North Carolina State Archives

Source: http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/archives/


 Physical address:

109 E. Jones St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27601
 
~~~~~

Mail should be addressed to:

North Carolina State Archives
4614 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, N.C. 27699-4614

~~~~~

Contact Information

Phone: (919) 807-7310
Fax: (919) 733-1354
Email: archives@ncmail.net

~~~~~~~~~~

County Records

Records created by county governments. All of the county government records that have been processed are now described in the MARS Online Catalog. While these descriptions do not detail the individual files, they do replicate the card catalog that is available in the Search Room.

Online Resources for County Records

Guide to Research Materials in the North Carolina State Archives: County Records: The County Records Guide, as it is also known, is available in PDF format. This guide is a listing of more than 9,000 bound volumes and 21,000 boxes, as well as over 24,000 reels of microfilm of county government records and documents available to researchers in the State Archives.
 
Original County Estates Papers: Listings of estates papers that related to the settlement of a person's estate. These papers are filed first by county and then in folders arranged by name and date. These listings were compiled by volunteers and then proofed by staff members. At this time, the listings of names do not link to images of the actual documents.
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

County Records in the
North Carolina State Archives

For information about record schedules and other records management topics, please consult the Government Records Branch web site.

For more information about specific county records, see the Guide to Research Materials in the North Carolina State Archives: County Records (pdf) and the MARS Online Catalog.

~~~~~~~~~~ 

Bonds

Apprentice Bonds and Records: Includes volumes and boxes of apprentice bonds (or indentures), arranged chronologically. Other papers may include petitions for apprenticeship, petitions for "freedom dues" upon the completion of an apprenticeship, and civil and criminal actions concerning masters or wards.
 
Bastardy Bonds and Records: Includes volumes and boxes of bastardy bonds, arranged chronologically. Other papers may include presentments against and examinations of unwed mothers and mothers-to-be, warrants to bring the putative fathers to court, and receipts for payments made on behalf of bastard children.
 
Officials' Bonds and Records: Includes bonds of various county officials, arranged alphabetically by office, then chronologically. In some counties, there are sufficient quantities to make up separate boxes of constables, sheriffs or clerks bonds. May also include record or register of officials' bonds (volumes). Some counties also include appointments, oaths, resignations, and civil and criminal actions involving county officials; in others, these are filed among the miscellaneous records.
 
Other Bonds: Includes tavern (ordinary) bonds and miscellaneous bonds.
 
~~~~~~~~~~

Census (County Copies)

These include only the state copy and include census years 1850, 1860, and 1870 for most counties.

~~~~~~~~~~

Court

Minute Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: County courts of pleas and quarter sessions evolved from precinct courts in 1738. The courts were composed of three or more justices of the peace and sat four times each year. The functions of county courts may be categorized into three distinct areas - judicial, probate and administrative - that are reflected in the minute dockets. The courts exercised both civil and criminal jurisdiction, original and appellate (from magistrates courts). Probate responsibilities included acknowledgment and probate of deeds, probate of wills, appointment and qualification of administrators, executors and guardians, binding of apprentices, and inquisitions of lunacy. The court also served as the governing body of the county, responsible for the appointment and qualification of local officials, levying of local taxes, expenditure of public funds, granting of licenses (tavern keepers, ferry operators, and peddlers), registration of stock marks, paternity inquisitions, and emancipation and manumission of slaves. Courts of pleas and quarter sessions were abolished by the Constitution of 1868. The judicial functions devolved to county superior courts and justices of the peace courts; the probate function was vested in the clerk of superior court; and administrative responsibilities were inherited by the newly created boards of county commissioners. This series may include both rough and smooth copies of the minutes.
 
Appeal Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Record of cases appealed to Superior Court.
 
Appearance Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Record of issuance of writs, summonses and subpoenas to bring defendants and witnesses to following term of court. Also records appearances of appeals from magistrates' courts and of proceedings by petition (sometimes recorded in separate Petitions Docket). Columnar arrangement shows number of case and name or initials of attorneys; names of parties; form of action; disposition of writ; and any rule or action taken by court at term, including confessed judgments. Prior to 1820, appearance dockets were often kept in same volume with trial dockets (308), which see.
 
Execution Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Record of money due to successful litigant, fines and court costs; the type of recovery writ issued; and the execution of writ and satisfaction of judgment.
 
Recognizance Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Record of persons expected and required to appear at term in criminal prosecutions.
 
Reference Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: May serve one of three purposes: 1) to track suits not concluded on appearance docket but not yet ready to come to trial (usage rare after 1778); or 2) to record causes referred to referee at law returnable during term, showing decisions of referees; or 3) to show civil cases referred to the present term for trial, in essence, a trial docket. Usually recorded in the same volume with trial (308) and/or appearance (303) dockets, which see.
 
State (or Crown) Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Criminal docket tracking appearance and trial of state prosecutions. During the colonial period, known as Crown Docket.
 
Trial Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Record of civil causes expected to come to trial during term. Brings forward information from appearance docket and also shows pleadings of defendant, prior ruling by court, verdict, judgment, and final orders. In most counties prior to 1820, appearance, trial and reference dockets were maintained in one civil docket at the convenience of the clerk. These combined dockets are generally included in this series. With the proliferation of cases after 1820, most clerks began keeping the various civil dockets in separate volumes.
 
Trial and Reference Docket, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Generally filed under 308, which see.
 
Other Dockets, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: Volumes may include levy docket; costs docket; allowance docket; clerk's account, fee, and receipt books; prosecution bond docket; witness fee docket; writs docket; and petition docket. Several other miscellaneous dockets peculiar to one or two counties are also included.
 
Minute Docket, Superior Court: Superior courts were established in each county in 1806, replacing the district superior courts that had functioned since 1778. These courts were clothed with original and appellate civil and criminal jurisdiction, as well as actions in equity. Criminal jurisdiction extended to serious felonies, such as murder, rape, larceny, house breaking, assault and battery, riot, forgery and the like; civil jurisdiction extended to suits involving $100 or more (after 1868, $200 or more). Extra-judicial matters assigned to superior court included legitimization of bastards, emancipation and manumission of slaves, registration of aliens, and hearing of grand jury presentments and reports. County superior court sat twice each year, spring and fall terms, with six judges riding circuit. Each county had separate clerks for law and for equity. The minute dockets record the daily transactions of the court, generally giving judgments in civil and criminal actions. They also reflect the internal workings of the court, recording the appointment and qualification of clerks, the summoning and impaneling of juries, and the hearing of grand jury reports.
 
Appeal Docket, Superior Court: Record of cases appealed to the Supreme Court.
 
Appearance Docket, Superior Court: Record of issuance of writs, summonses and subpoenas to bring defendants and witnesses to following term of court. Also records appearances of appeals from lower courts and of proceedings by petition (sometimes recorded in separate Petitions Docket). Columnar arrangement shows number of case and name or initials of attorneys; names of parties; form of action; disposition of writ; and any rule or action taken by court at term, including confessed judgments. After 1868, the functions of the appearance docket were continued with some modifications in the Summons Docket.
 
Equity Minute Docket, Superior Court of Law and Equity: Minutes of the Superior Court of Law and Equity (1806-1868).
 
Equity Enrolling Docket, Superior Court of Law and Equity: Record of complaints, petitions and answers filed in suits in equity.
 
Equity Execution Docket, Superior Court of Law and Equity: Record of money due to successful litigant in actions at equity, fines and court costs; the type of recovery writ issued; and the execution of writ and satisfaction of judgment.
 
Equity Trial (and Appearance) Docket, Superior Court of Law and Equity: Record of equity actions expected to come to trial during term. Brings forward information from appearance docket and also shows pleadings of defendant, prior ruling by court, judgment, and final orders. May include Equity Appearance Docket in same volume or in a separate book.
 
Execution Docket, Superior Court: Record of money due to successful litigant, fines and court costs; the type of writ issued to recover same; and the execution of writ and satisfaction of judgment. After 1868, in most counties this information was recorded in Judgment Dockets, although some continued to use separate Execution Dockets.
 
Recognizance Docket, Superior Court: Record of persons expected and required to appear at term in criminal prosecutions.
 
Reference Docket, Superior Court: Record of causes referred to referee at law returnable during term, showing decisions of referees.
 
State Docket, Superior Court: Criminal docket tracking appearance and trial of state prosecutions. After 1868, known as Criminal Issues Docket.
 
Trial Docket, Superior Court: Record of civil causes expected to come to trial during term. Brings forward information from appearance docket and also shows pleadings of defendant, prior ruling by court, verdict, judgment, and final orders. In most counties prior to 1820, appearance, trial and reference dockets were maintained in one civil docket at the convenience of the clerk. These combined dockets are generally included in this series. With the proliferation of cases after 1820, most clerks began keeping the various civil dockets in separate volumes. After 1868, this information was recorded in civil issues dockets.
 
Trial and Reference Docket, Superior Court: Generally filed with trial dockets (322), which see.
 
Other Dockets, Superior Court: Volumes include costs or fee docket; motion docket; transfer docket; clerk's account, fee or receipt books; presentment docket; and clerks' minute docket (not special proceedings). Other titles may be peculiar to one or two counties.
 
Civil Action Papers: Civil case files from magistrates courts, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Superior Court, and, in some counties, other inferior courts, arranged chronologically. In most counties, also contains executions issued supplementary to civil judgments. Civil actions concerning land are filed separately. Other sub-groupings may include actions concerning county officials, the Board of County Commissioners, occupational licensing boards, canals, mines, and timber.
 
Criminal Action Papers: Criminal case files from magistrates courts, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Superior Court and, in some counties, other inferior courts, arranged chronologically. In most counties, also includes executions issued supplementary to criminal actions.
 
Miscellaneous Court Records: Includes boxes of miscellaneous court records and dockets from both Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions and Superior Court.
 
Executions: Writs issued by magistrates and the clerks of Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions and Superior Court for the recovery of judgments, fines, penalties and court costs. In most counties, these records are interfiled with the civil and criminal action papers or in the series of attachments, executions, liens and levies on land in the miscellaneous land records (408). They are filed as a separate series in Hyde and Tyrrell counties.
 
Minute Dockets, Other Courts: Includes minute dockets from various inferior courts which were operational at times between the court reforms of 1868 and 1965, such as Criminal Court (in Craven, Mecklenburg, New Hanover and Wake counties), Inferior Court (1877-1885), Circuit Criminal Courts (reconstituted as Eastern/Western District Criminal Courts, 1895-1901), Recorders Court (1900-1970), and General County Court (1923-1970).
 
Other Dockets, Other Courts: Includes criminal issues dockets, judgment dockets, execution docket, clerk's minute docket, costs docket and half fee docket from various inferior courts.
 
~~~~~~~~~~

Land

Deeds: Includes record of deeds (volumes) and original handwritten deeds left in the courthouse after being deposited with the clerk for probate and recording. The loose deeds may be segregated into various types, such as deeds of sale, deeds of gift, deeds of trust, mortgage deeds, and quitclaim (or release) deeds. In many counties, all but the deeds of sale are boxed together as miscellaneous deeds. Deeds of sale are arranged alphabetically by the surname of the grantee; other deeds are arranged chronologically.
 
(Cross) Index to Deeds: Superceded volumes of indices, usually cross referenced to grantee and grantor.
 
Ejectments: Papers in ejectment suits, arranged chronologically. Ejectment was an artificial form under common law devised to try title to land. After 1868, when common law forms were abolished under the new state constitution, ejectment cases were tried as a summary proceeding (without a jury).
 
Land Entries: Includes land entry books and boxes of loose entries.
 
Land Grants: Includes Record of Grants (volumes) and boxes of loose grants.
 
Land Divisions, Partitions and Surveys: Includes volumes and boxes concerning divisions of land between tenants in common and the processioning of boundary lines between contentious neighbors. Volumes may include Land Divisions, Record of Surveys, and Record of Processions. Loose papers may include petitions for partition or sale of land (culled from actions at equity and, after 1868, special proceedings) and processioners' records.
 
Land Sales for Taxes: Includes volumes and boxes concerning the sale of land for nonpayment of taxes. Volumes may include Tax Levies on Land, Tax Suit Judgment Dockets, and Sheriffs' Deed Books. Papers from tax suits that resulted in the sale of land are arranged chronologically.
 
Miscellaneous Land Records: Contains records from other series of land records of insufficient quantity to make a full box. May also include boxes of records concerning land for which no series number has been assigned, such as condemnation proceedings, foreclosures, and attachments, executions, liens and levies on land, and volumes relating to the probate of deeds. Many box and volume titles may be peculiar to one or two counties.
 
Record of Sale and Resale of Land: Twentieth-century record of land sold under foreclosure by trustees and mortgagees. Case papers from foreclosure actions may be filed in some counties as civil actions concerning land (325) or as miscellaneous land records (408).
 
~~~~~~~~~~

Estates

Record of Estates/Accounts: Prior to 1868, volumes entitled record of estates may include inventories, accounts and final settlements of estates, and guardians' accounts. After 1868, the series in most counties contains only inventories, accounts of sales and annual accounts of administrators and executors.
 
Record of Sales of Estates: Record of sales by administrators and executors of estates. Often included in record of estates/accounts (501) or in inventories and accounts of sales (514).
 
Administrators' Bonds: Volumes arranged chronologically. Loose bonds are filed in the series of Estates Records (508). After 1919, see Appointment and Record of Administrators (504).
 
Appointment and Record of Administrators: Post-1868 record of appointment and qualification of administrators of estates. After 1919, includes oath and bond of administrators. Series also includes volumes (1868-ca.1915) entitled Appointment of Administrators, Executors, Guardians and Masters; in some counties, these are entitled Record of Probate (Estates) or Minutes, Probate Court (both in 519). May also include an index to administrators.
 
Appointment and Record of Executors: Post-1868 record of qualification of executors. Prior to ca. 1915, executors were included in an omnibus volume entitled Appointment of Administrators, Executors, Guardians and Masters, filed as 504, which see. In some counties, see also records of probate (519).
 
Appointment and Record of Guardians: Post-1868 record of appointment and qualification of guardians. After 1919, includes oath and bond of guardians. Prior to ca. 1915, guardians were included in an omnibus volume entitled Appointment of Administrators, Executors, Guardians and Masters; in some counties, these are entitled Record of Probate (Estates) or Minutes, Probate Court (both in 519). May also include an index to guardians and wards.
 
Record of Dowers and Widows' Year's Support: Volumes relating to the apportionment of widows' dower rights in the real property of her deceased husband, and the allocation of a sufficiency of provisions to enable her to support herself and family during the first year after his death, while the estate was being settled. Papers concerning dower and widows' year's support are filed in the estates records (508) under the name of the deceased husband.
 
Estates Records: Loose estates papers arranged alphabetically by name of decedents. Papers may include appointments and renunciations of executors and administrators; administrators' and guardians' bonds; inventories; accounts of sale; annual accounts; final settlements; civil actions and executions involving administrators, executors and guardians; and actions in equity or special proceedings involving property of an estate. If the father of wards can be determined from guardians' papers, they are filed with the estate of the deceased rather than with the guardians' records. A list of estates records is available. At this time, the listings of names do not link to images of the actual documents.
 
Guardians' Accounts: Volumes arranged chronologically. In most counties, these have been numbered with the Guardians' Records (510); eventually, all will be renumbered as 509.
 
Guardians' Records: Loose guardians' papers arranged alphabetically by surname of wards, and volumes of guardians' accounts (but see 509). Papers may include appointments, oaths and bonds of guardians; annual accounts; final settlements; civil actions and executions involving guardians; and actions in equity or special proceedings involving the property of a ward's estate. These records also include indigent wards for whom the clerk of superior court served as receiver. If the father of the wards can be determined from the papers, they are filed with the estate of the deceased rather than with the guardians' records.
 
Guardians' Bonds: Volumes arranged chronologically. Loose bonds are filed in either the estates records (by decedent) or the guardians' records (by ward). After 1919, see Appointment and Record of Guardians (506).
 
Guardians' Dockets: Includes dockets from Orphan's Court (days set aside in the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for the handling of matters relating to guardians and wards), guardians' summons dockets, and guardians' scire facias dockets.
 
Inheritance Tax Records: Twentieth-century record of settlement of tax assessed on estates worth more than $2000 provided to the clerk of superior court by the State Commissioner of Revenue. Statements include names of deceased and administrator or executor, approximate valuation of estate, and heirs or devisees. Loose papers concerning inheritance tax are filed in the series of estates records.
 
Inventories of Estates: Record of initial inventories of estates filed by administrators and executors; before 1868, may also include accounts of sale. May be recorded in series of record of estates/accounts (501).
 
Accounts of Indigent Orphans: Twentieth-century record of Clerk of Superior Court in his administration of estates of less than $300 (later $500?) which accrue to orphans without guardians. Also includes accounts of clerk in his capacity as receiver of estates of orphans without guardians.
 
Records and Accounts of Receivers and Trustees of Estates: Includes volumes of Record of Receivers of Estates, and Record of Inventories and Accounts of Assignees.
 
Record of Settlements: Volumes of settlements or final accounts submitted by administrators and executors after the complete distribution of the assets of an estate.
 
Miscellaneous Estates Records: May include records of probate of estates, including minutes of Probate Court (1868-1883); clerks' account and receipt books concerning estates; volumes concerning divisions of land and slaves of estates; account books of individual fiduciaries; and indices.
 
~~~~~~~~~~ 

Marriages

Marriage Bonds: Includes boxes of marriage bonds and certificates (1741-1868), arranged alphabetically by groom. Marriage bonds are statements of intent to marry that were attested by the prospective groom before the clerk of court in the bride's county of residence. Typically, one or more bondsmen signed as security for the forfeiture of the penal sum (originally 50 pounds, increased to 500 pounds in 1778, and to one thousand dollars in the nineteenth century) should the marriage not occur or prove to be illegal. Most marriage bonds give the names of the groom, bride, bondsmen and witnesses, the county in which filed and the date. If accompanied by a certificate of marriage, the information may also include the date of marriage, the name of the person performing the rites, and, towards the end of the period, the names of parents. The more than 170,000 marriage bonds in the Archives have been abstracted. Volumes of abstracts are available for each county from which bonds have been received. There is also a statewide index, arranged by both grooms and brides, available on microfiche.
 
Marriage Licenses: Includes boxes of marriage licenses (1868-), arranged alphabetically by groom, and volumes of licenses, applications for licenses, and record of licenses issued. Licenses prior to 1868 are filed with the marriage bonds. May also include lists of marriage bonds and licenses.
 
Marriage Registers: Includes record of marriage certificates (generally 1851-1867) and marriage registers (1867-).
 
Cohabitation Bonds and Records: Volumes and boxes concerning the legal acknowledgment of preexisting "marriages" of former slaves under statute of 1866, including cohabitation bonds and record of cohabitation.
 
Divorce Records: Includes divorce actions pulled from civil actions and arranged alphabetically, and a volume entitled "Maiden Names of Divorced Women," beginning in 1937.
 
Birth, Death and Vital Records: Includes record of births and deaths, county copies of death certificates, and indices to vital statistics.
 
 Miscellaneous Marriage Records: May include indices to marriages, and miscellaneous marriage and family records.
 
Disinterment/Reinterment Permits: County copies (1953-1987) of permits to disinter bodies, transport them across county lines, and rebury them. Only a few counties have been arranged to date.

~~~~~~~~~~ 

Tax

Lists of Taxables: Includes volumes and boxes of tax lists, chronologically arranged.
 
Tax Scrolls: Volumes of tax rolls prepared by individual list takers, from which the official tax list is compiled.
 
Miscellaneous Tax Records: Volumes and boxes of records relating to taxation. Boxes may include tax lists (if less than a box full), civil and criminal actions concerning taxation, lists of insolvent taxpayers, tax receipts, and merchants' purchase returns. Volumes may include Record of Federal Direct Taxes Collected, Poll Tax Register, Record of Assessment of Land for Taxation, and Schedule "B" Taxes.

~~~~~~~~~~

Wills

Wills: Includes record of wills and original wills arranged alphabetically by decedent. Many of the older record of wills may also record estates matters (inventories, accounts of sale, and final settlements) and deeds.
 
(Cross) Index to Wills: Superceded volumes of indices, usually cross referenced to devisee and devisors.
 

Other County Records

Alien, Naturalization and Citizenship Records: Includes volumes and boxes relating to the naturalization of foreign-born citizens, in which the clerk of superior court acted as federal agent. Volumes may include Declaration of Intent to Become a Citizen, Petitions for Naturalization, and Alien Registration.
 
Armed Forces Discharges [none received]: Record of discharge from military service, voluntarily filed with the register of deeds for recording under 1921 statute.
 
Assumed Business Names, Corporations and Partnerships: Includes volumes and boxes concerning corporations and partnerships. Volumes may include Record of Incorporation and Record of Partnerships (or more accurately, Record of Assumed Business Names).
 
Minutes of the Board of County Commissioners: Minutes of the board of county commissioners, the county administrative body after 1868.
 
Minutes of County Board of Education: Minutes of the county boards of education (1868-) and their predecessors, the boards of superintendents of common schools.
 
Minutes of County Board of Health: Minutes of the county boards of health, created by statute in 1893.
 
Marks, Brands and Strays: Includes volumes relating to the registration of marks and brands on livestock, and to the recovery of lost animals.
 
County Accounts and Claims: Includes volumes of county accounts and boxes of accounts and claims against the county for services rendered. Volumes may include County Claims Allowed; Settlement of County Accounts with the Committee of Finance (or County Trustee); Minutes of the Committee of Finance; Treasurer's Account Book; and Record of Official Reports, a compilation of financial reports from the sheriff, treasurer, clerk of superior court, and register of deeds to the board of county commissioners (1875-). Boxes of claims against the county are arranged chronologically.
 
County Boundaries: Records concerning boundary agreements between two or more counties.
 
Election Records: Includes volumes and boxes of election returns, arranged chronologically. Other volumes may include Permanent Registration of Voters (grandfather clause registrations, 1902-1908), poll books, and minutes of the county board of elections. Boxes may also include civil and criminal actions concerning elections.
 
Coroners' Records: Records of coroners' inquests, arranged chronologically. May also include record of coroners (volumes).
 
Insolvent Debtors and Homestead and Personal Property Exemptions: Includes boxes of records relating to insolvent debtors (1773-1868) and homestead and personal property exemptions (1868-). Records include applications of debtors, oaths, notices to creditors, property schedules of insolvents, and reports of committees to lay off homesteads exempted from forced sales. May also include volumes of homestead returns.
 
Jury Lists and Tickets: Includes volumes and boxes of jury lists and tickets, arranged chronologically.
 
Journals and Ledgers of County Officials: Includes account books of county officials, except those of clerks of court (filed under 310 or 324), county treasurer (910), county trustee (910), and committee of finance (910)
 
Records of Magistrates and Justices of the Peace: Includes volumes and boxes of records concerning the appointment, election, qualification and resignation of justices of the peace. Volumes may include the minutes of the Board of Magistrates, record of magistrates (1893-), and record of oaths.
 
Merchant and Professional Licenses and Registration Books: Includes registry of licenses to trades, a listing of merchants and other tradesmen subject to a license tax (Schedule "B"), and stub books of professional licenses for doctors, dentists, nurses, optometrists, chiropractors and architects.
 
Lunacy Records: Records of lunacy inquisitions, arranged chronologically. Papers may include appointment of guardians to oversee the property of the unfit. After 1899, the clerk was required to keep lunacy matters in a distinct volume, entitled Record of Inquisition of Lunacy or simply Lunacy Docket. From 1868 to 1899, lunacy proceedings were recorded in the Orders and Decrees (922), which see.
 
Military Records: Includes volumes and boxes of records relating to military service and militia activities. Volumes may include record of courts martial, minutes of Confederate veterans associations, and rosters of soldiers from a county in the Civil War or World War I.Oaths: Includes volumes of loyalty oaths of ex-Confederates and oaths of county officials.
 
Orders and Decrees and Special Proceedings: Includes volumes created in the hearing of special proceedings before the clerk: special proceedings (summons) docket, clerk's minute docket, orders and decrees, and (cross) indices. In all but three counties, the special proceedings case files were appraised and distributed among other series, especially estates and guardians' records, land divisions, partitions and surveys, miscellaneous land records and miscellaneous records. In Forsyth, Gaston and Sampson, the files were kept in their original sequence and are included in this series.
 
 
Pension Records: Includes volumes and papers concerning the issuance of pensions for Confederate service. The clerk of superior court served as chairman of the county pension board and maintained the records of application and examination of prospective pensioners, and of payment and receipt of pensions.
 
Personal Accounts: Includes boxes of personal and merchants' accounts, arranged chronologically. The majority of these records were probably submitted in court as evidence in civil actions for debt, but became separated from the case files in the appraisal process.
 
Road Records: Includes volumes and boxes of records concerning appointment of road overseers, reports on condition of roads, and petitions for new roads. Boxes may also include criminal actions concerning negligence of overseers and claims against the county for services on the roads. Records concerning bridges and railroads are also included in this series, usually as separate sub-series. Volumes may also include minutes of the county highway or good roads commission.
 
School Records: Includes boxes and volumes of school census records, school registers, school fund account books, vouchers of teachers, and miscellaneous school records.
 
Records of the Wardens of the Poor: Includes volumes and boxes concerning the care of the poor and infirm, a function of the county before assumed by the State Board of Charities and Public Welfare in 1917. In colonial times, care for the poor was an ecclesiastical responsibility; records from this period may be found in vestry minutes. From 1777 to 1868, maintenance of the unfortunate was entrusted to the Wardens of the Poor; after 1868, the Board of County Commissioners assumed the responsibility. Volumes may include vestry minutes, minutes and accounts of the Wardens of the Poor, accounts and registers of the county home, and accounts of outside poor (impoverished persons living at home rather than in the county home).
 
Miscellaneous Records: Includes records from other series, except land records, of insufficient quantity to make a full box. May also include box(es) of records for which no series number was assigned, including records of slaves and free persons of color; bills of sale; promissory notes; canal and drainage records; shipping and fishing records; mill records; mining records; timber records; powers of attorney; grand jury records; and witness tickets. Many box and volume titles may be peculiar to one or two counties.
 
Records of Assignees, Receivers and Trustees: Includes boxes of records concerning assignees, receivers and trustees appointed to settle the financial affairs of bankrupt individuals and businesses. In some counties, the records are merged into one chronological series; in others, the records of the three types of agents have been separated. Also includes volumes of accounts of assignees, receivers and trustees.

State Agency Records

Below is a list of state agency records of primary importance for historical and genealogical research. For a more complete listing of the Archives state agency holdings, please consult the MARS Catalog.

Adjutant General's Office

Attorney General's Office

Auditor's Office

Court

General Assembly Session Records

Governor's Office

Education Boards and Departments

Secretary of State

Supreme Court

Treasurer's and Comptroller's Office

Other State Agencies

Veterans Records

Though the North Carolina State Archives has no records which will establish or support benefit claims for disabled veterans, it does have some records which will be sufficient to establish the identity of a claimant as a serviceman.

Non-Governmental Records

Records created by a private, nongovernment source.

Academic Records

Bible Records

Cemetery Records

Maps

Military Collection

Newspapers

Non-Textual Materials

Organization Records

Private Collections

 

Academic Records

Student academic and (in some cases) financial aid records of a number of defunct proprietary, church-supported, or other non-public schools and colleges in North Carolina.

Related Information:

Bible Records

Copies of family information pages from privately-held Bibles. These Bible entries are arranged alphabetically by family surname but are seldom indexed by individual name. Family genealogies, including those which William Perry Johnson listed in North Carolina Genealogy, have been transferred to the Genealogical Services Branch, North Carolina State Library. All bible records held by the State Archives are now described in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS).

~~~~~~~~~~

Cemetery Records

Grave inscriptions for persons buried in many (but not all) North Carolina cemeteries prior to 1914 are available in an index arranged by name of decedent. This card file and DAR compilations and the records of the North Carolina Cemetery Survey Project are available for use in the Search Room. Those interested in submitting cemetary information to the North Carolina Survey Project should complete a North Carolina Cemetery Survey Form and mail it to the North Carolina State Archives. For information about laws protecting cemeteries, please consult the General Statutes web page (in particular Chapter 65 and Chapter 14, Section 148 and Section 149).

~~~~~~~~~~

Maps

Nearly 5,000 maps depicting North Carolina or some portion thereof. These maps have been brought together from various sources to create a reference collection consisting of manuscript and published maps, as well as photographic and facsimile copies of maps that have been made from originals located elsewhere in the United States and abroad. Many of the maps that in the State Archives collection are now described in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS).

~~~~~~~~~~

Military Collection

Records related to the military affairs of the State of North Carolina and the military service of her citizens dating from the 1740s to the present.

~~~~~~~~~~

Newspapers

Microfilm copies of newspapers that, for the most part, are no longer being published. Since 1959 more than 1,000 titles have been preserved. An ongoing joint project between the Division of Archives and History and the Division of State Library is attempting to identify and catalog every existing newspaper published in North Carolina. Those meeting specific criteria are being microfilmed. Copies of film made by the North Carolina Newspaper Project will be available for use by researchers in the Microfilm Room. Information for titles on film is available in the Search Room or at: http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/tss/newspape.htm.

~~~~~~~~~~

Non-Textual Materials

Includes films, videotapes, sound recordings, slides, posters, postcards, negatives, and photographic prints.

~~~~~~~~~~

Organization Records

Records of many of the state's private, professional, or civic organizations judged to be relevant to the history of the state. Some of these organizations are defunct, while others are currently active.

Related Information:

Private Collections

Papers of individuals important to North Carolina's history.

Back

This page was last updated October 10, 2010.

1997-2010 by the Surry County Coordinator
for the NCGenWeb Project