
the Oasis Shrine Temple of Charlotte, North Carolina. He was a Gold Card member
of the Republican Part of Horry County and a Silver Elephant member of the State
of South Carolina Republican Party. He was also a trust member of the U.S.
Capitol Society.

Like his father, Ronnie was a sportsman who enjoyed hunting and fishing. He
particularly enjoyed deep sea fishing and had several of big gamefish stuffed
and mounted for display in his home.

Ronnie Carpenter died November 10, 1994, at North Carolina Baptist Hospital,
in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, after a brief illness. His funeral was at the
Wilkinson Funeral Home Chapel in Concord, North Carolina. He was entombed in
Carolina Memorial Park Mausoleum on November 12, 1994.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from an Individual
Data sheet prepared by Blanche Lattimore Carpenter in September 1993,
conversations with Blanche, and from his obiturary.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 10/95.


More About DAVID RONALD CARPENTER:
Burial: 12 November 1994, Concord, Cabarrus County, North Carolina

54. SARAH LOUISE9 LATTIMORE (JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 02 May 1913 in Polkville, Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married CHARLES GRAY BEAMAN, JR. 25 August 1938, son of CHARLES BEAMAN and DORA STOUT. He was born 16 November 1914 in Troy, Montgomery Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for SARAH LOUISE LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Sarah Louise, "Louise", Lattimore was born on May 2, 1913, on her father's farm near Polkville, North Carolina, the daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mauney Lattimore. She was the seventh of their nine children, seven girls and two boys, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnny"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnny were twins. Clara died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Louise completed grades 1 though 3 at the Elliott School near Polkville, grades 4 through 7 at Fairview School near Polkville, and the 8th grade at Hollis. She completed grades 9 through 11 at Polkville High, graduating in 1931. In those days, they three instead of four years of high school. She then attended Applachian State Teachers College at Boone for two years.

Louise was a primary teacher at Wadeville near Troy in Montgomery County for three years; Alexander Wilson near Graham in Alamance County for two years; Brookhaven in Atlanta, Georgia, for two years; Prospect near Monroe in Union County for two years; and Valdese in Burke County for three years. She then taught in the nursery school at the Forest City Church for two years.

Louise married Charles Gray, "Charles", Beaman, a Methodist minister, on August 25, 1938. They have two childre: Barbara Louise, born 9 Mar 1943, and Jane Carole, born 29 Apr 1947. Charles Beaman graduated from Asbury College in Kentucky. Later, he received his Bachelor of Divinity degree from Emory
University in Atlanta, Georgia. He received his Doctor of Divinity degree
from Phifer College in June 1968.

Louise and Charles are retired and living in Greensboro, North Carolina. Louise's hobbies include flowers and plants, needle work, sewing, and reading.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data provided by Louise Lattimore Beaman in August 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for CHARLES GRAY BEAMAN, JR.:
REMARKS: Charles Gray, "Charles", Beaman, Jr., was born November 16, 1914, in
Troy, North Carolina, the son of Charles Gray, "Charlie", Beaman and Dora J.
Stout.

On August 25, 1938, Charles Beaman married Sarah Louise, "Louise", Lattimore,
daughter of John Daniel, "John Daniel", Lattimore and Vertie Irene, "Vertie",
Mauney Lattimore. They were married in Shelby, North Carolina, in the home of
the bride's sister Blanche Lattimore Carpenter. Charles and Louise Beaman had
two children: Barbara Louise, "Barbara", and Jane Carole, "Carole", Beaman.

Charles Beaman was a Methodist ministers. He graduated from Asbury College in
Kentucky. Later, he received his Bachelor of Divinity degree from Emory
University in Atlanta, Georgia. He received his Doctor of Divinity degree from
Pfeiffer Collenge in June 1968. He was District Superintendent of the
Thomasville, North Carolina, district of the Methodist Church prior to his
retirement.

Louise and Charles are retired and living in Greensboro, North Carolina.
Louise's hobbies include flowers and plants, needle work, sewing, and reading.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data provided by Louise
Lattimore Beaman in August 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Children of SARAH LATTIMORE and CHARLES BEAMAN are:
85. i. BARBARA LOUISE10 BEAMAN, b. 09 March 1943, Atlanta, Georgia.
86. ii. JANE CAROLE BEAMAN, b. 29 April 1947.

55. JOHN L.9 LATTIMORE (JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 02 May 1913 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 12 November 1999 in Cleveland County, North Carolian. He married MARY AGNES WILLIS 24 January 1948 in North Carolina, daughter of EDNEY WILLIS and MARY WRIGHT. She was born 10 July 1918 in Belwood, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHN L. LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: John L., "Johnie", Lattimore was born May 2, 1913, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of John Daniel Lattimore, "John Daniel", and Vertie Irene, "Vertie", Mooney. He was the eighth of their nine children, seven girls and two boys, who were born in the following order: Lula; Macie; Clara; Faye Rhea, "Rhea"; Mary Nancy, "Nancy"; Ora Blanche, "Blanche"; Sarah Louise, "Louise"; John L., "Johnie"; and Frank Carson, "Frank", Lattimore. Louise and Johnie were twins. Clara died in infancy. The others lived to middle or old age.

Johnie grew up on his father's farm on Hinton's Creek in Cleveland County, North Carolina, about two miles west of Polkville, which had been in the Lattimore family since 1787. The 200-acre tract on both sides of Duncan's Creek, which his great great grandfather, John Lattimore, purchased in 1783, and the 250-acre tract on Hinton's Creek, had been split up over the years. Johnie's father owned part of it, his Uncle Sam owned part of it, and other Lattimore relatives owned the rest of it.

Johnie learned to plow with a mule when he was eight years old. This was the beginning of his twenty years of farming with mules. He also learned to run the corn planter when he was eight. Although his father owned about fifty acres of land, some of it was hilly and some of it was swampy. They planted cotton, their cash crop, on on the flat land, and they planted corn, which they fed to the hogs, in the bottom land. The house was on a hill overlooking the road. Like most small farm, they had a garden, some chickens, some pigs, and some cows as well as the mules. Johnie, his sisters, and his brother Frank attended school in Polkville.

After they finished their schooling, Johnie and his brother Frank continued to work on the farm. After his father's health failed, Johnie assumed responsibility for running the farm. He and other Polkville farm boys went to Florida and worked in the celery packing sheds to pick up extra money. Johnie saved his money, and, in August 1940, he bought about 52 acres of land on the north side of Hinton's Creek from his Aunt Mary, the administrator of his Uncle Sam's will. Johnie continued to farm until the fall of 1940 when he and several other farm boys from the Polkville area got jobs as carpenters building Camp Croft at Spartanburg, South Carolina.

World War II started in Europe with the German invasion of Poland in September 1939, and it became apparent that the United States would become involved. In September 1940 Congress passed the Selective Service (draft) Act, the President mobilized the National Guard, and the Army started building camps to house the growing Army.

Johnie remembers riding to work with Delvis Beam, earning 89 1/2 cents per hour, and paying Delvis a dollar a day for the ride. They got paid time-and-a-half for overtime. They didn't have to pay income tax, but they did pay social security. He worked as part of the "framing" crew until March 1941, when they finished the framing, and he returned to farming. Charlie Elliott, Hoyle Gold, Lee Roy Elliott, and Ivy Elliott also worked at Camp Croft.

The United States entered the war after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Johnie could have stayed out of the war, because he was a farmer. His father's cousin, Dr. Tom Gold, was Chairman of the Draft Board, and Johnie knew that Cleveland County had to provide 94 inductees. So he decided to go into the Army instead of asking for a deferment. He finished plowing his cotton on the 17th of July, went fishing for a week, and reported to his Draft Board on July 23, 1942. He was inducted into the Army on July 25, 1942, at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, and sent to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, for Basic Training. His Army Serial Number was: 34-129-740. He claimed his parents as dependents, and they received a monthly allotment check while he was in the Army.

His WD ADO Form 53 - 55 (Enlisted Record And Report of Separation) shows that he received an Honorable Discharge on 8 October 1945. His rank was "Private First Class (PFC)", his Arm or Service was "Field Artillery (FA)", his Component was "Army of the United States (AUS)", his Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) and Number was "Cannoneer (844)", and his Military Qualification was "2nd Class Gunner Thompson (T) Sub Machine Gun".

A DD Form 215 was issued on September 24, 1999, correcting the original WD AGO Form 53-55, to reflect the awards the WWII Victory Medal and the Army of Occupation Medal with Germany Clasp at his request.

He participated in the following Battles and Campaigns: Normandy; Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes; and Central Europe. He received the following Decorations and Citations: European, African, and Middle Eastern Theater (EAMET) Campaign Medal with 5 Bronze Service Stars (one for each of the listed campaigns); Good Conduct Medal, awarded by General Order #4, Headquarters (HQ), 92nd Armored (Armd) Field Artillery (FA) Battalion (BN); and Belgian Fourragere with Colors.

He departed for the EAMET on 12 December 1942 and arrived in the EAMET on 24 December 1942. The day that he departed the EAMET for the United States is not recorded. According to the WD AGO Form 53 -55, he arrived back in the United States on 20 October 1945. However, this is a typographical error. The correct date is 2 October 1945, based on the Length of Foreign Service (2 years, 9 months, and 21 days from 12 December 1942) and the Length of Continental Service (0 years, 4 months, and 23 days). His Longevity For Pay Purposes was 3 years, 2 months, and 14 days.

According to the WD AGO Form 53 - 55, Johnie was assigned to Battery D, 195th Anti-aircraft Artillery (AAA) Battalion (BN) when he was separated at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He was transferred to the 195th AAA BN in September 1945, because it was returning to the United States, the 92nd Armored Field Artillery (AFA) Battalion was scheduled to stay in Germany, and Johnie was due for separation. The Reason And Authority For Separation was "Convenience of the Government RR1-1 (Demobilization) AR 615-365 15 DEC 44".

Johnie and all Army inductees were members of the "Army of the United States", obligated to serve for the duration of the war and up to six months after the end of the war, in contrast to members of the "United States Army", who were members of the Regular Army. Members of mobilized National Guard units were also members of the AUS. Since Johnie had lots of "points", having served overseas for 2 years, 9 months, and 21 days, he was one of the first to be separated (demobilized) after the war in Japan ended in August 1945.

After the war, Johnie returned to Polkville, and resumed farming, with a tractor instead of a mule. His father had died in October 1943, while Johnie was overseas. In addition to farming his 50 acres, he helped his brother Frank farm his mother's place. Initially, Johnie grew cotton and corn and had a few pigs and cows. He also had a garden, a water melon patch, and a few apple trees. After the boll weavel devastated North Carolina's cotton fields in the late '40s, he put more land in pasture and timber.

Johnny married Mary Agnes, "Mary", Willis who was born on July 10, 1918, in Belwood, North Carolina, the daughter of Edney Willis and Mary Elizabeth Wright Willis, on 24 Jan 1948. Mary was a school teacher in the Cleveland County Schools. They had one son, John Bruce, "John" or "John Bruce", Lattimore, who was born in Shelby, North Carolina, on October 23, 1954.

Johnie's land on the north side of Hinton's Creek is part of 250 acres that his great great great grandfather, John Lattimore, who served in the South Carolina Militia during the Revolutionary War, purchased on March 3, 1787, from the widow of William Willis, who patented the land in 1771, and Isacc Hinton. It surrounds the Lattimore Family Cemetery and contains the John L. Lattimore house, which was build before 1824, when Big John Lattimore, Johnie's great grandfather, purchased the property from his father, Daniel Lattimore, son of Captain John Lattimore.

The John L. Lattimore house is listed in the National Register of Historical Historical Places. After he returned from the war, resumed farming, and married, Johnny installed electric lights and running water and lived in the old house for several years. The wood in the walls of the house was so hard that he found it almost impossible to drill holes and drive nails. After he found it impractical to modernize the old house, he build a new house on the west side of Five Points Road, over looking the Lattimore Cemetery and the old house.

After he returned to farming, Johnie had recurring problems with his back. He went to the Veterans Administration Hospital for treatment. After an operation to relieve the pain from the damaged sciatic nerve in his back, he was declared 50% disabled and given a pension. Eventually, because of his back problems, he had to give up farming. He sold his cows and pigs, rented his pastures, and continued to live on his farm.

Johnie's military service is remarkable in that he elected to be inducted when he could have been deferred, that he went overseas and served continuously without ever going home on leave, that he was assigned continuously to one of the front line units, that he served in one of the critical positions in his 105mm howitzer crew, that he elected to return to his unit in France when he had an opportunity to return to the United States after he hurt his back, and that he and his unit served with distinction in one of the largest ground armies ever assembled. This record is described in greater detail in the following paragraphs.

After completion of Basic Training, Johnie completed 50 caliber machine gun schoool and was assigned to the 92nd Armored Field Artillery Battalion (92nd AFA BN) of the 2nd Armored Division, which was on maneuvers near Fort Bragg, as part of the "15% over strength" of units going overseas. In October, the 2nd Armored Division went to Fort Dix, New Jersey, for preparation for overseas movement. In December, his unit took the ferry to New York and went aboard ship. The ships carrying the 2nd Armored Divisiony left New York on December 12, 1942, took a course toward Bermuda to avoid German submarines, and then changed to an easterly course to head for North Africa.

In August 1942, an Allied Headquarters was established in London for Operation Torch, the code name for the Allied invasion of French North Africa, with General Dwight Eisenhower as overall commander. The land forces consisted of the British First Army and the U.S. II Corps. The first landings took place on November 8, 1942, and by the morning of November 11, 1942, Algiers, Oran, and Casablanca were in Allied hands. The French troops, acting under orders from the Vichy ("Free French" ) government, offered some resistance.

On November 11, 1942, all hostilities between the Allies and the French in Algeria and Morocco ceased, and on the following day, Admiral Jean Francois Darlan, the French High Commissioner in North Africa, handed over the French territories to the Allies. Meanwhile, the Axis forces in Tunisia were being heavily reenforced by air and through the ports of Bizerte and Tunis. The Allied advance in Tunisia was halted by Axis counterattacks in the area of Medjez-el-Bab on December 11, 1942. On December 24, the already complicated political situation between the Allies and the French was complicated by the assassination of Admiral Darlan.

On December 24, 1942, the 2nd Armored Division arrived in North Africa, which was part of the European, African, and Middle Eastern Theater (EAMET) of operations. The 2nd Armored Division disembarked in Casablanca, the largest port city in Morocco, and became part of U.S. II (Second) Corps. During January 1943, both the Allied forces (U.S., English, and French) under Eisenhower and the Axis forces (German and Italian) under Field Marshal Rommel, confined themselves to local operations and attempted to build up sufficient strength for a decisive operation. The lull permitted the 2nd Armored Division to conduct in-theater training operations.

On February 14, Axis forces launched a powerful attack against the U.S. II Corps, which, heavily outnumbered, was driven back about 50 miles between Faid Pass in the north and Gafsa in the south. Kasserine and Sbeitla were captured, and the enemy, advancing up Kasserine Pass, threatened the important centers of Tebess and Thala. This advance was serious, for it endangered some of the Allied forward airfields. Over 1,000 soldiers from the 2nd Armored, which was being held in reserve, were reassigned to the 1st Armored Division to replace their casualties. By February 23, the advance of the Axis forces had been halted, and between February 26 and March 3, the Axis forces were driven back to approximately their original positions.

Meanwhile, the British Eighth Army, under General Montgomery, made rapid progress after its victory at El Alamein, capturing Tobruk on November 12, 1942, Benghazi on November 20, Tripoli on January 23, 1943, Mareth on March 20, and Gabes on March 29. On April 6, Wadi Akarit was attacked, and the following day troops of the Eighth Army made contact with the Allies advancing in Tunisia. The Allied forces regrouped in mid-April to prepare for the final blow in Northern Tunisia. The main attack by the British First Army and the U.S. II Corps began on May 4, with the First Army drive directed at Tunis and the II Corps (including the 2nd Armored) drive directed on Bizerte. The assaulting troops were supported by a powerful force of aircraft, and the attack was preceded by a heavy artillery bombardment.

The Axis defense cracked on May 6, and the following day the Allied forces entered Tunis and Bizerte. According to Johnie, Bizerte had been completely destroyed by the time the 2nd Armored entered the city. On May 13, all Axis forces laid down their arms in surrender. About 240,000 prisoners were taken, including 125,000 Germans and Colonel General Von Arnim, the German commander in Tunis. Field Marshal Rommel escaped. With the surrender, no German or Italian forces in arms remained in Africa.

The Allies decided to invade Sicily after the conquest of North Africa to make the Mediterranean safe for Allied shipping. The 15th Army Group, consisting of the U.S. Seventh Army under General Patton and the British Eighth Army under General Montgomery, landed in Sicily on July 10, 1943. The 2nd Armored Division was held in reserve in Bizerte, while the rest of II Corps joined in Sicilian operations, and, later, the invasion of Italy. The 2nd Armored Division remained in North Africa until the fall of 1943, when it was moved to England to prepare for the invasion of Europe.

Johnie was admitted to an army field hospital for treatment for bacterima (blood poisoning) while he was in North Africa, and he had a chance to visit his brother-in-law, Roy Carpenter, who was in the same field hospital with pneumonia. The field hospital was a collection of tents, which sounds primative, but was much more sanitary than any of the available buildings. The cities of North Africa were was notorious for their filthy living conditions.

According to Johnie, the 2nd Armored Division turned over most of its equipment to the French, and they got new equipment when they got to England. Johnie sailed from Oran in the cargo hole of a British freighter. They slept on hammocks and had two meals a day. The main course was mutton. They took down the hammocks during the day. Johnie and another soldier went to get the rations for his battery. The convoy sailed through the Strait of Gibraltar and headed west toward the setting sun. After several days on their westerly course, some of the soldiers were betting that they were going home. Actually, they were avoiding the German submarines off the coast of France.

The 2nd Armored Division received new equipment and extensive training while it was in England. Johnie also had a chance to see his nephew, William C. (Bill) Elliott, who was a captain in the Quartermaster Corps, supporting the 8th Air Force.

Johnie was assigned to the 92nd Armored Field Artillery Battalion, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Buster. He was in Battery A, which was equipped with 105-mm howitzers mounted on M7 mortor carriages. The battery was commanded by Captain Jim Dixon. The M7 motor carriage had the same motor, transmission, and tracks as the Sherman medium tanks, but it had an open gun mount (similar to a half-track) instead of a turret. It also had a 50-caliber machine gun for protection against low-flying aircraft.

The crew consisted of the "Chief of Section" (sergeant), "Driver" (Tech 5, the same pay as a Corporal), "Gunner" (Private First Class), "Cannoneer" (Private First Class), "Loader" (Private First Class), and "Anti-aircraft Gunner" (Private First Class). Each howitzer had a half-track to carry 700 rounds of ammunition and three ammunition passers. The 105mm howitzer fired 32-pound projectiles up to 12,200 yards.

The battery had six guns; i.e., six sections. Initially, Johnie was an ammunition passer. He was big (6' 1' and 190 pounds), and the 32-pound
projectiles were easy for him to handle. He also liked the job because you
could relax except when you were actually in position to fire the howitzer. On the other hand, driving was a full time job. After he hurt his back (sprain of lumbosacral joints) in North Africa when they were replacing the steel "off-road" tank treads with rubber "highway" tread, he became the "Cannonner".

Cannoneer was a good job, because you had a seat and there was no "heavy lifting". His job was to "level the bubbles" (i.e., adjust the tilt of the gun until it was level), adjust the elevation of the gun, set S1 (a ballistics correction), and fire the gun. It was a critical job, because the shells would miss their targets if the gun was not level. Johnie got the job because he was older (31) and more mature than most of the other soldiers in his section, and they left him in that position because he was good at it. The Gunner's job was to open the breech block, standby while it was being loaded, and close the breech block after the gun was loaded. The Loader's job was to load the gun.

The guns had to be set up in stationary positions before they were ready to fire. Usually, they rigged camouflage nets over the guns and the halftracks. The Chief of Section was in charge of the gun and the associated halftrack. The Chief of Section, Gunner, and Cannoneer wore telephone headsets so they could receive firing orders from the Battery Command Post (CP) and respond immediately. Johnie said that his Chief of Section taught him all the tricks of the trade, because he wanted his gun to be the first to fire when the CP gave the order to commence firing.

The build up for the invasion of Europe began in the fall of 1943. As of January 1, 1944, the 2nd and 3rd Armored Divisions; the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 8th, 9th, 28th, and 29th Infantry Divisions; and the 82nd and 101st Airborne
Divisions were in the United Kingdom training for the invasion. The 1st and
2nd Armored, the 9th Infantry, and the 82nd Airborne had been in combat in the Mediterranean. The 2nd Armored and the 9th Infantry Divisions marshalled for the invasion near Southhampton in April and May 1944.

On May 8, General Eisenhower designated D Day as June 5, but because of poor weather, he decided on June 4 to postpone the invasion to June 6. Paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions were the first to land in France. The U.S. VII (Seventh) Corps landed on Utah Beach, and the U.S. V (Fifth) Corps landed on Omaha Beach on D Day, the 6th of June. The 4th Infantry Division was the first ashore at Utah Beach, and the 1st Infantry Division was the first ashore at Omaha Beach. Meanwhile British and Canadian troops were landing on Gold, Juno, and Sword Beaches.

The 2nd Armored Division, as part of V Corps, began landing on June 9th (D+4), after the 101st Airborne and the 1st, 2nd, and 29th Infantry Divisions had secured beachheads and began moving inland. Other units were also coming ashore. V and VII Corps were the first elements of the U.S. First Army, commanded by General Omar Bradley, ashore. By June 15th, they had been joined by the U.S. VIII (Eighth) Corps. By July 1st, three weeks after the initial landings, over one million men, more than 500,000 tons of supplies, and 177,000 vehicles had been landed in the American and British zones. A total of 27 divisions had landed on the continent, and more were to come.

In late June 1944, Johnie was sent to the 4147th U.S. Army Hospital Plant, A.P.O. 63, at Litchfield, England, for evaluation and treatment of his back problems. It was determined that the sprain of the lumbrosacral joints had compressed his sciatic nerve (i.e, sciatic neurits). There was nothing they could do except prescribe pain killers and caution him about heavy lifting and other activities that might aggrivate his condition. While he was in the hospital, he met his cousin, Dr. Frank Lattimore, who was an Army doctor.

While he was in the hospital, the Allied armies were stalled in the hedge rows in Normandy until July 17th, when the First Army captured Saint-Lo. Johnie returned to his unit before the First Army broke through the German lines on the 25th and headed for Paris. By August 1st, the First Army had grown to four corps. The Third Army, consisting of the VIII (Eighth) and XV (Fifteenth) Corps, commanded by General Patton, was activated on August 1st. V and VII Corps remained under First Army, now commanded by General Hodges. General Bradley became commander of the 12th Army Group, consisting of the First and Third Armies. The U.S. 2nd Armored Division passed to the west of Paris, headed for Luxembourg, as the French 2nd Armored Divison, which was also part of the U.S. V Corps, liberated Paris on August 25th.

By September 15, the U.S. First Army reached the West Wall (Siegfried Line), the line of German fortifications west of the Rhine. However, the British were facing increasing resistance in the North, and the Germans were reforming in the South. It was necesssary for the Allies to halt, reform, and prepare for the invasion of Germany. This was accomplished by December 15 during bitter fighting. On December 16th, Hitler struck back with his long-planned counter-offensive. From the bulge ceated in Allied lines, it came to be known as the Battle of the Bulge.

Hitler intended to strike with his force through the forested Ardennes, cross the Meuse River, and recapture Antwerp, in order to split the Allied lines and trap four Allied armies in the North. The Sixth Panzer Army almost immediately ran into unyielding resistance from the 2nd and 99th Infantry Divisions of the U.S. V Corps. The 2nd Armored Division, which was part of U.S. VII Corps after the reformation, was rushed down from the North, and in a pitch battle on Christmas Eve, the American armor annihilated one German regiment and threw back what proved to be the high water mark of the counteroffensive. According to Johnie, it was snowing, and it was the coldest place that he was ever in. "It was so cold the blood didn't run (from wounds)."

The Battle of the Bulge was the greatest pitched battle on the Western Front in World War II. In addition to the U.S. First Army's V and VII Corps, Patton's Third Army and Simpson's Nineth Army were part of General Bradley's 12th Army Group. A total of 29 German and 33 Allied divisions (mainly American) were involved. In the first week of the battle the First Army alone moved 248,000 troops and 48,711 vehicles. The German drive was stopped short of the Meuse River, and the original Allied line was regained by January 31st. Shortly after the Battle of the Bulge, Johnie went to the medics, complaining that he had dysentery. The doctor reviewed his medical record, asked him about his back, and offered him an opportunity to return to the States. Although his back was bothering him, Johnie elected elected to return to his unit.

The Germans created a short-lived bulge in American lines 70 miles wide and 50 miles deep at its westernmost point. They paid for it with the loss of priceless reserves. However, Hitler was determined. On December 31st, he launched coordinated attacks against the U.S. Seventh Army in northern Alsace, and the main force came within 12 miles of Strasbourg, its objective. The attacks were stopped by January 25th, and on January 29th, the Allied armies in Alsace took the offensive. The Germans incurred 25,000 casualties and the Americans incurred 16,000 casualties during Operation Nordwind, the German name for the operation in Alsace.

The Allied Advance to the Rhine began on February 8th, and, by March 21st, the Allies occupied the west bank of the Rhine, except for the section between Manheim and Karlsruhe, in the South. During the drive, the U.S. First Army seized a bridgehead across the Rhine at Remagen, and U.S. Third Army gained one at Oppenheim. These penetrations on the east bank upset German plans for defense of the Rhine, and their stubborness in defending the west bank cost them casualties that they could not afford. By the end of March, General Eisnehower's forces had increased to 85 divisions, 5 of them airborne and 23 of them armored. His total command now numbered 4 million men.

The three principal Allied leaders -- Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin -- met at Yalta in February 1945 and finished the assignment of occupation zones in Germany and Austria. The capitals of Berlin and Vienna were to be jointly occupied by the Americans, British, Franch, and Russians and governed by four-power commissions. It was agreed that the Russians would occupy eastern Germany, the British would occupy the Ruhr, the Americans would occup central Germany, and the French would occupy southwestern Germany.

The first Allied objective in the crossing of the Rhine was to encircle the rich industrial Ruhr. Field Marshal Montgomery's 21st Army Group was scheduled to make the main attack in the north and General Bradley's 12th Army Group was to make a secondary attack in the south. After the spectacular successes of Bradley's First and Nineth Armies, the plan was altered to permit Bradley's Group to make the main attack. By April 18th, the Ruhr had been captured and the Germans had lost 325,000 men and vast stores of supplies and equipment.

The First and Nineth Armies continued their advance to the Elbe, where they were to meet Soviet forces advancing from the east. Patton's Third Army struck for Vienna, and the 6th Army Group headed for western Austria and the Brenner Pass. On April 18th, the First Army captured Leipzig, and on April 25th, American and Soviet forces met at Torgau on the Elbe. Meanwhile the Third Army pressed on to the Czechoslovakian border. The Third Army's attack picked up momentum on the 22nd, and contingents of the Third Army seized Linz, Austria, on May 4th.

Meanwhile, the 6th Army Group swung southeastward from the Rhine, swept to the Swiss border, and eventually entered Austria and linked with Allied forces in Italy. The French swept through the Black Forest and took Stuttgart on April 22nd. The Seventh Army took Nurnberg on April 20th and headed into southern Bavaria and the Austrian Tirol. It took Munich on April 30th and Salzburg on May 4th. Berlin had been under direct attack by the Russians since April 16th.

After Hitler ordered a counterattack on the 22nd and it failed to materialize, he was still determined to stay in Berlin. When he realized the situation washopeless, he committed suicide and left a will designated Admiral Doenitz his successor.

The possibility of piecemeal surrender had been growing since mid-April. The Allies accepted the surrender of German forces in Italy on April 29th, to become effective on May 2nd. German forces in the north, including Denmark and the Netherlands, surrendered on May 4th, and German forces in the south surrendered on May 5th. General Eisenhower opened negotiations for the surrender of the remaining German forces on May 5th, but threatened to break off negotiations if the Germans did not immediately agree to unconditional surrender of all German forces on all fronts. The Germans signed the surrender on May 7th. The next day was designated V-E (Victory in Europe) Day. A second surrender, with ranking Russians in attendance, took place in Berlin on May 9th.

On V-E Day, there were 9 armies, 23 corps, and 93 divisions under Eisenhower's command. Since D-Day in Normandy, the Germans in the west had lost 265,000 dead; 49,000 permanently disabled; and 8,109,000 captured. Allied casualties were 186,900 dead; 545,700 wounded; and 109,600 missing (some later declared dead and others later repatriated as prisoners of war).

The 2nd Armored Division stopped at the Elbe, the agreed boundary between the U.S. and Russian forces. On April 19th, it was pulled back 100 miles and placed in garrison, where it remained until after the war ended.

Kathleen Elliott Lambert, Johnie's cousin, has a "V-mail" letter from Johnie. He had the following address when he wrote the letter, dated January 28, 1945, after the Battle of the Bulge":

PVT J. L. Lattimore
Btry A, 92nd Armd. FA
APO 252
%APO N.Y., N.Y.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Additional data from conversations with Johnie Lattimore and other descendants of John Daniel Lattimore.

The chronology of the war is from "A

More About JOHN L. LATTIMORE:
Burial: 15 November 1999, Lattimore Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for MARY AGNES WILLIS:
REMARKS: Mary Agnes Willis, "Mary", was born July 10, 1918, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Edney Willis and Mary Elizabeth
Wright. She was one of seven children: Robert Lee, "Lee"; Carl Jackson;
Edward Dickson; Joseph Wilson; Paul; Mary Agnes, "Mary"; and Lillie Mae Willis.

Edney Willis was a farmer, and they lived in Belwood in Number 10 (Knob Creek)
Township, where they were members of St. Peter's Methodist Episcopal Church.
The older children attended a small two-teacher school at St. Peter's for the
first seven grades, then attended Falston High School. The younger children
attended Belwood consolidated high school.

Mary married John L. Lattimore, "Johnie", on January 24, 1948, in Shelby, North
Carolina. Johnie Lattimore was the son of John Daniel Lattimore and Vertie
Irene Mooney. He served in the U.S. Army in Europe during World War II and
returned to Cleveland County and the family farm. He subsequently purchased
adjoining land from his aunt and became the fifth Johnie Lattimore to own and
farm the land surrounding the Lattimore Cemetery in Upper Cleveland County.

After Mary Agnes and Johnie were married, they lived in the old John Lattimore
house, which was built by Johnie's great-great-great grandfather, Big John
Lattimore, until they build a new house on a hill west of the road. They had
one child, John Bruce Lattimore, "John" or "John Bruce", who was born on
October 23, 1954, in Shelby, North Carolina.

Original data provided by John Bruce Lattimore, son of Mary Agnes Willis and
John L. Lattimore. Additional data from the "Joseph Gallashaw Willis Family"
entry, written by Mary Elizabeth Willis, and the "Edny and Mary Wright Willis"
entry, written by Lee Willis, in the "Heritage of Cleveland County, Volume 1 --
1982", and other cited sources.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 9/96.


Child of JOHN LATTIMORE and MARY WILLIS is:
87. i. JOHN BRUCE10 LATTIMORE, b. 21 October 1954, Shelby, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.

56. ILA MAUDE9 DIXON (LULA8 LATTIMORE, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born December 1894 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died Abt. 1960 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married FRED WASHBURN. He was born Abt. 1894, and died 1960 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for ILA MAUDE DIXON:
REMARKS: Ila Maude, "Ila", Dixon was born in December 1896, the daughter of T.
A. Dixon and Lula Lattimore. She was one of three children: Ila Maude, "Ila";
Hoyt Carson, "Hoyt"; and Vera Catherine, "Vera", Dixon.

Ila Dixon married Fred Washburn, and they had one son, Herbert Washburn, who
passed away before he reached manhood. Ila and Fred passed away in 1960,
or near that time.

Data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss
Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Notes for FRED WASHBURN:
REMARKS: Fred Washburn married Ila Maude, "Ila", Dixon, daughter of T. A.
Dixon and Lula Lattimore. They had one son, Herbert Washburn, who passed away
before he reached manhood. Fred and Ila both passed away in 1960.

I don't know when or where Fred Washburn was born, the names of his parents, or
whether he had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Child of ILA DIXON and FRED WASHBURN is:
i. HERBERT10 WASHBURN, b. Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for HERBERT WASHBURN:
REMARKS: Herbert Washburn was the son of Fred Washburn and Ila Maude, "Ila",
Dixon. He passed away before he reached manhood.

I don't know when or where Herbert Washburn was born or when he died.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from conversations with descendants of John Daniel
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


57. JOHNNIE L.9 CABINESS (MARGARET CATHERINE8 LATTIMORE, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 30 April 1904 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married HERSHEL CHARLES WHISNANT Abt. 1923, son of CHARLES WHISNANT and MARY LATTIMORE. He was born 08 June 1900 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for JOHNNIE L. CABINESS:
REMARKS: Johnnie L. Cabiness was born April 30, 1904, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Katie",
Lattimore. She was one of their six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L.,
Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

Johnnie Cabiness married Hershel Charles Whisnant, and they had four children:
Mary Frances, "Mary Frances"; Charles William; Margaret Catherine, "Catherine";
and Hershel Charles, "Hershel", Whisnant, Jr.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant
Family Tree.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for HERSHEL CHARLES WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Hershel Charles Whisnant was born June 8, 1900, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. He was the
fourth of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson, Prudence
Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Hershel Charles Whisnant married Johnnie Cabiness, and they had four children:
Mary Frances, Catherine, Charles, and Hershel Whisnant, Jr.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Children of JOHNNIE CABINESS and HERSHEL WHISNANT are:
88. i. MARY FRANCES10 WHISNANT, b. 28 September 1924, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
ii. CHARLES WILLIAM WHISNANT, b. 18 May 1926, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for CHARLES WILLIAM WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Charles William, "Charles", Whisnant was born May 18, 1926,in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Hershel Charles Whisnant and
Johnnie Cabiness. He was the second of their four children: Mary Francis,
"Mary Frances"; Charles William, "Charles"; Margaret Catherine, "Catherine"; and
Hershel Charles, "Herschel", Whisnant, Jr.

I don't know whether Charles Whisnant married and had children.

Original data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant Family Tree.
Additional data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by
Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


iii. MARGARET CATHERINE WHISNANT, b. 31 March 1927, Cleveland County, North Carolina; m. R. L. HAWKINS; b. Abt. 1927.

Notes for MARGARET CATHERINE WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Margaret Catherine, "Catherine", Whisnant was born March 31, 1927, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Hershel Charles Whisnant and
Johnnie Cabiness. She was the third of their four children: Mary Francis,
"Mary Frances"; Charles William, "Charles"; Margaret Catherine, "Catherine"; and
Hershel Charles, "Herschel", Whisnant, Jr.

Catherine Whisnant married R. L. Hawkins. I don't know whether they had any
children.

Original data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant Family Tree.
Additional data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by
Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for R. L. HAWKINS:
REMARKS: R. L. Hawkins married Margaret Catherine, "Catherine", Whisnant,
daughter of Hershel Charles Whisnant and Johnnie Cabiness. I don't know
whether they had any children.

I don't know where R. L. Hawkins was born, the names of his parents, or whether
he had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant Family Tree.
Additional data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by
Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


iv. HERSHEL CHARLES WHISNANT, JR., b. 03 September 1936, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for HERSHEL CHARLES WHISNANT, JR.:
REMARKS: Hershel Charles Whisnant, Jr., was born September 3, 1936, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Hershel Charles Whisnant and
Johnnie Cabiness. He was the fourth of their four children: Mary Francis,
"Mary Frances"; Charles William, "Charles"; Margaret Catherine, "Catherine"; and
Hershel Charles, "Herschel", Whisnant, Jr.

I don't know whether he married and had children.

Original data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant Family Tree.
Additional data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by
Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


58. ATHEL FRANKLIN9 CABINESS (MARGARET CATHERINE8 LATTIMORE, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 26 June 1907 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married ALINE HOYLE Abt. 1927. She was born Abt. 1910.

Notes for ATHEL FRANKLIN CABINESS:
REMARKS: Athel Franklin Cabiness was born June 26, 1907, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Katie",
Lattimore. He was one of their six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L.,
Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

Athel Franklin Cabiness married Aline Hoyle, and they had three children:
Robert Franklin, Donald Hoyle, and Janice Fraye Cabiness.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant
Family Tree.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for ALINE HOYLE:
REMARKS: Aline Hoyle married Athel Franklin Cabiness, the son of Frank
Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Katie", Lattimore. They had three children:
Robert Franklin, Donald Hoyle, and Janice Fraye Cabiness.

I don't know the date or place of Aline Hoyle's birth, the names of her
parents, or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Children of ATHEL CABINESS and ALINE HOYLE are:
i. ROBERT FRANKLIN10 CABINESS, b. 17 January 1928.

Notes for ROBERT FRANKLIN CABINESS:
REMARKS: Robert Franklin Cabiness was born January 17, 1928, the son of Athel
Franklin Cabiness and Aline Hoyle. He was one of three children: Robert
Franklin, Donald Hoyle, and Janice Fraye Cabiness.

I don't know whether he married and had any children.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


ii. DONALD HOYLE CABINESS, b. 14 May 1930.

Notes for DONALD HOYLE CABINESS:
REMARKS: Donald Hoyle Cabiness was born May 14, 1930, the son of Athel
Franklin Cabiness and Aline Hoyle. He was one of three children: Robert
Franklin, Donald Hoyle, and Janice Fraye Cabiness.

I don't know whether he married and had any children. In 1968 he was a Baptist
preacher.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


iii. JANICE FRAYE CABINESS, b. 12 August 1938.

Notes for JANICE FRAYE CABINESS:
REMARKS: Janice Fraye Cabiness was born August 12, 1938, the daughter of Athel
Franklin Cabiness and Aline Hoyle. He was one of three children: Robert
Franklin, Donald Hoyle, and Janice Fraye Cabiness.

I don't know whether she married and had any children.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


59. GEORGE GOLD9 CABINESS (MARGARET CATHERINE8 LATTIMORE, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 19 July 1909 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married RUTH WALKER Abt. 1930. She was born Abt. 1910.

Notes for GEORGE GOLD CABINESS:
REMARKS: George Gold Cabiness was born July 19, 1909, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Katie",
Lattimore. He was one of their six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L.,
Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

George Cabiness married Ruth Walker, and they had three children: Patsey,
Kenneth, and Morgan Cabiness.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant
Family Tree.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for RUTH WALKER:
REMARKS: Ruth Walker married George Gold Cabiness, the son of Frank Cabiness
and Margaret Catherine, "Katie", Lattimore. They had three children: Patsy,
Kenneth, and Morgan Cabiness.

I don't know when or where Ruth Walker was born, the names of her parents, or
whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Children of GEORGE CABINESS and RUTH WALKER are:
i. PATSY10 CABINESS, b. 21 February 1931, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for PATSY CABINESS:
REMARKS: Patsy Cabiness was born February 21, 1931, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the daughter of George Gold Cabiness and Ruth Walker. She was the
first of their three children: Patsy, Kenneth, and Morgan Cabiness.

I don't know whether Patsy Cabiness married and had children.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


ii. KENNETH CABINESS, b. 22 March 1934, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for KENNETH CABINESS:
REMARKS: Kenneth Cabiness was born March 22, 1934, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of George Gold Cabiness and Ruth Walker. He was the
second of their three children: Patsy, Kenneth, and Morgan Cabiness.

I don't know whether Kenneth Cabiness married and had children.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


iii. MORGAN CABINESS, b. 23 July 1936, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for MORGAN CABINESS:
REMARKS: Morgan Cabiness was born July 23, 1936, in Cleveland County, North
Carolina, the son of George Gold Cabiness and Ruth Walker. He was the
second of their three children: Patsy, Kenneth, and Morgan Cabiness.

I don't know whether Morgan Cabiness married and had children.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


60. JAMES EVERETTE9 CABINESS (MARGARET CATHERINE8 LATTIMORE, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 14 September 1912 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married GRACE HERMINE HOYLE 28 November 1934. She was born Abt. 1914.

Notes for JAMES EVERETTE CABINESS:
REMARKS: James Everette Cabiness was born September 14, 1912, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine,
"Katie", Lattimore. He was one of their six children: Alma, Fray Mildred,
Johnnie L., Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

James Cabiness married Grace Hermine Hoyle, and they had one child: Kay
Hoyle Cabiness.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant
Family Tree.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Notes for GRACE HERMINE HOYLE:
REMARKS: Grace Hermine Hoyle married James Everette, "James", Cabiness,
the son of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Catherine", Lattimore. They
had one child: Kay Hoyle Cabiness.

I don't know when or where Grace Hermine Hoyle was born, the names of her
parents, or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Child of JAMES CABINESS and GRACE HOYLE is:
i. KAY HOYLE10 CABINESS, b. 25 October 1943.

Notes for KAY HOYLE CABINESS:
REMARKS: Kay Hoyle Cabiness was born October 25, 1943, the daughter of James
Everette, "James", Cabiness and Grace Hermine Hoyle. She was their only child.

I don't know whether Kay Hoyle Cabiness married and had children.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


61. THOMAS ELLIOTT9 LATTIMORE (SAMUEL CARSON8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 28 June 1901 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 07 July 1931 in North Carolina. He married MARGARET NICHOLS. She was born 21 March 1905, and died 24 December 1971.

Notes for THOMAS ELLIOTT LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Thomas Elliott, "Tom", Lattimore was born June 28, 1901, in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Samuel Carson, "Sam", Lattimore and Mary Forbis, "Mary", Elliott. He was the first of their four children: Thomas Elliott, "Tom"; a twin son; a twin daughter; and John Carson Lattimore. The twins died the same day they were born. John Carson died when he was three years old.

Tom graduated from North Carolina State College at Raleigh in the class of 1924, married Margaret Nichols, and held a textile position in Kershaw, South Carolina, until his death July 7, 1931. Tom and Margaret Lattimore had one child: Mary Jean Lattimore. Tom Elliott died from heart failure.

After Tom's death his widow remarried, and Mary Jean went to live with her grand parents. After grandfather died on December 1, 1935, Mary Jean and her grandmother continued to live on the farm.

After Mary Jean married Ray Floyd, Ray assumed responsibility for running the farm. After her grandmother's death, Mary Jean inherited the farm.

Original data from Thomas Forbes Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from Mary Forbis Elliott entry (#13502) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Macie Lattimore Covington; and from conversations with descendents of Thomas Forbes Elliott and John L. Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 6/01.

Notes for MARGARET NICHOLS:
REMARKS: Margaret Nichols married Thomas Elliott, "Tom", Lattimore, son of Samuel Carson, "Sam", Lattimore and Mary Forbis, "Mary", Elliott. They had one child, Mary Jean Lattimore.

Tom Lattimore died July 7, 193, of heart failure. After his death, Margaret Nichols remarried, and Mary Jean went to live with her grandparents. After her grandfather's death, Mary Jean and her grandmother continued to live on the farm. After Mary Jean married Ray Floyd, Ray assumed responsibility for running the farm. Mary Jean inherited the farm after her grandmother's death.

Data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, His Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Macie Lattimore Covington; and from conversations with descendents of Thomas Forbes Elliott. Date of birth and date of death from her grave marker in the Lattimore Family Cemetery.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 6/01.

More About MARGARET NICHOLS:
Burial: Lattimore Family Cemetery, Cleveland County.

Child of THOMAS LATTIMORE and MARGARET NICHOLS is:
89. i. MARY JEAN10 LATTIMORE, b. 27 February 1932, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

62. WILLIAM GRIFFIN9 LATTIMORE (MATT RANSOM8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 23 August 1911 in Grady County, Oklahoma. He married MARGARET MARTIN. She was born Abt. 1911.

Notes for WILLIAM GRIFFIN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: William Griffin, "Buster", Lattimore was born August 23, 1911, in
Grady County, Oklahoma, the son of Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and Margaret
Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. He was the fifth of their six children: Johnnie L.,
"Johnny"; Nancy Belle, "Nancy"; Frank Cornwell, "Frank"; Dorcas Susan, "Susie";
William Griffin, "Griffin" or "Buster"; and Margaret Catherine, "Skeet",
Lattimore. Four of the children were born in North Carolina. The other two
were born in Oklahoma.

The Matt Lattimore family moved to Grady County, Oklahoma, near Minco, in
December 1910. Later they moved to Osage County, Oklahoma, where Matt
Lattimore had a stock farm. In 1928, the family moved to Terrell County,
Texas.

Buster Lattimore played football and basket ball during his senior year in
school at Sanderson, Texas. He attended Sul Ross College for one year. Later,
he operated a service station in Plains, Texas. He married Margaret Martin, and
they had two children: William Griffin, Jr., and Martha Ann Lattimore.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Margaret Gordon Elliott entry (#13503) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; an unpublished "Sketch
of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife, Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven
Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore Covington, dated January 11, 1968; "Terrell
County Texas, Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San
Angelo, Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Notes for MARGARET MARTIN:
REMARKS: Margaret Martin married William Griffin, "Buster", Lattimore, son of
Matt Ransom, "Matt", Lattimore and Margaret Gordon, "Mag", Elliott. They had
two children: William Griffin and Martha Ann Lattimore. They lived in Plains,
Texas, where Buster operated a service station. Before her marriage, she
taught English in Sanderson, Texas, where Buster graduated from high school.

I don't know when or where Margaret Martin was born, the names of her parents,
or whether she had any brothers or sisters.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife,
Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Terrell County Texas,
Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo,
Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Children of WILLIAM LATTIMORE and MARGARET MARTIN are:
i. WILLIAM GRIFFIN10 LATTIMORE, JR., b. Texas.

Notes for WILLIAM GRIFFIN LATTIMORE, JR.:
REMARKS: William Griffin Lattimore, Jr., was the son of William Griffin,
"Buster", Lattimore and Margaret Martin. He was one of their two children:
William Griffin, Jr., and Martha Ann Lattimore.

I don't know when or where William Griffin Lattimore, Jr., was born. He may
have been born in Sanderson, Texas, where his father graduated from high
school, or Plains, Texas, where his father operated a service station for a
number of years.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife,
Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Terrell County Texas,
Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo,Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


ii. MARTHA ANN LATTIMORE.

Notes for MARTHA ANN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Martha Ann Lattimore was the daughter of William Griffin, "Buster",
Lattimore and Margaret Martin. She was one of their two children: William
Griffin, Jr., and Martha Ann Lattimore.

I don't know when or where Martha Ann Lattimore was born. She may have been
born in Sanderson, Texas, where her father graduated from high school, or
Plains, Texas, where her father operated a service station for a number of
years.

Original data from an unpublished "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore, Wife,
Miss Nancy Amirita Gold, And Their Seven Children", by Mrs. Macie Lattimore
Covington, dated January 11, 1968. Additional data from "Terrell County Texas,
Its Past, Its People", published by Anchor Publishing Company, San Angelo,
Texas; and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott and John L.
Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


63. JAMES GORDON9 LATTIMORE (WILLIAM CHITWOOD8, FRANCIS7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1924. He married CAROL LYNETTE CROWDER.

Notes for JAMES GORDON LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: James Gordon Lattimore was the son of William Chitwood Lattimore and
Sarah Alpha Elliott, "Alpha". He was their only child.

James Gordon Lattimore married Carol Lynette Crowder. They had one child:
James Chitwood Lattimore.

Original data from "Oliver Beam Elliott" entry in "The Heritage Of Cleveland
County: Volume I - 1982", which was prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott.
Additional data from Oliver Beam Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 7/94.


Notes for CAROL LYNETTE CROWDER:
REMARKS: Carol Lynette Crowder married James Gordon Lattimore, son of William
Chitwood Lattimore and Sarah Alpha, "Alpha", Elliott. They had one child:
James Chitwood Lattimore.

Original data from "Oliver Beam Elliott" entry in "The Heritage Of Cleveland
County: Volume I - 1982", which was prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott.
Additional data from Oliver Beam Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 7/94.


Child of JAMES LATTIMORE and CAROL CROWDER is:
i. JAMES CHITWOOD10 LATTIMORE.

Notes for JAMES CHITWOOD LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: James Chitwood Lattimore was the son of James Gordon Lattimore and
Carol Lynette Crowder. He was their only child.

Data from Oliver Beam Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott.
Elliott.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


64. NIXON LATTIMORE9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 20 May 1893 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married MAY PHILBECK Abt. 1920. She was born Abt. 1893.

Notes for NIXON LATTIMORE WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Nixon Lattimore Whisnant was born May 20, 1893, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. He was the
first of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson, Prudence
Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Nixon Lattimore Whisnant married May Philbeck, and they had three children:
Mary Martha, Buena, and Buren Whisnant.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for MAY PHILBECK:
REMARKS: May Philbeck married Nixon Lattimore Whisnant, son of Charles C.
Whisnant and Mary Lattimore, and they had three children: Mary Martha,
Buena, and Buren Whisnant.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Children of NIXON WHISNANT and MAY PHILBECK are:
i. MARY MARTHA10 WHISNANT.

Notes for MARY MARTHA WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Mary Martha Whisnant was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
the daughter of Nixon Lattimore Whisnant and May Philbeck.

Mary Martha Whisnant married a "Cummings".

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


ii. BUENA WHISNANT.

Notes for BUENA WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Buena Whisnant was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
the daughter of Nixon Lattimore Whisnant and May Philbeck.

Buena Whisnant married a "Leslie".

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


iii. BUREN WHISNANT.

Notes for BUREN WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Buren Whisnant was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
the son of Nixon Lattimore Whisnant and May Philbeck.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


65. FANNIE JACKSON9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 22 November 1894 in Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina, and died 20 July 1984 in Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina. She married JOHN PAXTON ELLIOTT 13 July 1915, son of THOMAS ELLIOTT and REBECCA HOYLE. He was born 10 August 1890 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 10 December 1944 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for FANNIE JACKSON WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Fannie Jackson Whisnant, "Fannie", was born November 22, 1894, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary
Lattimore. She was the second of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore,
Fannie Jackson, Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella,
Thomas Dargen, Reba Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

She married John Paxton Elliott, son of Thomas Forbis Elliott and Rebecca Belle
Hoyle Elliott on July 13, 1915. They had six children: Thomas Forbis, "Tom";
Mary Belle, "Mary Belle"; Charles Whisnant, "Charlie"; Margaret Marie,
"Margaret"; John Paxton; and Robert Hoyle, "Bob", Elliott. The John Paxton
Elliott family lived on the family farm near Polkville, Cleveland County, North
Carolina.

John Paxton Elliott died December 10, 1944, and Fannie died July 20, 1984.
They are buried in the Elliott Family Cemetery in Polkville.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from John Paxton Elliott entry (#13506) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; John Paxton Elliott and
Fannie Jackson Whisnant family tree; and Charlie C. Mamie Lattimore family;
and from descendents of Thomas Forbis Elliott.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for JOHN PAXTON ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: John Paxton, "John", Elliott was born on August 10, 1890, on his father's farm in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Thomas Forbis, "Tommy", Elliott and Rebecca Bell Hoyle, "Bell", Elliott. He was the
seventh of their eleven children, who were born in the following order: Susan Ola, "Susan"; Sarah Tressia, "Sally"; Mary Forbis, "Mary"; Margaret Gordon, "Mag"; Julia Ann, "Julia"; Alice Hoyle, "Alice"; John Paxton, "John"; William Christopher, "William"; Florence Belle, "Florence"; Virginia Wells, "Ginny"; and Rebecca Belle, "Belle", Elliott.

On January 17, 1904, John's mother died after giving birth to Belle. In 1908, four years after his mother's death, his father married Carrie Withrow. daughter of Jason Withrow and Lou Sweezy. John had a half-brother, Valentine Jason Elliott, "Val", from her father's second marriage.

On July 13, 1915, John married Fannie Jackson, "Fannie", Whisnant, daughter of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore Whisnant. They had six children, who were born in the following order: Thomas Forbis, "Tom"; Mary Belle, "Mary Belle"; Charles Whisnant, "Charlie"; Margaret Marie, "Margaret"; John Paxton, "John"; and Robert Hoyle, "Bob", Elliott. The John Paxton Elliott family lived on the family farm near Polkville.

John Paxton Elliott died on December 10, 1944, and Fannie died July 20, 1984. Both are buried in the Elliott Family Cemetery near Polkville.

John grew up on his father's farm, which was in Number 8 township, near Polkville, about 12 miles northwest of Shelby, the county seat. He had many relatives in the area, including the descendants of Martin Elliott, who fought in the Revolution and moved to North Carolina from Virginia in 1806, and his son, John Crenshaw Elliott, John's great grandfather, who purchased 1300 acres on Hinton's Creek in 1809, in what was then Rutherford County. After John Crenshaw Elliott died, his wife deeded the community an acre for the school and an acre for the church.

John Crenshaw had six sons: William Martin, John Paxton, Thomas F., Edward Donoho, Andrew Jackson, and James Finch Elliott; and four daughters: Susan, Elizabeth Donoho, Nancy, and Mary F. Elliott. John was descended from John Paxton Elliott, who had six sons: Christopher Beam, Thomas Forbis, Oliver Beam, John Daniel, Andrew Jackson, and Robert Lafayette; and four daughters: Mary Donoho, Margaret Gordon, Ann Elizabeth, and Susan Elliott.

John Crenshaw and many of his descendants are buried in the Elliott family cemetery near Polkville. The descendants of John Crenshaw Elliott have a family reunion at the Elliott Church near Polkville on the Saturday preceding the fourth Sunday in August. The family historian posts the family trees on the side of the church; and the cousins share a potluck lunch; discuss family business, including the operation of the Elliott cemetery and maintenance of the Elliott Church; renew family ties; and refer to the family trees to trace their relationships with newcomers. It is a great heritage.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from Alice Hoyle Elliott entry (#13505) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; from conversations with descendents of Thomas Forbes Elliott; and visits to the Elliott Family Cemetery.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 7/95.


More About JOHN PAXTON ELLIOTT:
Burial: Elliott Cemetery, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of FANNIE WHISNANT and JOHN ELLIOTT are:
90. i. THOMAS FORBIS10 ELLIOTT II, b. 03 August 1918, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.
ii. MARY BELLE ELLIOTT, b. 16 March 1920, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for MARY BELLE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Mary Belle Elliott, "Mary Belle", was born March 16,1920, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of John Paxton Elliott and Fannie
Jackson Whisnant. She was the second of their six children, who were born in
the following order: Thomas Forbis, Mary Belle, Charles Whisnant, Margaret
Marie, John Paxton, and Robert Hoyle Elliott.

Mary Belle Elliott lives in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from John Paxton Elliott entry (#13506) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker. Additional data from
family record data provided by Thomas Forbis Elliott in August 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


91. iii. CHARLIE WHISNANT ELLIOTT, b. 24 February 1922, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.
iv. MARGARET MARIE ELLIOTT, b. 18 March 1923, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.

Notes for MARGARET MARIE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Margaret Marie Elliott, "Margaret", was born March 18,1923, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the daughter of John Paxton Elliott and Fannie
Jackson Whisnant. She was the fourth of their six children, who were born in
the following order: Thomas Forbis, Mary Belle, Charles Whisnant, Margaret
Marie, John Paxton, and Robert Hoyle Elliott.

Margaret Elliott lives in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from John Paxton Elliott entry (#13506) in "Peiter
Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker. Additional data from
family record data provided by Thomas Forbis Elliott in August 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


92. v. JOHN PAXTON ELLIOTT II, b. 04 June 1927, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.
93. vi. ROBERT HOYLE ELLIOTT, b. 05 July 1929, Cleveland Cnty, North Carolina.

66. PRUDENCE VIRGINIA9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 25 February 1898 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married TROY FESTUS GREEN Abt. 1925. He was born Abt. 1898.

Notes for PRUDENCE VIRGINIA WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Prudence Virginia Whisnant was born February 25, 1898, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the daughter of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore.
She was the third of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson,
Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Prudence Virginia Whisnant married Troy Festus Green, and they had six children:
Ruth, Betty Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for TROY FESTUS GREEN:
REMARKS: Troy Festus Green married Prudence Virginia Whisnant, and they had
six children: Ruth, Betty, Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Children of PRUDENCE WHISNANT and TROY GREEN are:
i. RUTH10 GREEN.

Notes for RUTH GREEN:
REMARKS: Ruth Green was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the
daughter of Troy Festus Green and Prudence Virginia Whisnant. She was the
first of their six children: Ruth, Betty, Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Ruth Green married a "Carver".

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.
Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


ii. BETTY GREEN.

Notes for BETTY GREEN:
REMARKS: Betty Green was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the
daughter of Troy Festus Green and Prudence Virginia Whisnant. She was the
second of their six children: Ruth, Betty, Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Betty Green married a "Knopf".

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


iii. RAY GREEN.

Notes for RAY GREEN:
REMARKS: Ray Green was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the
son of Troy Festus Green and Prudence Virginia Whisnant. He was the
third of their six children: Ruth, Betty, Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


iv. FLAY GREEN.

Notes for FLAY GREEN:
REMARKS: Flay Green was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the
son of Troy Festus Green and Prudence Virginia Whisnant. He was the
fourth of their six children: Ruth, Betty, Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


v. TOM GREEN.

Notes for TOM GREEN:
REMARKS: Tom Green was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the
son of Troy Festus Green and Prudence Virginia Whisnant. He was the
fifth of their six children: Ruth, Betty, Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


vi. JACK GREEN.

Notes for JACK GREEN:
REMARKS: Jack Green was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina, the
son of Troy Festus Green and Prudence Virginia Whisnant. He was the
sixth of their six children: Ruth, Betty, Ray, Flay, Tom, and Jack Green.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


67. HERSHEL CHARLES9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 08 June 1900 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married JOHNNIE L. CABINESS Abt. 1923, daughter of FRANK CABANISS and MARGARET LATTIMORE. She was born 30 April 1904 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for HERSHEL CHARLES WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Hershel Charles Whisnant was born June 8, 1900, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. He was the
fourth of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson, Prudence
Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Hershel Charles Whisnant married Johnnie Cabiness, and they had four children:
Mary Frances, Catherine, Charles, and Hershel Whisnant, Jr.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for JOHNNIE L. CABINESS:
REMARKS: Johnnie L. Cabiness was born April 30, 1904, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Frank Cabiness and Margaret Catherine, "Katie",
Lattimore. She was one of their six children: Alma, Fray Mildred, Johnnie L.,
Athel Franklin, George Gold, and James Everette Cabiness.

Johnnie Cabiness married Hershel Charles Whisnant, and they had four children:
Mary Frances, "Mary Frances"; Charles William; Margaret Catherine, "Catherine";
and Hershel Charles, "Hershel", Whisnant, Jr.

Original data from "Sketch of John L. (Johnny) Lattimore", by Mrs. Macie
Lattimore Covington, dated 11 Jan 1968. Macie Lattimore was one of his
daughters. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant
Family Tree.

Some sources spell the family name "Cabaniss" and others spell it "Cabiness".

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 2/94.


Children are listed above under (57) Johnnie L. Cabiness.

68. MATTIE ELLA9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 10 June 1905 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married ROBERT LUTHER LUTZ. He was born Abt. 1905.

Notes for MATTIE ELLA WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Mattie Ella Whisnant was born June 10, 1905, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. She
was the sixth of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson,
Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Mattie Ella Whisnant married Robert Luther Lutz, and they had two children:
Bobbie Jane and James Boyle Lutz.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for ROBERT LUTHER LUTZ:
REMARKS: Robert Luther Lutz married Mattie Ella Whisnant, daughter of Charles
C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. They had two children: Bobbie Jane and James
Boyle Lutz.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Children of MATTIE WHISNANT and ROBERT LUTZ are:
i. BOBBIE JANE10 LUTZ.

Notes for BOBBIE JANE LUTZ:
REMARKS: Bobbie Jane Lutz is the daughter of Robert Luther Lutz and Mattie
Ella Whisnant. She is the first of their two children: Bobbie Jane and James
Boyle Lutz.

Bobbie Jane Lutz married an "Elmore".

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


ii. JAMES BOYLE LUTZ.

Notes for JAMES BOYLE LUTZ:
REMARKS: James Boyle Lutz is the son of Robert Luther Lutz and Mattie Ella.
Whisnant. He is the second of their two children: Bobbie Jane and James
Boyle Lutz.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


69. THOMAS DARGEN9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 15 May 1907 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. He married LOUISE BURNETT. She was born Abt. 1907.

Notes for THOMAS DARGEN WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Thomas Dargen Whisnant was born May 15, 1907, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. He was the
seventh of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson, Prudence
Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Thomas Dargen Whisnant married Louise Burnett, and they had two children:
Rebecca and Thomas Dargen Whisnant, Jr.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for LOUISE BURNETT:
REMARKS: Louise Burnett married Thomas Dargen Whisnant, son of Charles C.
Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. They had two children: Rebecca and Thomas Dargen
Whisnant, Jr.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Children of THOMAS WHISNANT and LOUISE BURNETT are:
i. REBECCA10 WHISNANT.

Notes for REBECCA WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Rebecca Whisnant is the daughter of Thomas Dargen Whisnant and Louise
Burnett. She is the first of their two children: Rebecca and Thomas Dargen
Whisnant, Jr.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


94. ii. THOMAS DARGEN WHISNANT, JR., b. 1948.

70. REBA BLANTON9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 18 October 1910 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 25 April 1995 in Hickory, Catawba County, North Carolina. She married ROBERT WILLIAM ELLIOTT 05 May 1934, son of OLIVER ELLIOTT and VIRGINIA STOCKTON. He was born 31 January 1907 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 23 December 1995 in Hickory, Catawba County, North Carolina.

Notes for REBA BLANTON WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Reba Blanton Whisnant was born October 18, 1910, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. She
was the eighth of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson,
Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Reba Blanton Whisnant married Robert W. Elliott, son of Oliver Beam Elliott
and Virginia Ann Stockton. They had two children: Mary Carolyn and Ann
Nixon Elliott.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family
tree.

According to his obituary in the December 14, 1995, issue of "The Shelby Star",
Robert William Elliott, 88, of 1512 Third Street N.W., in Hickory, died
Saturday December 23, 1995, at Frye Regional Medical Center in Hickory. He was
retired from the Internal Revenue Service. He was survived by his daughters
Anne E. Pitner of Hickory and Mary C. Fox of Caozet, Virginia; his sister Mary
Gordon Elliott; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. The funeral
was held at Bass-Smith Funeral Home in Hickory, and burial was at Rosehill
Cemetery in Fallston. Reverand Pat Pearce officiated.

According to her obituary in the April 28, 1995, issue of "The Shelby Star",
Reba Blanton Whisnant Elliott, 84, died Tuesday April 25, 1995, at Frye
Regional Medical Center in Hickory. She was retired from Belks department
store and she was also employed by Spainhours and Kathyrn's Cheese House.
Survivors included her husband Robert William Elliott of the home; two
daughters, Anne Elliott Pitner of Hickory and Mary Carolyn Elliott Fox of
Virginia; two sisters, Edna W. Philbeck of Aiken, South Carolina, and Mattie W.
Lutz of Fallston. The funeral was at Bass-Smith Funeral Home in Hickory,
and burial was at Rose Hill Cemetery in Fallston on April 30, 1995. Memorials
to the Lottie Moon Offering, First Baptist Church, 150 Fourth Street N.W., in
Hickory.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


More About REBA BLANTON WHISNANT:
Burial: 30 April 1995, Fallston, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Notes for ROBERT WILLIAM ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Robert William Elliott, "Robert", was born January 31, 1907, in
Cleveland County, North Carolina, the son of Oliver Beam Elliott, "Oliver",
and Virginia Ann Stockton, "Ann". He was the sixth of their seven children:
Ophelia Scott, "Ophelia"; an infant son who lived only two days; Sarah Alpha,
"Alpha"; Oliver Paxton, "Paxton"; Frank Donoho, "Frank"; Robert William,
"Robert"; and Mary Gordon, "Mary Gordon", Elliott.

Oliver Elliott purchased the John Paxton Elliott homeplace and farm on Hinton's
Creek, and the family lived in the house that John Paxton Elliott built in 1840
from December 1895 until Oliver built a new house in 1902. Since the barn and
pasture was near the spring and there was a good well, the new house was
located near the old house.

Robert Elliott attended Hollis Elementary School, Piedmont High School,
Appalachian State Teachers College, and the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. He was a teacher and a U.S. Government Internal Revenue agent.
He gave almost 41 years to government service.

On May 5, 1934, Robert Elliott married Reba Blanton Whisnant, and they had two
children: Mary Carolyn Elliott and Ann Nixton Elliott.

Original data from John Paxton Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from Oliver Paxton Elliott and Edna Earle Parker
family group record prepared by Sara Elizabeth Elliott in August 1993 and
from the "Oliver Beam Elliott" entry in "The Heritage Of Cleveland County:
Volume I - 1982", which was written by Mary Gordon Elliott, and the Oliver
Beam Elliott family group record provide by Mary Gordon Elliott in June 1994.

According to his obituary in the December 14, 1995, issue of "The Shelby Star",
Robert William Elliott, 88, of 1512 Third Street N.W., in Hickory, died
Saturday December 23, 1995, at Frye Regional Medical Center in Hickory. He was
retired from the Internal Revenue Service. He was survived by his daughters
Anne E. Pitner of Hickory and Mary C. Fox of Caozet, Virginia; his sister Mary
Gordon Elliott; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. The funeral
was held at Bass-Smith Funeral Home in Hickory, and burial was at Rosehill
Cemetery in Fallston. Reverand Pat Pearce officiated.

According to her obituary in the April 28, 1995, issue of "The Shelby Star",
Reba Blanton Whisnant Elliott, 84, died Tuesday April 25, 1995, at Frye
Regional Medical Center in Hickory. She was retired from Belks department
store and she was also employed by Spainhours and Kathyrn's Cheese House.
Survivors included her husband Robert William Elliott of the home; two
daughters, Anne Elliott Pitner of Hickory and Mary Carolyn Elliott Fox of
Virginia; two sisters, Edna W. Philbeck of Aiken, South Carolina, and Mattie W.
Lutz of Fallston. The funeral was at Bass-Smith Funeral Home in Hickory,
and burial was at Rose Hill Cemetery in Fallston on April 30, 1995. Memorials
to the Lottie Moon Offering, First Baptist Church, 150 Fourth Street N.W., in
Hickory.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/97.


More About ROBERT WILLIAM ELLIOTT:
Burial: 26 December 1995, Fallston, Cleveland County, North Carolina

Children of REBA WHISNANT and ROBERT ELLIOTT are:
95. i. MARY CAROLYN10 ELLIOTT, b. Abt. 1935, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
96. ii. ANN NIXON ELLIOTT, b. Abt. 1937, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

71. EDNA BLANCHE9 WHISNANT (MARY8 LATTIMORE, CHARLES B.7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 18 January 1914 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married THOMAS EDWARD PHILBECK, SR.. He was born Abt. 1914.

Notes for EDNA BLANCHE WHISNANT:
REMARKS: Edna Blanche Whisnant was born January 18, 1914, in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. She
was the ninth of their nine children: Nixon Lattimore, Fannie Jackson,
Prudence Virginia, Hershel Charles, Hattie Sue, Mattie Ella, Thomas Dargen, Reba
Blanton, and Edna Blanche Whisnant.

Edna Blanche Whisnant married Thomas Edward Philbeck, and they had one child:
Thomas Edward Philbeck, Jr.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Notes for THOMAS EDWARD PHILBECK, SR.:
REMARKS: Thomas Edward Philbeck married Edna Blanche Whisnant, daughter of
Charles C. Whisnant and Mary Lattimore. They had one child: Thomas Edward
Philbeck, Jr.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


Child of EDNA WHISNANT and THOMAS PHILBECK is:
i. THOMAS EDWARD10 PHILBECK, JR..

Notes for THOMAS EDWARD PHILBECK, JR.:
REMARKS: Thomas Edward Philbeck, Jr., is the son of Thomas Edward Philbeck and
Edna Blanche Whisnant. He is their only child.

Data from Charlie C. and Mamie Lattimore Whisnant family tree.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/94.


72. DANIEL GOLD9 LATTIMORE II (DANIEL DOBBIN8, WALTER SLADE7, DANIEL DOBBINS6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 10 January 1933 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL GOLD LATTIMORE II:
REMARKS: Daniel Gold (Daniel) Lattimore was born January 10, 1933, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Daniel Dobbin (Dobb) Lattimore and Nancy
Blanche (Blanche) Gold. He was the older of their two children: Daniel Gold
(Daniel) and Nancy Frances (Nancy) Lattimore. Dobb Lattimore was a farmer
and a school teacher. Blanche was also a school teacher.

Daniel Lattimore married Beth Shepherd, daughter of Frank Shepherd and Grace
Newton, on June 29, 1953, and they had three children: Daniel Dobbin (Dobbin),
David Franklin (David), and Rachel Gold (Rachel) Lattimore.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from "The Lattimores, A Family History", by Esther Lattimore
Jenkins.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 5/95.


Children of DANIEL GOLD LATTIMORE II are:
i. DANIEL DOBBIN10 LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1960, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DANIEL DOBBIN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Daniel Dobbin, "Dobbin", Lattimore was born in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Daniel Gold, "Daniel", Lattimore and Beth Shephard.
He was the oldest of three children: Daniel Dobbin, "Dobbin"; David Franklin,
"David"; and Rachel Gold, "Rachel", Lattimore.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from Pauline Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


ii. DAVID FRANKLIN LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1964, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for DAVID FRANKLIN LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: David Franklin, "David", Lattimore was born in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the son of Daniel Gold, "Daniel", Lattimore and Beth Shephard.
He was the second of three children: Daniel Dobbin, "Dobbin"; David Franklin,
"David"; and Rachel Gold, "Rachel", Lattimore.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from Pauline Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


iii. RACHEL GOLD LATTIMORE, b. Abt. 1968, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for RACHEL GOLD LATTIMORE:
REMARKS: Rachel Gold, "Rachel", Lattimore was born in Cleveland County,
North Carolina, the daughter of Daniel Gold, "Daniel", Lattimore and Beth
Shepherd. She was the youngest of three children: Daniel Dobbin, "Dobbin";
David Franklin, "David"; and Rachel Gold, "Rachel", Lattimore.

Original data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage
Of Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.
Additional data from Pauline Lattimore.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Generation No. 9

73. THOMAS BYRON10 GOLD, JR. (THOMAS BYRON9, JOSEPHINE8 PACKARD, SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 10 October 1914 in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and died 21 July 1964. He married MARJORIE ALICE FAGON in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She was born Abt. 1914.

Notes for THOMAS BYRON GOLD, JR.:
REMARKS: Thomas Byron Gold, Jr., was born October 10, 1914, in Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the son of Dr. Thomas Byron Gold and Emma Dorcas
Greene. He was the older of their two children: Thomas Bryon and Jeremaine
Edon Gold.

Thomas Byron Gold, Jr., married Marjorie Alice Fagon, and they had two
children: Thomas Byron Gold, III, and Walter Asbury Gold. Thomas Byron Gold,
Jr., die July 21, 1964.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Notes for MARJORIE ALICE FAGON:
REMARKS: Marjorie Alice Fagon married Thomas Byron Gold, Jr., son of Thomas
Byron Gold and Emma Dorcas Greene. They had two children: Thomas Byron Gold,
III, and Walter Asbury Gold.

Data from the "Thomas Byron Gold, M.D., and Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Children of THOMAS GOLD and MARJORIE FAGON are:
i. THOMAS BYRON11 GOLD III, b. Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for THOMAS BYRON GOLD III:
REMARKS: Thomas Byron Gold, III, was the son of Thomas Byron Gold, Jr., and
Marjorie Alice Fagon. The was the older of their two children: Thomas Byron
Gold, III, and Walter Asbury Gold. Thomas Byron Gold, III, graduated from Elon
College, served three years in the U.S. Air Force, and worked for Cone Mills in
Reidsville, North Carolina, in various positions, including Assistant Manager
of Wage and Salary Administration in the Corporate Industrial Relations
Department.

Data from the "Thomas Byron Gold, M.D., and Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


ii. WALTER ASBURY GOLD, b. Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Notes for WALTER ASBURY GOLD:
REMARKS: Walter Asbury Gold was the son of Thomas Byron Gold, Jr., and
Marjorie Alice Fagon. He was the younger of their two children: Thomas Byron
Gold, III, and Walter Asbury Gold. Walter Asbury Gold was an orthodontist.

Data from the "Thomas Byron Gold, M.D., and Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


74. JEREMAINE EDON10 GOLD (THOMAS BYRON9, JOSEPHINE8 PACKARD, SARAH (SALLIE)7 LATTIMORE, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born Abt. 1916 in Cleveland County, North Carolina. She married EARL HAMRICK. He was born Abt. 1916.

Notes for JEREMAINE EDON GOLD:
REMARKS: Jeremaine Edon Gold was born in Cleveland County, North Carolina,
the daughter of Dr. Thomas Byron Gold and Emma Dorcas Greene. She was the
younger of their two children: Thomas Bryon and Jeremaine Edon Gold.

Jeremaine Edon Gold married Earl Hamrick, Jr., and they had two daughters: Edon
Hamrick and Celia Hamrick.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Notes for EARL HAMRICK:
REMARKS: Earl Hamrick married Jeremaine Edon Gold, and they had two daughters:
Edon Hamrick and Celia Hamrick.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


Children of JEREMAINE GOLD and EARL HAMRICK are:
i. EDON11 HAMRICK.

Notes for EDON HAMRICK:
REMARKS: Earl Hamrick married Jeremaine Edon Gold, and they had two daughters:
Edon Hamrick and Celia Hamrick.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


ii. CELIA HAMRICK.

Notes for CELIA HAMRICK:
REMARKS: Earl Hamrick married Jeremaine Edon Gold, and they had two daughters:
Edon Hamrick and Celia Hamrick.

Data from "The Dr. Griffin Miller Gold Family" entry in "The Heritage Of
Cleveland County: Volume I - 1982", written by Mrs. Palmer (Nan) Gold.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 8/94.


75. WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER10 ELLIOTT, JR. (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 17 July 1918 in Chickasha, Grady County, Oklahoma, and died 08 May 1975 in Annandale, Fairfax County, Virginia. He married WAVE IRENE SPIRES 18 May 1946 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, daughter of EDWARD SPIRES and FLORENCE CLAYCAMP. She was born 23 August 1921 in Kay County, Oklahoma.

Notes for WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT, JR.:
REMARKS: William Christopher Elliott, Junior, "Bill" or "Billie", was born on
July 17, 1918, at Chickasha, Oklahoma, the son of William Christopher Elliott,
"William", and Lula Lattimore Elliott. He was the second of twelve children,
six boys and six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia
Kathleen, "Kathleen"; William C., Jr., "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle,
"Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall,
"Frank"; Julia Mae, "Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee,
"Mary Lee"; Lula Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron
Cornwell, "Aaron" or "A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Bill grew up in Minco; graduated from Minco High School, where he played
football, basketball, and baseball, in 1936; and attended Northern Oklahoma
Junior College at Tonkawa, where he played Center on the varsity football team.
After graduating in June 1939, he donned his leather college "red letter"
football jacket and hitch-hiked to North Carolina and went to Florida with some
of his cousins to work. This was the "30s" and money and jobs were scarce. He
spent the winter making celery crates.

In August 1993, Vertie recalled her Mother telling her to get the house cleaned
up -- she had a feeling that Billie would be home for supper. Sure enough, he
was home for supper, and she had it ready for him. Vertie also remembered him
mentioning that he had visited the Barnum & Bailey Circus winter quarters at
Sarasota, Florida. She also commented that it was nice to remember there was
a time when a young man could hitch-hike across the country and have nothing
to fear.

After he returned to Minco, Bill drove a truck, delivering gasoline from the
storage tanks next to the railroad siding to filling stations and farms, and
saved money in order to return to college.

In July 1940, Bill attempted to enlisted in the Army Air Corps, but he was
rejected for flight training because of football injuries to his knee. Hesubsequently joined the National Guard was mobilized with Service Battery,
189th Field Artillery, Forty Fifth Division, on September 16, 1940, with the
rank of Private. He was promoted to Corporal after the division arrived at
Fort Sill, the complement was increased from 42 to 76, and the unit was
authorized additional non-commissioned officers. He was promoted to Sergeant
when the original Supply Sergeant was discharged. Bill, his father, and most
of the division spent the winter of 1940-41 in tents. The family remained in
Minco. Father and son got three-day passes and came home about once a month.

After Pearl Harbor, Bill went to Officers Candidate School (OCS) at Camp Lee,
Virginia; was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps upon
graduation on May 23, 1942; and was assigned to duty with the Army Air Corps at
Tinker Field near Oklahoma City. He was subsequently transferred to duty in
California and promoted to First Lieutenant. In Feburay 1943, he returned to
Tinker Field, where he became the Commanding Officer of a Quartermaster
Company. In October 1943, he was transferred to England for duty with the 8th
Air Force. He made the trans-Atlantic crossing on HMS Queen Mary, which was
serving as a high-speed troop transport. Kathleen has a "V-Mail" letter from
him, dated October 19, 1943, when his address was: "LT William C. Elliott, APO
12543, % Postmaster, NY, NY." He was promoted to Captain in October 1943.
After the invasion of Europe in June 1944, he was transferred to the Continent.

The War in Europe ended when Germany surrendered on May 7, 1945, and the War in
the Pacific ended when Japan surrendered on August 14, 1945. Demobilization
began immediately; "points" were assigned for months of service, months
overseas, and number of dependents; and the soldiers and sailors with the most
points were given "magic carpet" rides home on warships as well as transports.
Bill came back on USS Enterprise (CV-6), an aircraft carrier.

After the war ended in Europe, the Enterprise, which had participated in every
major action in the Pacific from Pearl Harbor to Okinawa, was assigned to
transport troops (in bunks installed in the hangars) from Europe for the
invasion of Japan. However, they dropped the bombs at Nagaski and Hiroshima,
the Japanese surrendered, and the soldiers disembarked on the East Coast instead
of in the Pacific.

Bill was released to inactive duty with the rank of Major and was home for
Christmas 1945. His brothers John and Frank, who were in the Navy in the
Pacific, didn't get home until January 1946.

Bill enrolled at the University of Oklahoma at Norman and majored in Petroleum
Engineering. On May 18, 1946, he married Wave Irene Spires, "Wave", who also
attended Northern Oklahoma Junior College at Tonkawa, graduating in 1940 with
an Associate Degree. She subsequently attended Oklahoma Agricultural and
Mechanical (A&M) College, now Oklahoma State University, at Stillwater;
graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Business in 1942; and was employed by
the Army Air Corps, Douglas Aircraft Company, and Standard Oil & Gas Company, as
a secretary. After their marriage she was employed as a secretary at the
University of Oklahoma. Bill remained in the Army Reserve and took three
months' active duty at Camp Leroy Johnson, in Louisiana, every summer while he
was in college.

In June 1950, Bill went to work for the Petroleum Division of the Bureau of
Mines, which is in the Interior Department, as a petroleum engineer, assigned
to the Dallas, Texas, Field Office. He also enrolled at Southern Methodist
University, where he completed the remaining requirements for his Bachelor
of Science in Petroleum Engineering degree. Wave accepted employment as a
secretary with Merrill-Lynch in Dallas. Their oldest daughter, Denise, was born
on November 4, 1950, and their other daughter, Wendy, was born on October 18,
1953.

Subsequently, Bill, who had been the Assistant Chief of the Dallas Field Office,
was transferred to Wichita Falls, Texas, as Head, Wichita Falls Field Office
(Petroleum) of the Bureau of Mines. Later, he was transferred to Washington,
D.C., as Administrative Assistant to the Chief of the Petroleum Division.
After the 1963 reogranization, which split petroleum research and production
responsibilities, he became the Chief of the Petroleum Division. Bill remained
active in the Army Reserve and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and then to
Colonel. The family lived on Sleepy Hollow Road in Annandale, Virginia, and
their daughters attended Fairfax County Schools.

In 1974, Bill learned that he had leukemia and that he had only a few months to
live. Fortunately, he was living in Annandale, Virginia, and was able to
participate in a leukemia research project at the National Institute of Health
in Bethesda, Maryland. Although the treatment extended his life several
months, he died on May 8, 1975, and was buried at Evergreen Cemetery in
Minco, Oklahoma, in the Elliott family plot next to his mother.

Wave moved to Oklahoma City after his death, where she maintains close contact
with Bill's brothers and sisters. Their children are grown, out of college, and
on their own. Denise attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute and graduated
from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She is a technical writer, married
to Kenneth Aiken Phair, and living in Denver. Denise and Ken are the proud
parents of Michelle Diane Phair, Bill and Wave's only grandchild. Wendy, who
has a Doctorate in Psychology, is a clinical psychologist in North Carolina.

Bill's mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where the
Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. His father came
to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, originally staying with his sister
Margaret, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909
and settled on the Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he
regained his health, his father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting
leather" (making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore
and Doc. Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his
father was in poor health and would not live much longer. William returned
to North Carolina, and his father died in June 1914. He remained in North
Carolina after his father's death and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After his parents were married, his father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that grandfather Elliott had owned, and lived in
a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were four miles up
Hinton's Creek from his grandfather Lattimore's house, just over the county
line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916 and the unprecedented
rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway,
telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the
floods, and his sister Kathleen was born prematurely the night the mill washed
away.

His father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten
miles south of Hollis. In September 1916 his father returned to Oklahoma. In
December 1916, his mother and his sister Kathleen, accompanied by his Aunt Susan
Elliott, came to Oklahoma on the train, and his father started working for
"Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family
moved to Chickasha, where his father accepted a job as a mechanic with Barton
Brothers Garage. The family lived at 216 South Eighth Street in Chickasha.
Bill was born at Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, on his sister Kathleen's
second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet and Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and his father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. Later, his father acquired an interest in the garage.
His father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next
to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he
purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

His sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and his sister Ann was born in
October 1923, the year his father sold 20 acres of land from his father's
estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, his father got sick from the
heat while working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and the next year his father was employed as caretaker mechanic,
responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment, with the
rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garage
on Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, his father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although he had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which
marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He
was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of his
business cards.

His brother John was born in January 1925, his brother Frank was born in
February 1927, and his sister Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, his
parents remodeled and modernized their house, and his father rejoined the
National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the rank of
Master Sergeant.

His father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September
1940, the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law,
responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, and the
Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of
France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about
60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery,
45th Division, and his father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the
United State. His father remained on active duty until he retired in May 1949.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in
"Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiographical
notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed by
Vertie Elliott to family members; newspaper clippings and other memorabilia
collected by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; and conversations with Bill's brothers,
sisters, widow, and daughter at the William C. Elliott family reunion in July
1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


More About WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT, JR.:
Burial: Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma

Notes for WAVE IRENE SPIRES:
REMARKS: Wave Irene Spires, "Wave", was born on August 23, 1921, in Kay
County, Oklahoma, the daughter of Edward Thomson Spires and Florence Amelia
Claycamp Spires. She has one brother, Harvey Donald Spires.

She graduated from Blackwell High School in Blackwell, Oklahoma, in 1938, and
attended Northern Oklahoma College in Tonkawa, Oklahoma, receiving an Associate
Degree in 1940. Subsequently, she attended Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical
(A&M) College, now Oklahoma State University, at Stillwater, and was awarded a
Bachelor of Science in Business Degree in 1942. She was employed by the U.S.
Army Air Corps, Douglas Aircraft Company, and Stanolind Oil & Gas Company until
1946.

On May 18, 1946, Wave married William C. Elliott, Jr., "Bill", the son of
William C. Elliott and Lula Lattimore Elliott, of Minco, Oklahoma. Wave met
Bill while they were students at Northern Oklahoma College. Bill had joined
the Oklahoma National Guard in 1940, was mobilized with the National Guard,
attended Officers Candidate School, was commissioned as an officer in the
Quartermaster Corps, and served in the European Theater with the Army Air
Corps. After the war ended in 1945 and Bill was released from active duty with
the rank of Major, he enrolled at the University of Oklahoma at Norman.

After their marriage, Wave was employed by the University of Oklahoma as a
Secretary. They moved to Dallas, Texas, after Bill was employed by the Bureau
of Mines of the Department of Interior, and Wave worked for Merrill-Lynch in
Dallas. Their daughter Denise was born November 4, 1950, in Dallas, and
their daughter Wendy was born October 18, 1953. They moved to Wichita Falls,
Texas, when Bill was transferred to the Petroleum Division Field Office there.
Subsequently, they moved to Annandale, Virginia, and Bill was assigned to
increasingly responsible positions in the Petroleum Division of the Bureau of
Mines.

After Bill's death in 1975, Wave sold their house in Annandale and moved to a
detached townhouse in northwest Oklahoma City, near Vertie Belle Elliott and
John T. Elliott, Bill's sister and brother. Her hobbies include travel,
reading, and duplicate bridge.


Children of WILLIAM ELLIOTT and WAVE SPIRES are:
97. i. DENISE11 ELLIOTT, b. 04 November 1950, Dallas, Texas.
ii. WENDY ELLIOTT, b. 18 October 1953, Dallas, Texas.

Notes for WENDY ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Wendy Elliott was born October 18, 1953, in Dallas, Texas, where her
father was a petroleum engineer with the Bureau of Mines. She was the younger
of the two daughters of William C. Elliott, Jr., and Wave Irene Spires Elliott.
The family moved to Wichita Falls, Texas, in 1957, when her father was
transferred to the field office there. In 1962, the family moved to Virginia,
when her father was promoted to Chief, Petroleum Division, Bureau of Mines.

Wendy graduated from high school in Annandale, Virginia, and the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she earned her Bachelor of Arts Degree
and was a member of Phi Betta Kappa. She earned her Master of Arts Degree at
Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and her Doctor of
Philosophy Degree at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Wendy lives in Salisbury, North Carolina, where she is a clinical psychologist.

Data provided by her mother, Wave Irene Spires Elliott, in July 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


76. ANNIE LOU10 ELLIOTT (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 15 October 1923 in Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma. She married WARREN TURLEY BASORE 12 April 1946 in Wichita, Kansas, son of WARREN BASORE and THEODOSIA BUMP. He was born 10 September 1921 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma.

Notes for ANNIE LOU ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Annie Lou Elliott, "Ann", was born October 15, 1923, at Minco,
Oklahoma, the daughter of William Christopher Elliott, "William", and Lula
Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". She was the fourth of twelve children, six boys and
six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen";
William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie
Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae,
"Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula
Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or
"A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Ann grew up in Minco, started to school there, and graduated from Minco High
School in May 1941. She was a class officer all four years of high school,
played clarinet in the high school band, member of debate team, and worked in
the Superintendent's office.

Ann attended Southwestern State College at Weatherford, Oklahoma, for two years.
After World War II started, the college was used to train mechanics for the
Army Air Corps and pre-flight students for the Navy. Ann worked in the college
cafeteria, helping feed over 500 Army and Navy students. She attended Central
State College at Edmond, Oklahoma, her junior year, and worked as secretary
to the Executive Secretary and then the President of the College, after their
secretaries left to work in the war effort.

She left college in May 1944 to work for the U.S. Army Signal Corps at Camp
Barkley, Texas, where her father was assigned to Post Ordnance. She transferred
to Camp Maxey at Paris, Texas, where she worked for the Signal Corps until after
the war ended.

She returned to Central State College in January 1946, where she worked as
secretary to the Dean of the College, handling all Veteran's contracts. She
received her degree in Business Education in May 1947 with a Master's Rank in
Alpha Phi Sigma Honorary Society and was named to "Who's Who Among Students in
American Colleges and Universities".

Ann married Warren Turley Basore, "Turley" or "W.T.", on April 12, 1946. They
have three children: Susan, Mark, and Bill. Ann worked briefly for General
Motors Acceptance Corporation (G.M.A.C) before dropping out of the work force to
raise her children. She participated in Parent Teachers Association, Girl
Scouts, Cub Scouts, Red Cross Blood Mobile, Methodist Manor Auxiliary, St.
John's Hospital Auxiliary, and St. Francis Hospital Auxiliary, as well as Church
related activities.

Her "loves" are her children, her family, her Church work, travel, reading,
crafts, jig saw and cross word puzzles, and her friends. She particularly
likes to travel. Ann and Turley set aside money for regular vacations while
their children were growing up, including cross-country trips. Now that she is
a "senior citizen", she favors bus tours with family members and friends.
Ann and Turley live in Tulsa, convenient to their daughter Susan, grandson
Grant, and members of the William C. Elliott clan.

Ann's mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where the
Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. Her father came
to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, originally staying with his sister
Margaret, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909
and settled on the Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he
regained his health, her father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting
leather" (making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and
Doc. Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was
in poor health and was not expected to live much longer. William returned to
North Carolina and his father died in June 1914. William remained in North
Carolina and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After her parents were married, her father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that her grandfather Elliott had owned, and
they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were
four miles up Hinton's Creek from her grandfather Lattimore's house, just over
the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916, and the unprecedented
rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway,
telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the
floods, and her sister Kathleen was born prematurely the next morning.

Her father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten
miles south of Hollis. In September 1916, her father returned to Oklahoma. In
December 1916, her mother and her sister Kathleen, accompanied by her Aunt
Susan Elliott, came to Oklahoma on the train, and her father started working
for "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family
moved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where her father worked
as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. Her brother Bill was born at
Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, her sister Kathleen's second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet & Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and her father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. Later, her father acquired an interest in the garage.
Her father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets,
next to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later,
he purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow posture.

Her sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and Ann was born in October 1923,
the year her father sold 20 acres of land from his father's estate and fixed up
the house. In August 1924, her father got sick while working on a tractor and
had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and the next year her father was employed as caretaker mechanic,
responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment, with the
rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garage
on Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, her father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although he had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which
marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He
was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of his
business cards.

Her brother John was born in January 1925, her brother Frank was born in
Feburary 1927, and her sister Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, her
parents remodeled and modernized their house, and her father rejoined the
National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the rank of
Master Sergeant.

Her father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September
1940, the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law,
responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, and the
Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of
France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about
60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, 45th
Division, and her father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United
States. Her father remained on active duty until he retired in May 1949.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision 7/93.


Notes for WARREN TURLEY BASORE:
REMARKS: Warren Turley, "Turley", Basore was born September 10, 1921, in
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the son of Warren Lee Basore and Marie Bump Basore.
He was the oldest of their three children: Warren Turley, Beennett, and Mary
Ann Basore. Turley attended public schools in Oklahoma City and graduated
from Northeast High School in May 1940. He worked for one year before starting
college at Central State College, Edmond, Oklahoma, in September 1941.

Turley enlisted in the Army Air Force in May 1942, but was not called to
active duty until March 1943. He served 19 months in China-Burma-India (CBI)
Theater during World War II, and he was discharged in January 1946 with the rank
of PFC (Private First Class), pay grade E-3. His MOS (Military Occupational
Specialty) was #207 (Teletype Operator). The following summary of CBI
activities from "American Miliary History 1607-1958", published by
Headquarters, Department of the Army, is intended to place his miliary service
in context.

Except for some minor ground actions in Burma, U.S. Army combat activity in
China, Burma, and India during World War II was largely limited to air
operations against Japanese forces in China and Burma, and anti-shipping
strikes over the South China Sea. The United States policy of keeing China in
the war and increasing the potential of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek's ground
forces required the Army to undertake a huge logistical effort in the CBI, an
effort also aimed at supporting Army Air Forces operations in China.

Early in 1942 the Army sent Lt. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell to Chian with the
missions of maintaining an overland supply line to China through Burma and
coordinating American efforts to train, equipm, and supply Chinese ground
units. In addition to his other duties, Stilwell commanded all U.S. Army
forces in China, Burma, and India.

In May 1942, the Japanese drove British and Chinese forces out of Burma and cut
the overland route to China. For the next 18 months, no significant ground
activity occurred in the area, and American forces concentrated on the
development of an aerial supply route to China and on training Chinese troops.
From small beginnings the aerial supply operations grew until by the end of the
war the Army Air Force was employing nearly 630 cargo planes to fly supplies
into China over the dangerous "hump" in a continuous effort to support the
Chinese Army and the Army Air Force operations.

The aerial supply route could not support all needs, and, in 1943, work was
started on a land route (the Ledo Road) from India across north Burma to
China. In the spring of 1944, a U.S. Army regiment, Merrill's Marauders, and
parts of another Army regiment spearheaded new offensives to secure the route
for the overland road. Through most of 1944 operations in northern Burma were
indecisive, although enough terrain was secured for engineers to push road
construction and start laying a pipeline.

Relations between Stilwell and Chiang became strained, and in October 1944,
Maj. Gen. Albert C. Wedemeyer replaced Stilwell as Chiang's Chief of Staff and
commander of U.S. Army forces in China. Maj. Gen. Dan I. Sultan became the
commander of U.S. Army forces in Burma and India. Construction of the Ledo
Road and the pipeline continued. By the end of the war in August 1945,
Japanese resistance in most of Burma had collapsed and the Japanese had begun
withdrawing their forces from southern and eastern China to Manchuria and the
homeland.

Initially, Turley was assigned to the 40th Photo Reconnaissance Squadron, where
he strung telephone lines, operated a telephone switchboard, and drove a jeep
or rode a motorcycle to pickup and deliver messages. After the war, he was
assigned to a troop carrier squadron, which had 145 C46 transports to moved
Chinese ground armies from western China to Nanking, Peking, Shanghai, and
other eastern cities.

After he was discharged, Turley returned to Central State College, where he
graduated in August 1947 and was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree. He
worked for about ten months in a business operated by his uncle while awaiting
call for employment by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), having passed the
Civil Service Examination in May 1947. Turley worked for the IRS in Oklahoma
until 1963, when he accepted a supervisory position in the IRS office in Tulsa,
He remained with the IRS in Tulsa until he retired in September 1976.

Four years later Turley joined the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE),
an organization of men and women who volunteer free counseling to small business
owners, managers, and people planning to go into business. They counsel at
Small Business Administration offices, at Chambers of Commerce, and other
community locations. He has served in various offices of the organization,
including Oklahoma Alternate District Manager.

Turley married Ann Elliott, daughter of William C. Elliott and Lula Lattimore
Elliott, on 12 April 1946, in Wichita, Kansas. They have three children: Susan
Carol, Mark Elliott, and William Tracy Basore. Although he has pursued a career
in tax accounting, he likes to tinker with and talk about automobiles. His
interest in automobiles dates back to his teenage years, when he owned a Model A
Ford. Ann and Turley live in Tulsa, Oklahoma, convenient to their daughter
Susan, grandson Grant, and other members of the William C. Elliott clan.

Original data provided by Ann Basore in March 1993. Additional data provided
by W. T. Basore in July 1995.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 1/96.


Children of ANNIE ELLIOTT and WARREN BASORE are:
98. i. SUSAN CAROL11 BASORE, b. 29 September 1949, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
ii. MARK ELLIOTT BASORE, b. 26 August 1952, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; m. MARY ANN AULT, 13 February 1981, Tulsa, Oklahoma; b. 04 July 1950, Kokomo, Indiana.

Notes for MARK ELLIOTT BASORE:
RESUME: Oldest son and second child of Warren Turley Basore and Ann Elliott
Basore. Born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Attended public schools in Oklahoma
City until 5th grade, when the family moved to Tulsa, Oklahoma. Graduated from
from Nathan Hale High School in Tulsa. Member of high school marching band,
concert ban, and symphony band. Played the drums. Graduated from Northeastern
State Colle, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Received degree in Accounting. His business
career has been in gas sales and Contract Analysis in the oil industry and
environmental related industry.

Married Mary Ann Ault. They live in Mandeville, Louisiana. Mark and Mary Ann
are very involved in Church related activities.

Data provided by Ann Basore, his mother, in March 1993.


Notes for MARY ANN AULT:
RESUME: Born in Kokomo, Indiana. Moved to Tulsa with her family.
Graduated from high school in Tulsa. Graduated from Northeastern State
College, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Married Mark Elliott Basore. They have no
children. She likes to run and has competed in several major races, including
the Boston Marathon.

Data provided by Ann Elliott Basore, her mother-in-law, in March 1993.


99. iii. WILLIAM TRACY BASORE, b. 15 September 1957, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

77. JOHN THOMAS10 ELLIOTT (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 04 January 1925 in Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma. He married CAROLINE ANN TUCKER 03 July 1953 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. She was born 09 January 1934.

Notes for JOHN THOMAS ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: John Thomas Elliott, "John" or "J.T.", was born on January 4, 1925, at Minco, Oklahoma, the son of William Christopher Elliott, "William", and Lula Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". He was the fifth of twelve children, six boys and six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen"; William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae, "Judy", Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or "A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

John grew up in Minco, attended public schools in Minco, and graduated from Minco High School in May 1942. While he was growing up, he helped with the garden, the cows, and other chores. He also helped sweep out the armory and performed other tasks to help his father. He played football, basketball, and baseball in high school, and he worked at the Ford Garage during his summer vacations, changing oil, fixing flats, and helping the mechanics. He spent one winter on the Baumgardner farm, helping Mrs. Baumgardner with the chores after her husband was mobilized with the National Guard.

John joined the U.S. Navy upon graduation from high school; completed recruit (boot) training at Naval Training Center, San Diego, California; volunteered for sea duty (give up his "boot leave"); was placed in "draft" (batch of replacements) for Pacific Fleet losses during the Battles for Guadacanal. He spent two weeks in transit to Pearl Harbor, traveling by "blacked-out" troop train to the U.S. Naval Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco, California, and embarking in the President Tyler, an old cargo ship, for transport to Pearl Harbor. One cargo hold on the President Tyler had been converted to carry troops, and steam pots had been installed for preparation of beans, rice, and other food. In Pearl Harbor, the boots were assigned in alphabetical order to ships. John was assigned to the USS New Orleans (CA32), a heavy cruiser, which was in port. The President Tyler was torpedoed and sunk at Espiritu Santo, Admiralty Islands.

Upon reporting to the New Orleans in August 1942, he was assigned to the 4th division. The 1st, 2nd, and 3rd divisions manned turrets 1, 2, and 3, the eight-inch guns; the the 4th division manned the five-inch (anti-aircraft) guns; and the 5th division manned the 20mm (anti-aircraft) guns. His sister Kathleen has a "V-Mail" letter from him, dated October 11, 1942, when his address was: "John T. Elliott, S 2/C, USS New Orleans, 4th Division, % FPO, San Francisco". "S 2/C" is an abbreviation of his rank, Seaman Second Class.

In August 1942, the New Orleans participated in the Capture and Defense of Guadacanal, as a general support gunfire ship, and the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, as a screening ship for the Saratoga, an aircraft carrier. After the Saratoga was torpedoed, the New Orleans accompanied the crippled Saratoga to Tonga Tabu, Society Islands, and to Pearl Harbor for repairs. In November 1942, the New Orleans proceeded to Espiritu Santos to join Task Force 67 (five cruisers and six destroyers), which sortied to intercept another of the "Tokyo Expresses" attempting to supply Japanese forces on Guadacanal. In the subsequent Battle of Tassafaronga, the New Orleans sunk one of the eight destroyers and assisted in the sinking of another destroyer and a merchant ship before the New Orleans was hit by a torpedo, which blew off the bow and the entire turret one. The ship remained afloat because of the extensive compartmentation and effective damage control by a valiant crew. The cruisers Minneapolis and Pensacola were also damaged during this battle.

The crippled New Orleans proceeded at two knots, backing down (traveling in reverse), to Tulagi Harbor to repair damage and make the ship seaworthy; i.e., shore the bulkheads of damaged compartments with coconut trees and plug leaks in the hull, arriving there on December 1, 1942. It remained in Tulagi with the damaged Minneapolis and Pensacola until December 12, 1942. It then proceeded (backed down) at six knots to Sydney, Australia, for temporary repairs, arriving there on Christmas Eve 1942. With an improvised bow, it proceeded to Puget Sound Navy Yard at Bremerton, Washington, for permanent repairs, arriving in April 1943. The ship was also "regunned", new radar and other equipment was installed, and the crew was given leave.

John came home on leave twice during the war. The first time was in April 1943, when he was granted 20 days leave. The second time was in February 1945, when he and Frank were home at the same time. The family was living in Abilene, Texas, because his father was stationed at Camp Barkley. He arrived from California on the Texas & Pacific Railroad, which ran right through the middle of town. Family members used to pass the railroad station, look at the many soldiers and sailors on arriving trains, and hope that J.T. would be one of them. He also went to Oklahoma to see Kathleen and Vertie, and he went to Minco to see his and family friends.

In August 1943, repaired and ready for duty, the New Orleans returned to the Western Pacific where it participated in the bombardment and air strikes on Wake Island in October 1943. It subsequently participated in the Gilbert and Marshall Island Operations; the raids on the Marianas, Palau, Yap, Ulithi, Wolei, Truk, Satawan, and Ponape; and the New Guinea, Marianas, Western Caroline Islands, Leyte, Luzon, and Okinawa Operations. It was in Subic Bay in the Philippines, preparing for the invastion of Japan, when the war ended.

After the war ended on August 14, 1945, the ship sortied from Subic Bay to support the occupation of Korea and China. It participated in shows of force at Tsingtago, Port Arthur, Dairen, Whaiwei, Chefoo, Chinwangtao, and Western Korea and supported landings at Jinsen, Korea, before proceeding to Tsingtao, China, on September 20th to take the Japanesse surrender of prize ships and to evacuate internees. It then participated in the occupation of Taku-Tientsin area.

The surrender and occuppation operations in Korea, North China, and Manchuria in October 1945 were not victory celebrations. It was a race against time. The Russians were on the move, and American prisoners of war had to be gotton out before they were overrun. Also, the Yellow Sea freezes in winter, limiting navigation. John was assigned temporary additional duty with the First Marine Division and quartered in the Imperial Hotel in Tientsin, China. The Imperial was one of China's most modern pre-war hotels. Tientsin was one of the major pre-war foreign trade ports, with French, British, and White Russian Sectors.

The conditions in Tientsin were beyond description. Horse-draw carts picked up bodies in the streets every morning. Some died or froze trying to keep warm wrapped in newspapers. Others were placed there by someone who cared -- or just wanted to get them out of the way. The war became more personal than it had been. These were "people". John had spent three and a half years shooting at targets -- ships -- planes -- islands. He hadn't let his mind dwell on what targets consisted of. His self pity at not having an opportunity to participate in the victory celebrations was replaced with "Guilt".

The New Orleans returned to the United States in January 1946, and John was released to inactive duty at U.S. Naval Station, Hunter's Point, San Francisco,California. He was given the option of being discharged or tranferring to the Naval Reserve. He elected to transfer to the Naval Reserve and was released to inactive duty as a Gunner's Mate 2nd Class (Pay Grade E-5) with an impressive array of ribbons, including 16 battle stars. His brother Frank made the same decision.

John says his Victory Celebration was four years of school on the GI Bill and playing football in college. Although he now feels that he didn't take full advantage of his educational opportunites (focusing on football instead of academics), he attended Murray State College (a junior college) at Tishomingo, Oklahoma, for two years (September 1946 through May 1948; the University of Oklahoma at Norman for one year (September 1948 through May 1949), and East Central State College at Ada, Oklahoma, for one year (September 1949 through May 1950). He had the height, weight (over 200 pounds), and athletic abiltiy to play offensive guard and defensive tackle at Murray State. Rather than sit on the bench at the University of Oklahoma, a football powerhouse, he transferred to East Central to get back in the game.

His decision to remain in the Naval Reserve turned out to be the wrong one. He was recalled to active duty on September 12, 1950, and was assigned to duty as Gunner's Mate 2nd Class on LST-840, a landing ship tank with four twin 40mm anti-aircraft guns, which was pulled out of the reserve fleet. If he had not stayed in the Naval Reserve, he would have qualified for a commission (over 135 college credit hours and previous experience) and gone on active duty as an officer instead of an enlisted man. However, he had stayed in the reserve and the Navy need experienced gunner's mates to quickly recommission amphibious ships for Korean service. He reported to LST-840 at Astoria, Oregon. After moving to Puget Sound Navy Yard at Bremerton, Washington, for commissioning and to San Diego, California, for shakedown training, the ship proceeded to Korea to support amphibious operations and naval activities, including transfer of North Korean prisoners of war to prison camps on the off-shore islands. John returned to San Diego on December 24, 1951, and was discharged the same day.

In January 1952, John took a temporary job with Hunzicker Brothers, Inc., an electrical wholesale company in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, planning to complete the seven college hours required for a teaching certificate and look for a high school coaching job upon graduation. In September, when it was time to return to college, the owner of the company made him a good offer and a challenge to grow with the company. Since he enjoyed what he was doing with the company, and he liked the people he was working with, he accepted the offer and the challenge. He stayed with the company, and he found it rewarding as well as a way of life that he enjoyed.

He met Caroline Ann Hester, "Caroline", at work, where she was a clerk, and they were married on July 3, 1953. They had one child, Frankie Diane, "Diane". Caroline is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Tucker of Oklahoma City. She graduated from Classen High School in Oklahoma City, where she was member of the Art Club and the Classette Pep Club. They were married at the First Methodist Church in Oklahoma. This was Caroline's second marriage. She had one child from the first marriage, Stephen Wayne, who was adopted by John.

The company, founded in 1920, grew to the largest independently owned and operated electrical wholesale company in their area, with five branches as well as the main house in Oklahoma City. John assumed additional responsibilities and was promoted as the company grew, eventually becoming Vice President for Operations. As an alternative to retirement at age 65, John was offered reduced responsibilities and an opportunity to set on the Board of Directors. He quickly accepted the unique opportunity.

John and Carolina live in their townhouse in Oklahoma City. Their children are grown up and on their own. Their daughter Diane, who married Bob Dyer, lives nearby, convenient for John and Carolina to enjoy the twins, Emily and Matthew.

John's mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where the Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. John was named for his two grandfathers, John Daniel Lattimore and Thomas Forbis Elliott.

His father came to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, originally staying with his sister Margaret, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909 and settled on the Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he regained his health, his father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting leather" (making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and Doc. Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was in poor health and would not live much longer. William returned to North Carolina, and his father died in June 1914. William remained in North Carolina after his father's death and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After his parents were married, his father operated a flour, corn, and shingle mill, one of several properties that his grandfather Elliott had owned, and they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were four miles up Hinton's Creek from his grandfather Lattimore's house, just over the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916, and the unprecedented rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway, telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the floods, and his sister Kathleen was born prematurely the night the mill washed away.

His father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten miles south of Hollis. In September 1916, his father returned to Okla homa. In December 1916, his mother and his sister Kathleen came to Oklahoma on the train, and his father started working at the "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family moved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where his father worked as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. His brother Bill was born at Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, his sister Kathleen's second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet & Son, the family moved back to Minco, and his father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick Garage" on Main Street. Later, his father acquired an interest in the garage. His father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

His sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and his sister Ann was born in October 1923, the year his father sold 20 acres of land from his father's estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, his father got sick while working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to Minco in 1924, and the next year his father was employed as caretaker mechanic, responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment, with the rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garageon Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, his father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal water well in Minco. Although he had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of their father's business cards.

John was born in January 1925, his brother Frank was born in February 1927, and his sister Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, his parents remodeled and modernized their house, and his father rejoined the National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the rank of Master Sergeant.

His father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September 1940, the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law, responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, and the Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about 60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, 45th Division, and his father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United States. His father remained on active duty until he retired in May 1949.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiographical notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed by Vertie Elliott to family members; newspaper clippings and other memorabilia collected by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; and conversations at the William C. Elliott family reunion in July 1993. The data for USS New Orleans World War II activities is from the "History of the United States Ship New Orleans (CA32)", distributed to crew members at the end of the war. Notes on surrender and occupation activies, Korean War service, and subsequent activities provided by John Thomas Elliott in April 1993. He and his wife live in Oklahoma City.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


Notes for CAROLINE ANN TUCKER:
REMARKS: Caroline Ann Tucker was born January 9, 1934, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. On July 3, 1953, Caroline married John Thomas Elliott, son of William Christopher Elliott and Lula Lattimore. They had one child, Frankie Diane, "Diane", Elliott.

This was Caroline's second marriage. I don't know her first husband's name. She had one child from the first marriage, Stephen Wayne, who was adopted by John Thomas Elliott.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 2/94.


Child of JOHN ELLIOTT and CAROLINE TUCKER is:
100. i. FRANKIE DIANE11 ELLIOTT, b. 10 March 1955, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

78. FRANK WALL10 ELLIOTT (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 01 February 1927 in Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma. He married ELEANOR MAE PIVACH 01 September 1956 in New Orleans, Louisiana. She was born 01 April 1934 in Buras, Louisiana.

Notes for FRANK WALL ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Frank Wall Elliott, "Frank", was born on February 1, 1927, at Minco, Oklahoma, the son of William Christopher Elliott, "William", and Lula Lattimore Elliott, "Lula", He was the sixth of twelve children, six boys and six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen"; William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae, "Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or "A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Frank grew up in Minco and attended public schools in Minco until August 1942, when the family moved to Texas. While he was growing up, Frank helped with the garden, the cows, and other chores. He also helped sweep out the armory and performed other tasks to help his father. He also helped Bill Olney deliver the "Daily Oklahoman" and the "Oklahoma City Times". In addition to the paper routes, Bill Olney operated the movie projector at the local movie theater, and gave Frank "passes" to the movies as well as money for helping him. His younger siblings were also born in Minco and started to school there.

In April 1942, his father was transferred from Fort Sill to Camp Barkley, Texas, about 15 miles southwest of Abilene. In August 1942, the family moved to Texas, initially living in a ranch house about 10 miles south of Abilene. Most of the ranch had been taken over by the Army for use as an artillery range. The house was on the Buffalo Gap highway, south of Wylie, convenient to Camp Barkley. In April 1943, the ranch was sold, and the family moved to Abilene, where they remained until October 1945, when they moved back to Minco.

The children attended schools at Wylie, which was about five miles south of Abilene, when they lived on the ranch. They attended Abilene High, Central Elementary, or South Junior High School after they moved to town. Frank delivered the "Abilene Reporter News" until he graduated from Abilene High School in May 1944 and joined the Navy. His brother Charles helped him deliver papers, and Frank turned the routes over to Charles when he left for the Navy.

Frank enlisted in the Navy at Mangum, Oklahoma, where his sister Kathleen was teaching school; took his physical examination in Oklahoma City; and completed "Boot Camp" (recruit training) at Camp Peary, Williamsburg, Virginia. He was subsequently assigned to a Landing Ship Medium (LSM).

LSMs were smaller than Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs) and larger than Landing Craft Infantry (LCIs). Their length at the water line was 196 1/2 feet, while LSTs were 316 feet long. The complement (number of officers and enlisted men) was 50; their armament consisted of two 40 mm antiaircraft guns; and their designed top speed was 12.5 knots. They were designed to carry about six Army tanks and to operate in restricted waters.

Frank reported to a new LSM on the East Coast in 1944; went through shakedown training on the East Coast, transited the Panama Canal; and arrived at the Naval Amphibious Base in San Diego, California, where it prepared for overseas movement in February 1945. While the ship was in San Diego, Frank, who had been promoted to Seaman First Class, was granted leave, and, by chance, he was home on leave at the same time as his brother John, who was assigned to the USS New Orleans (CA-32).

Frank's LSM, in company with others, crossed the Pacific Ocean, enroute to the Philippines to prepare for the invasion of Japan. They arrived at Subic Bay in the Philippines just before the war ended, August 14, 1945. Frank stayed with the ship until after it returned to the United States. He was released to inactive duty in January 1946. During separation processing, he had the choice of being discharged or staying in the Reserves. He elected to stay in the Reserves, and was released to inactive duty with the rank of Seaman First Class. His brother John made the same decision.

After they were released from active duty, Frank and his brother John returned to Minco and started worrying about college. After considering the options, and there weren't very many because there were so many veterans trying to go to college on the "GI Bill", they enrolled at Murray State College, a junior college, at Tishomingo. After two years at Murray State, they moved to the University of Oklahoma at Norman, where Frank majored in Petroleum Engineering. His brother Bill was also a Petroleum Engineering major at OU, but Bill was two years ahead of him, having completed junior college before the war.

Petroleum Engineering was normally a five-year program, and the students were encouraged to work in the oil fields during their summer vacations. Frank was working on an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico when the North Koreans invaded South Korea in June 1950, and he was recalled to active duty. He was assigned to duty at the Naval Supply Depot in Yokosuka, Japan, as a clerk, with his old rank of Seaman First Class. Since he had completed four years of college and he had prior naval service, he might have received a commission if he had not stayed in the Reserves.

In any event, after he was released to inactive duty, he returned to the University of Oklahoma, graduated, and returned to Louisiana to work in the offshore oil fields, where he met Eleanor Mae Pivach, "Eleanor", the daughter of George Pivach of Buras, Louisiana. They were married on September 1, 1956, in the Church of the Most Holy Name of Jesus. They have two sons: William Christopher Elliott, III, and Frank Wall Elliott, Junior.

After they were married, Frank and Eleanor opened an auto parts and hardware store, "Plaquamines Parts & Supply", in Buras, and his brother James joined them, concentrating on the auto parts side of the business. Later, Frank and some business associates formed a corporation, "Allied Wireline", with several barges, designed to service offshore oil wells.

The Frank Elliott residence and store was adjacent to the George Pivach residence and winery. In March 1962, Frank was seriously burned when the winery was destroyed by an explosion shortly after he entered the winery to investigate an unusual noise. The subsequent investigation determined that a gas regulator had failed, releasing explosive gases, which ignited.

In August 1969, the store, the Frank Elliott residence, the James Elliott residence, and every other building in Buras was destroyed by Hurricane Camille. The low lands in the area were protected by levees from flooding of the Mississippi River, but the buildings were destroyed by the violent wind and the wind-swept waters from the Gulf of Mexico.

They built a new store in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, up river from Buras, closer to New Orleans and on high ground. Frank and James also built new houses in Belle Chasse, and their businesses prospered until the early '80s, when the market for crude oil collapsed. Their "Allied Wireline" operations were hardest hit. Their "Plaquamines Parts & Supply" operations have adapted to current economic conditions.

Their sons graduated from high schools in New Orleans and moved on Tulane and other universities. Chris is a lawyer married to a doctor, living in Belle Chasse with two small daughters. F. J., who has a Doctorate in Mathematics, is at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton University.

"Frank" is a common name in the Lattimore family. The "Wall" is in honor of his father's friend B. Wall. The "B." in "B. Wall" is for "Brun", but no one called him anything except "B. Wall". His tombstone is even engraved "B. Wall".

Frank's mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where the Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. His father moved to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, originally staying with his sister Margaret, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909 and settled on the Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he regained his health, his father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting leather" (making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and Doc. Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was in poor health and would not live much longer. William returned to North Carolina, and his father died in June 1914. He remained in North Carolina after his father's death and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After his parents were married, his father operated a flour, corn, and shingle mill, one of several properties that his grandfather Elliott had owned, and they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were four miles up Hinton's Creek from his grandfather Lattimore's house, just over the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916, and the unprecedented rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway, telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the floods, and his sister Kathleen was born prematurely the night the mill washed away.

His father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten miles south of Hollis. In September 1916, his father returned to Oklahoma. In December 1916, his mother and his sister Kathleen moved to Oklahoma on the train, and his father started working at the "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family moved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where his father worked as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. His brother Bill was born at Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, his sister Kathleen's second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet and Son, the family moved back to Minco, and his father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick Garage" on Main Street. Later, his father acquired an interest in the garage. His father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

His sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and his sister Ann was born in October 1923, the year his father sold 20 acres of land from his father's estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, his father got sick from the heat while working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to Minco in 1924, and the next year his father was employed as caretaker mechanic,responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment, with the rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garage on Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, his father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal water well in Minco. Although he had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of their father's business cards.

His brother John was born in January 1925, Frank was born in February 1927, and his sister Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, his parents remodeled and modernized their house, and his father rejoined the National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the rank of Master Sergeant.

His father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September 1940, the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law, responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, and the Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about 60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, 45th Division, and his father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United States. His father remained on active duty until he retired in May 1949.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in "Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiographical notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed to family members by Vertie Elliott; newspaper clippings and other memorabilia collected by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; and conversations at the William C. Elliott family reunion in July 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


Notes for ELEANOR MAE PIVACH:
REMARKS. Eleanor Mae Pivach, "Eleanor", was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Pivach of Buras, Louisiana. She grew up in Buras, where her father was an orange grower, vintner, and businessman. She graduated from high school in New Orleans. She married Frank Wall Elliott, "Frank", on September 1, 1956, in the Church of the Most Holy Name of Jesus. They have two sons: William Christopher Elliott, III, "Chris", and Frank Wall Elliott, Junior, "F.J.".

After they were married, they operated an automotive supply and hardware store, "Placquamin Parts & Supply". Their store and residence was adjacent to the George Pivach residence and winery.

In August 1969, the store, their residence, and every other building in Buras was destroyed by Hurricane Camille. The low lands in the area were protected by levees from flooding by the Mississippi River, but the buildings were destroyed by the violent wind and the wind-swept waters from the Gulf of
Mexico.

They built a new store in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, up river from Buras, closer to New Orleans and on high ground. They also built a new house in Belle Chasse, and their business prospered until the early '80s, when the market for crude oil collapsed. Their "Placquamine Parts & Supply" operations have adapted to current economic conditionsl.

Their sons graduated from high schools in New Orleans and moved on to Tulane and other universities. Chris is a lawyer married to a doctor, living in Belle Chasse with two small daughters. F. J., who has a Doctorate in Mathematics, is at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton University.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 8/93.


Children of FRANK ELLIOTT and ELEANOR PIVACH are:
101. i. WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER11 ELLIOTT III, b. 21 August 1958, New Orleans, New Orleans.
ii. FRANK WALL ELLIOTT, JR., b. 24 August 1961, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Notes for FRANK WALL ELLIOTT, JR.:
REMARKS: Frank Wall Elliott, Junior, "F.J.", is the son of Frank Wall Elliott, "Frank", and Eleanor Mae Pivach, "Eleanor". He is the younger of their two sons: William Christopher Elliott, III, "Chris", and Frank Wall Elliott, Junior, "F.J."

F. J. was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. He grew up in Buras, Louisiana, where his parents operated an automotive supply and hardware store, "Placquamine Parts & Supply".

After the store, their residence, and all the buildings in Buras were destroyed in August 1969 by Hurricane Camille, the family moved up river to Belle Chasse, Louisiana, and his parents built a new store and a new house, closer to New Orleans and on high ground.

F.J. graduated from high school in New Orleans and earned bachelor of science in electrical engineering, masters in business administration, and Doctor of Philosophy in mathematics degrees from Tulane University in New Orleans. He is currently at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton University.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 8/93.


79. JULIA MAE10 ELLIOTT (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 29 November 1928 in Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma. She married CHARLES WILLIAM BROWN 17 June 1947 in Belton, Texas, son of IVAN BROWN and CLEO JANE. He was born 10 July 1929 in Hollis, Harmon County, Oklahoma.

Notes for JULIA MAE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Julia Mae Elliott, "Judy", was born November 29, 1928, at Minco,
Oklahoma, the daughter of William Christopher Elliott, "William", and Lula
Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". She was the seventh of twelve children, six boys and
six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen";
William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" of "V.B."; Annie
Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae,
"Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula
Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or
"A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Judy grew up in Minco, where her father was the caretaker for the National
Guard Armory. She attended public schools and the First Baptist Church in
Minco. In September 1940, the local National Guard unit was mobilized as
Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery Battalion, 45th Division. Upon
mobilization, the unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about 60 miles south of
Minco, and her father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United
States. In April 1942, her father was transferred from Fort Sill to Camp
Barkley, Texas, about 15 miles southwest of Abilene. In August 1942, the family
moved to Texas, initially living in a ranch house about 10 miles south of
Abilene. Most of the ranch had been taken over by the Army for use as an
artillery range. The house was on the Buffalo Gap highway, south of Wylie,
convenient to Camp Barkley. In April 1943, the ranch was sold, and the family
moved to Abilene, where they remained until after the war ended. The children
attended schools at Wylie, which was about five miles south of Abilene, when
they lived on the ranch. They attended Central Elementary, South Junior High,
or Abilene High after they moved to town. Judy had a part-time job as a clerk
at Woolworth's variety store while she lived in Abilene.

World War II ended in August 1945, the family moved back to Minco in October
1945, and Judy attended Minco High School. She also worked part time at the
drug store. In March 1947, the family moved to Camp Hood, Texas, where her
father was assigned to Post Ordnance after Camp Barkley closed. The family
lived in an apartment in a converted barracks at 40th Street and Battalion
Avenue. An Army bus took the older children to Killeen, where they attended
Killeen High School. The younger children attended school on the base.

Judy graduated from Killeen High School in May 1947 and married Charles William
Brown, "Bill", on June 19, 1947, at Belton, Texas, the county seat of Bell
County. After their marriage, Judy and Charlie resided in Minco, where Bill
worked for his uncle, Glen Gibson, at the "Clover Bloom Honey Company" in Minco.
They lived in an apartment above one of the stores on the south side of Main
Street.

During the debate that preceded the first peacetime draft, Charlie enlisted
in the Army in the spring of 1948 for three years and was assigned to Radio
School at Fort Gordon, Georgia, after he completed basic training. He
subsequently attended the Army Security Agency School at Carlisle Barracks,
Pennsylvania, and was assigned to duty in Kyoto, Japan, and then in Okinawa.

Judy lived with Bill's parents, Ivan I. and Cleo Jane Brown, and Bill's
sister, Arra Jane Smith, in Oklahoma City while Charlie was in the service.

After the peacetime "draft" law was passed, the Army had more soldiers than it
needed. Bill was offered an opportunity to transfer to the Reserve, and he
took it, preferring Oklahoma City to Okinawa. He was released to inactive duty
in July 1950. Unfortunately, the North Koreans invaded South Korea in late
June, and he was recalled to active duty in August 1950, one month after he
was released to inactive duty.

Bill was sent to Fort Hood, Texas, for 21 days Infantry Refresher Training, and
then taken to Camp Stoneman, California, where he remained overnight. The
next day he was placed on a troop transport in San Franciso. Upon arrival in
Yokohoma, Japan, he was taken by truck to Camp Drake at Tokyo, where they
arrived late, were fed, given blankets, and placed in the transit barracks.

The next morning, after an 03:00 reveille, they were given new rifes, which
were covered with cosmoline (preservative). They cleaned their rifles and went
to the rifle range. They were given three rounds to "zero" the rifles with
targets at 100 yards, and then returned to the same troop transport and
taken to Hungnam, the port city for notheastern Korea.

Bill returned to active duty with his old rank, PFC (Private First Class), pay
grade E-3, and his old MOS (Military Occupational Specialty), Radio High Speed
Manual Radio Operator. However, he was assigned to the U.S. X (tenth) Corps
Signal Company, and they didn't need CW (Continuous Wave), "Morse Code"
operators. He asked his platoon sergeant to assign him to one of the
Regimental Combat Team (RCT) Command Posts (CPs) as a voice radio operator,
because RCT CP personnel were considered line troops, and they were rotated
back to the states faster.

He was initially assigned TDY (Temporary Duty) at 187th RCT CP at Wangju.
Later, he was assigned to the Regimental CP for the 23rd Regiment, 2nd Infantry
Division, where he transmitted morning reports and other administrative traffic.
Meanwhile, Judy remained in Oklahoma City and worked as a clerk at the W. T.
Grant variety store.

After he was discharged from the Army, Bill returned to Oklahoma City and
worked for various automotive supply stores, becoming the manager of a "Save
Auto Parts" store. After the "Peanuts" comic strip and its main character,
Charlie Brown, became popular, Judy and his friends started referring to "Bill"
as "Charlie".

Charlies had always wanted to fly, and, when he was 40 years, he earned an
instructor's license as well as his pilot's license, in his spare time,
realizing one of his dreams. After he got his license, he became the
corporate pilot for Save Auto Parts, flying the twin-engine corporate plane
frequently to El Paso, where Save Auto Parts had six stores, and to other
cities. Meanwhile, Judy worked as a clerk in the W. T. Grant variety store,
then a souvenir shop, and then in Ashby Prescription Pharmacy in Oklahoma City.

Judy and Charlie have two children: Jane Ann and Charles Alan Brown. Both were
adopted as infants. Jane Ann was born May 30, 1961, and Charles Alan was born
on June 19, 1964. Both were raised in Oklahoma City, where they attended and
graduated from Oklahoma City Public Schools. Jane Ann married Ernest Allen
Stone of Oklahoma City after she graduated from high school, and they had one
son, Ernest Allen Stone, Junior, "Allen". Jane Ann and her son live in Oklahoma
City, where Jane Ann works at the Baptist Hospital. Charles Alan went on to
junior college, and received an Associate Degree in electronics upon graduation.
He is an electronics technician in Wichita, Kansas.

Judy retired in 1993 after 31 years with Ashby Prescription Pharmacy in various
capacities, including sales, typist, and bookkeeper. Her hobbies and interests
are her grandson, Allen; her family; her special Sunday School Class; and
Rancho Village Baptist Church. She is thankful for the loving parents and
special brothers and sisters that God gave Her.

Judy's mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where
the Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. Her father
originally came to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, staying with his sister
Margaret, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909
and settled on the Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he
regained his health, her father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting
leather" (making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and
Doc. Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was
in poor health and not expected to live much longer. William returned to North
Carolina, and his father died in June 1914. William remained in North
Carolina after his father's death and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After her parents were married, her father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that her grandfather Elliott had owned, and
they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were
four miles up Hinton's Creek from her grandfather Lattimore's house, just over
the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916, and the unprecedented
rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway,
telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the
floods, and her sister Kathleen was born prematurely the next morning.

Her father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten miles
south of Hollis. In September 1916, her father returned to Oklahoma. In
December 1916, her mother and her sister Kathleen, accompanied by her Aunt
Susan Elliott, came to Oklahoma on the train, and her father started working
for "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott familymoved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where her father worked
as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. Her brother Bill was born at
Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, her sister Kathleen's second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet & Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and her father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. Later, her father acquired an interest in the garage.
Her father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next
to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he
purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow posture.

Her sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and her sister Ann was born in
October 1923, the year her father sold 20 acres of land from his father's
estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, her father got sick while
working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and the next year her father was employed as caretaker mechanic,
responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment, with the
rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garage
on Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, her father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although he had dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which marketed
this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He was doing
business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of his business
cards.

Her brother John was born in January 1925, her brother Frank was born in
February 1927, and Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, her parents
remodeled and modernized their house, and her father rejoined the National
Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties with the rank of Master
Sergeant.

Her father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September
1940, on the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law,
responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, and
the Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of
France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about
60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, 45th
Division, and her father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the United
States. Her father remained on active duty until he retired in May 1949.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree by prepared Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in
"Peiter Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiographical
notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed to family
members by Vertie Elliott; newspaper clippings and other memorabilia collected
by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; data provided by Julia Mae Elliott Brown; and
conversations at the William C. Elliott family reunions.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 1/96.


Notes for CHARLES WILLIAM BROWN:
REMARKS: Charles William Brown, "Bill" or "Charlie", was born on July 10,
1929, at Hollis, Oklahoma. He was the son of Ivan I. and Cleo Jane Brown. He
has one sister, Arra Jane Brown. After he finished high school, Bill worked
for his uncle, Glen Gibson, at the Clover Bloom Honey Company in Minco.

As a "bee keeper," he drove a truck and moved bee hives from one Central
Oklahoma field to another in the spring, summer, and fall and from Oklahoma to
the Rio Grande Valley in Texas in the winter. He also performed a variety of
jobs in the processing plant, where the honey was placed in glass jars,
labeled, and boxed for distribution.

Charlie married Julia Mae Elliott, "Judy", on June 17, 1947, at Belton, Texas,
the county seat of Bell County, where Judy was living with her parents, Master
Sergeant and Mrs. William C. Elliott, of Camp Hood, Texas. After their
marriage, they lived in Minco, Oklahoma, where Charlie continued to work for
his uncle at the Clover Bloom Honey Company in Minco.

In the spring of 1948, during the debate that preceded the first peacetime
draft, the U.S. Army offered volunteers the school and duty of their choice.
Bill joined the Army and, as promised, was assigned to the Radio School at Fort
Gordon, South Carolina, upon completion of Basic Training at Fort Jackson,
South Carolina. After being selected for duty with the Army Security Agency
(ASA), Bill completed the Army Security Agency (ASA) School at Carlisle
Barracks, Pennsylvania, and was assigned to the ASA post at Kyota, Japan, for
six months of Advanced Field Training. From mid-1949 until June 1950, he was
assigned to the ASA post on Okinawa.

Bill enlisted for three years, but the Army had more soldiers than it needed
after Congress enacted the draft, and he was offered early release from active
duty if he would remain in the reserves. In June 1950, while he was enroute
from Okinawa to San Francisco for separation, ten North Korean divisions invaded
South Korea. However, the outbreak of hostilities had no immediate affect on
him, and he was released from active duty in July 1950. When he was released
from active duty he was CW (Continuous Wave) radio operator with the rank of
PFC (Private First Class), pay grade E-3. His MOS (Military Occupational
Specialty) was Radio High Speed Manual Radio Operator. In layman's terms,
he was an expert "Morse Code" operator.

One month later, in August 1950, he was recalled to active duty; sent to Fort
Hood, Texas, for 21 days Infantry Refresher Training; and then taken by troop
train to Camp Stoneman, California, where he remained overnight. The next day
he boarded a troop transport in San Francisco. He doesn't remember whether it
was the General Darbey, Sultan, or Brewster. In any event, he had his old rank
of PFC, his old MOS, and he was bounded for Korea as a replacement radio
operator.

Upon arrival in Yokohama, Japan, the replacements were taken by truck to Camp
Drake at Tokyo, where they arrived late, were fed, given blankets, and placed
in the transit barracks. The next morning, after 03:00 a.m. reveille, they
were given new rifles that were still covered with cosmoline (preservative).
They cleaned their rifles and went to the rifle range. He remembers it as being
mid-December, it was cold, and there was a strong wind. They were given three
rounds to "zero" their rifles with the targets at 100 yards, and then returned
to the same ship and taken to Hungnam, the port city for northeastern Korea.

The Korean Peninsula is mountainous, with a rugged east coast. The north and
east coasts, including the area around Hungnam, are the most rugged. The
western and southern coasts are deeply indented with many islands and harbors.
It has the same latitude as New York State. The summers are warm, permitting
the farmers to grow corn, potatoes, fruits, vegetabels, and rice.

The winters are miserably cold. The ground is normally frozen and covered with
snow from mid-October to mid-March frost. Frost bite was a major concern. The
troops slept in fox holes or in tents, depending on the tactical situation.
They normally ate C-rations. If they were lucky, they were hot. If they
were moving, they were cold. There was a general shortage of winter clothing,
equipment, and supplies. The following summary of Korean War activities is
intended to place Bill's military service in context.

The war started on June 25, 1950, when the North Koreans crossed the 38th
Parallel, the boundary between North and South Korea. The well equipped and
trained North Koreans were confident that they could overrun the poorly
equipped and trained South Koreans before any outside power could intervene.
The following day, President Truman authorized U.S. air and naval forces to
attack North Korean troops and installations in South Korea. On June 27th, the
United Nations Security Council urged United Nations members to furnish
assistance to the South Korean Republic.

On June 28th, North Korean forces entered Seoul, the South Korean capital. On
June 29th, President Truman authorized U.S. air and naval forces to attack
targets in North Korea as well as South Korea and authorized the use of U.S.
Army troops to protect Pusan, at the southeastern tip of the Korean
peninsula, the major South Korean port. On June 30th, he authorized General
MacArthur to use all U.S. forces available to him.

Although there were four divisions in Japan (the 1st Calvary, and the 7th,
24th, and 25th Infantry Divisions) and the 29th Regimental Combat Team (RCT)
on Okinawa, they were all understrength, poorly trained, and inadequately
equipped for combat. Nevertheless, they were sent to Korea in July and
assigned to the U.S. Eighth Army, commanded by Lt. General Walton Walker,
under General MacArthur's United Nations Command. In August, General Walker
ordered a final stand along a 140-mile perimeter from Pusan. Thirteen North
Korean infantry divisions and one armored division hammered on the perimeter,
but it held.

Meanwhile General Walker built up supplies and pieced together a landing force
from the 7th Division, most of the 1st Marine Division, and the 1st Marine
Brigade. This force, designated the X (tenth) Corps, landed on September 15,
1950, at Inchon, 25 miles west of Seoul. Concurrently, the Eighth Army,
consisting of the U.S. I (first) Corps, Republic of Korea (ROK) I Corps, and the
ROK II (second) Corps, launched an offensive from Pusan on September 16th.

When the North Koreans realized that X Corps was going to cut off their supply
lines, they fled to the north. The Eighth Army rolled forward and joined X
Corps on September 26th. Seoul was turned over to the South Koreans on
September 29th. By September 30th, over 100,000 North Koreans were captured.
Although the remnants of six divisions were operating as guerillas in the
mountains, the North Korean Army ceased to exist as an organized force south of
the 38th parallel.

On September 27th, President Truman authorized U.N. forces to cross the 38th
parallel into North Korea, and on October 1st, the ROK I Corps crossed the
38th parellel and advanced up the east coast toward Wonsan, North Korea's
major seaport. On October 3rd, the Communist China's Foreign Minister,
Chou En-lai, warned that Chinese troops would enter the conflict if other
than South Korean troops crossed the 38th parallel.

On October 10th, the ROK I Corps captured Wonsan. Meanwhile, the ROK II Corps
crossed the 38th parallel and advanced through central Korea, and the U.S. ICorps relieved the U.S. X Corps in Seoul area, crossed the 38th parallel, and
advanced toward Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, which it captured in
less than 10 days. The North Koreans mined Wonson harbor, delaying the
amphibious landing of U.S. X Corps' 1st Marine Division until October 26th.

The U.S. X Corps' 7th Division landed at Iwon, 80 miles further up the coast on
October 29th. Neither landing force met enemy opposition, because the ROK I
Corps had already advanced up the coast and captured the landing areas.

The U.S. X Corps, joined by the ROK I Corps, set out to capture the iron and
steel mills, communications network, port installations, and power and
irrigation plants of northeastern Korea. The Marines moved 50 miles north of
Wonson to industrial Hamhung and its port Hungnam, then struck inland for the
Changjin Reservoir, 45 miles to the northwest.

On October 24th, General MacArthur issued orders for attacks that by the Eighth
Army and X Corps that he hoped would carry his forces to the Manchurian border
and restore peace to Korea before the onset of winter. Chinese prisoners,
captured during brief clashes between October 25th and 28th, gave deceptive
information regarding their units, making it difficult to determine whether they
were Chinese volunteers or Chinese troops. In early November, it was estimated
that there were two Chinese divisions opposing the Eighth Army. On November
8th, the Chinese troops abruptly withdrew.

On November 24th, the Eighth Army and the ROK II Corps attacked in line, aiming
for intermediate terrain objectives that would give access to good routes for
the final march to the Manchurian border. On November 25th, the Chinese forces
stopped the U.N. attack cold with a sudden and furious attack of their own.
Four more Chinese armies joined the attack on November 27th.

On the same day, two Chinese armies attack the U.S. X Corps along both sides of
the Changjin Reservoir, encircled two battalions of the 7th Division and the 1st
Marine Division, and cut off the American supply lines by blocking the road
between the reservoir and Hamhung. The U.S. X Corps withdrew to the east
coast, and the Eighth Army fell back to Pyongyang.

By December 5th, the Eighth Army had withdrawn to the 38th Parallel, and had
evacuated its wounded and most of its supplies by water, rail, and air. Other
supplies were burned. The encircled U.S. X Corps troops, supplied by air drops,
had to fight their way out. At the same time, the U.S. 3rd division, newly
arrived from the United States, the ROK I Corps, and the rest of the 7th
division formed a perimeter around Hungnam. The evacuation of the U.S. X Corps
began on December 11th, the week before Bill arrived in Korea.

Bill arrived at Hungnam on December 19, 1950, and reported to the U.S.
X Corps Signal Company. On December 24th, the X Corps rearguard, including
Bill, was evacuated to Pusan, where they joined the Eighth Army. Bill was
evacuated on an old freighter. Meanwhile, the Eighth Army organized a
140-mile, coast-to-coast, defense line just south of the 38th parallel by
December 31st. The U.S. I and IX (nineth) Corps were west and north of Seoul
while the ROK III (third), II, and I Corps were east of Seoul. The U.S. X
Corps went into Army Reserve.

On December 23rd, General Walker was killed in a jeep accident, and Lt. General
Matthew B. Ridgeway succeeded him as commander of the Eighth Army. His
instructions were to defend his positions, to fall back if necessary, but to
keep his army intact. On January 1, 1951, enemy troops attack all along the
front, with the major effort directed against Seoul. Instead of risking
destruction in place, Ridgeway pulled back to the Han River, south of Seoul.
The Chinese took Seoul and began regrouping their forces.

The freighter took Bill to Pusan. From there, he went to Taegu, the northern
point for the move north. His permanent assignment was to the X Corps Signal
Company, which assigned personnel to the regimental combat teams (RCTs) and
other temporary organizations. The RCTs were considered "line" troops, so
they were rotated more frequently. He asked his platoon sergeant to give him
TDY (Temporary Duty) with an RCT, so that he would qualify for rotation back to
the states sooner.

As requested, he was assigned to the 187th RCT at Wanju, about 50 miles
southeast of Seoul. Later, he was assigned to the Regimental CP (Command Post)
for the 23rd Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He spent most of his time inKorea on TDY at the company and battalion level as a voice radio operator,
transmitting morning reports and other administrative traffic.

When it became apparent that Chinese were not going to continue their drive
down the peninsula, the Eighth Army began a cautious, probing advance on
January 25th, attacking slowly and methodically, ridge line by ridge line,
phase line by phase line, wiping out each pocket of resistance before making
the next advance. By March 1st, spring had come to South Korea, swelling
streams and turning the countryside into mud. The advance became a test of
endurance for both men and equipment. Nevertheless, they captured Seoul by
mid-March, and, by March 19th, they held a line that crossed South Korea just
below the 38th parallel.

Meanwhile, the enemy assembled troops north of the 38th parallel for an attack
on the U.N. forces. On April 5th, the U.N. troops launched an advance across
the 38th parallel to an objective line, designated Kansas, about ten miles
north of the 38th parallel. On reaching this line in mid-April, troops on the
west end of the line were sent north to a new objective line, designated
Wyoming. This was one of General Ridgeway's last actions as Commander, Eighth
Army. On April 12, 1951, President Truman relieved General MacArthur of his
command and named General Ridgeway as MacArthur's successor. On April 14th,
Lt. General James A. Van Fleet became Eighth Army Commander.

The enemy's spring offensive began on April 22nd, with attacks in the east and
the west. The attacks in the west were concentrated against Seoul. Eighth
Army troops in the west withdrew to preplanned positions north of Seoul. On
May 15th, the enemy resumed its spring offensive, driving a salient into the
east-central positions. After stopping the enemy advance, Eighth Army forces
launched a counterattack and advanced to positions just short of line Kansas by
May 31st.

At this point the U.N. objective changed from military victory to negotiated
settlement, and U.N. forces were not allowed to move further north than
objective lines Kansas and Wyoming. After June 1st, all tactical movements
were to strengthen the defensive lines or to harass the enemy, but not to
gain additional ground. Since political objectives prevented them from
advancing, the U.N. forces began fortifying their positions.

In June 1951, Bill received orders to report to X Corps for rotation. He
traveled by truck to Wanchu; caught the train to Pusan; took the ferry to
Sasebo, Japan; and embarked in the Marine Phoenix for the voyage to Seattle.
He took the train from Fort Lewis, Washington, to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where
he was discharged in July 1951. While he was in the Army, he earned the Good
Conduct Medal, the Korean Service Medal with three battle stars, the United
Nations Service Medal, and the National Defense Service Medal.

The war drug on for over two years after Bill was rotated. Negotiations for an
armistice began at Kaesong on July 10th, but they were broken off on August
22nd, and General Van Fleet launched a series of limited objective attacks to
improve Eighth Army positions. The U.S. X Corps and the ROK I Corps in
east-central Korea fought for terrain objectives 5 to 7 miles above line
Kansas, including Bloody and Heartbreak Ridges. These objectives were won by
the last week of October. Negotiations resumed at Panmunjom on October 25th.

The negotiations stalemated over a variety of issues, including the exchange of
the prisoners of war. After several breakdowns in negotiations, artillery
duels, and battles, the Armistice was finally signed on July 27, 1953. By the
terms of the Armistice, the existing front lines became the boundary between
North and South Korea. In 37 months of fighting, the U.N. forces lost almost
74,000 men killed and 250,000 wounded. Of those killed, 27,000 were American.
It is estimated that the Chinese and North Koreans had 1,350,000 dead and
wounded.

While Bill was in the Army, Judy lived with Bill's parents and sister in
Oklahoma City and worked as a clerk at W. T. Grant's variety store. After
he was discharged from the Army, Bill returned to Oklahoma City, worked for
for various automotive supply stores and become the manager of a "Save AutoParts" store. After the "Peanuts" comic strip and its main character, Charlie
Brown, became popular, his wife and his friends started calling him "Charlie."

Charlie had always wanted to fly, and, when he was 40 years old, in his spare
time, he earned an instructor's license as well as his pilot's license,
realizing one of his dreams. After he got his license, he became the corporate
pilot for Save Auto Parts, flying the twin-engine corporate plane frequently
to El Paso, where Save Auto Parts had six stores, and to other cities.

Meanwhile, Judy worked was a clerk in the W. T. Grant variety store, a
souvenir shop, and then in Ashby Prescription Pharmacy in Oklahoma City.

Charlie and Judy have two children: Jane Ann and Charles Alan Brown. Both
were adopted as infants. Jane Ann was born May 30, 1961, and Charles Alan was
born on June 19, 1964. Both were raised in Oklahoma City, where they attended
and graduated from Oklahoma City Public Schools. Jane Ann married Ernest Allen
Stone of Oklahoma City after she graduated from high school, and they had one
son, Enest Allen Stone, Junior, "Allen". Jane Ann and her son live in Oklahoma
City, where Jane Ann works at the Baptist Hospital. Charles Alan went on to
junior college, and received an Associate Degree in electronics upon
graduation. He is an electronics technician in Wichita, Kansas.

Data from various sources, including data provided by Judy Brown; conversations
with Charlie Brown, Judy Brown, and other family members; and personal
observation. The summary of Korean War activities was extracted from "American
Military History 1607-1958", published by Headquarters, Department of the Army.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 1/96.


Children of JULIA ELLIOTT and CHARLES BROWN are:
102. i. JANE ANN11 BROWN, b. 30 May 1961, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma.
ii. CHARLES ALAN BROWN, b. 19 June 1964, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma.

Notes for CHARLES ALAN BROWN:
REMARKS: Charles Alan Brown, "Alan", was born on June 19, 1964, in Oklahoma
City, Oklahoma. He was adopted as an infant by Charles William Brown,
"Charlie" or "Bill", and Julia Mae Elliott Brown, "Judy". He was the second of
their two children. His sister Jane Ann Brown, who was born on May 30, 1961,
in Oklahoma City. She was also adopted as an infant.

Alan was raised in Oklahoma City. He graduated from high school in Oklahoma
City and went on to junior college and received an Associate Degree in
Electronics upon graduation. He worked as an electronics technician in
Oklahoma City for several years, and then moved to Wichita, Kansas, where he is
and electronics technician. He has never married.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


80. CHARLES LATTIMORE10 ELLIOTT (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 20 March 1930 in Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma. He married EDLA MARIA PLOSILA 15 January 1954 in Makalapa Chapel, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, daughter of JAKKO PLOSILA and HILDA TAIVAL. She was born 25 August 1925 in Tonopah, Nye County, Nevada.

Notes for CHARLES LATTIMORE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Charles Lattimore Elliott, "Charles" or "Buddy", was born on March 20,
1930, at Minco, Oklahoma, the son of William Christopher Elliott, "William", and
Lula Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". He was the eighth of twelve children, six boys
and six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen,
"Kathleen"; William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or
"V.B."; Annie Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank";
Julia Mae, "Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary
Lee"; Lula Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell,
"Aaron" or "A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Charles grew up in Minco, a small farm town about 45 miles southwest of
Oklahoma City, and attended public schools in Minco until August 1942, when the
family moved to Texas. He had pneumonia when he was four years old, and he
wasn't expected to live. His recovery is attributed to "Harlick's Malted
Milk". After his recovery, his father routinely let him go with him to work
and on business trips to Oklahoma City and Chickasha, to the extent his
father's friends started calling him "The Shadow". He quickly learned to stay
out of trouble, speak when spoken to, and be helpful.

While he was growing up, Charles helped with the garden, the cows, and other
chores. He also helped sweep out the armory and perform other tasks to help
his father. He also helped his brother Frank deliver the "Daily Oklahoman"
and the "Oklahoma City Times", and became addicted to "front page" news and
the comics as he folded the newspapers and placed them in his paper bags.

In April 1942, his father was transferred from Fort Sill to Camp Barkley,
Texas, about 15 miles southwest of Abilene. In August 1942, the family moved
to Texas, initially living in a ranch house about 10 miles south of Abilene.
Most of the ranch had been taken over by the Army for use as an artillery
range. The house was on the Buffalo Gap highway, south of Wylie, convenient to
Camp Barkley. In April 1943, the ranch was sold, and the family moved to
Abilene, where they remained until October 1945, when they moved back to
Minco.

The children attended schools at Wylie, which was about five miles south of
Abilene, when they lived on the ranch. Charles attended Central Elementary,
South Junior High School, and Abilene High School after they moved to town.
Charles helped his brother Frank deliver the "Abilene Reporter News" until
Frank graduated from high school and joined the Navy, when Charles took over
the routes they had delivered. After the circulation manager quit and bought
a restaurent, Charles quit and worked in the restaurent on weekends. He soon
tired of washing dishes and peeling potatoes, and returned to the newspaper
business, delivering the "Fort Worth Star-Telegram" and, later, the "Dallas
Morning News". Charles joined Troop 10 of the Boy Scouts of America, rising to
the rank of Star Scout and serving as Patrol Leader and Junior Assistant
Scoutmaster.

World War II ended in August 1945, the family moved back to Minco in October
1945, and Charles attended Minco High School. His brother Bill came back from
the war, gave him an Argus C-3 camera, and stimulated an interest in
photography, leading to a part-time job at Branum's Variety Store, primarily
working in the photography laboratory, but also going odd jobs. Charles also
delivered the "Daily Oklahoman" and the "Oklahoma City Times", and, briefly, the
"Chickasha Daily Express". His brother Aaron helped him deliver papers, just as
Charles helped his brother Frank.

In March 1947, the family moved to Camp Hood, Texas, where his father was
assigned to Post Ordnance after Camp Barkley closed. The family lived in anapartment in a converted barracks at 40th Street and Battalion Avenue. An
Army bus took the older children to Killeen, where they attended Killeen High
School. The younger children attended school on the base.

Charles had a part-time job at the base Service Club, checking out books,
games, and so forth to the soldiers who frequented the club. Charles graduated
from Killeen High School in May 1948. He participated in the nation-wide
competition for Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) scholarships and
won one of the 45 four-year scholarships awarded to Texas students.

From the list of 52 universities with NROTC programs, he elected to attend the
University of Missouri at Columbia. The scholarship included an appointment
in the Naval Reserve with the rank of Midshipman. He lived in the university
dormitories and worked part time to supplement his Navy pay, initially at
Kroger's grocery, stocking shelfs and bagging groceries, then at Knight's Drug,
developing film. In his junior and senior years, he was a "student assistant"
(grader) for an economics professor, then for an accounting professor. He also
received monetary assistance from his older brothers and sisters.

He completed the naval science curriculum; participated in midshipman summer
periods, including cruises on USS Springfield (CL-66) from San Francisco to
Panama and USS Wisconsin (BB-64) from Norfolk to Nova Scotia, Aviation
Indoctrination at Pensacola, Amphibious Warfare Indoctrination at Little Creek,Virginia; and graduated from the School of Business Administration in June 1952,
with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree. His major was
accounting.

After he received his commission in the Regular Navy with the rank of Ensign,
he reported to the USS Foss (DE-59) in San Diego, California, for duty. The
Foss was a World War II destroyer escort with a complement of 17 officers and
165 enlisted men. He was assigned to the Engineering Department as Main
Propulsion Assistant. He was subsequently assigned additional duties as
Electrical Assistant. After attending various fleet schools, he moved up to
Damage Control Assistant.

The ship's homeport changed from San Diego to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in February
1953, shortly before it deployed for surveillance operations in the Caroline,
Bonin, and Marianas Islands under the operational control of Commander Naval
Forces, Marianas. During the deployment, he qualified as Officer of the Deck
Underway and Command Duty Officer in port. Upon the ship's return to Pearl
Harbor from the Western Pacific, he attended Destroyer Engineer Officers
School at Long Beach, California, where he met Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Edla
Maria Plosila, a Navy nurse, assigned to duty in the Naval Dispensary at the
U.S. Naval Station in Long Beach.

After returning to Pearl Harbor in December 1953, he was promoted to Lieutenant
(Junior Grade), and he moved up to the Engineer Officer position, assuming
responsibility for operation and maintenance of the ship's propulsion,
electrical, auxiliary, and damage control systems and for administration of
the engineering department with four officers and 90 enlisted men, including
five chief petty officers.

In January 1954, Charles and Edla were married at Makalapa Chapel, at Commander
in Chief, Pacific Fleet, Headquarters, in Pearl Harbor. Subsequently, the Foss
deployed for another six months surveillance operations, and Edla was assigned
to duty at Tripler Army Hospital in Hawaii, where she worked in the premature
nursery. She lived in the Nurses Quarters until Charles returned from the
Western Pacific in October 1954, and they moved into the duplex at 209 Center
Drive in Navy Housing near the entrance to the Naval Station at Pearl Harbor.

In December 1954, Edla resigned her commission, and Charles submitted his
request to transfer to the Naval Reserve upon completion of his obligated
service. In April 1955, Charles departed on his last deployment, as Station
Ship in Hong Kong. Enroute the Foss refueled at Midway, stopped at Subic
Bay in the Phillippines for awnings, and made port visits to Manila and
Zamboanga.

Since the Navy did not have a naval base there, it stationed a ship in Hong
Kong harbor to handle administrative matters, including post office, movie
exchange, shore patrol, and port services operations for U.S. Navy ships. The
regularly assigned Executive Officer was detached upon arrival in Hong Kong, and
Charles moved up to Executive Officer, second in command.

The new Executive Officer reported aboard in June, and Charles was detached from
the Foss in Hong Kong. He caught flights on naval aircraft to Taipai, Formosa;
Clark Field in the Phillippines; and Honolulu, Hawaii. Edla had arranged for
their return to the United States on the USNS General Edwin A. Patrick (TAP
124), a large troop transport. They sold their car, a '49 Mercury, checked out
of Navy housing, and spent their last weekend in the historic Moana Hotel on
Waikiki Beach, living like tourists, including the luau at the Queen Surf and
outrigger canoe riding.

Since Edla had arranged for Charles to be a member of the "voyage staff" (Troop
Mess Officer), they had a very nice cabin for the leisurely transit to San
Diego, then up the coast to San Francisco, with memorable views of Diamond
Head and the Golden Gate Bridge. Upon arrival, Charles reported to U.S. Naval
Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco, California, for release from active
duty. Edla's sister, Alma, and her husband, Earl Berry, picked them up in San
Francisco, took them to Reno for several days, and then sold them their '52
Mercury 4-door for the trip to New York, via Tonopah, where Edla was born, Las
Vegas, the Grand Canyon, and Oklahoma.

They arrived in Schenectady, New York, in July 1955, and Charles started work
for General Electric Company, initially as a general accountant in the Real
Estate and Construction Department. Charles also provided as-required
budgeting and accounting support to General Electric Realty Corporation. The
Real Estate and Construction Department was responsible for selecting sites for
new plants, purchasing the land, engaging architect/engineers, hiring general
contractors, and managing construction activities. General Electric Realty
owned and/or managed General Electric office buildings and warehouses used by
two or more departments. Later, Charles was the construction auditor for
winter damage repairs and for operations at Association Island in Lake Ontario,
where GE held senior management seminars. Charles also participated in GE's
after-hours Business Training Program.

Edla worked in the cardiac and diabetic ward at St. Clare's Hospital in
Schenectady for several months, resigning after she became pregnent. Their
oldest daughter, Cynthia Ann, "Cindy", was born in Schenectady in June 1956.
They lived in a small furnished apartment at 102 Edward Street, off State
Street, in a middle class neighborhood, in one of the two-story, two-family
houses common in large New England cities. The landlord, who had recently
remodeled and modernized the house, lived downstairs.

Although he liked General Electric, Charles tired of "desk" work, and, after
being promoted to Lieutenant in the Naval Reserve and being offered choice of
assignment, he requested active duty. He transferred back to the Regular Navy
with rank of Lieutenant, and reported to USS Fearless (MSO-442) in Charleston,
South Carolina, for duty as Executive Officer and Navigator, upon completion of
Naval Surface Mine Warfare School at Yorktown, Virginia. The Fearless was an
ocean minesweeper with a complement of five officers and sixty enlisted men,
one of five ocean minesweepers in Mine Division 82.

Initially, they lived in the house at 432 Stono River Road on James Island,
convenient to the Minecraft Base on the Ashley River and to Folly Beach. Later,
they moved to a small house on the Intercoastal Waterway, 620B Wappo Hall Road,
where they watched the many yachts enroute from Florida to Virginia, and vice
versa. While Charles was deployed to the Mediterranean, Edla and Cindy went
to Nevada to visit her sister Alma, her husband Earl Berry, and her son Tim.

After participating in trans-Atlantic operations, including joint minesweeping
operations with the Royal Navy in Malta as well as Turkish, Greek, and Italian
navies in their coastal waters, Charles applied for and was selected for Naval
Intelligence Post-Graduate School. Charles and Edla moved to an apartment at
3868 9th Street, Southeast, in Washington, D.C., in July 1958, where their
second daughter, Cheri Elizabeth, "Cheri", was born in November 1958 at
Bethesda Naval Hospital. Charles completed the nine-month curriculum, which
was designed to provide the knowledge and skills that naval officers need to
serve as naval attaches, fleet intelligence officers, intelligence watch
officers, counterintelligence officers, intelligence analysts, and intelligence
briefers, and received a Diploma from the U.S. Naval Intelligence School.

In July 1959, after moving Edla, Cindy, and Cheri temporarily into a furnished
apartment in Oklahoma City, Charles reported to U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba, for duty as Base Intelligence, Officer-in-Charge Intelligence Unit, and
Assistant District Intelligence Officer, Tenth Naval District. Edla, Cindy, and
Cheri flew to Guantanamo in August, after Navy Housing became available.

Charles served on the Base Commander's staff; was responsible for intelligence
collection and reporting during the critical period in U.S.-Cuban relations,
when the U.S. severed diplomatic relations and, over a year later, supported
the Bay of Pigs Invastion by Anti-Castro forces. He also managed local naval
investigative service activities. Charles, Edla, and their daughters lived in
a duplex on Caravella Point, near the Naval Hospital, where their third
daughter, Carol Mary, "Carol", was born and Edla worked as a clinical nurse.

In October 1961, Charles and Edla moved to a furnished apartment at 1930 12th
Avenue, in Oakland, California, while Charles attended the Damage Control; Fire
Fighting; and Atomic, Biological, and Chemical Warfare Defense Schools at the
U.S. Naval Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco, California. Charles was
promoted to Lieutenant Commander while they were at Treasure Island.

In February 1962, they moved to Long Beach, California, where Charles reported
to USS Valley Forge (LPH-8), for duty as Damage Control Assistant, the senior
assistant to the ship's Engineer Officer. The Valley Forge was a World War II
Essex-class aircraft carrier reconfigured to carry a battalion of marines and
a squadron of helicopters for amphibious operations. Charles was responsible
for maintenance and operation of auxiliary and damage control equipment. He
also trained and directed damage control parties when at battle and emergency
stations, coordinated shipyard overhaul and repair activities, served as Command
Duty Officer. The family lived at 3722 Petaluma Avenue, in northeast Long
Beach, and Cindy attended the parochial school at St. Maria Goretti Roman
Catholic Church.

In 1962, the ship participated in trans-Pacific operations, including amphibious
operations in the Gulf of Siam, preventing a Communist takeover in Thailand,
and ampibious exercises in the Philippines and at Okinawa. In 1963, the ship
spent most of the year in overhaul at Long Beach Naval Shipyard. In 1964, the
Valley Forge returned to the Western Pacific, conducted amphibious exercises,
and landed the first U.S. Marines in Vietnam.

Charles and Edla moved to France in August 1964, where Charles reported to
Headquarters, U.S. European Command, at Camp Des Loges, which was in the Royal
Forest near the Chateau in St. Germain-en-Laye, where Louis XIV was born,
18 miles west of Paris, for duty on the Joint Staff as an Intelligence Officer.
Initially, Charles was an intelligence watch officer in the Indications and
Warning Center, responsible for an intelligence watch section, and working
shifts. He was also a member of the FAST BREAK (mobile headquarters)
operational intelligence team. Later, he was an intelligence analyst,
responsible for preparing briefing and bulleting items regarding events in the
Middle East, North Africa, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands.

The first year they lived in an apartment on the third floor of a new apartment
building in St. Germain-en-Laye, Residence Ile de France at 7bis Rue de
Bergette. The second year they lived in a villa, Villa Jean Anne, Rue Des Pres,
in Verneuil Sur Seine. The two older girls, Cindy and Cheri, were picked up by
an Army school bus and taken to the Paris American School. Their youngest
daughter, Christina Suzette, "Chris", was born at the Paris American Hospital.
After Charles was promoted to Commander in 1966, he requested sea duty, and,
after he received his orders, he was awarded the Joint Services Commendation
Medal for his meritorious service.

In August 1966, Charles and Edla moved to Costa Mesa, California, about 20 miles
south of Long Beach, and Charles reported to Commander, Eighth Naval District,
in New Orleans, for duty as Prospective Executive Officer, USS Catskill (MCS-1),
which was being converted and modernized for duty as a mine countermeasures
support ship. In March 1967, Charles reported to Commander, U.S. Naval
Training Center, in San Diego, to organize and train Catskill personnel. They
lived in an apartment at 989 Valencia Drive until October 1967, when theypurchased their first home, the four-bedroom, two-bath house at 851 Santiago
Road. Cindy and Carol attended the parochial school at Saint John The Baptist
Roman Catholic School. They didn't have room for Cheri, so she attended Sonora
Elementary School.

Upon its arrival from the conversion shipyard, Charles reported to USS Catskill
for duty as Executive Officer, where he was responsible for developing operating
procedures, training the crew (25 officers and 500 enlisted men plus helicopter
and explosive ordnance disposal detachments) in minesweeping and helicopter
operations. The ship participated in trans-Pacific operations as task group
flagship, including transit to Sasebo, Japan, the Catskill's new homeport, with
stops in Pearl Harbor and Yokosuka, Japan. Charles left the ship in Okinawa,
where it was serving as flagship for Commander Mine Flotilla One. He was
awarded the Navy Commendation Medal for meritorious service.

In May 1969, Charles returned to Long Beach and reported for duty as Commander
Mine Division 92, initially a division of four minesweepters, during overhaul
and refresher training; then a division of six minesweepers for local
operations; then a division of four minesweepers for trans-Pacific operations,
including patrol operations off the coast of Vietnam. He also served as
Officer-in-Tactical Command (OTC) of a major minesweeping exercise, involving 13
sweeping and support ships. Edla and the girls remained in Costa Mesa.

In November 1970, Charles and Edla moved to Springfield, Virginia, and Charles
reported to the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) for duty and was assigned to
the Plans Directorate. After the agency's reorganization, he was reassigned to
the Central Reference Division, where he managed intelligence dissemination,
translation, and library operations; was responsible for Department of Defense
intelligence dissemination programs and for DIA intelligence information storage
and retrieval systems; developed computerized indexes to intelligence reports
and publications; integrated multiple intelligence dissemination, storage, and
retrieval systems; and initiated production of camera and computer generated
microfiche versions of intelligence documents and indexes.

Charles participated in the George Washington University after-hours program
while he was assigned to duty at DIA and earned a Master of Science Degree in
Administration, with concentration in information systems technology. They
lived in the two-story house at 8513 Parliament Drive in the King's Park
Subdivision. The children attended public schools in Fairfax County, and his
oldest daughter, Cindy, graduated from high school in June 1974. Upon
completion of 20 years active service, Charles requested transfer to the Retired
List. He was awarded the Legion of Merit during his retirement ceremonies in
July 1974.

Charles and Edla moved back to Costa Mesa in August 1974, Cindy started at
Orange Coast College, and the other girls returned to the Newport-Costa Mesa
School System. After fixing up the house, Charles started working for TRW
Systems Group, in Redondo Beach, in November 1974, as a member of the technical
staff in the Information Systems Laboratory, where he analyzed requirements and
developed preliminary designs for information systems.

In 1978, Charles was promoted to Staff Engineer in the Minicomputer and
Information Technology Laboratory, where he assisted project and functional
managers in specification, identification, evaluation, and selection of
minicomputer systems for computer-based command, control, communications, and
intelligence systems.

After he was promoted to Senior Project Engineer in 1979, he supported various
projects and proposal efforts, primarily supporting system engineering
activities. He also taught a course in Management Information Systems in the
after-hours Master's Degree Program at West Coast University for three years,
1978 - 80.

In 1981, he was assigned as Subproject Manager for a classified project, where
he was responsible for preparing the prime item development specification for a
suite of mobile communications, data processing, power, transport, and support
equipment. He also reviewed operational requirements, planning, and conceptdocuments.

After six years of commuting 35 miles to work, Charles and Edla purchased the
townhouse at 109 South Prospect Avenue in Redondo Beach in March 1981. By this
time Cindy had graduated from the University of California at Los Angeles, and
was on her own; Cheri had graduated from the University of California at Irvine
and had married; and Carol had graduated from Orange Coast College and moved on
to California State University at Hayward. Chris was the only one living at
home. She moved to Redondo Beach and graduated from Redondo Union High School
in 1981.

In 1983, Charles was offered an opportunity to move to Massachusetts to work on
Ballistic Missile Early Warning Systems (BMEWS) Site 1 Upgrade project. After
consulting with Edla, he accepted the offer, and Charles and Edla moved to
Massachusetts, and Chris who was attending El Camino College, moved into an
apartment in Torrance, California. After several months in a furnished
apartment at 44-2 Briarwood Lane in Marlborough, they bought the new house on
the large lot at 79 East Bare Hill Road in Harvard, a small town about 30 miles
west of Boston.

Charles was the Assistant Project Manager for System Engineering, responsible
for preparing preliminary design review, critical design review, and subsequent
timing and sizing estimates for the mission, simulation, and data reduction
software. He also assisted in baselining software requirements, coordinated
software requirements engineering activities, and managed the communications
upgrade proposals. After the 1985 reorganization, he was Senior Staff
Engineer, responsible for coordinating TRW system engineering support to the
prime contractor; preparing product specification for mission software; editing
the simulation software product specification, data reduction software product
specification, and scenario generation user manual; and drafting the software
acceptance plan.

In July 1986, they sold their house, moved back to Redondo Beach, and bought
the house that was being constructed at 1714 Haynes Lane. Edla lived in the
Residence Inn in Torrance while Charles returned to Massachusetts to help wind
up the project. In October 1986, Charles started work on an automated message
processing system, supporting hardware development and logistic support tasks,
including preparation of the operations and maintenance manuals.

In April 1988, Charles was assigned responsibility for analysis and definition
of system performance, design, and construction requirements for the software
support system for B-2 Weapon System Support Center. In May 1989, he was
assigned to the United States Army Europe Tactical Command and Control System
Project, responsible for preparation of the operations and maintenance manuals.

In April 1990, Charles was assigned as Assistant Project Manager, Systems
Development and Support Center, where he managed assigned hardware development
and support work packages. In June 1992, after the end of the "Cold War" and
the concurrent cuts in the Defense Budget, Charles requested retirement with 18
years service at TRW, in response to the Company's offer of incentives for
voluntary retirements. Charles and Edla are still living in their house in
Redondo Beach, about a mile in from the ocean. They like its location, and it
is convenient to their two younger daughters, Carol, who lives in Long Beach
and works at St. Mary's Medical Center, and Chris, who lives in Hawthorne and
works at TRW.

Charles spends his time reading, walking down to the beach, and working on this
genealogy project. He also likes to travel. In 1992, Charles and Edla spent a
week in Hawaii in January, made a trip to Denver in April, toured Washington
and Oregon in June, and drove cross-country to attend the Elliott Reunion in
North Carolina in August. In 1993, they went to Tucson in January and to
Denver in May. In June, they went to Walla Walla, Washington, for Edla's
nursing school reunion, visited the new Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in
Baker City, Oregon, and came back through Yellowstone and Grand Teton National
Parks.

"Charles is a common name in the Elliott and Lattimore families. The use of
the mother's family name as a middle name is common in the Elliott family.

Charles's mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where
the Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. His father
moved to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, joining his sister Margaret, "Mag",
and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who moved to Oklahoma in 1909, settling on
the Johnson Ranch, about eight miles northeast of Minco. After he regained his
health, his father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting leather"
(making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and Doc. Gold
came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was in poor
and not expected to live much longer. After his father died in June 1914,
William remained in North Carolina and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After his parents were married, his father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that his grandfather Elliott had owned, and
they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were
four miles up Hinton's Creek from his grandfather Lattimore's house, just over
the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916, and the unprecedented
rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway,
telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the
floods, and his sister Kathlleen was born prematurely the next morning.

His father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten
miles south of Hollis. In September 1916, his father returned to Oklahoma. In
December 1916, his mother and his sister Kathleen moved to Oklahoma on the
train, and his father started working at the "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock
Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family
moved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where his father started
working as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. His brother Bill was born at
Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, his sister Kathleen's second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet & Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and his father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. Later, his father acquired an interest in the garage.
His father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next
to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he
purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

His sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and his sister Ann was born in
October 1923, the year his father sold 20 acres of land from his father's
estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, his father got sick while
working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and next year his father was employed as caretaker mechanic,
responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and equipment, with the
rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old Brick Garage
on Main Street until the new armory was constructed in 1936.

In 1928, his father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although he had some dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which
marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He
was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of her
father's business cards.

His bro

Notes for EDLA MARIA PLOSILA:
REMARKS: Edla Maria Plosila, "Edla", was born August 25, 1925, in Tonopah,
Nevada, the daughter of Jack Plosila and Hilda Taival. She was the second of
their two children: Alma Josephine, "Alma", and Edla Maria, "Edla", Plosila.
On her birth certificate, her father's occupation was: "Gipsy Queen Top-man"
and her mother's occupation was: "Housewife".

Tonopah was a mining town on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains,
the "Gipsy Queen" was one of the many gold mines, and her father cut and
installed timbers to shore up the "top" of the mine shafts. The family moved
from Tonopah, the county seat of Nye County, to Hawthorne, the county seat of
Mineral County, in the 1930s, after the country went off the "gold standard"
and the gold mines in Tonopah closed and the Naval Ammunition Depot in
Hawthorne opened and offered employment.

Edla graduated from Mineral County High School in Hawthorne in May 1943 and
worked at the Naval Ammunition Depot in Hawthorne until she started nursing
school in March 1944. She graduated from Saint Mary Hospital School of Nursing
in Walla Walla, Washington, in March 1947, receiving a Diploma of Graduation
upon completion of the regular course of three years of theory and practice of
nursing. She received her State of Washingon Nursing License in May 1947.

After graduation, she returned to Nevada, was licensed to practice Nursing, and
worked at Saint Mary's Hospital from March 1947 until March 1948, as a clinical
nurse on the evening (3 - 11) shift. She attended the University of Chicago
from April through July 1948, completing a Post Graduate course of four months
in the theory and practice of Obstetric Nursing.

Upon her return to Saint Mary's, she was promoted to Supervisor, 3 - 11
Obstetrics. In her new position she supervised three aides, was in charge
of the Labor and Delivery Rooms, and was responsible for nursery and post
partum patients. She also attended the University of Nevada at Reno for one
semester (September 1948 thru January 1949).

In October 1949, Edla moved to Vallejo, California, was licensed to practice
Nursing in California, and worked in the allergy clinic at Permanente Hospital,
giving injections and performing allergy testing until she received her
appointment as an Ensign in the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps.

On May 14, 1951, she reported to the Office of Nanal Officer Procurement in the
Federal Office Building in San Francisco, California, for active duty and
was ordered to report to the U.S. Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Illinois. She
completed Indoctrination training between May 18 and June 16, 1951, and
was assigned to the Obstetrics Ward for duty. She remained at Great Lakes
until May 23, 1952, working in the dependants ward and the allergy clinic.

On June 8, 1952, Edla reported to U.S. Naval Station, Long Beach, California,
and was assigned duties in the Naval Station Infirmary as ward nurse and night
nurse. She also worked in the dependants outpatient clinic. On December 18,
1952, she was promoted to Lieutenant (junior grade). While she was in Long
Beach, she lived in the Bachelor Officers Quarters.

On January 15, 1954, Edla Plosila married Charles Lattimore Elliott, son of
William Christopher Elliott and Lula Lattimore, in Honolulu, Territory of
Hawaii. Charles was also a Lieutenant (junior grade) in the U.S. Navy,
assigned to the U.S.S. Foss (DE-59), as Engineering Officer. They had met
while Charles was attending the Destroyer Engineer Officers Course in Long
Beach. After their marriage, in Makalapa Chapel at the U.S. Naval Base, Pearl
Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, Edla requested assignment to duty in Hawaii,
because Charles's ship was homeported there.

In May 1954, Edla was transferred to the U.S. Naval Medical Unit at Tripler Army
Hospital, Army Post Office #438, San Francisco, California, located on the
island of Oahu, near the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor. She was assigned to
duty in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Ward, where she worked in the pre-mature
nursery. Deciding that extended separations from her husband were inevitable
(Charles's ship had left for the Western Pacific while she was waiting for her
transfer) if she remained in the Navy, she submitted her resignation from the
Navy on July 30, 1954, and she was discharged on December 14, 1954, at the U.S.
Naval Receiving Station, Navy #128, in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawii, with
the rank of Lieutenant (junior grade).

The U.S.S. Foss returned to Pearl Harbor in October 1954, and they moved into
quarters in the Navy Housing Area outside the main gate to the Naval Base.
Charles requested transfer to the Naval Reserve and release from active duty
upon completion of his active obligated service. He was released to inactive
duty with the rank of Lieutenant (junior grade) in June 1995, and they moved to
Schenectady, New York, where Charles was employed by the General Electric
Company.

After getting her New York Nursing License, Edla worked as a registered nurse at
Saint Claire's Hospital in Schenectady until her pregnency made it difficult to
perform her nursing duties. Their first daughter, Cindy, was born in
Schenectady in June 1956. Charles returned to active duty in the regular navy,
and they moved to Charleston, South Carolina, in December 1956. They moved to
Washington, D.C. in August 1958, and their second daughter, Cheri, was born at
Bethesda Naval Hospital in November 1958. After Charles completed Intelligence
Post-graduate School in June 1958, they moved to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where
their third daughter, Carol, was born in November 1960.

From Guantanamo, they moved to Oakland, California, in October 1961; to Long
Beach, California, in February 1962; and to Paris, France, in August 1964.
and Paris, France. Their youngest daughter, Chris, was born at Paris American
Hospital in October 1964, while Charles was assigned to Joint Staff, U.S.
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. European Command. Edla worked at Lakewood General
Hospital for several months while they were living in Long Beach, and she worked
at the U.S. Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for several months while they
were living there.

From France, they moved to Costa Mesa, California, between Long Beach and San
Diego, the two major bases for Pacific Fleet ships. They bought their first
house in Costa Mesa and decided to keep it and rent it when Charles received
orders to the Defense Intelligence Agency in Washington, D.C. They moved to
Springfield, Virginia, in October 1970, and remained their until Charles
retired from the Navy in July 1974. They moved back to Costa Mesa in August
1974, and Charles started working for TRW Systems Group in Redondo Beach. Edla
took nursing refresher courses and became a Red Cross Disaster Nurse.

They bought a condominium and moved to Redondo Beach in March 1981. In October
1983, they moved to Massachusetts. Their daughters were grown up and either on
their own or in college. Charles and Edla bought a new house in Harvard, about
30 miles west of Boston. Charles was an Assistant Project Manager, and they
had time to enjoy touring New England. They returned to Redondo Beach in
August 1986 and bought another new house, their current residence.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 4/94.


Children of CHARLES ELLIOTT and EDLA PLOSILA are:
103. i. CYNTHIA ANN11 ELLIOTT, b. 11 June 1956, Schenectady, Schenectady Cnty, New York.
104. ii. CHERI ELIZABETH ELLIOTT, b. 08 November 1958, Bethesda, Montgomery Cnty, Maryland.
iii. CAROL MARY ELLIOTT, b. 25 November 1960, U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Notes for CAROL MARY ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Carol Mary Elliott, "Carol", was born November 25, 1960, in the U.S.
Naval Hospital, U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the daughter of Charles
Lattimore Elliott and Edla Maria Plosila. She was the third of their four
children: Cynthia Ann, "Cindy"; Cheri Elizabeth, "Cheri"; Carol Mary, "Carol";
and Christina Suzette, "Chris", Elliott.

Carol's family moved frequently because her father was a naval officer. She
was born at the U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, while her father was
assigned to duty there as Base Intelligence Officer; Officer-in-Charge,
Intelligence Unit; and Assistant District Intelligence Officer, Tenth Naval
District. In October 1961, the family moved to Oakland, California, when her
father was assigned to duty as student, Damage Control School, U.S. Naval
Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco, California. In February 1962, the
family moved to Long Beach, California, when her father was assigned to duty
as Damage Control Assistant, USS Valley Forge (LPH-8).

In August 1964, the family moved to France and lived in Saint Germain-en-Laye,
about 20 miles west of Paris, when her father was assigned as Intelligence
Officer, Joint Staff, U.S. Commander-in-Chief, U.S. European Command, at Camp
Des Loges, near Saint Germain-en-Laye. During the summer of 1965, the family
moved from an apartment in St. Germain-en-Laye to a house in Verneul Sur Seine,
about 15 miles west of St. Germain-en-Laye. Carol completed kindergarden while
in the public school in Verneul Sur Seine, the only American student in the
school. All of the classes were taught in French, and she learned to speak
French fluently at the 6-year old level.

In August 1966, the family moved to Costa Mesa, California, between Long Beach
and San Diego, when her father was assigned as Prospective Executive Officer,
USS Catskill (MCS-). The family lived in the Mesa Del Mar Subdivision, and
Carol attended St. John The Baptist Elementary School until October 1970, when
the family moved to Springfield, Virginia, after her father was assigned to
duty with the Defense Intelligence Agency, Washington, D.C. The family lived
in the Kings Park Subdivision and Carol attended Kings Park Elementary School
and Lake Braddock High Schools.

In August 1974, the family moved back to Costa Mesa, after her father retired
from the Navy, where Carol graduated from Costa Mesa High School and Orange
Coast College. She graduated from California State University, Hayward, in
June 1984, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. After graduation, she
worked in the Trauma Center at Highland General Hospital in Oakland,
California, as a Registered Nurse. In January 1987, she moved back to
Southern California, after her parents moved to Redondo Beach from
from Massachusetts. Carol is currently a clinical nurse in the Medical/Surgical
Ward at St. Mary's Medical Center in Long Beach.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


iv. CHRISTINA SUZETTE ELLIOTT, b. 10 October 1964, Paris, Isle De France, France; m. MARK ERNEST WEBER, 10 December 1988, Gardena, California; b. 20 September 1964, Hawthorne, Los Angeles, California.

Notes for CHRISTINA SUZETTE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Christina Suzette Elliott, "Chris", was born October 10, 1964, in
the Paris American Hospital in Neuilly-Sur-Seine, a suburb of Paris, France,
the daughter of Charles Lattimore Elliott and Edla Maria Plosila. She was the
youngest of their four children: Cynthia Ann, "Cindy"; Cheri Elizabeth,
"Cheri"; Carol Mary, "Carol"; and Christina Suzette, "Chris", Elliott.

Chris's family moved frequently because her father was a naval officer. She
was born in Paris while her father was assigned to duty as Intelligence Staff
Officer, Joint Staff, U.S. Commander-in-Chief, U.S. European Command, at Camp
Des Loges, near Saint Germain-en-Laye, France. They lived in an apartment in
St. Germain-en-Laye until the summer 1965, when the family moved to a house in
Verneul-Sur-Seine, about 15 miles west of St. Germain-en-Laye.

In August 1962, the family moved to Costa Mesa, California, between Long Beach
and San Diego, when her father was assigned as Prospective Executive Officer,
USS Catskill (MCS-). They lived in the Mesa Del Mar Subdivision, and Chris
started school at Sonora Elementary School. In October 1970, the family moved
to Springfield, Virginia, after her father was assigned to duty with the
Defense Intelligence Agency, Washington, D.C. They lived in the Kings Park
Subdivision, and Chris attended Kings Park Elementary School.

In August 1974, the family moved back to Costa Mesa, after her father retired
from the Navy. Chris attended Davis Intermediate School and Costa Mesa High
School. In March 1981, the family moved to Redondo Beach, California, after her
parents purchased a condomium there. Chris graduated from Redondo Union High
School in May 1982, worked in a doctor's office for several months, and then
enrolled at El Camino College. She worked part time while attending El Camino
until she graduated in June 1986, receiving an Associate of Arts degree with a
major in electronics and certification as an electronics technician. After
graduation, she worked for TRW Space and Electronics, in Redondo Beach.

On December 10, 1988, Chris married Mark Weber, son of Wolfgang Paul Weber,
"Paul", and Berta Janssen, "Berta", Mark also attended El Camino College,
majored in electronics, and worked for TRW after graduation in June 1986. Chris
and Mark live in Hawthorne, California. Chris and Mark work full time at TRW in
Redondo Beach, Mark is working on his Bachelor of Science in Electrical
Engineering degree at California State University in Long Beach, and Chris is
taking electronics and art courses at El Camino College.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


Notes for MARK ERNEST WEBER:
REMARKS: Mark Ernest Weber, "Mark", was born September 20, 1964, in Hawthorne,
California, the son of Wolfgang Paul Weber, "Paul", and Berta Janssen, "Berta".
He was the older of their two children: Mark Ernest, "Mark", and Doris Weber.

Mark graduated from Bishop Montgomery High School in Redondo Beach, California,
in May 1982, and from El Camino College in Torrance, California, in June 1986,
receiving an Associate of Arts degree with a major in electronics and
certification as an electronics technician. After graduation, he worked for
TRW Space and Electronics in Redondo Beach, California.

On December 10, 1988, Mark married Christina Suzette Elliott, "Chris", daughter
of Charles Lattimore Elliott and Edla Maria Plosila. Chris also graduated from
El Camino College in June 1986, receiving an Associate of Arts degree with a
major in electronics and certification as an electronics technician. They live
in Hawthorne, California. Mark is working full time at TRW and working on
his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree at California State
University in Long Beach, California. Chris is working full time and taking
electronics and art courses at El Camino College.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 3/94.


81. MARY LEE10 ELLIOTT (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 29 June 1931 in Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma. She married (1) TROY ROBERTS. He was born 29 October in Middleton, Arkansas. She married (2) MICKEY MCLEOD 18 May 1949 in Texas. He was born Abt. 1930.

Notes for MARY LEE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Mary Lee Elliott, "Mary Lee", was born June 29, 1931, at Minco,
Oklahoma, the daughter of William Christopher Elliott, "William", and Lula
Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". She was the ninth of twelve children, six boys and
six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen";
William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie
Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae,
"Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula
Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or
"A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Mary Lee grew up in Minco and attended public schools in Minco. In April 1942,
her father was transferred from Fort Sill to Camp Barkley, Texas, about 15
miles southwest of Abilene. In August 1942, the family moved to Texas,
initially living in a ranch house about 10 miles south of Abilene. Most of the
ranch had been taken over by the Army for use as an artillery range. The house
was on the Buffalo Gap highway, south of Wylie, convenient to Camp Barkley. In
April 1943, the ranch was sold, and the family moved to Abilene, where they
remained until after the war ended. The children attended schools at Wylie,
which was about five miles south of Abilene, when they lived on the ranch.
Mary Lee attended Central Elementary and South Junior High Schools after they
moved to town.

World War II ended in August 1945, the family moved back to Minco in October
1945, and Mary Lee attended public schools in Minco. After Camp Barkley
closed, her father was transferred to Post Ordnance at Camp Hood, Texas. In
March 1947, the family moved to Camp Hood, where they lived in a converted
barracks at 40th Street and Battalion Avenue. An Army bus took the older
children to Killeen, where they attended the Killeen High School. The younger
children attended school on the base.

Mary Lee graduated from Killeen High School in May 1949 and married Mickey
McLeod, a soldier stationed at Camp Hood. They had one daughter, Nina Cheryl
MacLeod, "Cherie". After Mickey was transferred to Germany and Mary Lee was
not allowed to go with him, Mary Lee and Cherie moved to Oklahoma, where she
went to beauty operators school in Muskogee. The marriage failed after Mickey's
tour of duty was extended, and Mary Lee was unable to join him in Germany.

Subsequently, she married Troy Roberts, a farmer from Westville, Oklahoma.
After their marriage, Mary Lee, Troy, and Cherie lived on the Roberts farm near
Westville, and Mary Lee operated a beauty shop in Westville. Mary Lee and Troy
had three daughters: Mary Ann, Lee Ann, and Troy Lynn. All four girls attended
public schools in Westville.

Troy has engaged in a variety of activities, as well as farming. Several years
ago, Troy and Mary Lee started their own business, making and selling fishing
lures. Eastern Oklahoma is well known for its lakes, rivers, and fishing.

Cherie married Lee Lamer, and they had three children: Don, Lynnea, and Mikki
Lamer. Cherie, lives in New Mexico, is a paramedic. Mary Ann, who married
Christopher Curtis Stogsdill, "Chris", lives in Westville, Oklahoma. Lee Ann,
who married Darrel Alex Self, "Darrel", lived in Westville until she died
suddenly on July 9, 1989, after an asthma attack. Troy Lynn, who married Larry
McAlister, lives in Praire Grove, Arkansas, about 20 miles from Westville.

Mary Lee's mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where
the Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. Her father
originally came to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, staying with his sister
Margaret, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909
and settled on the Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After
he regained his health, her father worked in the livery stable in Minco,
"cutting leather" (making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam
Lattimore and Doc. Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that
his father was in poor health and was not expected to live much longer.
William return to North Carolina, and after his father died in June 1914, he
remained in North Carolina and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After her parents were married, her father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that her grandfather Elliott had owned, and
they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were
four miles up Hinton's Creek from her grandfather Lattimore's house, just over
the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916, and the unprecedented
rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway,
telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the
floods, and her sister Kathleen was born prematurely the next morning.

Her father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten
miles south of Hollis. In September 1916, her father returned to Oklahoma. In
December 1916, her mother and her sister Kathleen moved to Oklahoma on the
train, and her father started worked for "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn"
in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family
moved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where her father worked
as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. Her brother Bill was born at
Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, her sister Kathleen's birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet & Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and her father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. Later, her father acquired an interest in the garage.
Her father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next
to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he
purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

Her sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and her sister Ann was born in
October 1923, the year her father sold 20 acres of land from his father's
estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, her father got sick while
working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and the next year her father was employed as caretaker mechanic,
with the rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in the old
Brick Garage on Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, her father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although he had dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which
marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He
was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of his
business cards.

Her brother John was born in January 1925, her brother Frank was born in
February 1927, and her sister Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, her
parents remodeled and modernized their house, and her father rejoined the
National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the rank of
Master Sergeant.

Her father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September
1940, on the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law,
responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, and the
Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of
France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about
60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery,
45th Division, and her father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the
United States. Her father remained on active duty until he retired in May
1949.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott familty tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in
"Peiter Heyl And His Descendants", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiographical
notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed to family
members by Vertie Elliott; newspaper clippings and other memorabilia collected
by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; and conversations at the William C. Elliott family
reunion in July 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


Notes for TROY ROBERTS:
REMARKS: Troy Roberts was born on October 29 in Middleton, Arkansas. Troy
was a farmer in Westville, Oklahoma, when he married Mary Lee Elliott McLeod,
daughter of William C. Elliott and Lula Lattimore Elliott. This was the
second marriage for Mary Lee, and she had a daughter, Nina Cheryl McLeod,
"Cherie", from the first marriage. After their marriage, Troy, Mary Lee, and
Cherie lived on the Roberts farm near Westville, and Mary Lee operated a beauty
shop in Westville. Troy and Mary Lee had three daughters, who were born in the
following order: Mary Ann, Lee Ann, and Troy Lynn Roberts. All four girls
attended public schools in Westville.

Troy has engaged in a variety of activities, as well as farming. Several years
ago, Troy and Mary Lee started their own business, making and selling fishing
lures. Eastern Oklahoma is well known for its lakes, rivers, and fishing.

Date compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


Notes for MICKEY MCLEOD:
REMARKS: Mickey McLeod married Mary Lee Elliott, daughter of William C.
Elliott and Lula Lattimore Elliott, on May 18, 1949, and they had one daughter,
Nina Cheryl MacLeod, "Cherie". Mickey McLeod was a soldier at Camp Hood,
Texas, when they married. The marriage failed after he was assigned to duty
in Germany and Mary Lee was unable to accompany him.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


Children of MARY ELLIOTT and TROY ROBERTS are:
i. MARY ANN11 ROBERTS, b. 28 December 1959, Fayetteville, Arkansas; m. CHRISTOPHER CURTIS STOGSDILL, 11 October 1984.

Notes for MARY ANN ROBERTS:
REMARKS: Mary Ann Roberts was born December 28, 1959, in Fayetteville,
Arkansas, the daughter of Troy Roberts and Mary Lee Elliott Roberts of
Westville, Oklahoma. She was the oldest of their three daughters, who were born
in the following order: Mary Ann, Lee Ann, and Troy Lynn Roberts.

Mary Ann grew up in Westville, Oklahoma; graduated from Westville High School;
married Christopher Curtis Stogsdill on October 11, 1984. They live in
Westville, Oklahoma.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


Notes for CHRISTOPHER CURTIS STOGSDILL:
REMARKS: Christopher Curtis Stogsdill married Mary Ann Roberts, daughter of
Troy Roberts and Mary Lee Elliott Roberts, on October 11, 1984. They live
in Westville, Oklahoma.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


ii. LEE ANN ROBERTS, b. 12 July 1962, Fayetteville, Arkansas; d. 09 July 1989; m. DARREL ALEX SELF, 27 October 1985.

Notes for LEE ANN ROBERTS:
REMARKS: Lee Ann Roberts was born July 12, 1962, in Fayetteville, Arkansas,
the daughter of Troy Roberts and Mary Lee Elliott Roberts of Westville,
Oklahoma. She was the second of their three daughters, who were born in the
following order: Mary Ann, Lee Ann, and Troy Lynn Roberts.

Lee Ann grew up in Westville, Oklahoma; graduated from Westville High School;
married Darrell Alex Self 27 Oct 1985. They lived in Westville until she died
9 Jul 1989 after an asthma attack.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


Notes for DARREL ALEX SELF:
REMARKS: Darrel Alex Self married Lee Ann Roberts, daughter of Troy Roberts
and Mary Lee Elliott Roberts, on October 27, 1985. They lived in Westville,
Oklahoma until Lee Ann died after an asthma attack on July 9, 1989. They had
no children. Darrel remarried after Lee Ann's death.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


iii. TROY LYNN ROBERTS, b. 24 May 1969, Fayetteville, Arkansas; m. LARRY MCALISTER.

Notes for TROY LYNN ROBERTS:
RESUME: Granddaughter of William C. Elliott and Lula Lattimore. Married Larry

REMARKS: Troy Lynn Roberts was born May 24, 1969, in Fayetteville, Arkansas,
the daughter of Troy Roberts and Mary Lee Elliott Roberts of Westville,
Oklahoma. She was the youngest of their three daughters, who were born
in the following order: Mary Ann, Lee Ann, and Troy Lynn Roberts.

Troy Lynn grew up in Westville, Oklahoma; graduated from Westville High School;
married Larry McAlister. They live in Praire Grove, Arkansas.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


Notes for LARRY MCALISTER:
REMARKS: Larry McAlister married Troy Lynn Roberts, daughter of Troy Roberts
and Mary Lee Elliott Roberts. They live in Praire Grove, Arkansas.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest Revision: 12/93.


Child of MARY ELLIOTT and MICKEY MCLEOD is:
105. iv. NINA CHERYL11 MCLEOD, b. 08 April 1950, Camp Hood, Texas.

82. LULA FAYE10 ELLIOTT (LULA9 LATTIMORE, JOHN DANIEL8, JOHN L.7, JOHN6, DANIEL5, JOHN4, JOHN3, JOHN2, LATTIMORE1) was born 17 August 1932 in Minco, Grady County, Oklahoma. She married BOBBY RAY ANDERSON 29 June 1951 in Fort Smith, Arkansas, son of ROBERT ANDERSON and NOLA NEESE. He was born 15 December 1930 in Vian, Sequoah County, Oklahoma.

Notes for LULA FAYE ELLIOTT:
REMARKS: Lula Faye Elliott, "Faye", was born August 17, 1932, at Minco,
Oklahoma, the daughter of William Christopher Elliott, "William", and Lula
Lattimore Elliott, "Lula". She was the tenth of twelve children, six boys and
six girls, who were born in the following order: Virginia Kathleen, "Kathleen";
William C., Junior, "Bill" or "Billie"; Vertie Belle, "Vertie" or "V.B."; Annie
Lou, "Ann"; John Thomas, "John" or "J.T."; Frank Wall, "Frank"; Julia Mae,
"Judy"; Charles Lattimore, "Charles" or "Buddy"; Mary Lee, "Mary Lee"; Lula
Faye, "Faye"; James Emmett, "James" or "Jim"; and Aaron Cornwell, "Aaron" or
"A.C.". All lived to middle or old age.

Faye grew up in Minco, a small farm town about 45 miles southwest of Oklahoma
City, and attended public schools in Minco. In April 1942, her father was
transferred from Fort Sill to Camp Barkley, Texas, about 15 miles southwest of
Abilene. In August 1942, the family moved to Texas, initially living in a
ranch house about 10 miles south of Abilene. Most of the ranch had been taken
over by the Army for use as an artillery range. The house was on the Buffalo
Gap highway, south of Wylie, convenient to Camp Barkley. In April 1943, the
ranch was sold, and the family moved to Abilene, where they remained until
after the war ended. The children attended schools at Wylie, which was about
five miles south of Abilene, when they lived on the ranch. They attended
Central Elementary, South Junior High, and Abilene High Schools after they
moved to town.

World War II ended in August 1945, the family moved back to Minco in October
1945, and Faye attended public schools in Minco. After Camp Barkley closed,
her father was transferred to Post Ordnance at Camp Hood, Texas. In March
1947, the family moved to Camp Hood, where they lived in a converted barracks
at 40th Street and Battalion Avenue. An Army bus took the older children to
Killeen, where they attended Killeen High School. The younger children went
to school on the base.

In May 1949, her father retired, and the family moved to the Sequoah County
stock farm that her father had purchased shortly before his retirement. The
farm was on Blackgum Mountain, about five miles northwest of Vian, Oklahoma.
Faye and her two younger brothers, James and Aaron, were the only children
living at home.

Her father had a long-range plan when he bought the farm. He wanted to build
a new house, improve the pastures, build stock ponds and stock them with fish,
and build cow sheds and corrals. James and Aaron helped build the barn, repair
fences, and improve the pastures. Faye helped her mother until she graduated
from Vian High School in 1951 and married Bobby Anderson, "Bobby", the son of
Robert E. Anderson and Nola Mae Nesse, on June 29, 1951.

Bobby Anderson, a native of Vian, was in the U.S. Air Force, stationed at
Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. They began married life in San
Antonio, but moved to Oakland, California, in November 1951, when Bobby was
transferred to Parks Air Force Base, south of Oakland. While they were in
Oakland, Faye worked at Montgonery Ward as a mail reader in the mail order
department.

They returned to Vian in November 1953, after Bobby was discharged from the
service, and she worked at the high school, as secretary to the Superintendent
of Schools. Bobby commuted to Northeastern State University in Tahlequah,
about 30 miles north of Vian, and completed the requirements for his degree.
He also worked for his father in Anderson's general store in Vian.

In 1958, she enrolled at Northeastern State University and started working on
her degree. In 1960, they moved to West Plains, Missouri, where Bobby had
signed a contract to teach Industrial Arts in the Junior High School. While
they were in West Plains, she continued to work on her degree, completing nine
semester hours through correspondence courses. She also worked as a substitute
teacher for nine weeks at Oregon County High School at Alton, Missouri, about
25 miles southeast of West Plains. The second semester she stayed with
relatives in Vian and commuted to Northeastern.

In August 1961, her son, William Robert, "Bill Bob", was born at West Plains,
and she missed the fall semester. The grandparents, who lived in Vian, took
care of Bill Bob, and she commuted from Vian to Northeastern for the spring
semester and completed the requirements for her degree.

She graduated from Northeastern in May 1962, received a Bachelor of Science in
Education Degree, and started teaching in August 1962 at Oregon County RIV High
School in Alton, Missouri. After teaching at Alton for one year, she
transferred to West Plains High School, which was a bigger and better school
system, closer to home.

Faye, Bobby, and Bill Bob moved from West Plains to Vian during the summer of
1966 to be near their relatives. In August 1966, Faye started teaching at Vian
High School. She completed the requirements for her Master of Science in
Education by attending night classes and summer sessions, including courses
at East Central State and the University of Albuquerque.

After they returned to Vian, Bobby left teaching to work for Kerr-McGee in the
Sequoyah Fuels Nuclear Facility at Gore, Oklahoma, about ten miles west of
Vian. He retired as Control Room Operator in May 1990, but he is still
involved in stock farming, which he was pursuing on a part time basis.

Faye retired in May 1988 after 27 years of teaching. During those 27 years she
taught English, reading, health, general business, accounting, shorthand, and
typing and 6th through 12th grades. Although she has retired, she still works
part time, less than one day per week, at the school.

Their son graduated from Vian High School, then Oklahoma City University, and
then medical school. He is now practicing medicine in Gore. He married
Katherine Ellene Weaver, "Kari", in November 1988, and they have two daughters:
KyLeigh Shea Anderson, "KyLeigh", and Katherine Wray Anderson, "Katie".

Her mother and father were from Cleveland County, North Carolina, where the
Elliott and Lattimore families settled after the Revolution. Her father
originally came to Oklahoma in 1912 for his health, staying with his sister
Margaret, "Mag", and her husband, Matt Lattimore, who came to Oklahoma in 1909
and settled on the Johnson Ranch about eight miles northeast of Minco. After
regaining his health, her father worked in the livery stable in Minco, "cutting
leather" (making and repairing harness). At Christmas 1913, Sam Lattimore and
Doc. Gold came to visit Matt and Mag, and they told William that his father was
in poor health and not expected to live much longer. William returned to North
Carolina, and his father died in June 1914. William remained in North Carolina
and married Lula Lattimore in January 1915.

After her parents were married, her father operated a flour, corn, and shingle
mill, one of several properties that her grandfather Elliott had owned, and
they lived in a four-room house near the mill. The mill and the house were
four miles up Hinton's Creek from her grandfather Lattimore's house, just over
the county line in Rutherford County, near Hollis.

A hurricane struck the South Atlantic Coast in July 1916, and the unprecedented
rains caused the worst floods ever known in the area, disrupting railway,
telegraph, and telephone communications. The mill washed away during the
floods, and her sister Kathleen was born prematurely the next morning.

Her father worked for a short time in a flour mill in Ellenboro, about ten
miles south of Hollis. In September 1916, her father returned to Oklahoma. In
December 1916, her mother and her sister Kathleen, accompanied by her Aunt
Susan Elliott, came to Oklahoma on the train, and her father started working
for "Johnson & Wall Garage & Stock Barn" in Minco.

In January 1917, after Johnson & Wall sold to Bennet & Son, the Elliott family
moved to Chickasha, about twenty miles south of Minco, where her father worked
as a mechanic at Barton Brothers Garage. Her brother Bill was born at
Chickasha Hospital on July 17, 1918, her sister Kathleen's second birthday.

In November 1918, after B. Wall purchased the garage from Bennet & Son, the
family moved back to Minco, and her father worked for B. Wall in "The Brick
Garage" on Main Street. Later, her father acquired an interest in the garage.
Her father purchased the house at the corner of Burt and Railroad Streets, next
to the B. Wall residence, on the same block as the Brick Garage. Later, he
purchased the lots across the street for a garden and cow pasture.

Her sister Vertie was born in November 1921, and her sister Ann was born in
October 1923, the year her father sold 20 acres of land from his father's
estate and fixed up the house. In August 1924, her father got sick while
working on a tractor and had to give up automobile work.

Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery, Oklahoma National Guard, was moved to
Minco in 1924, and the following year her father was employed as caretaker
mechanic, responsible for maintenance of the National Guard armory and
equipment, with the rank of Sergeant. The National Guard armory was located in
the old Brick Garage on Main Street until the new armory was built in 1936.

In 1928, her father resigned his position as caretaker mechanic, and went into
research, developing and patenting several products, notably water pump control
equipment, including the control equipment for the water pumps in the municipal
water well in Minco. Although he had dealings with Cutler-Hammer, which
marketed this type of equipment, he never made any money off the patents. He
was doing business as "Elliott Manufacturing Company". Kathleen has one of his
business cards.

Her brother John was born in January 1925, her brother Frank was born in
February 1927, and her sister Judy was born in November 1928. In 1929, her
parents remodeled and modernized their house, and her father rejoined the
National Guard and resumed his caretaker mechanic duties, with the rank of
Master Sergeant.

Her father remained in the National Guard until it was mobilized in September
1940, on the same day President Roosevelt signed the first peacetime draft law,
responding to the German invasions of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, and the
Netherlands; the Russian invasions of Poland and Finland; and the fall of
France. Upon mobilization, the local unit moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, about
60 miles south of Minco, and became Service Battery, 189th Field Artillery,
45th Division, and her father became a Master Sergeant in the Army of the
United States. Her father remained on active duty until he retired in May
1949. The new armory was constructed in 1936.

Original data from Thomas Forbis Elliott family tree prepared by Mary Gordon
Elliott. Additional data from William Christopher Elliott entry (#13507) in
"Peiter Heyl And His Descendents", by Elizabeth Hoyle Rucker; autobiographical
notes prepared by William C. Elliott in November 1954 and distributed to family
members by Vertie Elliott; newspaper clippings and other memorabilia collected
by Kathleen Elliott Lambert; and conversations at the William C. Elliott family
reunion in July 1993.

Data compiled and edited by Charles Lattimore Elliott. Latest revision: 10/93.


Notes for BOBBY RAY ANDERSON:
REMARKS: Bobby Ray Anderson, "Bobby", was born December 15, 1930, at Vian,
Oklahoma, the son of Robert E. Anderson and Nola Mae Nesse Anderson. Bobby
grew up in Vian, where his parents operated a general store, and his father had
farming interests. Bobby graduated from Vian High School and attended
Northeastern State University at Tahlequah before he joined the U.S. Air Force
and was assigned to Lac