Colfax Co. - Peeking into the Past (Feb. 1924) NEGenWeb Project
PEEKING INTO THE PAST (February, 1924)
By The Colfax County Press
Colfax County, Nebraska


The Colfax County Press publishes a weekly column entitled Peeking into the Past, which is comprised of articles taken from earlier Colfax County Press files, written by Helen C. Evans. A special thank you to the Colfax County Press for allowing me to reprint those articles! The following are selections from that column.

February 7, 1924 - reprinted June 7, 1995

The February, 1924, term of district court in and for Colfax Co., Nebraska, will convene at the courthouse in Schuyler on Monday, February 25th, 1924.
    Hon. Frederic W. Button of Fremont will be the presiding judge. There are ten criminal cases on the docket for this term, nine of which are for violation of the liquor laws.
    This is the largest number of criminal cases on the docket in this county for quite a period of years. But few other jury cases will be heard at this term. Jurors drawn for this term of district are: Jerry Beran, George Brixius, Ernest Coufal, Wesley A. Cuba, Wm. Gerrard, Jerry Grady, Rudolph Hobza, Emil E. Indra, John F. Krivohlavek, W.P. McIntosh, Jas. A. Stark, Jos. S. Lapacek, Walter Blum, T.P. Costello, George Craig, Anton Drahota, Wm. Gondring, Richard Hogel, Wm. Hughes, Jerry Karel, W. Naber, V. Malena Jr., Jos Vanicek Jr. and Ralfe E. Wolfe.

An adjuster representing the two fire insurance companies carrying insurance on Dr. A.J. Knight's residence property was here last week to settle the damages done by fire on Tuesday of last week. The damages were estimated [at] $525 for which sum Dr. Knight has received a check as full settlement of the claim.


February 7, 1924 - reprinted June 14, 1995

Adolph Kluntke, prominent farmer residing 2 1/2 miles north of Creston, was killed Saturday night when his car ran off the edge of an embankment just beyond the Humphrey city limits.
    When the accident was discovered by a party of Humphrey people it was believed the victim had been dead for at least three hours. His body was found pinned beneath his machine.
    Mr. Kluntke had been to Humphrey and had started on the return trip to his home in Creston, traveling the main road between Humphrey and Madison. The accident occurred at the edge of town at a spot where his car could be seen from one direction only.
    He was driving a small Ford truck and had just crossed the railroad tracks. Apparently, in turning back into the road, he did not turn quick enough and drove off the side. The truck turned over and pinned him beneath it.

Miss Vlasta Humlicek has been at Beemer the past week substituting for one of the city teachers in the city schools.

Roy Seiberts, who had been staying with relatives in this community the past few months, took his departure last Monday for Edmunds, North Dakota, where his parents reside.

Miss Tillie Dudycha returned Tuesday morning to Hooper where she is employed at the Hooper Inn. Miss Dudycha was down for an over-Sunday visit with home folks.

Leonard Rozmarin came up from Omaha Saturday for a visit with relatives and also to attend to business matters. While here he rented the Rozmarin farm to Jos. Havel.

Mr. and Mrs. John Janda and Emil Folda were at Abie and Linwood yesterday. Mr. Janda was looking after the farm he owns in that locality.
    Chas. Kander and Hugh Butterfield of the Haymow vicinity were here yesterday on a business mission. While here Mr. Butterfield joined the evergrowing list of Press readers.

William Roether and family were up from Schuyler last Sunday visiting with local relatives.

Dr. Fred Vosika and family and Mrs. Vosika's mother, Mrs. Kuncl, all of Howells, were visitors at the J.M. Mundil home yesterday. Mrs. Kuncl for many years had made her home in Ravenna and is an aunt of Edward Cekal who is well known in Clarkson.

Mrs. Olga Novotny is home from Oakdale since the beginning of the week. We understand that the Oakdale city school is closed temporarily on account of a scarlet fever epidemic which has overtaken that part of the country.

Word was received here the latter part of the week from Grand Island by Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Tobias, informing them that their son, Stanley, attending the Grand Island Business College, is sick with a serious attack of measles. Mr. Tobias at once took his wife to Schuyler from where she proceeded to Grand Island to be with her son during his illness. We are further told that Stanley has had his full share of hard luck since the day he first came to Grand Island. It is said that he missed his gold watch when but a few days in the city. Later he lost a good sum of money in one of the Grand Island national banks which closed its doors recently; now he is suffering with measles.

Frank Fendrich, tenant on the Belina farm three miles southeast of Clarkson will have a public sale on February 21. Mr. Fendrich will leave the farm and will engage in the blacksmith business in Clarkson, having made arrangements for the use of F.C. Koci shop.
    Anton Hladik, residing northwest of Clarkson, will have a public sale February 19.

Anton Kyncl, living on the F.W. Noh [farm], three and a half miles northeast of Clarkson, decided to farm on a much smaller scale and will for that reason have a public sale on February 26. Anton will move onto the J.M. Bukacek eighty east of town but will not do much farming as most of the land is sowed down to clover.

Emil Pavlis, living in the south part of Clarkson, will have a public sale on Saturday, February 16th.

The town property in the west part of Clarkson belonging to the estate of the late Frank Sixta sr., will be auctioned off Wednesday February 20. Frank Krofta, acting as executor, is in charge of the sale. At the same time, Mrs. Sixta will dispose of her household furnishing.

Mrs. John S. Novotny stayed with her friend Mrs. Alice Moeller last Tuesday night.

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Rosenbery and son, Ivan visited at the C.O. Brown home Thursday evening.

Mrs. Chas E. Church and son, Ted Porter, were at the Will Porter home Friday.

Several from this vicinity attended the Luxa-Podany wedding dance at Clarkson last Tuesday evening.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Trojan and little son, Donald visited at the Mrs. Marie Callely home Sunday.

Ed Shuster and son, John, helped Adolph Zabka haul some lumber from Leigh, Thursday.

Evald Trojan, who was on the sick list with tonsilitis, is now able to be out and around again.

Mrs. M.R. Rosenbery visited with Mrs. Antonia Otto, Thursday afternoon.

Thomas Cooper, 22, of Columbus, gives police a constant series of surprises. He had just finished serving a 10-day sentence in the city jail for taking a bicycle with[out] the formality of asking for it and riding the wheel to Schuyler in the night over snowbound roads. The bicycle was found by police.
    Meanwhile Cooper obtained a job at a garage. He saw the bicycle in the police station. He asked the police judge why the bicycle remained there. The chief said the boy from whom it was stolen did not have the money to pay the express charges back from Schuyler. Cooper paid the charges and told the police to take the bike back to the boy.


February 7, 1924 - reprinted March 29, 1995

This noon we were horrified upon the receipt of the sad news that our young friend, Ludwig Powolny, is dead. His untimely and unexpected departure comes as a distinct surprise to all who had known him as it is only a few days ago that he was seen on our streets. He took sick suddenly, his illness being due to blood poisoning of the entire system. In spite of the attention given him by several physicians, there was nothing that medical science could do for the young man.
    Ludwig is said to have been around the house and it was thought that all would be well in short time. These predictions, however, have not matured and the patient took a decided change for the worse. His condition was again pronounced as very serious and since the boy had a terrible struggle. The patient fought bravely and although a strong young man he soon gave out and surrendered to his enemy.
    The end came this noon, at the family home in the west part of town. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Powolny of Clarkson, his father being engaged in the photographic business here. He was a bright young man and at the time of his death was not quite 19 years of age. He was born in Austria-Hungary on the 18th of of August 1905, and came to this country about ten years ago. He worked at odd jobs after leaving the school and for the past several months was employed at the A.J. Karel & Son's store.
    We have known Ludwig since his arrival in Clarkson and have always found him a good-hearted and an honest young man and it is too bad that his stay here culminated at a time when he was to enjoy the best years of his life. He leaves besides his parents seven brothers, Frank, Ladislav, Ignac, William, Erick, George and Joseph; two sisters, Mary and Olga.
    The eldest two boys of the Powolny family are in California where they have employment in the moving picture industry.
    The funeral will be held on Sunday forenoon at 10:00 o'clock, from the Bukacek undertaking parlors. The remains will be taken to the opera house and thence will be escorted to the last resting place in the cemetery adjoining Clarkson.
    We extend sincere sympathy.

Attorneys for Harry E. Tutin, aged Stanton county farmer, were in supreme court yesterday asking that he be not fined too heavily for contracting a mail order marriage. Tutin's wife died some years ago. A short time thereafter he went back to Illinois and married a stenographer to whom he had been introduced through a matrimonial agency.
    They had a child born, and later got a divorce and heavy alimony. He appealed. Then her attorney asked for an order requiring him to pay temporary alimony while the suit is pending. His attorney said that he had no greater income off his farm than $500 last year, and that his wife is much younger and more able to work than he is.

Fire, lashed on by a furious wind which attained the proportions of a gale, destroyed the G. Crawford harness shop, the Otto Stolzman jewelry shop, and the Carl Schwink implement store at Beemer at two o'clock, resulting in a loss that will probably total twenty or twenty five thousand dollars. Only prompt discovery of the blaze by Chalk Marquardt and William Harder, both of Scribner, who were driving though the town, prevented a much larger destruction.
    The blaze started in the Crawford harness shop and flames were leaping high when it was discovered. The Scribner men awakened roomers in the burning building, and spread a general alarm. The West Point and Wisner fire departments responded to a call for help.


February 7, 1924 - reprinted October 9, 1996

At the time we first reported the illness of Mrs. Emil Petr in the issue of The Press of December 20th, not in the least did we expect that it would fall to our lot to chronicle the death of the splendid and respectable woman, who was not only dearly loved beyond the defines of her family home but honored and esteemed by all who had the privilege of having her acquaintance.
    It matters not what station of honor we hold in life we are all subject to death, and when the final summons is given, there is nothing within the bounds of human power to prevent it and when the inevitable comes we must serenely yield to the wishes of the Heavenly Father. With the nation at large mourning the loss of one of its distinguished leaders, Woodrow Wilson, the untimely departure of this noble woman comes as a double shock to the people of Clarkson.
    The deceased was a lady endowed by nature with a kindness that made her life a blessing to many, a beautiful character that imparted much of the best there is in life to those who came under her influence and a spirit that brought courage to the hearts of those dear to her. Her absence will be greatly missed not only by her immediate family but all with whom she had ever mingled on life's journey.
    From the first day of Mrs. Petr's illness until last Friday, when all hopes were given up for her recovery, many an anxious were the hours spent in the overbearing suspense by relatives and friends for reports from the sick room, hoping against hope that there would yet come favorable words of encouragement for her recovery. All that medical skill and loving hands could do for their loved one proved futile and Mrs. Petr as a tired wanderer fell into peaceful sleep on Tuesday evening February 5th, 1924, at the hour of 11:35 a few minutes before the arrival of her thirty-seventh birthday.
    Mrs. Petr suffered a light paralytic stroke on December 15th, at which time her condition was serious but not considered grave.
    It was last Friday when Mrs. Petr's condition became so critical that all hopes for her recovery were abandoned. Slowly as the hours and minutes passed on she began to sink and her vitality gave out in the bold battle for her life, which was slowly ebbing away, until the Angel of Death claimed her and left the home bereft of a loving mother and a faithful wife.
    Emilie Splichal, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Kopietz, was born in Midland precinct, Colfax county on February 6, 1887. She passed into her peaceful rest at the family home in Clarkson, Nebraska on February 5, 1924. had she lived for only twenty five minutes longer, she would have reached her 37th natal day.
    The days of her girl hood and young womanhood with the exception of a few years when the family resided at Schuyler were spent in Clarkson and the nearby vicinity. November 17th, 1909 she was united in marriage to Emil Petr, at that time assistant cashier of the Farmers State Bank and now holding the cashier ship of the Clarkson State Bank. Their union was blessed with one child, a son, Jerome, now aged thirteen years, who especially will miss the tender affection of his mother.
    The surviving relatives are the husband, son, Jerome, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Kopietz; one sister, Mrs. Mary Whitney, wife of J.P. Whitney, of Fullerton, Nebraska; one brother, Emil Splichal of Valentine; and a half brother, Jos. Kopietz of Omaha
    She is also survived by two step-brothers, Frank M. Kopietz of Stanton county, and John Kopietz of Linwood; four step sisters, Mrs. Adolf Fiala, Schuyler, Mrs. Geo. Haen, Wolf Point, Montana; Miss Tillie Kopietz, Detroit, Michigan; and Miss Katie Kopietz of this place.

Attorneys for Harry E. Tutin, aged Stanton county farmer, were in supreme court asking that he be not fined too heavily for contracting a mail order marriage Tutin's wife died some years ago. A short time thereafter he went back to Illinois and married a stenographer to whom he had been introduced through a matrimonial agency. They had a child born, and later got a divorce and heavy alimony. He appealed. Then her attorney asked for an order requiring him to pay temporary alimony while the suit is pending. His attorney said that he had no greater income off his farm than $500 last year, and that his wife is much younger and more able to work than he is.

Will Roether of Schuyler is being urged to make the race for County Judge against the present incumbent, Adolph Fiala, who has held the office for so long that no other judge can be remembered. He has already filed for re-election.


February 7, 1924 - reprinted October 16, 1996

This noon we were horrified upon the receipt of the sad news that our young friend, Ludwig Powolny, is dead. His untimely and unexpected departure comes as a distinct surprise to all who had known him as it is only a few days ago that he was seen on our streets. He took sick suddenly on Friday, his illness being due to blood-poisoning of the entire system. In spite of the attention given him by several physicians, there was nothing that medical science could do for the young man. On Sunday, Ludwig is said to have been around the house and it was thought that all would be well in short time. These predictions, however, have not matured and the patient took a decided change for the worse. On Monday, his condition was again pronounced as very serious and since, the boy had a terrible struggle. The patient fought bravely and although a strong young man he soon gave out and surrendered to his enemy. The end came this noon, Thursday, at the family home in the west part of town.
    He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Powolny of Clarkson, his father being engaged in photographic business here. He was a bright young man and at the time of this death was not quite 19 years of age. He was born in Austria-Hungary on the 18th of of August 1905, and came to this country about ten years ago. He worked at odd jobs after leaving the school and for the past several months was employed at the A.J. Karel & Son's store. We have known Ludwig since his arrival in Clarkson and have always found him a good-hearted and an honest young man and it is too bad that his stay here culminated at a time when he was to enjoy the best years of his life.
    He leaves besides his parents seven brothers, Frank, Ladislav, Ignac, William, Erick, George and Joseph, and two sisters, Mary and Olga. The oldest two boys of the Powolny family are in California where they have employment in the moving picture industry.
    The funeral will be held on Sunday forenoon at 10 o'clock from the Bukacek undertaking parlors. The remains will be taken to the opera house and thence will be escorted to the last resting place in the cemetery adjoining Clarkson.

County Judge Doten of Albion officiated at his first double wedding, the contracting parties being Bonhart John Dekerre of Cedar Rapids and Alvina Bertha Hoff of Clarkson; Joseph Frank Fiala of Schuyler and Elisa Mary DeKeere of Cedar Rapids.

For saving the life of a small boy who was drowning in the Elkhorn river at Neligh on July 21, 1920, J.A. Reynolds, manager of the Northwestern Bell Telephone Company here, was presented with a Vail bronze metal.
    While working at Neligh near the banks of the Elkhorn, Mr. Reynolds was attracted by cries for help. Rushing to the river, he found a boy of twelve struggling to save himself from being sucked down by the swift current by clinging to branches of a dead tree fifty feet from the bank. Ridding himself of his overalls and shoes, Reynolds swam through the swift and dangerous current, directing the boy to cling to his shoulders and brought him safely to shore. The boy scampered home as fast as he could and his name was never learned. -Pilger Herald.

A very pretty mid-winter wedding occurred here when Louis J. Luxa and Miss Bessie Podany plighted their troth in happy wedlock. The bridal pair was escorted to the Catholic parsonage by Miss Frances Fisher and Helen Pekny and Messrs. Joseph Luxa and Charles Podany who stood up for the contracting part while Father Petlach pronounced the solemn words. Upon completion of the ceremony at the parsonage and after having had their picture taken the merry party motored over to the Podany farm northwest of Clarkson where they were awaited with a bountiful wedding repast. Only the very closest relatives had the honor of participation in the reception. In the evening a dance was given in honor of the newly wedded couple, admittance to which was gained through special invitation. A large number of friends and relatives were present to enjoy the dance.
    The groom is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Luxa of this city and for the past several years has been engaged in farming in Stanton county. He is prudent young man and has a brilliant future before himself. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Podany of Stanton count and like her companion was born and reared in this community. Her friends are many and are numbered by her acquaintances. Mr. and Mrs. Luxa will go to housekeeping on the old Luxa farm in Stanton where they are followed by the best wishes of their large circle of friends.

Thomas Cooper, 22, of Columbus, gives police a constant series of surprises. He just finished serving a 10-day sentence in the city jail for taking a bicycle without the formality of asking for it and riding the wheel to Schuyler in the night over snowbound roads. The bicycle was found by police.
    Meanwhile Cooper obtained a job at a garage. He saw the bicycle in the police station. He asked the police judge why the bicycle remained there. The chief said the boy from whom it was stolen did not have the money to pay the express charges back from Schuyler. Cooper paid the charges and told police to take the bike back to the boy.

J.B. Wangberg sold his 80 acre farm to William Pribnow for the price of $235 per acre. The farm is located 4 miles east and one mile south of West Point and is well improved.

Ex-president Woodrow Wilson, age 68, died February 3, 1924.

Casper Brockman, one of the prominent farmers of Stanton county, was a guest of Howells Chief of Police Dickey last Saturday, the reason being that the chief suspected something wrong and watched the gentleman and later searched his car where he located four gallons of what he termed "high-class hootch" and the little delivery which was not made cost Casper $100.00 and costs and the loss of his car. It is a lesson to him and no doubt to the party or parties to who he was to deliver it feel the loss as much as Casper does. Well, he will have to replenish his stock from elsewhere so that he could supply his regular trade.


February 7, 1924 - reprinted October 23, 1996

Last Friday's World Herald contained a likeness of Miss Lillian Barta, daughter of Mrs. Mary Barta of Howells. Miss Lillie makes her home in Omaha and posed for the picture in a masquerade costume made up entirely from the World-Herald news items etc. It was, we understand a masterpiece and Miss Lillie has many compliments paid upon the clever costume makeup.

Jos. Sucha has just disposed of 80 acres of land to Henry Thalken. The consideration was $200 per acre for unimproved land.
    Oscar Hild disposed of 40 acres of his farm to Jos. Richtig. The consideration in this deal was $175 per acre. This also is unimproved land.-Leigh world

Fire lashed on by a furious wind which attained the proportions of a gale, destroyed the G. Crawford harness shop, the Otto Stolzman jewelry shop, and the Carl Schwink implement store at Beemer at two o'clock Monday, resulting in a loss that will probably total twenty or twenty-five thousand dollars. Only the prompt discovery of the blaze by Chalk Marquardt and William Harder, both of Scribner, who were driving through the town, prevented a much larger destruction. The blaze started in the Crawford harness shop and flames were leaping high when it was discovered. The Scribner men awakened roomers in the burning building and spread a general alarm. The West Point and Wisner fire departments responded in a call for help.

Adolph Kluntke prominent farmer residing 2 miles north of Creston was killed Saturday night when his car ran off the edge of an embankment just beyond the Humphrey city limits.
    When the accident was discovered by a party of Humphrey people it was believed the victim had been dead for at least three hours. His body was found pinned beneath his machine.
    Mr. Kluntke had been to Humphrey and had started on the return trip to his home in Creston, traveling the main road between Humphrey and Madison. The accident occurred at the edge of town at a spot where his car could be seen from one direction only.
    He was driving a small Ford truck and had just crossed the railroad tracks. Apparently, in turning back into the road, he did not turn quick enough and drove off the side. The truck turned over and pinned him beneath it.


February 14, 1924 - reprinted March 29, 1995

Dr. Kavan has been a very busy man the past several days enacting the part of Dr. Stork. On that evening, he left a first-born baby girl at the Chas. Marinec home in the west part of town. He gifted the Gus Mohnsen home with a fine little girl and left husky boys at the homes of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Budin and Mr. and Mrs. Emil Blecha homes, north of Clarkson.

The new Clarkson High school orchestra made its first public appearance at the movie show last evening. They did exceedingly well for the first time. Rudolph Severa is the leader.

Rudolph Faiman was a Fremont visitor last Friday. On Monday he entered the employment at Karel's store, having taken up the place vacated by the death of Ludwig Powolny.

Pete Knecht is leaving today for Kansas City, Mo., to enroll at the Sweeney Automobile School of that city. Pete knows a good deal about cars and the training he will receive in the school will be so much more beneficial to him.

Jos. Pavlish has traded his farm of 160 acres, four miles southwest of this place, to Jos. Disterhaupt for an 840-acre ranch in Holt county. In the deal the Pavlish land went in at a valuation of $150 per acre and the Holt county land at $45.

Joseph Kastanek is getting lumber onto his five-acre tract in Wolf's addition to Clarkson with which to build at once a good sized residence; work on which commences at once.

Miss Olga Novotny is home from Oakdale since the beginning of the week. We understand that the Oakdale city school is closed tempoarily on account of a scarlet fever epidemic which has overtaken that part of the country.

Mr. and Mrs. John Janda and Emil Folda were at Abie and Linwood yesterday.
    Mr. Janda was looking after the farm he owns in the locality.

One Pound of .30c Fancy Chocolate Creams and one 48 lb. Sack of $2.00 Fancy Cream Flour, both of $1.70.

Mrs. Hall of Omaha is spending a brief visit with her daughter, Anabelle, here the past few days. Miss Hall is one of our high school teachers.


February 14, 1924 - reprinted May 24, 1995

The mortal remains of Mrs. Emil Petr of whose earthly departure we gave account in the last issue of the Press, were laid to eternal rest in the presence of a large gathering of friends and relatives from far and near.
    The services at the church and home were conducted jointly by Rev. B.A. Filipi and Rev. Jos. Havlik who paid high tribute to the memory of the deceased one.
    Especially beautiful were the numerous floral tributes. A count disclosed that over 900 people attended the services at the church.
    We are herewith reproducing a list of distant visitors of whom we caught glimpse during the sad rites: Mr. and Mrs. Fred F. Mundil, Linwood; Frank Dudek, Rogers; Richard Swoboda, Newman Grove; Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Whitney, Fullerton; Miss Tillie Kopietz, Detroit, Mich.; Mrs. G. Hagen and son, Wolf Point, Montana; Joseph Lichnovsky, So. Omaha; Frank J. Lichnovsky, So. Omaha; Joe Kopietz and wife, South Omaha; Adolph Vraspir and wife, Bruno; Theodore Otopal, Bruno; Miss Agnes Vraspir, Paxton, and many others from Madison; Stanton, Schuyler, Howells, and Leigh.

The funeral of Ludwig Powolny was also very largely attended which gave eloquent evidence that the young man had been held in high regard by his fellow citizens.
    The number of people in attendance ran far into the hundreds. Services were held at the Z.C.B.J. opera house, Otto Odvarka having delivered the eulogy over flower bedecked casket.
    Appropriate music was rendered by the Clarkson Band and the bereaved family evidently found profound consolation in extremely large assembly of friends. Six young men and six young ladies served as pall bearers and the floral offerings were both exquisite and large. The remains were laid to rest in the Boh. Slov. cemetery west of town.


February 21, 1924 - reprinted October 23, 1996

On February 14, the Christian Endeavor Society gave a supper party in the basement of the Presbyterian church in honor of their fathers and mothers. About sixty people were present. Supper was served at 6:30 and the guests found their places to the music of a march played by Miss Elinor Nob.
    There were five tables with centerpieces of red flowers. The Valentine idea was further carried out in the placards and mini baskets. Eight boys from the society were waiters, while the Misses Olga and Libbie Novotny, Vlasa Humlicek and Anabel Hall presided in the kitchen.
    The menu consisted of meat loaf with beet hearts, scalloped potatoes, creamed peas and carrots in heart-shaped timbales., Parker house rolls, pickles and olives, fruit salad, ice cream, cake and coffee.
    Victrola music furnished entertainment during the meal. Between courses a piano duet was played by the Misses Alma Karel and Alyce Filipi. Also the Misses Anabel Half and Elinor Nob combined their efforts in a humorous reading. The president of the society, Miss Elinor Noh, gave a toast of welcome and Mr. Bukacek responded in behalf of the parents. Rev. Filipi then made a few remarks concerning the work and purpose of the Christian Endeavor.

Mrs. Anna Pollard, wife of William Pollard of near Heun, died at her home after a lingering illness. Mrs. Pollard was thirty-eight years of age and the mother of eight children, ranging in age from 18 months to 17 years. She was a daughter of P. Costello, a pioneer settler of this county, and had she lived until the 21st of this month she would have reached the 18th anniversary of her marriage to Mr. Pollard. Burial was made in the Heun cemetery in the presence of very large gathering, the services having been conducted by three clergymen, namely, Rev. Folda, Rev. Dobson, and Rev. Vitko.

Jerry Novotny, son of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Novotny of this city, came near losing his Ford touring car. He was having some brazing done on the vehicle at the Lukl blacksmith shop and while the work was being performed by Mr. Lukl it was not noticed that gasoline was dripping from the carburetor on the floor which caught on fire from the torch and in less time than it takes to relate the story, the whole car was in one flame.
    A pyrene which happened to be on hand was at once turned on the blaze and after an exciting fight by those in the shop the fire was put out and the car saved. Jerry had nine gallons of gasoline in the supply exciting by those in the shop the fire was finally put out and the gallons of gasoline in the supply tank at the time of the fire and it was feared that this would explode. The damage is small.

A host of friends and relatives invaded the farm home of Mr. and Mrs. John Mastny, Jr. south of Clarkson and spent the day celebrating Mr. and Mrs. Mastny's tenth wedding anniversary. It was a merry affair and it is needless to say that the occasion was properly commemorated and enjoyed by all.
    Mr. and Mrs. Mastny were taken by complete surprise and knew nothing of the "frame-up" until after the guests had swarmed the yard. Knowing that they would catch Mrs. Mastny prepared for a party of this kind, various food stuff was brought by the visitors and when the time arrived all partook of a princely feast.
    Mr. and Mrs. Mastny also received numerous tin articles as gifts. Below are the names of those in attendance: Mike Zrust and family, Frank J. Zrust and family, Emil E. Musil and family, Frank J. Mastny and family, Ed. Shuster and family, Johnny Shuster and family, Anton Zrust and family, Louis Severa and family, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Zombie, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Her, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Tonuses, Misses Stacie Story, Josie Sterna, Libbie Fillip, Ester Fillip, Josie Fillip, Bertha Hued, Messrs. Ben Bayer, Emil Tonuses and Jos. Fillip.


February 21, 1924 - reprinted October 30, 1996

Clarkson Market Wheat - .92; Corn - .57; Oats - .40; Rye - .54; Hogs - 6.30; Butter - .25; Eggs - .25.

On Valentine day, Emil Fillipi of Pender and Miss Tillie Malasek of Walthill were married at Sioux City. Miss Anna E. Fillipi was the bridesmaid and Jerry Malasek was the best man. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vaclav Malasek of Walthill and the groom formerly made his home near Clarkson.

Albert Svoboda and his helper, A. Dolezal, arrived home from a two weeks' sojourn in Oklahoma where Albert is interested in a stone quarry.

The residence property belonging to the estate of the late Frank Sixta, Sr., and situated in the west part of Clarkson, was put up in auction sale yesterday but failed to find a buyer. The property was bid in by Frank Vidlak at $1800 but as the price seemed too low, the heirs decided to keep the property.

The hospitable home of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. R. Vitek was the center of a pretty Valentine party given in honor of their daughter, Norma, who attained her thirteenth birthday. Various parlor games appropriate to the occasion provided amusement after which all indulged in a big feast. Following is the list of guests in attendance: Sylvia Janecek, Marcella Slama, Evelyn Ruzicka, Marjorie Fajman, Mary Rehak, Lillie Nykodym, Lillie Novotny, Iola Fajman, Victor Pimper and Frankie Miller.

February 17th was the thirtieth anniversary of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. K. Vlach, residing north of town. They make no special preparation to commemorate the occasion, so instead, their relatives, who were of the opinion that the event was too great to be passed up arranged for a real surprise.
    Mr. and Mrs. Vlach were married at West Point, Nebraska, February 17, 1894, and made their home near Dodge until a few years ago when they purchased the old Jos. Tomes farm north of Clarkson.
    The list of visitors is made up of the following names: Mrs. Anna Vlach, Frank Vlach and family, Wm. Vlach and family, Mr. and Mrs. Emil Moelle, all of Leigh; Jos Luxa and family of near Butterfly; Fred Kemp and family of near Schuyler; A. J. Vlach and family of Clarkson; Mr. and Mrs. Chas Vlach of near Leigh; and Miss Marie Vlach who came down purposely from Omaha. There were exactly thirty people participating in the wedding dinner.

Mrs. G.A. Koza presented her husband in the presence of Dr. Knight with a fine baby boy. The father is rejoicing over the gift and is making arrangements at the post office to enlarge his helping crew which in due time can be taken over by the three bright Koza Brothers, sons of Mr. and Mrs. G. Koza. Congratulations.

Mrs. John Kopietz has been seriously ill and under the medical care of Dr. Knight. Mrs. Kopietz suffered with gall troubles several years ago but the past few years was not bothered with the ailment and felt real well. Her recent bereavement caused by the death of her daughter, Mrs. Emil Petr, coupled with other unresistable complications, is said to have renewed the former attack. Dr. Peterson of Fremont was called into consultation. Mrs. Kopietz at this writing is resting some what easier and is taken care of by a trained nurse.

The marriage of Frank Charipar and Miss Marie Done took place at the Catholic Church at Clarkson. Father Petlach performed the ceremony in the presence of Miss Bohumila Roucka and John Manak who acted as attendants to the contracting couple
    Mr. Charipar is an ex-service man and has worked at different places in the country surrounding Clarkson for a number of years.
    The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vaclava Done of Stanton County at whose home a wedding reception is being held. Mr. and Mrs. Charipar will reside on the Mrs. Tom Novotny farm south of Leigh.

Mayor A.J. Vlach received a telegram from the city officials of Geddes, South Dakota, informing him that a man by the name of Jos. Novotny died at Geddes and that the authorities are trying to get in touch with some of the relatives of the deceased man. Novotny was to have told someone before his death that he has relatives in the vicinity of Clarkson and it is on the strength of this statement that the city officials of Geddes are making a search for the dead man's kin in this part of the state.

The Clarkson firemen had a big meeting at which time they initiated two new members into the ranks of fireman-hood. Special rituals were prepared for the occasions and each applicant was given the "the first degree". Two more degrees will be given at later meetings and it will be then that the new applicants will become full fledge firemen. The new members were given a real tryout when called to the Ruzicka residence and all seemed to have performed their duty wonderfully.
    The list of new firemen reads as follows: Jos. A. Hanel, Ernest Hamsa, Frank Zdenek, John Knapp, Frank J. Vitek, Adolph Richtig, Louis Kacin, William Schulz, James Hampl and Rudolph Faiman.

The Emil R. Pinker household north of Howells greeted a newly born baby boy.

Stanley Tobias is home from Grand Island recuperating from his recent illness. He was brought home from Schuyler having been met there by his father. He is doing fine and it is only a matter of a few days when he will again be able to return to his studies.

Bert J. Pinker and his family left here for Omaha where they will make their permanent home. Mr. Pinker's son-in-law, Jim Malik, departed for St. Louis, Missouri, where he was promised a steady job. Messrs. Pinker and Malik were tenants on the Vaclav Podany farm northwest of Clarkson.

If you are looking for a good time be sure not to miss the big non-stop dance to be given at Clarkson next Saturday. A band and orchestra will furnish the music.

The seniors of the high school will present a program in honor of Washington's Birthday.


February 21, 1924 - reprinted November 6, 1996

Last week we made mention of the marriage of Miss Anna Renner and Nick Mueller and this week we are completing that item.
    The young people were married at St. John's Lutheran parsonage at Council Bluffs. They were attended by Wm. Renner and Miss Frances Chilcoat. Both the bride and bridegroom come from pioneer families of this vicinity. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Renner of Stanton County and the bridegroom is a son of Mrs. Henry Mueller, formerly of Maple Creek precinct, this county, now residing at Lindsay. They are respectable young people and enjoy the friendship of a host of friends who wish them a most happy wedded life.

Macedonia Community News

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Novotny and the formers' brother, Steven, and Mr. and Mrs. V.J. Malena and son, Adolph, visited at the Jose. Lauda home.

Chas. E. Church hauled some shingles from Leigh which he will use in repairing his buildings.

Tillie Lauda visited at the Rosenberry-Moeller home.

Betty Porter and daughter, Beth, are now staying at the C.E. Church home.

Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Lauda visited at the Jos. V. Podany home north of Clarkson.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Trojan and son, Donald, visited at the George Botsch home south of Leigh

Lavina and Calvin Rosenberry visited at the Rosenberry-Moeller home.

Mr. and Mrs. Emil Hoff and daughter, Elaine, visited at the Martin Rosenberry home.

Many from this vicinity attended Albert Busse's sale northwest of Leigh.

Martin Rosenberry and family visited at the John S. Novotny home Friday evening

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Busch and son, Eugene, Mr. and Mrs. Will Busch and children, Mr. and Mrs. Will Steiner and children, Mary and Emil Teply, John, Clarence and Theresa Callely, Grace and George Woods spent Sunday at the Frank Trojan home.

Below is a reproduction of a clipping handed in for publication. Grandma Kupka, who has just passed her 95th milestone at her home in Crete; is a grandmother of Mrs. W. J. Kavan, wife of Dr. Kavan of Clarkson. Mrs. Kupka is also a grandmother of our former city electrician, Vance Kowari, and we believe their many friends will be glad to read the item.
    Crete, Neb., Feb. 9 - Grandma Veronika Kupka celebrated her ninety-fifth birthday at her home in this city on February 3. She is still hale and hearty and does her own work. She lives just across the road from her only daughter, in her own little home.
    Mrs. Kupka came to America with her husband, Martin Kupka, in 1856 and settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they remained until 1866, when they came to Nebraska and settled on a homestead two miles west of Crete. They remained there until 1890, when they came to town and bought the little house in which she still resides. Mr. Kupka died sometime ago. Their five sons and one daughter were born on the farm.
    Mrs. Kupka prepared the dinner at her own house with help of a few neighbor ladies and there were only herself and three of the sons able to be present on account of the storm. These, with their families and two grandsons, Vance and Joe Kolarik, made up the group at the celebration. A large handsome bouquet of roses was presented to "Grandma" and was the centerpiece of the table. She also received a number of gifts of candy and flowers.
    Mrs. Kupka has twenty-five grandchildren, thirty-three great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren, making five generations. At present she bids fair to reach the hundredth milestone.

Emil Iwansky has invested into a cleaning and pressing outfit and has rented the building four doors south of the Howells State Bank where he will be ready in a few days to do all kinds of cleaning and pressing of clothes. Emil has had some experience in this line of work and everyone knows that he is an ambitious and energetic young man and we are sure that he will build up a profitable business.

Since our last report the following successful live stock feeders of Howells were on the market with finished live stock: Adolph Svitak, John Maska, Ed. Schlautman, George Limback, Fred Sindelar, Karel Cerny, Jerry Lolezal, Jos. T. Glodowski, Theo. Schlautman, Jos. F. Marik, Frank Zvacek, J.E. Purchal, James Kucera, Jr., Mike Sindelar, Vincenc Tresnak, Frank Busch, Rudolph Shanle and a large list of other farmers who marketed from one to several wagon loads of hogs and small numbers of cattle that were sold to the Farmers Lumber & Grain Co. on the local market.

Alex Hruby, who is manager of a store at Dwight, was an over-Sunday visitor in Howells. He tells us that he expects to move his family to Dwight on about March 1st. On his return trip he accompanied Jerry Hlubocky and the latter's son who also visited here from Sunday until Monday and who also are former residents of our little city.

W. I Strehle went to Omaha to attend the great automobile show now being held in that city. On his return trip he expects to bring another new Ford.



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