ELIZABETH BARTMAN


Elizabeth was born at Madison and lived in and around Kearney for 46 years. Her last residence was at 1116 Fifth Ave. She was 64 when she died.

Mrs. Bartman worked as a cook at the Midway hotel.

She is survived by her husband, John Bartman Sr., three daughters, three sons; four brothers, five sisters and 19 grandchildren.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com

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LOUIE ALICE BRANCH

Mrs. Louie Alice Branch, 81, 1422 Central, died, after being seriously ill approximately one month.

Mrs. Branch had been a resident of Kearney for approximately 20 years, coming to Kearney from Minden with her husband, Robert. She is survived by her two daughters, Mrs. Nellie Lynn, Norman, and Mrs. Adda Wells, Heartwell; one son, W. D. Branch of Kearney; 14 grandchildren and 15 greatgrandchildren.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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CATHERINE GUTHRIDGE WAPLES CASWELL

Old Settler Answers Call
Mrs. Catherine Caswell Passes Away Tuesday Evening

Mrs. Elizabeth Caswell, wife of Warren Caswell, passed away at the family residence on C Avenue between Twenty-second and Twenty-third Streets late Tuesday evening. Mrs. Caswell's death was due to old age, she being over ninety years. She is survived by a son, Matt Waples, who is the only member of the immediate family, except her husband who is also of advanced age.

Mrs. Caswell came to this city in 1886 and has been a continuous resident since that time. Funeral arrangements have not as yet been made, owing to relatives who have not been heard from.

Kearney Hub, November 26, 1913 Submitted by Cindi Fernandez, cindi.fernandez@asu.edu


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MARIE DEVALL
Maria Devall, 73, Dies

Maria was 73 when she died in a Kearney convalescent home. She had been ill for the past 5 years.

She was born in Shelton, and had been a Kearney resident for the past 38 years. Maria is survived by her five daughters, one brother, 33 grandchildren and 21 great grandchildren. A son, Leroy and her husband Ira proceeded her in death.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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ALBERT DOBBERSTEIN

Albert was born on Oct. 17, 1897 to Mr. and Mrs. Peter Paul Dobberstein near Huntley, Neb. He died on Aug. 26, 1955 at the age of 57 in Kearney.

He married Nora Hodge in Phillips County, Kans. on Sept. 18, 1918.

Mr. Dobberstein is survived by his widow, Nora, eight children; and 12 grandchildren; his mother; sisters and brothers. A son preceded him in death.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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GLEN R. DOBBERSTEIN

Mr. Dobberstein was born in Harlen County., Neb. on Nov. 20, 1920 to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Dobberstein and died Oct. 23, 1953 in Kearney.

He was in the military during WWII.

He married Victoria Shada of Kearney on Aug. 30, 1953.

Surviving are his wife; his parents; six brothers and two sisters and many other relatives who mourn his death.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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MARY L. FINES

Mrs. Mary Fines Dies Following Brief Illness
Came to This Section of the State in 1865.
Funeral Was Held Here Yesterday.

Following a brief illness with pneumonia, Mrs. Mary L. Fines died at her home here Monday at 2:15. Her death removes from the community another of its pioneer women who came here in the Civil War days when bands of savage Indians inhabited the prairies and When but a few white people were to be found in this section of Nebraska. Despite her advanced age, Mrs. Fines has enjoyed unusually good health and attended to her household duties until taken ill with influenza a few days before her demise occurred. Her son, James McKee, has been making his home with her and two other sons, Thomas Ellis and D. D. McKee, were present when the end came.

Mary Loomis was born in Indiana June 2, 1838, being a daughter of Oliver and Sabrina (Hall) Loomis. When she was a little girl her parents removed to Ohio where they lived for three years, after which they went to Iowa and took up a claim. Seven years later the parents sold that place and moved to Worthington, Iowa. The mother's death occurred at Manchester, Iowa, but the father passed away in Nebraska. Mrs. Fines is the last of a family of seven children. She was indebted to the public schools for her education and remained at home until she was married to Edward Ellis, by whom she has two children, Robert and Thomas, both born in Dubuque County, Iowa. Edward Ellis died shortly after the birth of Thomas. Robert resides at Liberty-ville, Illinois, and is one of the well-to-do and highly respected citizens of that place. Thomas Ellis is a prominent and prosperous farmer of this community and is well known to the majority of people here. For her second husband, she married Stephen McKee, who enlisted in 1861 inthe Union Army for service in the Civil War. He remained at the front until the close of hostilities making a creditable record as a soldier and in 1865, after peace was restored, he and his wife removed to Buffalo County, Nebraska, where his demise occurred in 1877. By that union there were six children born, but only two, James and David D. are now living. After the death of her second husband, she was married to William F. Fines, who died February 23, 1891.

Besides the surviving children, a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren survive. One granddaughter, Miss Marion McKee, is a graduate of the state University and is now teaching in the Lincoln schools. D. D. McKee, who formerly lived in this community, is now a resident of Holly, Colorado, where he is engaged in farming.

Mrs. Fines was united with the Methodist Episcopal church many years ago and lived a Christian life. Her many good qualities gained for her a warm regard by all acquaintances. She was a kind and loving mother and has always been deeply devoted to members of her family and friends who were closely associated to her. She belongs to that sturdy type of pioneer woman who came to this state in the early days and who endured much suffering and great hardships before the country became very thickly settled.

Funeral services, conducted by Rev. George M. Gates, were held at the Methodist Episcopal church in Shelton yesterday morning at 10 o'clock. Burial took place in the Shelton Cemetery.

Shelton Clipper, Thursday, March 8, 1923
Submitted by Kaylynn Loveland, great-great- granddaughter of Mrs. Fines.


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DAN GION

Mr. Gion died suddenly at the age of 59 at his home, 1608 Second Ave., due to a heart attack.

Dan was born at Marquette and came to Kearney in 1917 from Aurora. He spent many years in Kearney as a stock dealer.

He is survived by his wife, Myrtle; two sons; three daughters; and a sister from Colo.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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JOHN COLLINS GION
John Collins Gion Dies at the age of 26

Mr. Gion was born to Mr. and Mrs. Dan Gion at Merion, Colo., Oct. 27, 1919 and died May 15, 1946 in Kearney.

John attended Kearney public school and graduated from Kearney High School after which he enlisted in the Coast Guard.He married Helen Marie Schmitz on Dec. 29, 1941 at Minden, Neb.

Mr. Gion is survived by his wife, his parents; three sisters. Preceding him in death was a brother, Myrl, who died in World War II.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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J. C. HALL

Died November 1, 1905 at his home in Miller, Neb., J.C. Hall, aged 66 years. Father Hall, as he was familiarly called, was born in Jefferson County, Tennessee and moved from there to southwest Iowa. Eleven years ago he moved to Miller where he has since resided. At the age of twenty-five years, at his country's call he entered the service as a volunteer in the Union Army and served with distinction throughout the war, being a member of company A, 34th Iowa Infantry. He was discharged at Houston, Texas, August 15, 1865.

Deceased was united in marriage on December 17, 1865 to Mary Jane McCullough. Two children survive him one a daughter Mrs. Donovan residing at Chapman, Neb., the other Lester W. engaged in the mercantile business at this place. Mr. Hall was a member of the Masons, Knights of Pythias and Odd Fellows in all of which he was a regular attendant and active in the work, being by far the best posted lodgeman in this vicinity. He was a member of R. Jewet Post G.A.R., and it was ever a pleasure for him to associate with the old boys who fought in the 60's. Father Hall was above all a pious, Christian gentleman, having been for years a member of the M.E. church. He was a good husband, father, neighbor and friend, and will be greatly missed by all. The funeral services were held at the home, Friday, November 3, conducted by Rev. Brink, the funeral discourse was delivered by Rev. Wagner after which the remains were laid to rest in Miller Cemetery. The Masonic lodge conducted the services at the grave, assisted by the three other orders. The relatives have the sincerest sympathy of the entire county in their hour of sorrow. The surviving members of the family, Mrs. J.C. Hall, L.W. Hall and wife and Rose Donovan and husband, desire through the Hub to express their thanks to all who kindly assisted and rendered services of consolation and comfort in their hour of need.

Submitted by Lorie Norton,
great-great-granddaughter of J. C. Hall.


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HERBERT W HANDY

Herbert was 82 when he passed away in Denver. Mr. Handy was a carpenter most of his active life. He spent most of his years in Kearney before moving to Denver to live with his daughter.

He is survived by his wife, Amelia, one daughter, and one sister and brother.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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FANNY JANE HARPER

"Farmer's Wife Dies Suddenly"

Mrs. Fanny Jane Harper died suddenly Monday at her home 41/2 miles southeast of Shelton of heart failure, her death resulting in about 2 hours after the attack. Mrs. Harper was in the yard when she was stricken and fell to the ground. Mr. Harper was at the barn and was called by a daughter who had seen the mother fall. He immediately ran and picked her up and carried her into the house and placed her on a bed. Word was sent to the home of Thomas Ellis nearby and from there a telephone message was sent for Dr.E.L. Smith of Shelton. The physician immediately went out but could do nothing to relieve the woman and she died at 8:30. She was conscious up to within about 5 minutes of her death. Mrs. Harper had been in apparently good health and had not complained of not feeling well, so that her death was wholly unexpected. She leaves a husband and 7 children in ages from 3 to 15 years.

The funeral was held at the home yesterday afternoon, the remains being interred in the Wood River Cemetery.

The deceased was 38 years of age, having been born in DeWitt County, Illinois, April 6, 1873, the daughter of John and Sarah (Provin) North. She was married at Clinton, Illinois Jan. 26, 1893 to Samuel D. Harper and they came to Nebraska Feb. 25, 1893, locating at Wood River. They have resided in this vicinity ever since. She was held in the highest esteem by all who knew her, and her sudden and unexpected death was a great shock to all her friends.

Shelton Clipper, Aug. 17, 1911
Submitted by Kaylynn Loveland, great-granddaughter of Mrs. Harper.


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HELEN HOUSTON

Helen Francis Houston was born August 16, 1902 at Miller, Nebraska and departed this life March 22, 1919 at Ft. Collins, Colorado, aged 16 years, 7 months and 6 days. She was taken suddenly ill at 2:30 p.m. March 21 and passed away at 3:45 p.m. the following day of acute pneumonia. She had but recently gone to Colorado to make her home with an aunt and go to high school.

The funeral was held from her home at Miller, March 25 and her remains laid to rest beside those of her mother. She leaves to mourn her early departure a father, C.M. Houston, of Miller, Neb., four sisters, Mrs. L.H. Irwin, Grand Island; Mrs. Jno. Weinbrandt, Miller; Miss Gertrude Houston, Miller; and one brother, Lee, of Miller, also a host of friends.
Submitted by Lorie Norton.






EARL D. JARNAGIN

Military services will be conducted by the American legion for Pfc. Earl Dale Jarnagin, 19, whose body was returned here Thursday.

He is the first of the Kearney servicemen to be returned from overseas under the repatriation program in returning war dead to this country.

Earl was born in Ames, Ia. He joined the Marine Corps Jan. 21, 1944 and died at Iwo Jima March 12, 1945.

Those surviving are his mother, Mrs. Flossie Jarnagin, 1420 Central; one brother Delmar, Lincoln, and two sisters, Mrs. Norma Erickson, Holdrege, and Mrs. Jean Heinrich, Kearney.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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WILLIAM F JARNIGAN

William F. Jarnigan Dies at Home at 58

William Fred Jarnigan, 58, died at his home, 1420 Central. Born at Omar, Mo., March 17, 1887, he was united in marriage to Flossie Shearer, May 14, 1919 at Ames, Iowa.

He came here from Ames, Ia., and began working for the Central Power Company in September, 1924, as a gas fitter. He remained with that firm and with its successor, the Northwestern Public Service Co., until his death.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Flossie Jarnigan; one son, Pfc. Delmar Jarnnigan, Kearns, Utah; and two daughters, Jean and Norma, both at home. Twin sons preceded him in death.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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MARY JOURNEY

Mrs Mary Journey Of Kearney dies;

Mrs. Mary Journey, 77, 1501 Avenue F, died Sunday. She was born in Nashville, Tenn.

Mary is survived by her husband, William; seven sons; six daughters, and 57 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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ANNA MARIE KELSEY

Mrs. Anna Marie Kelsey, 68, of 1524 Second Avenue, died at her home Tuesday evening after an extended illness. She was born in Grand Island and lived in Kearney for 25 years.

She was the widow of James R. Kelsey, a veteran of the Spanish American War. Survivors are one daughter, two sons, two sisters, three brothers, Denver, and four grandchildren.

Funeral rites will be at the Anderson funeral home at 2 p.m. Friday, and the burial will be in the Kearney cemetery.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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E. A. MILLER
Taken Ill Two Weeks Ago - Was Active in Civic Affairs

E. (Edwin) A. (Aley) Miller, 61, died at his home on East Twenty-sixth street Friday morning, shortly after six o'clock. He was taken ill about two weeks ago, but showed steady improvement during the past few days and on Thursday his condition was such that it was thought he might be out and about again within a few days. Friday morning he awoke about six o'clock and seemed in excellent health. Mrs. Miller proceeded with preparations for breakfast and a few moments later was attracted to the bedroom by moans. Her husband had lapsed into unconsciousness and died within a short time before medical aid could be summoned. Arrangements for the funeral have not been completed.

Mr. Miller came to Kearney in 1883 and has made his home here continually since that time. He acted as county clerk for four years and served several terms on the city council. He also acted in office of secretary of the Nebraska State Volunteer Fireman's association for more than twenty years, being reelected to that office at the recent state convention. He was a member of the Nebraska Embalmers Board, acting as secretary. Mr. Miller was a Shriner and Odd Fellow and was also affiliated with a number of other fraternal organizations.He took an active part in civic affairs and was considered among the best citizens of the community. His loss will be keenly felt and hundreds will sympathize with the bereaved family.

Mr. Miller is survived by his widow (Phoebe Anna nee Herbert) and three daughters; Mrs. Emil Parks (Florence), Mrs. Harry Troup (Pearl) and Clarabelle, the latter remaining at home with her parents.

THE KEARNEY DAILY HUB, 5 March 1920
Submitted by Lawrence Parks, great-grandson of E A Miller


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MARY MUSSER

Mrs. Mary Musser, Early Resident of This Area, Dies

Mrs. Mary Musser, 73, 11902 Avenue C, died in a Kearney hospital early Friday. Mary was born in Philadelphia, Pa., but she had lived in Kearney for the past 64 years.

Surviving are her husband, John Musser; three sons, one daughter, a sister, three brothers, and two grandchildren.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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FANNIE JANE NELSON

Fannie was born on September 29, 1881 in Drakesville, Iowa. On May 28, 1902 she was united in marriage to Charles O. Nelson. They had 6 children.

She is survived by 4 daughters and 2 sons, 29 grandchildren. Her husband, Charles preceded her in death in 1936. She was on a trip to California when she was in an accident which eventually took her life.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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DONZEL PARR

Donzel, of 1524 First Ave, died at the age of 27, a victim of Meningitis.

Mr. Parr worked for the Hub since 1945 and before that he worked for the Union Pacific.

He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Myrtle Parr, and four sisters. His father, Sam Parr, was a former Buffalo County Sherrif.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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WILLIAM W PATTERSON

HE RESTS FROM HIS LABORS
All Kearney Mounts the Loss of Her Founder and Friend
His Motto was Kearney First and Self Second - His Life as Told by Himself - Great Plans Never Realized - The Last Sad Rites.

As stated briefly last evening, Col. W.W. Patterson died near Aurora while returning from Hot Springs, SD yesterday.

He left Kearney in company with his wife Friday morning, May 19, at 9:30, to regain, if possible, his feeble health, and closed his eyes forever upon the scenes and city he loved so well.

At the time of his death he was aged 62 years, 4 months and 18 days, and had spent the past twenty-two years in Kearney. Kearney was the city of his founding and he never failed to praise its advantages and prophesy wonderful things for its future growth and prosperity. He always put Kearney first and self second, and as a result allowed others to accumulate and profit by his energy and ability.

His last sickness commenced about a year ago by the breaking of a blood vessel and the loss of a child soon afterwards weighed heavily upon him. He didn't know what it was to give up, however, and almost to the very last believed he would get well and, as he expressed it, live long enough to see some of his enemies buried yet. But the disease had obtained too strong a foothold.

As a man he was far sighted, and it was a common expression among his acquaintances that he was "twenty years ahead of his times."

He was a warm friend to all who had the best interests of Kearney at heart and could have but secured sufficient capital to carry out his ideas the results would have been realized. Some called him "visionary," but time has brought forth some of his early visions and other are being gradually realized.

In his loss, Kearney has lost her warmest friend, her greatest admirer and her most enthusiastic worker.

The remains were met last night at the depot by a large circle of friends, among them being the oldest settlers now living in the city.

He leaves a widow and a number of children to mourn the loss of a fine husband and an indulgent father and a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.

The day before he took his final leave the writer visited him at his home and found him sitting in his chair. He looked like a shadow and his face had an ashy whiteness, but his grasp was firm and often in conversation his eyes would flash with the fire of youth. His mind was a regular storehouse of knowledge and he could express himself in a clear and interesting manner.

During the conversation he was asked to give a brief history of his life and work and the following is his account as it fell from his ------.

"I was born on the 11th day of February, 1831, in Warsaw, NY. My father's name was William Patterson and was a native of Londonderry, NH. He died while a member of congress in 1838. Two weeks afterwards my mother died and left me an orphan boy at seven years of age. My uncle, Gov. George W. Patterson of Chautauqua county, NY was appointed my guardian, and I lived with him a year. After that I went to live with another uncle, Major Patterson, of Perry, NY, and made my home with him until I went to the Wesley seminary at Layman, NY, one of the best seminaries in the United States at the time and then attended college at Genes, NY.

I left my native place and went to Minneapolis, MN, in the spring of 1856, and resided there until the war broke out. I then enlisted in the Twelfth regular United States Infantry. Before leaving New York, I helped organize the Twelfth Infantry at Ft. Hamilton, NY, and was also lieutenant colonel and colonel of the Sixty-first New York, so as soon as the commanding officer of the Twelfth United States Infantry ascertained that fact, I was promoted and drilled the regiment all winter in Hairdo's tactics and bayonet exercises.

After being promoted, I joined my regiment in the field and after the battle of Chancellorsville General Ayers, commanding one of the divisions of the fifth corps place me upon his staff and at the battle of Gettysburg General Sakes ordered me to report to him during the battles, and placed me on his staff for temporary duty. After the battle of Gettysburg, Gen. Sakes placed me in command of the fifth corps, and when the army was on its march, I marched at the head of the fifth corps, clearing up obstructions, building bridges, etc.

From injuries received at Gettysburg and from the injuries received on the 5th of May, 1864, in the battle of the Wilderness, I was sent to Washington by special order of the medical director of the fifth corps, placed in a hospital, and the board of surgeons declared that I was no longer able to keep the field.

I then tendered my resignation and returned to Minneapolis. I was two years recuperating before summing my business of selling real estate, and all old citizens of Minneapolis know how I issued circulars and advertised their city and their water power, and Minnesota in general and called the attention of the whole country to the grand water power that has made Minneapolis the city that she is now.

But in 1869 my health was so impaired that I was obliged to seek a warmer climate. I went to Creston, Iowa, which was then a bare prairie with only one house in sight, and started to sell the lots in the new town for the CB&Q railroad company.

In the winter of 1871 DN Smith, the town lot and land agent for CB&Q for the state of Nebraska, sent me to Ft. Kearney with a number of teams and men amply provided with instruments for topographical and geological surveys to determine for the CB&Q Railroad company if the country between Lincoln and Ft. Kearney could ever be made inhabitable and be developed into and agricultural country. Although laughed at by the people of the state and by the officers at Ft. Kearney, I analyzed the soil, studied out the geological formation, discovered the great underflow in this whole Platte valley by which the water rushes through the sand and gravel below the bed of the Platte river so that his whole valley of the Platte could be irrigated from Denver to Omaha, and that it would furnish at least 5,000 horse power in the center of every township or manufacturing purposes, for generating electricity to furnish power, light and heat, and to build up one of the finest sections of the Union.

I, in company with three others, started Lowell, and when the railroad reached there we sold out to the company, but in the meantime had selected a site for Kearney and laid it out and the company confirmed the selection.

I opened up the first farm here and have farmed it ever since to a greater or less extent. The people who first settled here went through the struggles accompanying all pioneers, but having the Union Pacific and the CB&Q Railroad they have profited in a large measure and have generally received good prices for the grain and stock that they have raised, while facilities for obtaining fuel and building material of all kinds have been ample and the people have prospered so that now farms are selling in this country for from $30 to $40 an acre.

But Kearney had no more than got a start before the locusts came in 1873. They remained with us until the fall of 1876 and spring of '77, but that was last of them. During the '70s we received but very little moisture, but from 1880 to the present time Buffalo County has raised the finest crops of any county in the state. The people who came here as pioneers, turned over the sod, built houses and raised grain can see that the rainfall has greatly increased and is increasing every year.

Having lived in Minneapolis and having studied hydraulics and hydrostatics under the United States officers in charge of the Mississippi river, and being conversant with every feature of the grand water power at Minneapolis, I at first readily saw what could be done to make this the grandest water power on earth, and I have talked and preached and begged of the people ever since to build a great canal from Denver to Omaha. If this was done, it would develop this magnificent country until it would surpass any other on earth. I have always worked for Nebraska and I believe that it only requires the completion of the grand canal to make this country blossom as none other in the United States.

I make no claims whatever upon the people for what I have done or said and am willing to let my acts live after me. I would rather leave behind me a good name and the records of having done what I could for Kearney and Nebraska than all the wealth of the world."

The funeral services were held at his late residence this afternoon at 3 o'clock, Rev. R. D. Black, of the First M. E. Church officiating. The exercises were conducted under the auspices of the G. A. R. and music was furnished by the members of the Midway Military band who volunteered their services. The members of the city council attended in a body and business was largely suspended on the street as many businessmen attended the funeral. The remains were followed to their last resting place by one of the largest processions ever seen in Kearney and all felt the city had lost one of its truest and best supporters.

Taken from the Kearney Daily Hub, 6 June 1893
Submitted by Jamie Isaacson, great-great-granddaughter


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C E POFFENBARGER

On Feb. 22, 1952, Mr. Charles Poffenbarger, age 54, died of a heart attack. He was born at Shelton and lived there until moving to Kearney 24 years ago. He was a carpenter contractor and a veteran of WW I.

His wife, Gertrude; one daughter; two sons; his mother; one sister and nine grandchildren survive him.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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JAMES SALTER

James H. Salter died in Portland, Oregon a week ago. The body was returned to Shelton and arrived today for burial here. He leaves 1 son and 2 daughters: James Salter,Jr., New York; Mrs. Mike Kirkmeyer, Boulder, Colorado; Mrs. Roland Shockey, Boulder, Colorado.

From the Shelton Clipper, May 5, 1921.
Submitted by Marilyn Monical, great-granddaughter


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META SCHIRNEKER
Mrs. Meta Schirneker Dies; rites Wednesday

Mrs. Meta Schirenker, 71, died on March 3, 1956, late Saturday at her home on 1713 Second Ave.

Mrs. Schirneker was born to Henry and Carolina Baumgarn on Nov. 24, 1884 in Divide Township in Buffalo County and spent all her life in that community and in Kearney. She was the widow of Fred Schirneker, who died in 1936. Survivors are four daughters; and 14 grandchildren.

Funeral services will be at the Nielsen Mortuary in Kearney. Burial will be in the Divide Cemetery northeast of Riverdale.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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MARY SORENSON

Mrs. Mary Sorensen, 96

Mrs. Mary Sorensen, aged 96, died Oct. 31 after having suffered a stroke a month earlier. Mrs. Sorensen, a former resident here, lived in Kearney for 25 years.

Those from this area attending the rites were her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Keen and her grandson Chester Keen, of Minden; and a granddaughter.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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WAYNE SPENCER

Mr. Wayne Spencer, age 25, of Lexington, was electrocuted at Buffalo while working with a group of linemen repairing damage to the REA line from storm damage.

He is survived by his wife, Grace Lorraine, a son, a daughter; his parents; and brothers and sisters.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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WILL STONECIPHER

Will Stonecipher, Kearney Resident 35 years, Is Dead

Will Stonecipher, 60, 1717 Fourth Ave., a resident of Kearney for 35 years, died Friday afternoon. Born in Corydon, Ind. Surviving are his wife, Beulah; one son, Jack; a sister, Mrs. Jacie Kinneer of Veedersburg, Ind., a brother, Maurice of Hillsboro, Ind.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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DELBERT STOUT

Mr. Stout was only 35 when he died from Bright's disease. Delbert was born in Gothenburg and lived in Kearney until his move to California to work at a Safeway store.

He is survived by his wife, Dorothy, and his son and daughter; and his parents. He will be buried in the Kearney Cemetery.

Extracted from a newspaper clipping collection of Cora Schippert Williams of Kearney.
Submitted by Cora's grand-daughter Christy Logan Obermire CObermire@aol.com


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MATT WAPLES

"Matt Waples, a former resident of this city passed away in Lincoln, according to word received this ..... Mr. Waples was a resident of Kearney for more than twenty-five years, being employed at the Switz furniture Store for a time. Just prior to leaving this city, he was located in the basement of the Midway Hotel Building, engaged in furniture repair work and upholstering."

Kearney Hub, January 3, 1916
Submitted by Cindi Fernandez, cindi.fernandez@asu.edu


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ROSE BLANCH HAYNES

Mrs. R. A. Haynes

Rose Blanch Wacek was born in Jordan, Minn., March 19, 1863 and passed away at her home in Kearney, Nebraska, June 26, 1930. As a young woman she was graduated from the Stanbury Normal School in Missouri and later accepted a post as book-keeper in Omaha.

On February 15, 1886 she was united in marriage to Robert A. Haynes in Omaha were he was also a book-keeper for a large wholesale and retail concern. Here, too, they continued to reside for about twelve years, Mr. Haynes accepting a position with the B. & M. Railway Co., first as auditor and later as station agent at various places. About twenty years ago they came to Kearney, and with the exception of a couple of years during the war, Mr. Haynes has been station agent here.

Four children were born into their home, the eldest dying in infancy. The others, Mrs. Jessie Martinez of Portland Ore., Robt. of Long Beach, Calif., Byron of Sterling, Colo., were all here for the funeral of their mother. Others among the near relatives are a brother, M. J. Wacek, and family of Omaha, who were also here for the funeral.

Mrs. Haynes was recognized as one of the loyal, devoted workers in the Baptist church. While she had been failing in health for some years, her spirit was indomitable and she was actually confined to her bed but a short time.

A host of her friends gathered on Monday afternoon in the Baptist church where the funeral service was held, conducted by her pastor, D. I. Coon, and the body was laid to rest in the Kearney cemetery.

Unspecified Kearney paper and unspecified date
Submitted by Larry Park


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THOMAS WAPLES

Thomas Waples died Saturday, January 25, 1890, and was buried Sunday in the Kearney cemetary. Rev. Haight, of the M.E. Church together with the Odd Fellows lodge of this place, conducting the funeral services.

One week ago last Saturday Mr. Waples slipped on the icy walk in Front of Hastings & Son's store, fell and broke a thigh bone. Complications set in, and he lingered in great pain for one week until death came to the relief.

The deceased was born at Putnam, Ohio, November 18, 1828 and was therefore 61 years, 2 months and 18 days old at the time of his death. Fifty years ago he moved to Illinois and resided there until October 1886; when he came to Nebraska. December 22, 1850, he was married to Miss Catherine Gutteridge and from this union there were five children born, only one of whom now lives.

Mr. Waples was a member of the M.E. Church, a good and loyal worker, As well as honored and respected citizen. He was also a member of the Odd Fellow lodge, bringing his card here from Gibson (Ill.) Lodge No. 542.

The church and lodge have lost a valued and beloved brother and the community a useful citizen.

Kearney Hub - January 27, 1890
Submitted by Cindi Fernandez, cindi.fernandez@asu.edu


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Last updated -- Tuesday, 13-May-2008 23:04:45 MDT