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Bowman County Death Notices and Obituaries

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Surname Index
ADAMS,   ANFINSON,   ANDERSON [3],   ARITHSON,   ARTHUR,   BAKER,   BENNETT,   BERG,   BEVY,   BURNS,   CADY,   CARLSON,   CARON,   CARTER,   CHURCHWARD,   CIHAK,   COMSTOCK,   CONNELL,   CONNER,   COUSER,   CRAWFORD,   DAHLHAUG,   DALSTROM,   (DAY),   DEGAN,   DEMMLER,   DOTEN,   DOWNING,   ENSTROM,   ERICKSON [2],   FISHBEIN,   FREDERICK,   GALLAGHER,   GARDNER,   GRANGE,   GRIMSON,   GUSTRUD,   HAGEMEISTER,   HANSEY [2],   HERMAN,   HIPPLE,   HOMELVIG,   HOOK,   HORA,   JACKSON,   JACOBSEN,   JOHNSON,   KLINE,   KLUG,   KNEIFEL,   KNUDSON,   KNUTSON,   KOSKI,   (KROCKERA),   LARSON,   LEE [2],   LEGALLAIS,   LEMM,   LENO,   LORENZ,   LUNGSTROM,   LYONS,   MAGNUSEN,   MAHONEY,   MAIER,   MANNING,   MATTSON,   MCCANN,   MCGEE,   MCTIGUE,   MILKS,   MOOMEY,   MRNAK,   MUSIL [2],   NELSON [4],   NESS,   OAKS/ OAKES,   ODEN,   OLSON [2],   PETERSON,   PFEIFER,   PLADSON,   PREICHEL,   REEVEY,   REZIN,   RILEY [2],   RISK,   RODAKS,   ROEN,   ROSS,   SATHER,   SHUCKS,   SHUMATE,   SINCLAIR/ ST.CLAIR,   SMIDSANG,   SODERSTROM,   STILES,   SYHRE,   TAYLER/ TAYLOR,   THUNEM [2],   TILL,   TRAILL,   TRHLICK,   ULEBERG,   VANDEPAS,   WASALASESKY/ WASAELESKY/ WASALESKY,   WILLETT,   WILLIAMS,   WILLIS,   WOODEN,   WREN,   WRIGHT,   YANSKI [2]


ADAMS, JAMES
Farmers Leader, 6 Feb 1919, p 2 col 3
Slope County Farmer Ends Life With Gun
James Adams, Farmer Living North of Rhame Takes Life With Shot Gun

Because of financial difficulties James Adams, a farmer living about twelve miles north of Rhame, 
committed suicide Sunday evening by blowing off his head with a shot gun.  The exact nature 
of the motive prompting Mr. Adams' act is not known, but it is believed difficulties arising out 
of financial affairs prompted the suicide.

Mr. Adams was a hard working farmer who always did his best to make ends meet, and the fact 
that his life was ended in the manner it was, should not reflect more than at times the conditions 
of life are too severe even for the most sturdy.

A wife and family are left to face alone the conditions too severe for the husband.  Will they carry on 
where he went under?  That is the question that everywhere confronts the American family that bucks 
life under Big Biz.  It is for us, then, the change the conditions of life before we condemn the act 
of this farmer who couldn't see his way.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

ANFINSON, GUNDER
Gascoyne Gazette, 4 Oct 1916, p 5, col 3
Snyder Shoots Anfinson

Last Wednesday afternoon about five o'clock , while Gunder Anfinson and William Snyder 
were at the latter's home, young Anfinson, a son of Gunder Anfinson, came over to Snyder's.  
It seems that Anfinson, Jr., and Snyder had, previous to this time, had trouble over a horse 
and Anfinson had beat Snyder up and upon his arrival at the Snyder home the trouble was resumed.  
The report is that they had all been drinking more or less, so young Anfinson started in 
and gave Snyder another beating.  This so enraged Snyder that he grabbed up his rifle, 
whereupon the two Anfinsons ran out doors, pursued by Snyder.  The young man had disappeared 
by the time Snyder got out of the house, but Gunder was just coming around the corner of the building, 
and being crazy with rage and booze, Snyder took him for young Anfinson and opened fire upon him, 
the bullet taking effect in one of his hips and tearing its way clear thru his body.  Mr. Anfinson was taken 
to Scranton and was to have been taken from there to a hospital, but he died before they could 
take him there.  He was buried at Haley on Tuesday of this week.

Snyder was arrested and taken to Buffalo, where he was lodged in jail to await trial.

A later report is to the effect that Snyder has been released, how true it is we do not know.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

ANDERSON, PETER
Gascoyne Gazette, 21 July 1915, p 1 col 3
Peter Anderson is Drowned in River
Attempts to Ford River in Face of Advice to Stay Out and Meets Death in Little Missouri

Marmarth Mail:
Pete Anderson, a ranch hand who has been working for C. A. Brown for the past couple years, 
went to his death in the little Missouri River just before noon today when he attempted to ford it 
at the Second Street ford in the face of advice to stay out.

He had been up town and had been drinking, and decided to start home about eleven o'clock.  
He was on horse-back and had his dog with him.  When he arrived at the ford, he was accosted 
by C. P. Brownlee, who had just walked down to the River to see how high the water was.  
Mr. Brownlee asked Anderson if he intended to ford and the answer was, "yes."  Mr. Brownlee 
assured Pete that the water was in a dangerous condition and that it was not safe, stating 
that it was much higher than on the day Everett Stuart lost his horse and came so near 
losing his life.  However this advice did not influence Anderson in the least and he answered 
by saying that, "I will ford the  ---- ---- ---- or die in the attempt."

The horse did not want to go into the water but Pete put the spurs to the animal and forced it in, 
his dog following a trifle up stream.  When about one-third the way across, the horse 
seemed to give out and started straight down stream with the result that horse and rider 
were soon enmeshed in the cable and drift that has been across the river since the ferry 
went out, and they went down out of sight under the load of drift hanging to the ferry cable.  
Mr. Brownlee says that they were under this drift for a matter of several minutes, but the horse 
soon came up below the cable and managed to swim to the opposite shore.  Anderson's 
body never again came into sight, and Mr. Brownlee immediately spread the alarm, 
but there was nothing that could be done and the body is still somewhere in the little Missouri River.

There was some idea that the body had lodged against the drift and was still entangled 
in the drift and cable, and a boat was secured and launched with the purpose of examining 
the cable, but the current was so strong that it was impossible to handle it the least distance 
from shore and the effort was given up.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Gascoyne Gazette, 11 Aug 1915, p 1 col 3
Body of Pete Anderson is Found Near Sam White's
Has Been in the River for Three Weeks and Floated Twelve Miles Down Stream

The Marmarth Mail:
A body, supposed to be that of Pete Anderson, was located this morning by Sam White 
some twelve miles down the river, and he has notified Justice M. A. Tripp and turned 
the matter over to him.  The justice has subpoenaed a coroner's jury and gone to the White crossing 
where the body will be taken care of and given burial.  Mr. Tripp has also taken Undertaker Gibbs 
with him, as the body has been in the river for three weeks, and will demand the attention of an undertaker.

It will be remembered that Pete Anderson attempted to ford the river with a saddle horse 
three weeks ago today, after being warned that the river was too high for safety, and when 
his horse became exhausted they were both entangled in the cable that had been stretched 
across the river for the purpose of operating the ferry boat.

The horse managed to extricate himself and swam to the opposite shore, but Pete never 
came to the surface and it was generally believed that his body had become buried 
in the sand bar which had formed below the cable and drift.  Mr. White discovered the body 
this morning but could not identify it as he was not acquainted with Anderson, but in all likelihood 
it will prove to be the remains of Anderson, as no other drowning has been reported.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Farmers Leader, 26 Jun 1919, p 1 col 4
Velma Anderson

On Wednesday evening at nine o'clock the Angel of Death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Anderson, 
and on departing, was accompanied by the spirit of their little girl Velma, age fourteen.

All the care and love that attendants and an anxious mother could give for her comfort and assistance were 
brot into play, but the one fiat of he who rules our incoming and outgoings had been issued, and as a beautiful 
day was drawing to a close, her spirit left for that home in the eternal heavens.  There in God's radiance she 
will prepare a greater home for the heart broken mother and father who are left behind.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday by Rev. Wangberg from the Lutheran church.   Interment was made 
at the Bowman cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


ANDERSON, REBECHA
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 20 Dec 1917, p 8 col 3
Mortuary

Mrs. Rebecha Anderson was born in Sweden on Oct. 23, 1827, and passed away at the home 
of her son, Andrew Nilson southwest of Scranton in Bowman county on Dec. 13, 1917 
at the advanced age of ninety years.

In 1855 she was married to Nils Anderson and to this union were born four children, three boys 
and one girl, the latter being dead.  One son resides in Idaho, one in Wisconsin and the other, 
Andrew, near Scranton who has cared for his mother in her declining years.  Her husband died 
in 1894 and that same year she came to this country with her son Andrew Nilson and settled 
in Wisconsin where she resided for eleven years.  Then she removed to Idaho, but in 1907 
she in company with her son came to Bowman county where he filed on a homestead and 
where she has since lived.

Mrs. Anderson had been brot up in the Lutheran faith and was a true Christian woman, being 
strong in her faith to the last.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. O. Wangberg, of Bowman, 
from the Congregational church in Scranton, the remains being laid to rest in the cemetery north 
of Scranton.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

ARITHSON, CONRAD
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 3 Jan 1918. p 3 col 3
Obituary

Conrad Arithson was born the 12th of October, 1900, at Vestnes, Ramsdalen, Norway, 
and died at Griffin, N.  Dak., Dec. 28, 1917, thus reaching the age of 17 years.  In 1908 
he came with his parents to this country and settled at Willmar, Minn., where they remained 
for four years.  In 1912 he came with his parents to Bowman county where his father had 
taken up a homestead near Langberg.  This fall he started to go to school in Rhame, 
but shortly afterward he took sick and was taken to his sister, Mrs. Ole Smedesang, 
at Griffin, where he died the above mentioned date.  He leaves the parents, two brothers 
and four sisters to mourn his loss.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev J. O. Wangberg 
from the home of Ole Smedesang at Griffin, Jan. 2, 1918, and remains laid to rest in the 
Lutheran cemetery north of Griffin.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

ARTHUR, LYNN WATSON
The Farmers Leader, 7 Nov 1918, p 1 col 6
Lynn Watson Arthur

The death of Lynn Watson Arthur at the Miles City hospital November 2 of spleen trouble following influenza, 
comes as a severe shock to his wife and family and the many friends in this section who have known him 
as a healthy and sturdy young man.

He was born at Pipestone, Minn., March 28 1895, coming west a few years ago.  He has made his home 
at Terry, Mont. and Bowman.

Mr. Arthur was a mechanic at the Bowman Motor Co., where his skilled work will be greatly missed.  
He leaves a wife and small child to mourn his loss, together with the many friends he has made here 
and elsewhere.  The bereaved wife and baby have the sympathy of the community.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

BAKER, LEO GLENN
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 30 May 1918. p 4, col 3
Leo Glenn Baker
(from The Chariton (Iowa) Leader)

Leo Glenn Baker, son of Geo. W. and Hepsie A. Baker, was born in Ottercreek township 
May 12, 1895, and died at Camp Grant, Illinois, on May 15, 1918, at the age of 23 years and 3 days.

He leaves to mourn his death his father and mother and two brothers and one sister: Bert D. Arnold, 
of Scranton, N. D.; W. P. Arnold, of Phoenix, Ariz.; and Effie M. Arnold, of Liberty township, besides 
a large number of other relatives and friends.

Leo volunteered for service in the navy, Dec. 15, 1917, but could not pass the examination 
for that particular branch of the service that was open and awaited his call under the classification, 
which was 1-A, and enlisted February 25, 1918, at Camp Dodge in the United States army.  
When asked if he would apply for a lower classification, he replied, "No, if I don't go, some 
other mother's son will have to go in my place.  I want to do all that I can."

During his sickness, his parents visited him and were at his bedside when he died.  
They found him among friends and every desirable ministration was given. 

He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Norwood Lodge No 490, 
in good standing.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. E. W. Curtis from the Mt. Zion church and 
interment made in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

The attendance was very large, probably exceeding any ever before held from this church.  
The Red Cross organization was represented in the fine floral offering, and the body was 
covered by the Stars and Stripes given by the Relief Corps.  In the services the entire 
audience stood and sang "America" with a new meaning and a profounder significance.  
The noble spirit of this young man can never be forgotten.  B. D. Arnold, of near Scranton, 
was present at the funeral, as was also his brother, W. P. Arnold, of Phoenix, Ariz.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

BENNETT, MORRIS
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 20 Dec 1917, p 5 col 3
Prominent Druggist Dies in Aberdeen

A telegram announcing the serious illness of Abe Bennett's father, Morris Bennett, 
was received Monday from Aberdeen and Mr. Bennett left on No. 18 for that city.

On Tuesday Mr. Bennett passed away, his death being due to Brights disease and 
other complications.  He was born in Yates county, New York state, and was married 
before coming west.  His widow with the following children survive him: B. B. Bennett, 
Abe Bennett, Lee Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett.  The funeral was private, particulars 
not being given at this hour.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

BERG, OLIVER
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 5, Col 3
Death Takes Prominent Farmer

Oliver Berg, known as the wealthiest farmer in Bowman County, passed away at his home 
in the eastern part of the County last Thursday evening.  Mr. Berg was ill but a few days 
with the influenza, but his constitution was not strong enough to withstand the inroads 
that the illness made.

Mr. Berg came to Bowman County in 1907, and has done large scale farming here 
since that time.  Last year he built the finest farm home in the western part of the state.  
He was widely known as a man who had accomplished much in bringing the farming 
industry in the County up to the standard that it now holds.

Mr. Berg leaves a large family who have the warmest sympathy of the entire community.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

BEVY
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 3 Jan 1918. p 5 col 3
Undertaker Kvalness was in Rhame Monday where he went to prepare for shipment 
the body of Mr. Bevy, who passed away at his home south of that city the latter part 
of the week from pneumonia.  Mr. Bevy was a carpenter contractor, and located 
on a homestead near Rhame several years ago.  The body was shipped to Norwood, Minn.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

BURNS, D.E.
Gascoyne Gazette, 31 Jan 1917, p 4 col 3
Well Known Railroad Man Dead

D. E. Burns, aged about thirty-two years, died on Sunday at the home of his mother at Miles City, Mont., 
after a lingering illness.  The funeral was held at Marmarth Tuesday afternoon, Rev. R. Bach of the Catholic church 
at Bowman officiating.  There was a large attendance at the funeral, many coming from a considerable distance.  
Section Foreman Nettvet (?), of Bowman, an old friend of the deceased, went up from here.

The deceased was a son of P. B. Burns, roadmaster on this division of the Milwaukee road, and during 1915 
was roadmaster here, with his residence at Marmarth.  Owing to poor health, he was transferred to a position 
at Marmarth, being yard foreman.  This he was obliged to give up a few months ago.  Less than a year ago 
Mrs. Burns passed away, and now Mr. Burns has gone, leaving a family of six children.

Mr. Burns was a thorough railroad man, having been brought up in the business.  He was a friend of all 
with whom he came in contact, and his demise is deeply mourned by his old associates with whom he had 
worked for years.  (Bowman County Pioneer)

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CADY, ALLAN CLYDE
Gascoyne Gazette, 22 Mar 1916, p 4 col 4
The sad tragedy which took from our midst one well known friend, 
Clyde Cady, has caused a deep gloom throughout this vicinity.  
Everyone who knew him will miss his smiling countenance and 
congenial disposition.  His family has the sympathy of the entire community.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Gascoyne Gazette, 22 Mar 1916, p 5, col 3
Sad Death of Clyde Cady

It becomes our sad duty this week to chronicle the untimely taking away 
of one of Gascoyne's most highly respected citizens, Allan Clyde Cady.

Having taken his wife to the home of her parents near Cadyville, S. D., 
last Friday, he was returning to Gascoyne when his auto became stuck 
in the mud.  Mr. Cady then went back to the Cavin home for a horse 
with which to extricate the auto.  In passing out of the yard, thru a gateway, 
the horse was seen to plunge and fall, throwing Mr. Cady violently to the ground 
and upon investigation he was found to be unconscious, remaining 
in that condition until about 3 o'clock Saturday morning when he passed away.  
Altho three doctors were called and an operation was performed upon the skull, 
their efforts were of no avail.

It was believed that the horse caught his foot in the gate, which caused him to fall, 
thus throwing his rider.

The body was brought up to Gascoyne Saturday to the saddened home, 
which he had left a few days previous so full of life and with all the bright 
prospects that a young married couple, with a cozy new home, usually have.

Allan Clyde Cady was born at Maple Ridge, Minnesota, on Sept. 22, 1884, 
being nearly 31 years and 6 months old at the time of his death.  He was married 
the 30th of November, 1915, to Miss Sarah Cavin, of Cadyville, S. D. who 
with his parents, Mrs. and Mrs. A. D. Cady, Sr. two brothers, Arthur and Leroy 
of this place and other relatives, survive to mourn his loss.

The funeral was held at Scranton on Tuesday a.m., at 10 o'clock and was 
conducted by Rev. Father Belch of Bowman.  Remains were interred in the 
Catholic Cemetery at Scranton.  Short services were held at the home here 
at 8 o'clock.  A choir of five voices rendered the music, namely, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hert Perison, Mrs. L. V. Skoglund, Jessie Wescher and Link Fischbein.  
The Bazette extends its heartfelt sympathies to the bereaved family and relatives.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Gascoyne Gazette, 29 Mar 1916, p 5, col 1
In their write up of the recent death of Clyde Cady, the Bowman County Pioneer, 
published at Bowman, has the following to say of Gascoyne:

Gascoyne is one of the liveliest and most enterprising villages in the country, 
and this man who has been so suddenly taken away had a large part 
in making it so.  He will be greatly missed in that part of the county.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CARLSON, ARON
The Farmers Leader, 25 Sep 1919, p 7, col 5
Aron Carlson

Aron Carlson of Amor Township passed away at his home Monday Sept. 22 1919.  
Deceased had been ill for several months with Brights disease.

Mr. Carlson was sixty-eight years old and had been a resident of Bowman County 
for several years.

Left to mourn the loss of a husband and father are his wife, three daughters and a son, 
Mrs. Nels Erickson of Amor, Mrs. John Halverson, of Lake Park, Minn., Mrs. Carl Halberg 
of Superior, Wis, and John Carlson of Eleva, Wis.

Funeral services were held at Bethlehem church and interment was made at the church 
cemetery, Rev. Dordall of Rhame officiating.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CARON, A. E.
The Farmers Leader, 27 Mar 1919, p 4, col 4
Died

Mr. A. E. Caron died at his home north of Scranton last Wednesday at 4 a.m. March 19 (may be 13- an) 
as the result of a fall which he sustained a week before, his back being broken in two places.  
He was taken at once to the hospital at Aberdeen for medical treatment.  After examination the doctor 
declared that there was no hope for the unfortunate man, so they brought him back home.  
Mr. Caron was one of the early settlers here and was a man of a very pleasant disposition 
which made him many friends.  He leaves to mourn his loss, his widow and seven children 
who have the heartfelt sympathy of the whole community in their sad bereavement.  The remains 
were taken to Wheatland for internment.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CARTER, MRS. F.B.
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 22 Nov 1917, p 8, col 1
Mrs. F. B. Carter Dies Suddenly

Was At the Home of Her Parents in Spencer, Iowa

Mrs. F. B. Carter, wife of F. B. Carter, former owner of the Hotel Rudolph, 
and who is well known to the people of Bowman county, died last Thursday evening 
at Spencer, Iowa, where she had been for some time at the home of her parents.  
Mr. Carter was in Bowman, and received the news by wire, leaving immediately 
for Spencer Friday morning of last week accompanied by his mother, Mrs. J. B. Carter, 
and Mrs. O. M. Young, a sister of the deceased.

The funeral was held Sunday at Spencer.  Among the relatives present from out of town 
were F. G. Carter, W. H. Skiff, Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Young of Bowman, Mrs. J. S. Carter 
of Bowman, and Miss Marion Winter, a niece of the deceased, of Madison, Wisconsin.  
The news came as a shock to Mrs. Carter's many friends in Bowman and throughout 
the county.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CHURCHWARD, E. M.
The Farmers Leader, 21 Aug 1919, p 4, col 5
Obituary

E. M. Churchward who lives on a farm near the state line passed away in St. Paul Minn August 15th, 
of cancer of the liver.  He was sixty years old at the time of his death.  He was well known to many 
in this vicinity and the word of his death comes as a great shock to all.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CIHAK, MRS. JOSEPH
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 1, col 4
Died

Mrs. Joseph Cihak died at her home five miles south of Bowman Wednesday morning, Oct. 23, 
of pneumonia following influenza.  She leaves to mourn their loss, a husband and two sons 
aged ten and twelve years.  She was ill about a week.  The bereaved husband has the full 
sympathy of the community in his loss.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

COMSTOCK, (child)
Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 5 col 3
The hand of death for the second time in a few weeks was extended to C. E. Comstock 
of Line when his child died in the hospital at that place Sunday morning.  His wife died 
but a short time ago.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CONNELL, ALEX
Gascoyne Gazette, 31 May 1916, p 4 col 4
Alex Connell, an old and honored citizen of Scranton, passed away last Saturday 
and was buried in the Scranton cemetery.

Mr. Connell is one of the old pioneers, having lived in this state a good many years.  
He was largely interested in several enterprises in Scranton, being a large stockholder 
in the First National Bank and that place.  He was also vice president of that institution 
and had shares in the coal mine and brick yard which are located at Scranton.  
He leaves to mourn his demise, one nephew and several nieces.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

CONNER
The Farmers Leader, 16 Jan 1919, p 2 col 2
In the wee hours of the morning on Dec. 23 [may be 28] occured the death of a noble woman, 
Mrs. W. B. Conner of Mound, of influenza.  She was doing more than her strength would permit 
in caring for her young son and nursing her husband who had the flue.  She was formerly 
Miss Pearl Repholz and lived with her parents near Ines until a short time before her marriage.  
We extend our sympathy to her parents and young husband and son less than one month old.  
Interment was made in the Mound cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

COUSER
The Farmers Leader, 9 Jan 1919, p 4 col 2
Bert Nelson passed away Christmas eve at the home of his parents near Ladner.  
He was 16 years old and his death was caused by pneumonia following influenza.  
The family have the sympathy of all in this section. 

The flu seems to have been especially virulent in the Willett neighborhood and has taken 
a terrible toll and from among the very best people there.  Among the victims are Oren Willett, 
one of the finest young men in Harding County and Miss Fannie Lee, than whom no better 
liked or more respected young lady has ever been a resident of this neighborhood.  
Both of these splendid young people contracted the disease while caring for their stricken 
neighbors and no person could have been taken whose death would have been felt worse 
than that of either of these noble young people.

The death of Postmaster Couser and wife, leaving a lone orphan child; also the death 
of Joseph Nelson were sorry visitations on the community as on the stricken families.  
If human sympathy could reach far enough to cure their sorrows it would surely do so 
in these cases as it is most heartfelt and freely extended, but how vain is sympathy 
to assuage such grief.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).



CRAWFORD, JOHANNA GERTRUDE
Gascoyne Gazette, 5 Apr 1916, p 4, col 3
We were shocked to learn of the sudden death of Mrs. Elmer Crawford 
Friday night.  She leaves a husband and four small children,  
a sister Mrs. Dave Muier, besides a host of friends to mourn her loss.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Gascoyne Gazette, 12 Apr 1916, p 5, col 1

Card of Thanks

We wish to express in these few words something of our appreciation of, 
and thanks for, the love, sympathy and assistance of our many neighbors 
and friends during the sickness and death of our beloved wife and mother.  
Your Kindness will never be forgotten.

J. E. Crawford and Family

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*******
Gascoyne Gazette, 12 Apr 1916, p 5, col 3

Obituary

Johanna Gertrude Crawford was born in Chicago, Illinois, on Feb. 24, 1882, 
and died on March 31, 1916, at the age of 34 years, 1 month and 7 days.

She was the youngest daughter of John P. and Anna Roushausen and 
was united in marriage to Joseph Elmer Crawford in Chicago January 3, 1907, 
and came to Haley where in February of that same year they located on a claim 
just south of Haley where they have lived ever since.

Mrs. Crawford's untimely death came as a shock to the whole community.  
Funeral services were conducted from the residence on Tuesday, April 4th, 
Rev. E. A. Hobbs, of Plateau, S. D. officiating.  The remains were laid to rest 
in the Haley cemetery.

Mrs. Crawford was a beautiful Christian woman and was beloved by all who 
knew her.  She leaves behind to mourn her loss a husband, an aged father 
and mother and a sister, Mrs. Dave Muere, of Haley, N. D., also  four small children, 
the oldest not yet 8 years and the youngest only about two weeks.  That the bereaved 
family have the sincere sympathy of the whole community was attested by the large 
number of friends and neighbors in attendance upon the funeral services.

The loved one is not dead but has really just entered into life.  She has passed 
from this world of sorrow, suffering and death into that other world where none 
of these things can enter.  We may weep with the sorrowing loved ones whom 
she has left behind but we can only rejoice with her at her entrance into that wonderful 
life which hath no ending.  - Contributed

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

DAHLHAUG, ALMA
The Farmers Leader, 29 Aug 1918. p 5, col 3
Death's Summons

Miss Alma Dahlhaug, who was pinned beneath an overturned car last week 
south of Scranton while riding with two friends, died Tuesday at Dickinson.

The accident happened when the driver of the car lost control at the wheel and 
the car running to the edge of the embankment turned turtle.  The other two 
occupants escaped uninjured, but Miss Dahlhaug was thrown in such a manner 
as to be pinned beneath the car.  She was injured internally, and blood poisoning 
set in, resulting in death.

She was taken to the Dickinson hospital for treatment, but death came in about 
thirty minutes after she arrived.  The funeral and interment will be at Amidon 
where the parents reside.  She formerly lived in Bowman, and her many friends 
here have learned of her death with the greatest of sorrow.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

DALSTROM, HAROLD
The Farmers Leader, 19 Sep 1918. p 1, col 3
Harold Dalstrom Meets Death Through Accident

Harold Dalstrom, seventeen year old son of Mrs. Frank Walgren, was accidentally shot 
by his eleven year old brother Tuesday afternoon near Gascoyne.  The bullet, a 25-20 calibre, 
entered his body just above the heart and pursued a downyard course and came out 
just above the left hip bone.  Death was instantaneous.

Harold and his stepfather, Frank Walgren, were  in the hayfield a considerable distance 
from their home at work, and the younger brother had come to the field to bring their dinner 
to them.  The rifle was in the wagon with some other things, and for some reason 
the younger boy was told to get into the wagon and hand the things out.  Walgren heard 
the boy ask Harold if the rifle was loaded, to which Harold replied that it wasn't.  The next 
instant Mr. Walgren stated, he heard the explosion of the rifle, and looking up saw Harold 
fall to the ground.  It is not known whether the gun was accidentally discharged by being 
caught some way, or whether the younger boy believing it to be unloaded carelessly pulled 
the trigger.

Mr. Walgren hitched up a team to a buggy and took Harold to Gascoyne, thinking there 
might be a chance that he was still alive, but Dr. Nutting said that death was immediate.  
Bowman was called for the coroner but Mr. Kvalness was not in town, so deputy sheriff 
Herbert Lincoln went down immediately in Mr. Kvalness' place.

Harold Dalstrom was a big strapping boy for seventeen, one such as we could ill afford 
to lose.  He has a multitude of friends who will learn of his death with keenest sorrow, 
and whose sympathy will serve to assuage the bereavement of the family in their great loss.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

(DAY)
The Farmers Leader, 3 Oct 1918. p 5, col 1
Rubie Day of Slope Center left Monday for Rockford, Ill, being called 
there by a message announcing the death of her sister.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

DEGAN, WILLIAM H.
Stevens Point [Wisconsin] Daily Journal, Friday October 25, 1940, p. 11
Funeral of Mr. Degan 
Funeral services for William H. Degan, 60, a native of Stevens Point, 
who died Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock at a veterans' hospital at Fargo, 
North Dakota, were held in Stevens Point Thursday afternoon. 
The body arrived in Stevens Point Thursday, accompanied by a brother, 
George R. Degan of Fargo, and was taken to the Rosenow funeral home 
where services were held at 3:30 o'clock; Rev. Edward Lewis officiated 
and military rites were conducted by the local American Legion post 
with Commander Roger Emmons in charge. Burial took place in Forest 
cemetery. The firing squad was composed of Leonard Whitman, 
James Tierny, Felix Shebilski, and Joseph F. Kraus. R. B. Lewis sounded 
"Taps" and an American flag was presented to the brother. 
The pallbearers were Leo Larsen, Ernest Zieper, Paul M. Vincent, 
Frank A. Grabin, William Shodler and Barney Stroik. 
Mr. Degan was born on July 20, 1880 in Stevens Point, a son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank A. Degan. He attended the local public schools and in 1899 
joined the United States army and served during the Philippine 
insurrection and the Boxer rebellion in China. He returned to Stevens Point 
in 1901 and worked in his father's blacksmith shop. In 1907 the family 
went to North Dakota and located near Bowman. He had since lived 
in the Bowman vicinity with the exception of short periods which he 
spent in California and Montana. 
A World War veteran, Mr. Degan served overseas five years and participated 
in five battles. He was a member of the First division. 
Surviving are his mother in Jamestown, North Dakota, and six sisters 
and three brothers, Miss Addie K. Degan and Mrs. Florance Pauley 
of Bowman, Mrs. B. W. Ellis and George R. Degan of Jamestown, 
Lewis F. Degan of Fargo, Mrs. H. G. Gage of Redlands, California, 
Mrs. B. C. Roy and Mrs. Evelyn Gallager of Arcadia, California, and 
Frank A. Degan, Jr., in California. His father died in 1932. 
Besides his brother, others who came for the funeral were Louis Pfeiffer 
and son of Milwaukee, Mrs. Leon Matthews and Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Builer 
of Wausau and Ed Zimmer of Plover.

Submitted by Sharon Buethner. 
(Notes: I am not related to Mr. Degan, but my grandmother was married to him for about 5 years, 
and lived in Bowman during that time. The marriage ended with a divorce, -sb) (Aug. 2011)


DEMMLER, GEO. A.
The Farmers Leader, 10 Oct 1918. p 5, col 4, 5
Geo. A. Demmler Dies of Influenza

Geo. A. Demmler, son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Workman of Bowman, and a soldier 
of the national army died of Spanish Influenza on Oct. 3rd at Camp Grant, Ill, where he 
had been since July 28th.

Mr. Demmler was married to Miss Elanor Workman of Bowman on June 29th.  Before his 
induction into the army he was employed as a chemist for the New York and Pennsylvania
Paper Co. at Johnsonburg, Pa.  For the greater part of the time since he entered the service 
he has been employed in the service he has been employed in the gas school at Camp Grant.  
In a letter to Mrs. Demmler's parents he stated that the building being used for the gas 
school was being overhauled, and fitted up for a hospital to accommodate the increasing 
number of cases of the disease with which he died.

Mr. and Mrs. Workman were in Slope County when word came of Mr. Demmler's death, 
so they were unable to receive the information at once, but they were notified at Amidon 
and came on into Bowman in time for Mrs. Workman to take train E (18?)  to Eau Claire, Wis., 
the home of Mr. Demmler's parents and at place interment will take place.

The family have the sympathy of the people in this locality, who can realize the magnitude 
of the sacrifice that has been made by them.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


DOOTEN, FRED
Farmers Leader, 14 Aug 1919, p 1, col 5
Fred Doten Killed By Maddened Horse

Fred Doten a well known rancher from near Karinen died at his home Monday morning 
at 8:00 o'clock a.m.  Death came from injuries received the day before his corrall [sic].  
A maddened horse lunged at Mr. Doten, knocking him to the ground and stamping upon him.  
He never recovered consciousness.

The death of Mr. Doten comes as a severe shock to this country, He having lived here 
for about thirty-five years.  He was a man of sixty-five.

He leaves to mourn his loss a wife, two daughters and two sons.  Sincerest sympathy 
is extended to them in their time of sorrow.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


DOWNING, RICHARD
Gascoyne Gazette, 4 Apr 1917, p 5 col 2,3
The following people from Reeder were in attendance at the burial of little Richard Downing, 
which took place in the Gascoyne cemetery last Sunday: Mr. and Mrs. Hungerford and family, 
Mr. and Mr.s J. C. Kleeman and Michael Puarieau.

Passed On

Richard Downing, aged eight years passed away at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Downing, 
of Scranton, last Thursday, of pneumonia, resulting from measles.  Services were held at the home 
Saturday p.m.  The body was brot to Gascoyne Sunday p.m. and a short service held at the cemetery, 
it being against the order of the health officer to hold a public funeral.

During the short services at the cemetery, Rev. John Nickerson gave some very comforting words 
to the sorrowing one, and showing how at times like these the very bottom seems to drop out 
of everything, yet always there is the everlasting arms of the savior underneath it all to comfort them.  
The songs of "Nearer My God to Thee" and the solo, "Jesus Lover of My Soul" were sung.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Gascoyne Gazette, 11 Apr 1917, p 4 col 2
District No. 22, School No. 1

The death of our old playmate, "Dicky" (he was Dicky to us) Downing was a surprise 
and shock to all of us.  We were looking forward to having his shining face with us again 
but Jesus willed otherwise and called him home.

We have decided to send his Father and Mother and brother and sister the following 
letter of sympathy.

To Mr. and Mrs. Downing, Chester and Mildred - 
We Dicke's [sic] old playmates wish you to know that we sympathize with you in Dicky's departure 
for his home in Heaven.  We looked forward to having him with us again but Jesus wished him 
to come home and in this we find consolation.  We pray that the master will comfort you as he has us 
and that we may all see him again in his new home with Jesus in Heaven.

Signed,
Dicky's old playmates and teacher in Gesaman School, Gascoyne School District

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


ENSTROM
Gascoyne Gazette, 20 Oct 1915, p 1
Tripple [sic] Murder and Suicide 
Scranton Farmer Kills Wife and Two Children With a Corn Knife and Then Shoots Self Thru Heart 
Parties Well Known in Gascoyne 
This Community was terribly shocked Monday morning when word was received about the tragedy 
which occurred at the home of Carl Enstrom, about five miles southwest of Scranton Sunday evening, 
when Mr. Enstrom, for some unknown reason, murdered his wife and two of his children, and then 
took his own life by shooting himself with a rifle. 
Motive For Act Unknown 
Why Mr. Enstrom wished to do away with his wife and two children is unknown, but it is understood 
that they had often quarreled as they had on this particular evening. 
Kills Wife With Corn Knife 
Judging from appearances Mr. Enstrom drove his wife out of the house and then murdered her 
with a corn knife. He then took after one of the boys, who had ran from the house crying, and 
murdered him some sixty feet from the house, after which her returned to the house where he 
murdered the other boy and then dragged him to where the other laid, covering them with a coat. 
The boys, Albert and Elmer, aged 10 and 12 years, respectively, were killed with a hatchet. 
Two Smaller Children Spared 
After murdering his wife and two sons he then shot himself with a rifle. How it happened that 
he spared the lives of his two smaller children, Anna six years and Emma three years, is another 
mystery. They were in the house at the time, but the father seemed to have lost his courage 
after murdering the other three. 
Coroner Holds Inquest 
Anna and Emma spent the night in the house, sleeping in their mother's own bed. In the morning 
they went to Fred Johnson's, their nearest neighbors and told what had happened. 
Coroner Kvalness was notified and he held an inquest the same morning. 
Finds Note 
The coroner found a note on Mr. Enstrom's body which read as follows: 
"This ends the misery of one who has tried to do right. Be kind to my babies. 
Carl E. Enstrom" 
After his signature were added these lines: 
"Good-bye everybody. Sell all my property and see that my two loving little children 
have a good schooling." 
Coroner's Verdict 
A jury picked by Coroner Kvalness gave the following verdict. "The jury finds that 
Mrs. Carl Enstrom and two sons, Albert and Elmer were murdered by Carl Enstrom 
and that he came to his death by his own hand." 
Are Old Settlers 
The Enstrom family were quite early settlers in this country, and were well known throughout 
the county. It is said that Mr. Enstrom was one of the many citizens of our fair land who like 
to take things easy, while Mrs. Enstrom was the main stay of the family, having sold and peddled 
vegetables throughout the county in order to support the family 
Well Known Here 
Mrs. Enstrom was well known in Gascoyne, having been here many times, selling her vegetables, 
and is well spoken of by those who know her. RFK

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


ERICKSON, ARTHUR
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 5, Col 4
Arthur Erickson Dies at Camp Custer

Arthur Erickson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Erickson of Amor, died at Camp Custer, Mich., 
with Spanish influenza, Oct 18, 1918.

The remains were shipped to Bowman for interment, where an impressive military funeral was held, 
Rev. Benson and Rev. Wangberg conducting the services.

The Erickson family have the sympathy of the people of the community, who eel deeply and inexpressibly 
grateful for the sacrifice they have made for humanity.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

ERICKSON, MRS. NELS
The Farmers Leader, 11 Dec 1919, p 1 col 3
Mrs. Nels Erickson Succumbs to Appoplexy [sic]

Mrs. Nels Erickson of Amor township passed away at her home last Friday 
after a four days illness with appoplexy followed by a paralytic stroke.

Deceased was born in Vermland Sweeden [sic] in 1875 coming to America 
thirty years ago.

She leaves a husband, three sons and a daughter, a mother and sister 
in Lake Park Minn., a brother in Elva Wis., and a sister in Superior Wis.

Funeral services were held at Bethany church last Monday, Reverend Dordahl 
officiating.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Farmers Leader, 18 Dec 1919, p 1 col 7
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank all those who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our mother and wife.

We also wish to thank the Ladies Aid of the Bethania Congregation for their contribution of flowers.

Nels J. Erickson and family

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


FISHBEIN, HENRY G.
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 14 Mar 1918. p 5 col 2
Henry G. Fishbein, one of the oldest and best known residents of Gascoyne, 
died at his home at that place last Friday.  The funeral was held Tuesday.  
A large number of the Bowman Masons went down to attend the services.  
Rev. Benson conducted the services at the church and the Masonic order 
had charge at the grave.  Mr. Fishbein was postmaster at Gascoyne and 
had many friends who regret his passing.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


FREDERICK
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 21 Feb 1918. p 5 col 3
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Will Frederick, who reside on the John Ellis farm 
south of Bowman, died last week.  The remains were taken to the old home 
at Portage, Wis., for interment.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


GALLAGHER, MRS. VERNON
Farmers Leader, 24 Jul 1919, p 1, col 4
Mrs. Vernon Gallagher Passes Away Thursday

Mrs. Vernon Gallagher passed away at her home in Bowman at four o'clock Thursday afternoon.  
She had been in ill health for several months, but it was only during the past two weeks that she 
was compelled to take to her bed.  For several days it had been known that there was little hope 
for recovery, and the near relatives were notified.

Mrs. Gallagher was thirty-two years old.

Those left to mourn her untimely leaving, besides a loving husband and two small daughters 
are F. T. Irons, her father, her sisters Mrs. Loula McGray of Hankinson and Mrs. Ruby Berquist 
of Rhame, and Irma and Olga Irons of Bowman and three brothers, James, Leslie, and Wm. Irons.

Funeral services were held at the Catholic church Saturday morning.  Interment was made 
in the Catholic cemetery.

The sincere sympathy of all is extended to the bereaved family.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
Farmers Leader, 24 Jul 1919, p 1, col 4
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our many friends for their kind assistance given us during the illness and death 
of our beloved wife, mother, daughter and sister.

V. T. Gallagher and daughters Louvern and Loraine, and Frank T. Irons and family.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


GARDNER, ASA
Gascoyne Gazette, 23 Aug 1916, p 5 col 5
Asa Gardner Killed in Automobile Wreck

Fargo, Aug. 15 - A message received here this afternoon from Beulah, Wyo., tells of the death 
of Asa Gardner, for the past 13 years a leading businessman in New England, and recognized 
throughout the western country as one of the best hustlers on the Missouri Slope.  Mr. Gardner 
left New England Saturday morning in company with Dr. T. L. Stangebye, Mr. and Mrs. G. D. McClennan, 
Georgia Fitzgerald and Mildred Lawrence for a fishing trip and outing in the Black Hills.

Details are lacking, but it is understood the auto turned turtle when Mr. Gardner 
was driving in the hills.

The deceased is survived by his wife, five sons and three daughters, George, Gordon 
and Harry Gardner make their home in New England; Mrs. Gardner and the four younger 
children have been living in California the past year; one son, Dr. Chas. Gardner, is located 
in Portland.  For a year the deceased has been shaping his business to retire and make 
his permanent home in California.  A delegation of citizens left this afternoon to accompany 
the remains to New England where the funeral will be held, when relatives arrive from the west.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

GRANGE, MRS. FRANK
The Farmers Leader, 12 Dec 1918, p 5 col 1
Mrs. Frank Grange died at the farm home near Amidon Saturday night of pneumonia 
following influenza.  She was the mother of ten children.  She will be buried Wednesday.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

GRIMSON, KNUTE
The Farmers Leader, 30 Jan 1919, p 5 col 3
Knute Grimson died at the home of his son, Gust Grimson, near Ladner, January 19th.  
Mr. Grimson was born at Bergen, Norway, September 28, 1829 and came to America 
in 1854.  Settling first in Wisconsin, later in 1920 he came to this county with the family 
of his son Gust and his grandson Carl Errison.  The deceased was a quiet and kindly 
gentleman and well liked by all.  His death was caused by the infirmities incidental 
to old age.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

GUSTRUD, C.A.
The Farmers Leader, 3 Oct 1918. p 5 col 4
C. A. Gustrud Crushed Beneath Milwaukee Train at Buffalo Springs

C. A. Gustrud, a farmer living near Buffalo Springs was fatally injured Monday 
when attempting to cross the Milwaukee tracks at Buffalo Springs.  Mr. Gustrud 
was in a wagon to which he had hitched four horses with two colts following.  
When the grain crashed into the wagon Mr. Gustrud was thrown out 
on the opposite side, but was so mangled that he died at Mobridge a few hours 
later.  All four horses and the two colts were instantly killed.  Albert Hansey, 
a farmer living at Buffalo Spring, was near by and way Mr. Gustrud either 
urging the horses to hurry over other crossing or trying to hold them back, - 
which he could not tell, but he states that the thing happened so quickly 
that there was little time for any action.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HAGEMEISTER, ERNEST LOUIS
The Farmers Leader, 9 May 1918. p 5, col 2
The family of Wm. Hagemeister, living north of Scranton, are having a run of typhoid fever.  
Last week the 17 year old son died from the effects of the disease.  Since that time two other 
children are down with the same ailment.  The many friends of the family extend heartfelt sympathy.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
The Farmers Leader, 13 Jun 1918. p 5 col 1
Card of Thanks

We wish to express our thanks to the many friends and neighbors who so kindly 
assisted us during the sickness and sudden taking away of our dear son and brother, 
Ernest Louis; also for the many beautiful flowers.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hagemeister and family

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*****
Farmers Leader, 24 Apr 1919, p 4 col 5
In Rememberance [sic]

In loving rememberance of our dear son and brother Ernest who passed 
away just one sad year ago today, April 27, 1918.

And is now one shining star in heaven,
The rose that is sweetest and fairest;
Is the bud that is killed by the frost,
And the Love that is dearest and rarest,
Is the Loved on that we have just lost.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hagemeister and family
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Porten

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HANSEY, ALVIN CLARENCE
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 13 Dec 1917, p 8 col 1
On Monday occurred the death of Alvin Hansey, nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hansey 
of Whiting township.  Little Alvin was stricken with acute appendicitis about two weeks ago and 
was rushed to the Miles City hospital for an operation.  He rallied from the serious operation 
and appeared to be on the road to recovery when complications set in and, in spite of the best 
of medical care, he passed away.  Little Alvin was a boy of sunny disposition and cheerful 
temperament.  In the school room, on the playground and in the home he always was the same 
cheerful, earnest and lovable boy and he will be sorely missed by his parents, teacher and playmates.  
A little soul has taken flight to the great Unknown; a little life has been taken from us.  In the home 
the family circle is broken, in the school is a vacant desk and on the playground disrupted ranks.  
His passing came as a terrible shock, but we find comfort in the thought that, while he was with us, 
he made our lives a little brighter and that it will be better for him in the great Beyond, for "Of such 
as he is the Kingdom of Heaven."  The heartfelt sympathy of the community is extended to the grief-stricken 
family with the assurance that their grief is our grief for Alvin belonged to us as well and their loss is 
also our loss.  The last sad rites will be observed in the home at 11 o'clock on Thursday morning 
with interment in the Bowman cemetery, Rev. J. O. Wangberg officiating.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*****
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 20 Dec 1917, p 8 col 3
Card of Thanks

To our many kind friends and neighbors who assisted us during the illness and death 
of our young son and brother, Alvin Clarence, we wish to thank them for the great thoughtfulness 
shown us in this sad hour in our home when our hearts are heavy in the loss of our beloved child.

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hansey and family

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HANSEY, EDWARD
The Farmers Leader, 13 Jun 1918. p 6, col 2
Obituary

Edward Hansey was born Nov. 20, 1868, at Lansing, Iowa, and died in Bowman county, 
North Dakota, the 4th of June, 1918, having reached the age of 49 years.  He settled 
in Bowman county in 1910 on a homestead eight miles south of Buffalo Springs.  
In 1913 he sold this place and bought a farm nearer Buffalo Springs, where he lived 
till he died.  In 1913 he was married to Bertha Larson, of White Sulphur Springs, Montana.  
He leaves a wife, four brothers and one sister to mourn the loss.  The funeral services 
were conducted from the home June 6th, Rev. J. O. Wangberg officiating, and the remains 
laid at rest in the cemetery eight miles south of Buffalo Springs.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HERMAN, IMA LEOTA
The Farmers Leader, 3 Oct 1918. p 5, col. 1, 2
Obituary

Ima Leota Herman, daughter of Geo. Herman and his wife Addie Perkins, 
was born September 3rd 1918, near Scranton, Bowman County, N. Dak.

The little body was strong and healthy and delight of its parents, Wednesday, 
Sept 11th at 3 p.m. she suddenly took sick before a physician could be called 
the Lord God took her from [cannot read] to himself [cannot read].  Her death 
is mourned by her father, mother, one brother and one sister and numerous 
friends and relatives.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HIPPLE
Gascoyne Gazette, 1 Aug 1917, p 4 col 1
John Hipple received word of his father's death Monday at Henning, Minn., and left immediately for that place.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HOMELVIG, CHRIS
The Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 1 col 6
Chris Homelvig died Monday night at his home near Amidon from pneumonia 
following influenza.  Deceased was one of the best known farmers in that section 
and a man loved and respected where known.  Burial will be at Amidon.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HOOK, FLOY
The Farmers Leader, 1 May 1919, p 5 col 3
Floy Hook

Floy, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hook passed away Wednesday afternoon.  
The little girl was ill but two days, and at first her trouble was not believed serious, but a bad cold 
soon developed into pneumonia and took her away with very little warning.  She was 
about fifteen months old.

Funeral services will be held from the Congregational church Friday afternoon.

The bereaved parents and relatives are extended the unreserved sympathy 
of the entire community.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

HORA, ROBERT ERNEST
The Farmers Leader, 14 Aug 1918. p 4, col 2
Obituary

Robert Hora was born in LaFarge, Vernon county, Wis., April 15, 1908.  When two years old 
his family moved from Wisconsin to Langberg, N. Dak., where they have lived since upon a ranch.

Last May his parents took him to Rochester, Minn., for treatment for Leukemia, but he was able 
to receive no material help and has been failing constantly since until death came Sunday, 
August 11, at 3:15 p.m.  He had thus reached the age of 10 years, 3 months and 27 days.

The funeral services were held from the Catholic church Tuesday afternoon, and the remains 
were interred at the Bowman cemetery.

Card of Thanks

We wish to thank all of those who so kindly assisted us in our late sorrow, and also those 
who so thoughtfully contributed flowers, and in other ways made the passing of our son 
and brother Robert less painful.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hora and children

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******

Farmers Leader, 7 Aug 1919, p 7, col 5
In Rememberance [sic]

In loving rememberance of our dear son and brother Robert Ernest Hora who passed away 
just one sad year ago today, August 11, and is now a shining star in Heaven.

The rose that is sweetest and fairest, 
Is the bud that is killed by the frost.
And the love that is dearest and rarest,
Is the loved one we have just lost.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hora and children

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

JACKSON, RICHARD LUDLOW
Gascoyne Gazette, 11 Aug 1915, p 1 col 1
R. L. Jackson Passes Over Great Divide
Well and Familiarly Known "Uncle Dick," An Early Pioneer, Passes Away Tuesday at Haley

Harding County Herald-
Richard L. Jackson died at his home in Haley, Tuesday, August 3rd, 1915, 
at 5:45 p.m. of cancer of the liver.

Richard Ludlow Jackson was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, September 13, 1842.  
He removed to Missouri when 28 years of age and engaged in the drug business.  In 1883 
he came west and settled at Camp Crook where he engaged in the hotel business.  
In 1889 he moved to Harding, where he was engaged in ranching until he moved to Haley 
in 1898, where he continued ranching, and had the post office and started a hotel, 
which he continued to conduct, and this was a popular stopping place on the road 
from Dickinson to Camp Crook and the Black Hills country.  Here many a traveler enjoyed 
his genail hospitality, and his jovial manner and popularity won friends from far and near.  
To know him was to love him.

The passing of this grand old pioneer casts sorrow throughout this part of the country, 
as there was no man better known that Uncle Dick Jackson.  He was one of nature's 
noblemen in its truest sense - brave, generous, manly.  His was a soul of honor and 
his friends and friendships were sacred to him.

At the time of his death he was nearly 73 years of age.  For the past few weeks 
he gradually failed and for the last two days before death he was in an unconscious state, 
and passed away peacefully.

Funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon by Rev. E. A. Hobbs both 
at the house and at the hall in Haley, and a large number were present to pay their last respects 
to one of the grandest pioneers of the west.

The surviving children are: Edgar Ludlow Jackson, Mrs. John R. Dodge, John Richard Jackson, 
J. P. Jackson and Frank C. Jackson.  Six children having passed away, and Mrs. Jackson having 
died April 7, 1890.  All of the children were present at his death bed except Frank C., who was 
there a few days previous, but was called home on account of illness in his family.

the pall bearers were selected from among early settlers who had been close friends 
of the deceased for many years.  They were: Wm. Murphy, Alex Connell, James Vines, Wm. Phillips, 
Wm. A. Shaw and Wm. Elliott.  These gentlemen bore the remains to its last resting place 
in the cemetery located on the old homestead of the deceased, where he had asked to be buried.

Uncle Dick Jackson is gone, but long will his kind acts remain in the memory of those 
who knew him best.  The sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of all.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*******
Gascoyne Gazette, 11 Aug 1915, p 2 col 3

Card of Thanks

We wish to thank all those who were so kind and helpful to us during the sickness, 
death and burial of our father, R. L. Jackson.  Such kindness is highly appreciated 
and long remembered.

Edgard Jackson
Mrs. J. R. Dodge
Richard Jackson
James Jackson
Frank Jackson

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

JACOBSEN, CLARENCE
The Farmers Leader, 27 Mar 1919, p 8 col 2
Clarence Jacobsen

Clarence Jacobsen passed away at three o'clock Tuesday morning at his home 
three miles north of the H. T. ranch.  Death was caused by influenza, from which he had 
been gradually weakened for the past several days.

Deceased was a soldier who had been back from service in France only three weeks, 
having been in the service for over a year.

Besides the family and many friends here left to mourn his death, he has a brother still 
in the service in France.

Funeral services and interment will be at the Lutheran church and cemetery southwest 
of Amidon.  The entire section join the bereaved family in the feeling of loss, and extend 
sympathy.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

JOHNSON, WALTER
The Farmers Leader, 2 Jan 1919, p 3 col 3
Walter Johnson, who returned from Camp Houston, Texas a week ago died at his home 
at Ludlow, Wednesday at one o'clock in the morning from influenza.  He will be buried here 
tomorrow, Friday.  A brother is very ill with the same ailment, having had a severe attack 
while east with a shipment of stock.  Upon getting back home he had a relapse.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

KLINE, C.W.
The Farmers Leader, 26 Sep 1918. p 1, col 4
A Fatal Automobile Accident

C. W. Kline, of Huron, S. D., met death Wednesday evening when he was pinned under his car 
when it turned turtle on the crossing over Spring Creek, near the Stewart ranch.  The overturned car, 
with the unfortunate man underneath was found Thursday morning, and immediate notice was sent 
to relatives at Huron, and his son Harry, who resides north of Scranton, also his daughter, Maude, 
who is at Buffalo.  Mr. Kline was coming from the south, and had at a point where the road turns 
to cross the bridge, gone right on over a twenty-foot ban, and the car landed bottom side up.

Mr. Kline came out just a week ago, in company with Mrs. Kline to attend to the affairs of their son 
Robert, who left last week with the draft call from Harding county, and they were intending to return 
to their home near Huron where they have a farm.  There is quite a large family to survive, and two 
of the boys are now in service.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

KLUG, (CHILD)
The Farmers Leader, 13 Feb 1919, p 1 col 1
Mineral Springs

One of the twin girls born to Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Klug a few weeks ago died Friday morning Feb. 7.  
She was sick only two days with a severe cold.  The other little girl was also very low, but is 
better at the present writing.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

KLUG, (CHILD)
The Farmers Leader, 20 Feb 1919, p 8 col 2
Death has again visited the Klug home Saturday morning, and claimed the other twin girl.  
She survived her little sister by only a week.  Funeral services were held Monday afternoon.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

KNEIFEL, FANNY FRANCIS
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 13 Dec 1917, p 6 col 3
Obituary

Fanny Francis Kneifel was born September 28, 1892.  April 8, 1917, she was united in marriage 
to Mr. C. C. Harriman at Bowman, N. D.   Early in the fall they removed to Plains, Montana, at which 
place occurred her death on December 3, 1917, of acute nephritis.  She was a loving sister, a kind 
and obedient daughter, making a host of friends wherever she went; always ready and willing 
to make sacrifices for the good of others.  She testified to a faith in her Savior as her Redeemer 
and a home in heaven.

She leaves to mourn her loss her husband, who bade her goodbye in Plains, Montana; her father 
and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kneifel; three sisters, Mrs. Eliza Forman, of Stanley, Wisconsin, 
Mrs. Chas. Kriby [?Kirby], of Bowman, and Miss Lilly; three brothers, John Kneifel, of Gayser, Montana; 
Frank and Harold of Bowman, all of whom were present at the funeral except John, who could not 
be reached by message.

The funeral was held from the Methodist church in Bowman Saturday afternoon at 2:30, Dec. 8, 1917, 
the pastor Rev. C. C. Benson officiating.  Interment was made in the family lot in the Bowman cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

KNUDSON, BERT
Farmers Leader, 7 Nov 1918, p 5 col 4
Bert Knudson Succumbs to Influenza

Bert Knudson who lived west of Ludlow, South Dakota was brought in Sunday suffering 
with influenza.  He was taken to the local Pest House where he died Wednesday morning 
at about 8 a.m.

Mr. Knudson was in town last Friday apparently well and healthy, so his demise comes 
s an unexpected deprivation to all who knew him.

Mr. Knutson's father arrived the first of the week to be near his son.  He shipped the remains 
to Stoddard, Wis., their home, where interment will be made.  The sympathy of the entire 
section is given the bereaved family.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

KNUTSON
Farmers Leader, 12 Dec 1918, p 1 col 2
Obituary

Vina Knutson was born the 8th of Nov. 1888 in Minneapolis, Minn., baptized by Rev. M. Falk Gjertsan, 
while yet a child she moved with her parents to Mitchell county, Iowa.  There she was instructed 
in the catechism and confirmed by Rev. Waldehand.  In 1908 she moved with her parents to Scranton, N. D. 
and lived with [them] till 1914 when she filed on a homestead 3 miles from her parents home.  
She proved up this fall.  The 22nd of Nov., she took sick with pneumonia and died the 27th of Nov.  
When she said farewell to her parents, brothers and sisters, she said it was so hard to leave them, 
but God's will be done - Lord help me!

[article missing text] dren, one of her sisters preceeds dren [sic], one of her sisters precedes her 
to the place beyond.  She leaves 4 brothers of which one is sick in the hospital at Camp Funston, 
4 sisters, her parents and a host of friends to mourn the loss.

The funeral services were conducted from the congregational church at Scranton, Dec. 7th, 
Rev. J. O. Wangberg of Bowman officiating and remains laid to rest in cemetary [sic] north of Scranton.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

KOSKI
Gascoyne Gazette, 28 Jun 1916, p 4, col 1
John Koski's father died and will be buried in the Cathlic [sic] cemetery at Haley Tuesday.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

(KROCKERA)
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 5, Col 2
John Krockera received a message the first of the week saying that his brother 
had died.  Mr. Krokera has the sympathy of this community.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

LARSON, PETER A.
Farmers Leader, 1 May 1919, p 1 col 3, 4
Farm Lad Meets Death Through An Individually Peculiar Accident

What is believed one of he most peculiar accidents that ever happened 
in this section of the state resulted in the death of Peter A. Larson, 
the sixteen year old son of P. N. Larson who lives two miles north 
of Slope Center.

While plowing with a gang plow for a neighbor Wm. Reager Tuesday, 
the young man was arranging the harness on one of the horses when 
he noticed that one of them, a colt, was about to kick him.  The sudden 
and violent exertion necessitated in dodging the blow, it is believed, 
broke the lad's neck.

A Son of Mr. Reager was in the field only a few feet away from the Larson boy, 
and he states that the horse did kick, and that he was under the impression 
that it was the blow that broke the boy's neck, but investigation by the doctor 
found the contrary to be true, as there were no lacerations anywhere upon 
the head or body other than slight scratches which were probably received 
in the fall.  The boy's body was picked up several feet from the plow, 
to which point he had staggered before falling.

Funeral services will be held in Bowman at the Catholic church Saturday.  
The Larson family have the sympathy of this section.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

LEE, FANNIE
The Farmers Leader, 9 Jan 1919, p 4 col 2
Bert Nelson passed away Christmas eve at the home of his parents near Ladner.  
He was 16 years old and his death was caused by pneumonia following influenza.  
The family have the sympathy of all in this section. 

The flu seems to have been especially virulent in the Willett neighborhood and has taken 
a terrible toll and from among the very best people there.  Among the victims are Oren Willett, 
one of the finest young men in Harding County and Miss Fannie Lee, than whom no better 
liked or more respected young lady has ever been a resident of this neighborhood.  
Both of these splendid young people contracted the disease while caring for their stricken 
neighbors and no person could have been taken whose death would have been felt worse 
than that of either of these noble young people.

The death of Postmaster Couser and wife, leaving a lone orphan child; also the death 
of Joseph Nelson were sorry visitations on the community as on the stricken families.  
If human sympathy could reach far enough to cure their sorrows it would surely do so 
in these cases as it is most heartfelt and freely extended, but how vain is sympathy 
to assuage such grief.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

LEE, H. O.
Farmers Leader, 23 Oct 1919, p 5 col 2
H. O. Lee

O. H. Lee [note switch of initials - not sure which is correct- an] died Sunday morning at the home 
of his daughter, Mrs. Peder Mahlum in Bowman after an illness of a year.

Deceased was 65 years old.  He was born in Norway in 1854 and came to Redwood Co., Minn., about forty 
years ago where he farmed thirty years.  Since the death of his wife three years ago he has made his home 
with his son Hans Lee, formerly a resident of Bowman, and stayed the last few months with his daughter, 
Mrs. Mahlum.

He is survived by his son, Hans, living at Mobridge and daughter Mrs. Peder Mahlum of this city.

The remains were taken to his old home at Franklin, Minn., for burial.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

LEGALLAIS, PERCY
Gascoyne Gazette, 17 May 1916, p 5, col 3
Ed and Wm. LeGallais received word on Monday that their youngest brother, 
Percy, had been accidently killed.  He lived with his mother at Pasvebeac [sic, probably Paspébiac], 
Province of Quebec, Canada.  The telegram did not state how he came to his death.  
Percy was about 30 years old and was manager of the Government Banks.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

LEMM, RHINEHALD
Gascoyne Gazette, 23 June 1915, p 1 col 6
A Double Tragedy Near Murchison

Rhinehald Lemm, Living Near Murchison, Shoots His Wife And Then Takes His Own Life

The culmination of a sad tragedy was reached Thursday evening when the bodies 
of Mr. and Mrs. Rhinehald Lemm were laid to rest in the Riverside Cemetery, south of Buffalo.

It seems that Mr. and Mrs. Lemm had never agreed and Mrs. Lemm and the children 
were living apart from him and had been doing so for some time.  On Wednesday, 
Mr. Lemm went over to the field where his wife was working and evidently tried to effect 
reconciliation.  Altho there were no eye witnesses, it is thought that she refused and 
upon her refusing to come back to him, he shot her with the shot gun he was carrying, 
death resulting immediately.  Then injecting another shell into the gun, Mr. Lemm took 
his own life.  The children, wondering why their mother did not come to dinner, went out 
to the field and discovered the bodies.  They immediately notified the neighbors and 
Wm. F. Schroeder and Bert Scott came to town and notified the authorities, who went 
at once to the scene.  An inquest was held and the findings were as above stated.

There are four children surviving, their ages ranging from 18 months to 12 years.  
It is thought that the two youngest will be placed in an orphan asylum, while the two elder 
will be cared for by relatives.

This is a sad occurrence and, as is usual in such cases, the survivors, the children, 
are the principal sufferers.  To be deprived of a loving mother at their age is a loss 
that they will not realize until after years and great sympathy is felt for them by all.  
(The Buffalo Times)

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


LENO, GENE
Gascoyne Gazette, 5 July 1916, p 5, col 2
There was a man by the name of Gene Leno accidently drowned at Buffalo Springs lst Sunday.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


LORENZ, JOSEPH
The Farmers Leader, 30 Jan 1919, p 1 col 1
Joseph Lorenz Has Leg Badly Crushed

Well Known Garage Man Suffers Horrible Agony When Engine He Was Working On Suddenly Starts

On Tuesday afternoon while starting a Mogul tractor for the Schumacher boys, Joseph Lorenz, 
proprietor for the Lorenz garage and well known resident of this town, suffered a very serious 
accident and it will possibly be two weeks before the full extent of the injury can be ascertained.

It appears that the boys had experienced some difficulty in getting their engine started and 
had enlisted the assistance of Mr. Lorenz, he owning a tractor of the same kind.  After the machine 
had been running some time it was driven between the Home Lumber yard and the Larson 
machine sheds where it was stopped and the radiator tank filled with water.  Noticing that there 
was little if any oil in the lubricator cup Mr. Lorenz climbed up on the drive wheel to fill the cup 
with oil and it is supposed that in so doing he stepped on a rod that connects with the control lever 
and the friction mechanism of the clutch.  At any rate the engine suddenly became engaged 
in "forward," and before C. M. Hjerleid, who was standing on the opposite side of the engine, 
could jerk the lever into neutral it had jumped fully five feet, throwing Lorenz's leg between 
he drive wheel and the lugs on the big driver.  The space between the pulley and the big driver 
is but about three inches and opposite each of these spade lugs the leg is broken and the knee 
injured.

On the opposite foot the big toe was cut nearly off by the sharp spade lugs and had to be amputated.

The suffering of the victim was great and as a result of the shock it will be some time before 
it will be possible to operate on the crushed leg, which includes the knee.

D. A. A. Whittemore and Jos. Moore accompanied the victim to Miles City where he is now in a hospital.

Later

On account of being late in getting to press we are enabled to state that Mr. Lorenz died 
at the Hospital at 10 :30 Thursday, January 30th.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


LUNGSTROM, ELVIRA
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 20 Dec 1917, p 8 col 3, 4
Mortuary

Elvira Lungstrom was born at New London, Minn., June 12, 1904, 
and died at Rhame, N. D., Dec. 17, 1917.

At the age of thirteen years she moved with her parents to Rhame in 1910.  
It was on Dec. 2, 1916, that her mother died, which left her the fourth child 
in the family and while she appeared strong and well, yet, last Saturday 
she was taken very ill and on Monday passed away. 

By her death she leaves two brothers, two sisters, and father together 
with a host of friends to mourn her loss.

Funeral services were held from the Lutheran church in Rhame and 
the remains laid to rest in the cemetery west of Rhame, Rev. J. O. Wangberg 
of Bowman conducting the services.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
[note - in paragraph 2 the age "thirteen" no doubt should have been "six", 
thirteen being her age at time of death- an]


LYONS, NICK
Farmers Leader, 16 Oct 1919, p 1 col 1
Three Lives Lost in Hettinger Hotel Fire

Flames Raze Lafayette Hotel to Ground Thursday

When the LaFayette Hotel of Hettinger was burned to the ground early Thursday morning Floyd and Agnes Mahoney, 
age eight and thirteen respectively, and Nick Lyons, the cook were burned almost beyond recognition.

The two Mahoney children are the children of Mrs. Armstrong, wife of the proprietor of the hotel.  Nick Lyons 
is a Syrian cook who has no relatives in America but has a wife and children in his native land.

Mr. Armstrong was badly burned when he attempted to rescue the children.  He approached their room but had to pass 
over a floor that was so badly burned that he fell through it into the dining room below which was seething with flames.  
There were no ladders near, so the children who stood at the window were begged to jump to the street, but they were 
so badly frightened that they refused to do that.

Many other people were badly injured in getting away from the building.  Dr. Smith who had office rooms in the hotel fractured 
his hip in lighting on the side walk.  He lost all of his surgical tools and library in the fire.

The origin of the fire in unknown, the first flames having been seen coming out of the basement windows.  A property loss 
of $8,000 is the estimated result of the fire.  Loss is partly covered by insurance.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

MAGNUSEN, THERESA
Gascoyne Gazette, 22 Dec 1915, p5 col 3
Theresa Magnusen died last Wednesday of a complication of appendicitis 
and heart trouble. The funeral was held in the Swedish Lutheran church and 
enterment [sic] was in the Luthern [sic] cemetery south of Haley.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MAHONEY, FLOYD and AGNES
Farmers Leader, 16 Oct 1919, p 1 col 1
Three Lives Lost in Hettinger Hotel Fire

Flames Raze Lafayette Hotel to Ground Thursday

When the LaFayette Hotel of Hettinger was burned to the ground early Thursday morning Floyd and Agnes Mahoney, 
age eight and thirteen respectively, and Nick Lyons, the cook were burned almost beyond recognition.

The two Mahoney children are the children of Mrs. Armstrong, wife of the proprietor of the hotel.  Nick Lyons is a Syrian cook 
who has no relatives in America but has a wife and children in his native land.

Mr. Armstrong was badly burned when he attempted to rescue the children.  He approached their room but had 
to pass over a floor that was so badly burned that he fell through it into the dining room below which was seething 
with flames.  There were no ladders near, so the children who stood at the window were begged to jump to the street, 
but they were so badly frightened that they refused to do that.

Many other people were badly injured in getting away from the building.  Dr. Smith who had office rooms in the hotel 
fractured his hip in lighting on the side walk.  He lost all of his surgical tools and library in the fire.

The origin of the fire in unknown, the first flames having been seen coming out of the basement windows.  
A property loss of $8,000 is the estimated result of the fire.  Loss is partly covered by insurance.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MAIER, JOHN
Gascoyne Gazette, 2 Aug 1916, p 5 col 5, 6
Obituary

John Maier was born in Erie County, Pa., March 27th, 1854, and died at Lisbon, N. D., July 16th, 1916.  
At the age four years he emigrated to Iowa with his parents where he resided until almost six years age, 
when he moved to Lisbon, N. D.  In the spring of 1913 he came to Harding county and took a homestead 
near that of his son, Irvin, and they engaged in the stock business.  Deceased had been in poor health 
a greater part of the time since coming here and visited several eminent physicians but to no avail, 
and passed away on Sunday, July 16th.

He was a devoted husband and a kind and indulgent father, to his friends the soul of fellowship.  
But the greatest of all he was a man and was well liked by all who knew him.

Besides a wife he leaves to mourn his loss two daughters, Mrs. J. L. Long of Overbrook, Kansas, 
and Mrs. C. G. Stoner of Glenwood, Minn., and one son, Irvin F. Maier of Ludlow; three sisters, 
Mrs. G. Idemeller, Mrs. Quaas, Mrs. H. Etsel, and three brothers, Sam, Jacob and Andrew, all of 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  (Ludlow Herald)

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MANNING, ORVILLE
Farmers Leader, 21 Nov 1918, p 1 col 4
Orville Manning Dies in France

C. A. Manning received a message Sunday that his son Orville had died in France, 
Oct. 13th of pneumonia.  The news was delayed for several weeks for some reason not 
contained in the message.

Orville left Bowman last June for the cantonment and was trained but a short time before 
leaving for France.  He was but 24 years old and was a general favorite among the young 
people of this section.

It is indeed solemn news to learn of the death of another one of our young men especially 
after the war is over, and we have all been looking forward to the home-coming of the boys.  
A great sympathy goes out to the Manning family from the whole community, for we can all 
appreciate the sacrifice they have made for democracy.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MATTSON, BEN ERIC
Gascoyne Gazette, 23 June 1915, p 1 col 1
Ludlow Resident Suicides With Gun
Placed Muzzle of Shot Gun in Mouth - Blew off Half His Head - Burial At Bowman Wednesday

Ben Eric Mattson, a homesteader near Ludlow, S. D., met death by his own hand 
in front of a neighbor's shack Sunday, June 13th, by placing the muzzle of a shot gun 
to his mouth and pulling the trigger.  Half of his head was blown off.

Mattson came to Harding County in August 1913 and has since resided on a claim, 
which at the time of his death had not been proved up.  Sunday, Miss Della Langen, 
a neighbor saw him walking back and forth along the creek carrying two guns.  
Later he left one of the guns by the fence and came to Miss Langen's house.  
It is stated that she became frightened by his actions and asked him if the gun 
was loaded and he stated that it was.  She asked him if he could hit a fence post 
and he blazed away at the post.

Following this Miss Langen went into the house and made believe that she was 
deeply interested in a book.  Mattson followed her in and spoke to her but 
she thought it best not to let on that she heard him.  He then went to the door, 
and just as he got outside, Miss Langen heard a shot and running to the door 
found Mattson dead upon the ground.  She then ran to the nearest neighbor's 
about three and a half miles away, for assistance.

The body was brought to Bowman and interment was made here Wednesday, 
Undertaker Kvalness conducting the ceremonies.  The deceased was born 
in Sweden in 1878 and on leaving the old country, came direct to Harding County 
to file on a claim.  A brother, Andrew Mattson, resides on a farm twelve miles south 
of Bowman.  The Harding County coroner's verdict was that the unfortunate man 
met death by his own hand.  No reason is assigned for his act.  (Bowman Citizen)

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MCCANN, A. J.
Farmers Leader, 10 Jul 1919, p 5 col 5
A. J. McCann

Mr. A. J. McCann passed away Monday evening at his home near Ludlow.

Mr. McCann was sixty years of age and had lived on a homestead near Ludlow 
for a number of years.  Death came from acute indigestion.

Funeral services were held in the Catholic church Thursday, and interment was 
made at the Bowman cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MCGEE, LAURA BELLE
Farmers Leader, 6 Feb 1919, p 2 col 3
Laura Belle, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McGee passed away at her home 
near Austin on January 27 at 7 p.m.  Death resulting from an attack of influenza.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MCTIGUE, ROSE MARY
Farmers Leader, 1 May 1919, p 5 col 3
Rose Mary McTigue

Rose Mary, the two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. H. McTigue of Marmarth 
died at the J. J. Coleman hoe in Bowman last Thursday of congestion of the lungs.  
Funeral services were held at the Catholic church by Rev. Fr. Bacher.  The bereaved parents 
and relatives have the sympathy of the community.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MILKS, JAMES
Gascoyne Gazette, 20 Dec 1916, p 4 col 3
James Milks died last Wednesday morning after a short illness at the home 
of his son Frank.  The remains were laid at rest in the Haley cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MOOMEY, HELEN
Gascoyne Gazette, 29 Sept 1915, p 1
Little Girl Mortally Bitten by Rattlesnake
Four Year Old Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lem Moomey Dies From Rattlesnake Bite

The Marmarth Mail:
Wednesday afternoon little Helen, the four year old daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lem Moomey, was bitten by a rattlesnake 
while playing with the other children a short distance 
from the Moomey house, and although she was brought to town 
and put in the care of the physician as soon as possible 
the venom had had ample time to permeate the blood 
of the little one and her life slowly ebbed away until yesterday 
morning when she died.

As soon as the little girl screamed her mother went to her aid, 
and help was summoned at once.  Perry Allison, whose ranch 
is only a little over a mile from the Moomey house, was called 
to her assistance, and he loaded the victim and her parents 
into his Cadillac and made a hurried run for town, but as 
the distance is some fifteen miles and the roads are not 
the best, it must have been a matter of three hours or more 
from the time the child was bitten until she was placed 
in the doctor's care, which was ample time for the poison 
to get in its deadly work.

Dr. Bordwell did everything in his power to alleviate her suffering 
and overcome the effects of the poison, but without avail and 
she died the next morning.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MRNAK, RIANHOLD
The Farmers Leader, 5 Jun 1919, p 4 Col 1
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Mrnak are mourning the death of their little son which occured 
after a short illness last Friday morning.  The sympathy of the community is extended 
them in their bereavement.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

*****
Farmers Leader, 5 Jun 1919, p 1 col 4
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our neighbors and friends of country and village for the kindly assistance 
given us during the illness and death of our infant son, Rianhold.

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Mrnak and children

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


MUSIL, JOHN J.
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 5, Col. 3
Taken By Influenza

John J. Musil, a farmer prominent in all progressive movements in Bowman county, 
passed away Thursday morning at his home five miles south of Bowman with influenza.
In choosing John Musil, death has worked an inestimable hardship upon the many 
neighbors and friends who have known him as a man possessing high motives, 
and a deep passion for fairness and human rights.

Mr. Musil's death has taken from the scroll of progress and democracy the name 
of a man who could not do too much for his fellow men.

The wife and children of the departed, and the many friends who have valued his friendship, 
have the sympathy of the entire community in their hour of overwhelming sorrow.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*****
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 1, col 4
A Proclamation

To the bereaved family and many friends of J. J. Musil:

Since death has taken from us a fellow worker, whose absence we shall deeply regret, 
and whose fellowship we shall constantly reverence, it seems only fitting that we manifest 
our sorrow in losing the President of the Farmers Publishing Company, the late John J. Musil.

Mr. Musil's broad and progressive ideas have done much in making the Farmers Leader 
successful, and in bringing it up to a high journalistic standard.  In his death we feel that 
a momentous personal blow has befallen us.

To the bereaved family we wish to extend our personal sympathy, and we pray that the high 
regard in which we held our fellow worker may in a way serve to mitigate their sorrow.

E. J. Nelson, Vice President
E. M. Kerr, Treasurer
C. R. Feist, Secretary
Fred Anderson
Robert B. French, Manager
Harrison B. French, Editor

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

MUSIL, MRS. JOHN
The Farmers Leader, 7 Nov 1918, p 1 col 5
Mrs. John Musil Dies of Influenza

Last Thursday Mrs. John Musil passed away in Bowman of influenza.  Her husband died 
the preceding week, thereby leaving parentless six small children the eldest but fourteen 
and the youngest six months old.

The funeral services were held from the local Catholic Church, Rev. Father Backer officiating.

Several relatives of the family were here, coming for the funeral of Mr. Musil the week before.  
This family has been dealt an unusually severe blow in the loss of both father and mother.  
Their friends and neighbors extend their unreserved sympathy.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

[Note: Here's a link to Bowman County Data. Scroll down that page for a follow-up article re: MUSIL children - csk]


NELSON, BERT NELSON, JOSEPH
The Farmers Leader, 9 Jan 1919, p 4 col 2
Bert Nelson passed away Christmas eve at the home of his parents near Ladner.  
He was 16 years old and his death was caused by pneumonia following influenza.  
The family have the sympathy of all in this section. 

The flu seems to have been especially virulent in the Willett neighborhood and has taken 
a terrible toll and from among the very best people there.  Among the victims are Oren Willett, 
one of the finest young men in Harding County and Miss Fannie Lee, than whom no better 
liked or more respected young lady has ever been a resident of this neighborhood.  
Both of these splendid young people contracted the disease while caring for their stricken 
neighbors and no person could have been taken whose death would have been felt worse 
than that of either of these noble young people.

The death of Postmaster Couser and wife, leaving a lone orphan child; also the death 
of Joseph Nelson were sorry visitations on the community as on the stricken families.  
If human sympathy could reach far enough to cure their sorrows it would surely do so 
in these cases as it is most heartfelt and freely extended, but how vain is sympathy 
to assuage such grief.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

NELSON, C. E.
The Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 5 col 3
C. E. Nelson of Langberg passed away Tuesday night after an illness of several days.  
Death was caused by pneumonia following influenza.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

NELSON, MRS. JULIUS
Farmers Leader, 12 Dec 1918, p 5 col 3
Mrs. Julius Nelson, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Homelvig of Amidon, 
came to Amidon in response to a summons stating that her brother Chris was not expected 
to live.  Contracting influenza, she herself died Saturday night after her brother's funeral.  
She leaves a daughter 7 years of age and a son three.  Hans Homelvig is very low 
with pneumonia at his home near Amidon.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


NESS
The Farmers Leader, 8 Aug 1918. p 5, col 3
Card of Thanks

We desire to express our heartfelt thanks to the people of Lone Tree who showed us 
so much sympathy and kindness in our recent bereavement, both in deed and words, 
and also for the flowers given as a last remembrance, and for the patriotism shown 
in the decoration of our beloved son and brother's grave.

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Ness and Family

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


OAKS/ OAKES, JOHN
The Farmers Leader, 14 Nov 1918, p 5 col 4
The sad news was received here this week that John Oaks, who was in an auto accident 
while returning from Baker, Mont. died of injuries at Marmouth.  Mr. Oaks came here in 1910 
and filed on a homestead west of town, which he proved up when he moved to Ika, 
where he resided until the spring of 1916 when he returned and has lived here since.  
He was preparing to leave for Missouri, having disposed of all his personal property.  
He is survived by his wife and four small children, the eldest being eight years and 
the youngest an infant, the family recently left for Virginia to visit Mrs. Oakes mother 
until Mr. Oakes could prepare their new home in Missouri.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*****
Farmers Leader, 21 Nov 1918, p 5 col 4
Johnny Oakes who was severely hurt some time ago by the capsizing of his auto and who was reported 
to have died at a hospital in Miles City, is not dead but badly injured, and will be laid up a long time we are told.  
Mr. Oakes is a poor man and this accident is going to be a very expensive one for him.  
We wish him a speedy and complete recovery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


ODEN, GLENN
The Farmers Leader, 16 Jan 1919, p 3 col 3
Glenn Oden, living near Buffalo Springs and conducting at the time of his death 
a large ranch, died last Monday from the effects of the influenza.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


OLSON, HANS
The Farmers Leader, 25 Jul 1918. p 5, cols 4
Obituary

Hans Olson, the son of Hans J. Olson and Hannah Olson, was born Dec. 27, 1891, 
in Lake county near Winfred, S. Dak., and died July 22, 1918, at Camp Dodge, Iowa, 
thus reaching the age of 26 years, 6 months and 21 days.  He was baptized at Vermillion, S. Dak., 
Feb. 2, 1892 and June 10, 1906, after having been duly instructed in the doctrines 
of the Christian religion, he was confirmed in the Trinity Lutheran congregation 
of Madison, S. Dak.  He worked around his old home until the fall of 1911, when 
he went to Marmarth, N. D.  Two years later he filed on a homestead near Killdeer, 
where he resided till the country called for men to defend liberty and freedom when 
he enlisted and was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa, where he arrived Feb 21, 1918, 
nd commenced training.  On the 27th of April he was taken sick with pneumonia, 
of which death was the result.  The funeral service will be conducted Friday, July 26th, 
at 11 o'clock, conducted from the Grand River church and remains laid to rest 
in the cemetery near the church.  He leaves one brother, two sisters and the parents 
to mourn the loss of a beloved son and dear brother.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
The Farmers Leader, 1Aug 1918. p 4, col 3
Funeral of Hans Olson

A most impressive funeral service was held on Main street Friday over the remains of Hans Olson, 
whose demise was brought on by a case of pneumonia which he took at Camp Dodge last spring.

The Bowman Band, Home Guard and the Red Cross, together with most of our citizens came out 
and paid their last respects to one whose deeds and service the utmost respect and honor can 
only too meagerly pay.  Rev. Wangberg of the Lutheran church read the obituary was a record 
of a life of noble deeds.  Rev. Benson of the Methodist church delivered a sermon that touched 
upon the life and service of Hans Olson, bringing home to everybody the gratitude we owe for 
the sacrifice he made.

The body was taken to Ring for burial, accompanied by a large number of friends and mourners.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


OLSON, HENRY
The Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 1 cols 1, 2
Private Henry Olson Dies in France

Paul Olson of Langberg Received Notice of the Death of His Son, Saturday, Nov. 30th

Paul Olson received the sad news of the death of his son, Harry, through the captain 
of his company and his regimental chaplain.

Harry Olson was born at Weaver, Minnesota, May 23, 1896 and came to this county with his parents 
nearly ten years ago since which time he was an active assistant to his father on the farm, 
until he joined the colors, going out with one of the contingents early in the year.  He was popular 
among his friends and acquaintances who extend to the stricken family their sympathy in the great loss, 
meantime feeling a pride that he died in the defence of democracy.

His captain's letter follows:

Dear Mr. Olson -  You have doubtless received notice before this of the death of your son 
Henry L. Olson of this company.

Henry was taken sick on Oct. 3, with Spanish influenza, at a small village where we were billeted.  
He was taken to the Regimental Hospital at once and everything possible done for him.  
He continued to get worse, so on Oct. 5 he was taken to the American Section of the French Military Hospital 
at Hericourt, France where he died at 9:15 a.m. October 8, 1918 of labar pneumonia.  He was buried 
on Oct. 10, 1918 at the American Military Cemetery in Hericourt, France with military honors.

Henry had $10,000 war risk insurance and you can get full information about it by writing the War Risk Bureau 
at Washington, D. C.

Henry was a good soldier and we regret that it was his lot to die over here of disease but he has done 
his duty and paid the full price and I extend to you my sympathy in your sorrow.

Sincerely Yours,

Geo. K. McCollough,
Captain Engineers, U. S. A.
Com Co. B. 313 Engineers,
October 15, 1918

Following is the letter received by Mr. Olson from the regimental chaplain:

Somewhere in France,
October 25, 1918

To the Relatives and Friends of Private Henry Olson

Dear People:

As the Chaplain who officiated at the funeral service of him whom you love and mourn, 
it may be of some comfort to you to hear from me.  In every instance, we always try to have 
a chaplain of each man's own faith, Catholic or Protestant, to minister to him.  Everything 
possible was done by the nurses and doctors to help save your boy.  But the disease 
that gripped him was too virulent.  We are all sorry that this had to be, and extend to you 
our sympathy in this hour of sorrow that has come into your life and home.

We had our little funeral services in the hospital chapel where his comrades and friends 
were gathered.  His coffin was decorated with French and American flags.  After the services 
the procession formed.  The lring [firing?] squad marched ahead, the clergy, the hearse, 
the pallbearers and the escort following.  When we went through the streets the French 
and American soldiers stood at at attention and saluted in respect to the dead and those 
who had paid the great price.  After the committal service at the grave, the bugler blew taps 
over the grave.  As the echo of those long, drawn out, sad notes returned to us from the hills 
and as we saw the setting sun in the West, it made us think of the folks at home and 
our own native land.  I am sure that every soldier's heart goes out to you in sympathy.

The cemetery in which your loved one is buried is a French-American Military Cemetery 
of which our Central Records Office keeps an accurate record and photograph.  The number 
of his grave is 65, and his serial number is 2703608.  He died on the 8th of October.  We have 
put up a little cross at his grave with his name, rank, organization, serial number and date 
of his death.  The French women they who have lost fathers, sons, nephews, uncles and 
husbands, show their sympathy to the distant mothers, sisters, wives and daughters of America 
by decorating graves with flowers and keeping them beautiful.  These women of France show 
a most beautiful and wonderful spirit.

My poor words may be of little comfort to you for the absence of one whom you will never again 
see and for the voice that is still.  I do not know your name as I write, but I gather it from letters 
you have written, or from some little pocket testament which he carried in his pocket, given him 
by a mother, or wife, or pastor or loved one.  As I see these treasuries and read your letters, I feel 
as though I know you and that you are my brother, my sister, especially as I stand beside the grave 
of your loved one.  May God be with you and bless you, comfort you in your home, and help you 
to feel that the Sprit, the invisible part of ourselves, the soul which we cannot touch but which 
we know within ourselves as life, cannot die, but lives on.  And may the suffering and sorrow which 
our nation must bear help us to realize the precious value of life and help our nation to be stronger, 
nobler and more virtuous than ever before.  In our prayers out here on the distant fields of France 
we always remember the folks at home, our country and our flag, and we pray that the Kingdom 
of God may increase among us.  May you find help and comfort in Him who alone can be your stay 
and help in trouble.

Very sincerely yours,
John P. Jockinson,
Chaplain

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


PETERSON, LAWRENCE HAROLD
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 13 Dec 1917, p 6 col 3
Lawrence Harold Peterson, the twelve day old son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Peterson, 
was born Nov. 24, 1917, died December 5, at their home on the Dugald Steward ranch 
northwest of Bowman.  Little Lawrence Harold was baptized by Rev. Knudson 
of Mineral Springs when only a few days old.  He came to gladden the home and 
in the few days that he was allowed to remain in the embrace of the loved ones 
he entered into the heart affections, and when death called him their hearts were filled 
with sorrow, but with the great hope of being reunited again in the glorious Resurrection 
morning.  Services were held from the Methodist church in Bowman, Saturday afternoon 
at 2:30, by the pastor.  Interment was made in the Bowman cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

PFEIFER, ANNA K.
The Farmers Leader, 11 Jul 1918. p 5, col 4
Mrs. Pfeifer Dead

The sad news was received in Bowman Wednesday of the death of Mrs. Anna K. Pfeifer 
at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. J. Boyk, of Spokane, Wash.

Mrs. Pfeifer has been suffering for several years with diabetes.  She went west last fall, 
thinking she might be revived by climatic change, but to no avail.

The body will arrive on Bowman about Friday and will be interned beside that of her husband, 
Mr. N. G. Pfeifer, in the Bowman cemetery.  Funeral services will be held from the Methodist church.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

PLADSON, CLARENCE WILLARD
The Farmers Leader, 30 Oct 1919, p 1 col 5
Clarence Willard Pladson, six months old son of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Pladsen of eight miles south 
of Buffalo Springs, died Friday morning Oct. 24 after a short illness.  He was buried Monday, interment being made 
at Union Prairie Cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

PREICHEL, (INFANT)
The Farmers Leader, 10 Jul 1919, p 1 col 2
Baby Devoured By Brood Sow

A shocking tragedy occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Preichel homesteaders 
living near Lemmon, when their three months old infant was torn to pieces by a sow.

The parents were working in the field, leaving the child asleep in the temporary sod 
shack which they had made their home.

The sow burrowed her way thru the sod wall and snatched the baby.  The children were 
aroused by the child's screams, but before they could force the sow away, the infant had 
been terribly mangled.  Aid was promptly administered, but the baby only lived thru the night.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

REEVEY, WM.
The Farmers Leader, 14 Nov 1918, p 2 col 3
Wm. Reevey Succumbs to Influenza

Wm. Reevey, well known local man, died of pneumonia Sunday night at Reeder.  
Mr. Reevey was ill with influenza but a few days after which he took pneumonia.

Mr. Reevy was a carpenter employed by the Western Lumber and Grain Co., 
and had worked in and about Bowman since the town was begun.

The remains were shipped to Pingree, North Dakota, where interment will take place.

He will be greatly missed by the many friends he has made.  His passing on is 
a keen deprivation to the entire community.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

REZIN, EDNA MATILDA
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 5, Cols 2, 3
Obituary

Edna Matilda Rezin, eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rezin, was born at Rudolph, Wisconsin, 
March 30, 1890.  At the age of ten years she moved with her parents to Warre.  In the fall of 1905 
she entered the Tomah high school at Tomah, Wis., from which she was graduated with the class 
of 1909.  Two years later she was graduated from the state normal at Stevens Point and since 
has taught successfully in the graded schools of Wisconsin and North Dakota.

On Sept. 9th of this year she began her school work in Gascoyne, N. D.  The prevailing epidemic 
of Spanish influenza found her and Sunday night it turned into plural pneumonia, from which 
she died Monday evening, Oct. 14.

Her body was taken to Grand Rapids, Wis, and laid at rest beside her twin sister in the family lot 
in Forest Hill cemetery.

She was a member of the order of Eastern Star in Grand Rapids.  She was a young woman 
of strong Christian character, great ability and loved by all who knew her.  Hers was a deep 
quiet nature, moving steadily forward to high ideals of life and character, loving her home and 
deeply interested in the welfare of each member of her family.  Her absence is keenly felt by all.

Left to mourn her loss are a father and mother, two sisters, four brothers, other relatives and 
a host of friends.  Services will be held later in St. John's Episcopal church in Grand Rapids.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

RILEY, MRS. WILLIAM P.
The Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 5 col 4
J. P. Holzemer was up from Amidon Tuesday evening to make arrangements 
for the funeral of Mrs. W. P. Riley, who died at her home six miles southeast 
of that place Monday night.

The funeral services attending the death of Mrs. William P. Riley of Amidon will be 
held from the Catholic church in this city today.  Mrs. Riley died Monday night 
and leaves two small children, one two and the other three years of age.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

RILEY, PETER
The Farmers Leader, 22 May 1919, p 5 col 3
Peter Riley of Ludlow, well known rancher, who has lived in the Cave Hills for over thirty years, 
died at Spearfish, S. Dak. of heart failure.  He leaves to mourn his death a wife and son William of Ludlow.

Interment will be made at Spearfish, South Dakota.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

RISK, RAY
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 21 Feb 1918. p 8 col 4

Death of Ray Risk

Ray Risk was born at Homer, Iowa, August 28, 1888, and died at Omaha, Neb., Feb 11, 1918.  
After an illness of six days Ray Risk succumbed to an attack of pneumonia at the home 
of his brother in Omaha.

His father, John W. Risk, of Amor, was notified and was in attendance at the funeral.  During 
the past two years Ray Risk has made Bowman county his home and has made many friends 
here who profoundly regret his untimely death, and the sympathy of all reaches out to his father, 
his sister, Mrs. McBirney, of Boone, Iowa, Earl, of Omaha, and Guy, who is also a resident of Iowa.

He was a young man in the prime of life, strong, and vigorous, and his sudden taking away 
has been a severe shock to all who knew him.  At the time he was taken ill, Ray Risk was 
employed in a wholesale hardware house in Omaha, where he had been engaged since leaving 
Bowman last fall.  Interment was made Thursday, Feb. 11, at Homer, Iowa, beside the last resting 
place of his mother and brother.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

RODAKS, MRS. STANLEY
Gascoyne Gazette, 9 Aug 1916, p 4 col 2
The funeral of Mrs. Stanley Rodaks was held in Haley Sunday afternoon at three o'clock.  
Mrs. Rodak's death came as a shock to the neighborhood as she was in fair health, 
but on Friday about noon, members of the family came in and found her lying on the floor dead.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
***** Gascoyne Gazette, 9 Aug 1916, p 5 col 3
Sad Death

The many friends of the Stanley Rodaks family are grieved to learn of the sudden death 
of Mrs. Rodaks, which occurred last Friday, the cause of which we did not learn.

It seems that Mr. Rodaks was out in the hay field at work and Mrs. Rodaks was alone 
in the house and that one of the girls who was out in the garden, went into the house 
and found her mother on the floor, dead.  Mrs. Rodaks leaves to mourn her death, 
her husband and five children.  The funeral was held in Haley last Sunday afternoon 
at three o'clock.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


ROEN, GEORGE
The Farmers Leader, 7 Aug 1919, p 7, col 6
Langberg Farmer Succumbs at Aberdeen

George Roen, a well known farmer who for the past several years has made his home 
in the Langberg country died after a very short illness at Aberdeen, S. D. last Saturday.  
He was ill but about three hours before death came, but his health had been poorly 
for several months.  Mr. Roen had gone to Aberdeen with an emigrant car for Isaac Johnson, 
and was remaining there for a few days when he was stricken with the illness.

Mr. Roen had no near relatives in this section so interment was made at Aberdeen.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


ROSS, GEORGE FRANCIS
The Farmers Leader, 23 May 1918. p 6, col 5
Death of a Soldier

George Francis Ross of Desart, who was one of the men of Slope county's contingent 
that left Bowman for Camp Dodge on Easter Sunday, died at Cap Dodge last Monday morning.  
His father went there three weeks ago, when the son was reported seriously ill.  The cause 
of his death was pneumonia.  The remains were sent here and taken overland to the old home 
near Desart, from where they will be taken to New England for interment Saturday.  
The Reeder Home Guards escorted the funeral cortege through the village.  A number 
of friends and neighbors from Desart were down with their cars.  The parents of the deceased 
young soldier have the heartfelt sympathy of this entire section of the state.  
(Reeder Western Call)

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


SATHER, AGNET MADELIN
Farmers Leader, 17 Apr 1919, p 10 col 3
Agnet Madelin Sather

Agnet Madelin Sather died at the home of her parents near Griffin, Sunday, 
after a brief illness of measles with complications.  She was but ten years old, and 
had up until her demise been healthy.

Funeral services and interment were at Griffin, Rev. Wangberg of the Lutheran church 
officiating.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


SHUCKS, HARVEY
Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 5 col 1
Harvey Shucks of near Griffin died Monday night of pneumonia, and leaves a wife 
and four children.  The family were former residents of this place.  Funeral services 
will be held today, Thursday.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


SHUMATE, MRS. MARY E.
Farmers Leader, 3 Apr 1919, p 4, col 7
Mrs. Mary E. Shumate

Mrs. Mary E. Shumate died at her home near Bowman Sunday night of Spanish Influenza.
A husband and a son and daughter survive to mourn the loss of a beloved wife and mother.
The Shumate family came to this county thirteen years ago, and have many friends in this district.
Funeral services were held from the Kvalness Undertaking parlors by Rev. J. O. Wangberg.  
Interment was made at the Bowman cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


SINCLAIR/ ST.CLAIR, LLOYD
Farmers Leader, 13 Mar 1919, p 8 cols 1, 2
The entire community was saddened this week by news of the death of Lloyd St. Clair [sic, should be Sinclair] 
in Kansas City.  Death was caused by an attack of measles.  Lloyd was a young man of sterling worth, popular, 
and highly respected by everyone.  His sorrowing parents have the sympathy of all who know them.

God gave my son in trust to me,
Christ died for him, that he
might be a man for Christ.

My true son can never die:
'Tis but his body that will die
In our fair land, while I will keep
Remembrance fond and true, 
Deep within my soul for my 
[the microfilm copy has cut at least one line here- an]
Because of triumphs that he won.
And when his vacant place I see
My heart will bound with joy
To know that he was mine so long,
My fair young son
And I'll cheer for him whose work is done. - Dr. James Hughes

[Editorial note - these lines are excerpted from a then well-known poem "My Son", by James D. Hughes, 
regarding World War 1.  The full text may be found in "The Best Loved Poems of the American People," 
selected by Hazel Felleman, Doubleday, 1936]

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*****

Farmers Leader, 13 Mar 1919, p 10 overflow col 2
Lloyd Sinclair

Lloyd Sinclair died at Kansas City last Saturday of measles followed by pneumonia.  
He was attending the Kansas City Auto school when death came.  The remains were 
brought to Bowman for burial and were interred from the Kvalness Undertaking Parlors.  
Deceased was about 21 years old and was well known in this community, having lived 
with his people near Langberg for a number of years past.  The bereaved family are 
extended the sympathy of this section.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


SMIDSANG, OLE
Farmers Leader, 26 Dec 1918, p 1 col 6
Ole Smidsang died at the Rhame hospital Thursday, December 19 
from hemorrhage caused by influenza.

Deceased was a man of public spirit, greatly respected by those who chanced 
to know him.  He was born in Favang, Norway 33 years ago, coming to Wisconsin 
about 14 years ago where he resided until settling on a homestead three miles 
north of Rhame.  About four years ago he was united in marriage to Christine Advesen, 
and of this union two children, both girls survive.  One is three years of age 
and the other but 22 months.

The remains were laid to rest in the Griffin cemetary [sic], ministers from Rhame 
and here conducting the services.  This part of the state has lost a valuable citizen 
in the death of Ole Smidsang and our sympathies go out to the widow and her babes.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


SODERSTROM, CONRAD LOUIS
Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 1 col 6
Obituary Notices

Conrad Louis Soderstrom passed away at the home of his brother G. W. Soderstrom in Griffin, 
North Dakota, November 30, 1918, at 8:15 a.m. at the age of 30 years 9 months and 8 days.  
He was born near Cambridge, Min. where he lived until the spring of 1906 when he moved 
to Bowman County, North Dakota with his parents and brothers and sisters.  He lived on his farm 
one mile west of Griffin until three years ago when he was married to Miss Bell Baker and 
moved on her claim near Concord, North Dakota about 35 miles southwest of Griffin where 
he lived until taken ill with Pleurisy when he came up to the R. R. where he could get care 
and treatment.  But Influenza and Pneumonia set in and he was too weak to stand the com-
plications and passed away after a few days illness.

Left to mourn his loss are his wife, his father and mother at Albany, Oregon, brothers, Godfrey 
in the mercantile business, Bert and Leonard in the farming business, all at Griffin, and Clarence 
and Earnest with the Unites States army in France, Albin at Camp Lewis, Wash., and Lawrence 
at the Military Training School Corvallis, Oregon, and two sisters living with their parents at Albany, 
Oregon.

Funeral services will be held in Griffin at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8th, Rev. Wangberg will conduct 
the services and the body will be laid at rest in the Griffin cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


STILES, LAURA
Gascoyne Gazette, 13 Oct 1915, p 1
Death of Laura Stiles 
Suddenly Passes Away at Minneapolis, Minnesota 
The Boyes (Mont.) Blaze: 
Thursday evening of last week just as our week's issue was off the press 
Senator Oliver of Ekalaka arrived in Boyes, with a message for Charles W. Stiles, 
stating that his daughter, Miss Laura Stiles, had suddenly passed away at 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Some weeks ago while riding a horse at Ekalaka, the horse pitched with her and 
she received internal injuries, from which it seems she never entirely recovered. 
A short time ago she went to Minneapolis to visit friends, and while there she rode 
a horse that she had some trouble with, and that caused a renewal of her former 
injuries, and from which she suddenly passed away. 
Senator Oliver was accompanied from this place to the Stiles ranch by Haz Bailey, 
who happened to be in Boyes that evening. They did not arrive at the Stiles ranch 
until 1 a.m. On account of the bad condition of the trails south of the East Fork, and 
the hills being so bad going towards the south it was necessary for John Taffner, 
with one of Mr. Bailey's teams, to accompany them from East fork to the Stiles ranch. 
On arrival at their home Mr. Oliver immediately informed Mr. and Mrs. Stiles 
of the death of their daughter, which of course was a great shock to them. 
After hurried preparations Mr. and Mrs. Stiles accompanied Mr. Oliver to Ekalaka, 
where the body of Miss Laura was met, it having been shipped over the Milwaukee 
railroad from Minneapolis to Baker, and taken from Baker to Ekalaka. 
On Saturday the trip was made from Ekalaka to Boyes with several autos and 
accompanied by sympathising friends. It took a steady run of seven hours to make 
the trip from Ekalaka to Boyes with autos. 
On Sunday at 2 p.m. the funeral took place from Boyes Hall, conducted by 
Senator John Oliver, of Ekalaka, and M. S. Jameson of Boyes. The choir from Ekalaka 
assisted by several Boyes singers, furnished the music. Friends of the family were present 
from both the Big and Little Powder countries, Ekalaka, Ridge and Pinicle [sic]. 
Also Mrs. Carr of Minneapolis, who accompanied the body from Minneapolis to Boyes. 
Interment was made in the Boyes cemetery. At the service at the hall Mrs. Anna A. Champney 
sang the beautiful solo, "Some Time We'll Understand." 
Laura Ethel Stiles was born July 29, 1888, in Breule county, S. Dak. Died in Minneapolis, 
Minn., Sept. 15, 1915. Age 27 years, 1 month and 16 days. Several years ago Miss Laura 
came with her parents to Montana and with them located on Horse Creek, 15 miles southwest 
of Boyes, where she took a homestead. During the past year, she has been Assistant Postmaster 
at Ekalaka. In that work she proved herself to be capable and efficient. She resigned 
her position to become the bride of F. M. Dwarshak, of Ekalaka, which was to occur Sept. 20th. 
She leaves her father and mother, one sister and three brothers, to mourn her loss besides 
many good friends. In her death the community loses one of its brightest and best young ladie's [sic] 
and a leader in society, and in her home and around the fireside there will be a vacant place 
that can never be filled. Miss Laura united with the Baptist Church in 1908, and was 
an earnest and sincere believer in the Bible and Christianity. 
The pall bearers were J. D. Beach, Scott Bruce, R. S. Burgey, C. L. Bruce, V. A. Sheley 
and C. Mathwig. There were a number of beautiful floral offerings. 
The Blaze extends its sympathy to the bereaved family in this hour of sadness and affliction.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


SYHRE, MRS. A.N.

The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 15 Nov 1917, p 4, col 3
Mrs. A. N. Syhre, of south of Scranton, died on Thursday night of last week of heart failure.  
Mrs. Syhre went to bed in the evening perfectly well apparently, and in the morning when 
Mr. Syhre called her and she did not answer, he tried to arouse her and was shocked beyond 
reason to find that she was dead.  Coroner Kvalness of Bowman was called out immediately, 
and upon investigation pronounced it a case of heart failure and deemed no inquest necessary.  
The funeral was held on Monday of this week.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
******
The Farmers Leader and Gascoyne Gazette, 15 Nov 1917, p 10, col 5
Northwest Haley

This community was saddened by the sudden death of Mrs. A. N. Syhre Thursday, Nov. 8th.  
She was found Thursday morning by the family peacefully sleeping the long sleep of death.  
The funeral was held at the Lutheran church 10 miles from the home Sunday, Nov. 11th, 
and interment in that cemetery.  A husband, four sons and four daughters, a sister and 
two brothers are left to mourn her sudden departure.

She has gone, a wife and mother,
To that heavenly home above.
She has gone to dwell with angels,
And to meet with those she loved.
While our hearts are sad and lonely,
Dear ones over there rejoice,
As they greet the angel spirit,
And she hears her Savior's voice.
He has called her home to heaven
And our loss is but her gain,
Dwelling in that Golden City,
Where our Savior reigns supreme.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

TAYLER/ TAYLOR, DANIEL GUY
The Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 1 col 6
Daniel Guy Tayler {sic?} died at his home on Adeline township Dec. 1 of pneumonia 
following influenza after a short illness, aged thirty-one years and nine months.  
He was born in Austin, Minn., and came to this county about eight years ago, since 
which time he has lived on his farm about 15 miles west of this place.  He was 
a member of the Modern Woodmen lodge and a communicant of the presbyterian church.

Besides the parents Mr. and Mrs. James Tayler of Austin, Minn., there remains 
four brothers and two sisters to mourn his untimely departure from this life: William H. Taylor 
of Austin, Miss Anna E. Taylor of Chicago, James H. Taylor of Austin, Clarence O. Taylor 
of Tyler, Mont., Mrs. Emma C. Coutts of Bowman and Geo. A. Taylor, now in service 
with the U. S. marines in France.

The remains were shipped to Austin, Minn., his former home for burial.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

THUNEM, JESSIE THRESSA
The Farmers Leader, 29 Aug 1918. p 5, col 3
Died

Last Saturday, while in the Camp Crook hospital, Miss Jessie Thressa Thunem 
answered the Divine Message.

She was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Thunem so her "going on" is unusually 
hard for the parents and six brothers.  She was only 23 last October but her brief life 
had been rich in loving service.  She had been a faithful worker in the Lutheran church 
here of which she was a member.

The services were held in the Lutheran church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. Arneson 
of Cox delivering a very fine message.  Special music was rendered.  The floral offerings 
of friends were beautiful, attesting their love for Jessie.

I cannot say, and will not say that she is dead - she is just away.  With a cheery smile - 
and a wave, she has wandered into an unknown land, and left us dreaming how very fair 
it needs must be, since she lingers there.
-- Contributed

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
[note - the citation is from a poem by James Whitcomb Riley - an]

THUNEM, PETER B.
Farmers Leader, 16 Jan 1919, p 1 col 5
Peter B. Thunem

The subject of this sketch was born in Norway 51 years ago, coming to this country when 
eight years of age and settling with his parents at Benson, Minn., where he resided until 
eight years ago when he moved to Bowman county.  For some time past he has been 
superintendent of sales of the Fondulac Tractor Company for South Dakota and held that 
position at the time of his death, Wednesday, January 15, at six o'clock a.m. in Bowman.

In 1893 he was joined in marriage to Emma Larson at Benson, Minn., and of that union 
six sons survive: Bert aged 22 years; Ray 19; Ernest, 17; Clifford, 15; Carroll, 13; Kenneth, 3; 
all living in Bowman.  The wife and these sons of the immediate family survive to know 
the desolation of the loss of a considerate husband and father.

The funeral will take place from the Lutheran church in this place tomorrow (Friday) 
Rev. Wangberg conducting the services.  The community extends sympathy to the family 
in their great loss.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

TILL, ADAM
Gascoyne Gazette, 12 May 1915, p 2 col 3
Adam Till of Brattsberg committed suicide last Sunday by shooting 
himself through the brain with a rifle.  He was employed on 
Louis Mattson's sheep ranch.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


TRAILL, HUGH M.
Farmers Leader, 10 Apr 1919, p 5 col 4
Hugh M. Traill

Hugh M. Traill, a young man of Grand Haven, Mich., who has been in Bowman 
about two months, died at the Rudolph hotel Monday noon of influenza followed by pneumonia.  
Mrs. Traill, his mother was notified of his illness and was with him when he passed away.  
She accompanied the remains to their Michigan home Tuesday.

Mr. Traill was 32 years old, and while not generally well known here, was well thought of 
by all those who had enjoyed his acquaintance.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


TRHLICK, MRS. JOSEPH
Farmers Leader, 30 Jan 1919, p 5 col 6
The sad news of the death of Mrs. Joe Trhlick [sic?] at Aberdeen on Saturday reached here Sunday.  
She was seriously sick for several weeks, but death released her from her sufferings.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).


ULEBERG, MRS. AUSPER
Gascoyne Gazette, 4 Oct 1916, p 5, col 4
Passes Away

Mrs. Ausper Uleberg who has been a resident of Haley township for the past six years 
and has made her home with her daughter Miss Anna Uleberg, passed away Friday morning, 
Sept 29, aged 86 years and 13 days.  She was born in Hardnas, Norway and came 
to America in July 1888.

Se has been confined to her bed for the past four years, but bore her suffering with Christian 
fortitude.  Six sons, Thomas and Jens of Haley township, Nels and Ole now living in Norway, 
Osmond and John of Madelia, Minn., and two daughters, Mrs. Andrew Rudberg of Mankato, Minn., 
and Miss Anna survive her.

Funeral services were held at the house by Rev. Lovseth.  The remains were taken 
to Madelia to be buried by the side of those of her husband.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

VANDEPAS, JOHN
The Farmers Leader, 5 Dec 1918, p 1 col 6
Obituary Notices

Sunday morning, Dec. 1 at his home near Bowman, John Vandepas, after an illness 
dating back several months passed away, death being caused by cancer of the stomach.

Born in Holland in 1859, he came to this country together with his wife in 1908; Mrs. Vandepas 
dying a little over two years ago.

Two sons and two daughters are left to mourn the loss of the father, Neil J. Vandepas of this place, 
Theodore now with the colors at Camp Dodge, Mrs. T. Holm of Bessie and Mrs. Joseph Mrnak 
of this place.

Funeral services were held from St. Charles church Tuesday, Rev. Fr. Bacher conducting and 
interment taking place in the catholic cemetery at this place.

Our community has lost a real friend and there(?) citizen, one who was always ready to cooperate 
in any movement calculated for the common good and the Leader joins with friends and neighbors 
in extending sympathy to the bereaved families.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

WASALASESKY/ WASAELESKY/ WASALESKY, JOSEPH
The Farmers Leader, 4 Dec 1919, p 1 col 2
Joseph Wasalasesky Passes Away

After suffering several months from cancer Joseph Wasaelesky, 
a farmer of Amor township, passed away Saturday in Bowman.

Mr. Wasalesky was a native of German Poland, coming to America about 
seventeen years ago, first making his home in South Dakota and then removing 
to Bowman County where he filed upon a homestead.  He has lived here since 1908.

Deceased had applied for citizenship to the United States and was to receive his last papers 
at the postponed term of court last month.  He is survived by a wife and six children.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

WILLETT, OREN
The Farmers Leader, 9 Jan 1919, p 4 col 2
Bert Nelson passed away Christmas eve at the home of his parents near Ladner.  
He was 16 years old and his death was caused by pneumonia following influenza.  
The family have the sympathy of all in this section. 

The flu seems to have been especially virulent in the Willett neighborhood and has taken 
a terrible toll and from among the very best people there.  Among the victims are Oren Willett, 
one of the finest young men in Harding County and Miss Fannie Lee, than whom no better 
liked or more respected young lady has ever been a resident of this neighborhood.  
Both of these splendid young people contracted the disease while caring for their stricken 
neighbors and no person could have been taken whose death would have been felt worse 
than that of either of these noble young people.

The death of Postmaster Couser and wife, leaving a lone orphan child; also the death 
of Joseph Nelson were sorry visitations on the community as on the stricken families.  
If human sympathy could reach far enough to cure their sorrows it would surely do so 
in these cases as it is most heartfelt and freely extended, but how vain is sympathy 
to assuage such grief.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

WILLIAMS, MYRA
The Farmers Leader, 26 Sep 1918. p 5, col 2
Death Calls Myra Williams

Myra, the seven year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Williams of Gem township, 
passed away at Rewey, Wis., Thursday, Sept. 19, with infantile paralysis.

She was sick but two or three days and the chances were fair that she would have 
recovered, had it not been that her constitution was weakened by the measles, 
from which disease she had just recovered, when stricken with infantile paralysis.

Death entered the family while they were spending a few weeks at their former home 
at Rewey, and because of the contagious nature of the disease it was imperative 
that interment be there.

Myra was the only child in the family, and her going has left a deep mark of sorrow 
upon the bereaved parents.  But the courage and faith with which she faced 
the ultimate hour must surely live on and be an ever present blessing to the discon-
solate father and mother who have given their greatest earthly treasure, and found 
that she met the last test unflinchingly.

The parents, we need not say, have the sympathy and consolation of everyone, 
who can appreciate the overwhelming misfortune that has befallen them, and we all 
pray that their sorrow may be mitigated with the knowledge that their little girl passed 
over the great river in safety.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

WILLIS, IRENE & MAUD
Gascoyne Gazette, 4 Aug 1915, p 1
Two Young Girls Drown, Two Others Have Narrow Escape
Irene and Maud Willis Victims in Terrible Tragedy Last Saturday Afternoon

Rhame Review, July 29 - On Saturday last, Mound was visited by the greatest tragedy 
in its history.  About 5 p.m. word went around the neighborhood that Irene and Maudie Willis 
had been drowned and that Alta Willis and Margaret Pearl had narrowly escaped the same fate.  
The sad facts were soon learned:  The girls had gone to the Allie Eastman place a half mile 
from home to go in bathing in a pool formed by this season's rains.  Soon after reaching 
the spot a heavy shower came up and they took shelter in the little shack.  The day and water 
were warm and as soon as the shower passed the girls went for the bath and were playing 
in the water when Maudie proposed to run through the pool, not realizing how the big shower 
had raised the water and not knowing how the land had been washed by recent rains.  
She ran into a hole where the water was far above her head.  She called for help.  
The others tried to rescue her, Margaret Pearl being the first to plunge in.  She and Alta 
both went down but managed to grasp the grass and escape, but Irene went down 
with her little sister.  With great presence of mind Alta jumped on her pony and rode 
for her father, A. E. Willis, while little Margaret bravely stayed alone to watch the spot and 
direct Mr. Willis when he came as quickly as the pony could bring him.  Mr. Willis went 
into the water which he found to be fully seven feet deep, and soon brought the bodies 
to land where he worked to restore them.  The family was speedily notified and hurried 
to the place and all tried all possible ways to bring life back to the loved ones, but it was too late, 
they were beyond recall.  They were taken home and undertaker Gibbs called, 
who embalmed them, and awaited the coming of their sister Ruth, and brothers 
Frank and Lyall who were in the west, before they were laid away in the new cemetery.

The father, Mr. W. H. Willis, was away when the accident occurred, and was called home 
by telephone from Mobridge, S. D.  Many friends from far and near are calling at the home 
to express the sincere sympathy all feel for the stricken house hold.  Miss Ruth Willis came home 
Tuesday afternoon from Grand Junction, Colo., and the brothers reached home Wednesday morning.  
They were in San Francisco when the sad news reached them.

The funeral was held at the Mound Presbyterian church July 31st and the attendance 
was the largest that has been seen here.  The church would not hold one-fourth 
of the people who attended.  The services were conducted by Revs. Tjornhom and Hood, 
and the bodies laid to rest in the new cemetery near the church.  The floral tributes 
were many and exceptionally fine and the whole community joined in extending sympathy 
to the bereaved relatives of the two little girls.

Irene was thirteen years of age and Maudie ten.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

WOODEN, FRANCIS ASBURY
Gascoyne Gazette, 4 May 1917, p 5 col 3
At Rest

Last Sunday it became the sad duty of many friends to lay to rest the earthly temple of the good and 
faithful soul, whom we have long known as a beloved neighbor and upright citizen, Grandpa Wooden.  
Whose exemplary life and faith in his Master's promises have ever been a helpful inspiration to all 
who were so fortunate as to know him.

A few days before he left us he remarked, in his quiet, measured way, "I don't believe I will be here 
much longer.  But I'm not going to worry about it.  I'm going to wait till I'm called."  This, coupled 
with the fact that he was given the name of the Methodist bishop, Asbury, proves that his parents 
did not live in vain.

Francis Asbury Wooden was born November 10, 1834, in Baltimore County, Maryland.  He was married 
to Harriet A. Sellack, July 22, 1866, at Troy Michigan.  Six children were born to them of which four are 
still living: Daniel B. Wooden, Winnifred R. Redman, Sauk Rapids, Minn.; Odda W. Perkins, Gascoyne, N. D.; 
Pearl H. McPharlin, Bowman, N. D.  Also, seven grandchildren and one great grandchild.  One brother, 
Alec Wooden, is living at Woodensburg Maryland.

Mr. Wooden died on April 26, at 6:25 p.m. at the age of 82 years 5 months and 15 days.  Services were 
held at the Gascoyne church by Rev. Dalton of the Bowman Congregational church.  The choir sang favorite 
songs of the deceased: "Jesus, Lover of My Soul", "Beula [sic] Land" and "That City Foursquare."  
The pall bearers were John Hipple, Victor Johnson, Lewis Johnson, Bert Peirson, Gilbert Davidson and 
Clark Perkins.  The interment was in the Gascoyne cemetery southeast of town.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

WREN, JOHN
The Farmers Leader, 14 Nov 1918, p 1 col 6
Buffalo Springs Man Dies of "Flu"

John Wren, a farmer living near Buffalo 
Springs died this (Thursday) morning of influenza.  He leaves besides a wife and child, 
a father and mother, all residing at Buffalo Springs.

Mr. Wren's father and mother had just returned from Jamestown where they attended 
the funeral of their daughter, Mrs. John Caven, formerly of this vicinity.  The family is 
extended the unreserved sympathy of this section.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

WRIGHT, JOHN
The Farmers Leader, 3 Apr 1919, p 4, col 6
John Wright

Death came to John Wright, a farmer residing near Bowman last week while 
at the hospital in Miles City receiving treatment.  Death was caused by Uremia.

Funeral services were held from the Methodist church in Bowman Monday.  
Interment was made in the Bowman cemetery.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

YANSKI, LLOYD
The Farmers Leader, 10 Oct 1918. p 5, col 5
Death Take Lloyed [sic] Yanski

Llyod [sic], the two years and four months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Yanski died Tuesday 
afternoon at 2:30 with Summer Complaint.  He had been ill for about three weeks, and had become 
so weakened from the length of his illness that he was unable to recover.

Funeral services will be held at the home three miles south of Bowman, at 2 o'clock this afternoon.

The bereaved family have the sympathy of their friends and neighbors who can appreciate the loss 
they have suffered.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

YANSKI, LOIS MARCELLA
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 5, Col. 4
Obituary

Lois Marcella Yanski was born June 5th 1916 and passed away Oct. 16th, 1918, at the age of 2 years 
and four months, after an illness of four weeks.  It was thought for a time that the little one was 
on the road to recovery but when hope was at its best there came a change for worse and Lois was called 
by the angel of death to join her little twin brother in heaven who passed away just a week before.  
These little twins were both bright little children and by their loss a dark shadow is cast upon the home 
they have left.

We know not how or whither
Their spirit found its way
We only know they liveth
In God's eternal day.

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).
*****
The Farmers Leader, 24 Oct 1918. p 5, Col 2
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank all those who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our darling children.

Mr. and Mrs. Emil Yanski and family

Submitted by Alan Nicholson (Oct 2011).

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