Denton Community 
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Biographies A-L

Many biographies are from 
"LINCOLN The Capitol City 
and Lancaster Co., NE" 
Published Chicago, Illinois.
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company 1916

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OAKLEY ADAMS 
Oakley Adams, who since 1895 has lived retired in Emerald, where he has a pleasant home and eight acres of land, was born in Monroe county, New York, in the town of Hamlin in March 1847. His parents, Lewis and Jane (Haggerty) Adams, were natives of New Jersey. The father was a farmer by occupation and followed that pursuit in New York for many years, there passing away in 1897. For more than a quarter of a century he had survived his wife, who died in 1871. Oakley Adams was reared and educated in New York and the total number of days which he spent in school was but two hundred and twenty. 

At the age of fourteen he joined the army, enlisting for service in the Civil war, but his father brought him back home, feeling that he was too young to serve. When sixteen years of age he began firing on the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, now the Erie Railroad, and continued in that employ for twelve years, spending the last seven years of that period as an engineer. He next made his way into the oil country of Pennsylvania and devoted three years to putting down oil wells. At the end of that time he was married and in 1880 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, here purchasing eighty acres of land on section 22, Middle Creek precinct. 

He at once began improving this tract and operated it until 1895, when he sold his farm and removed to Emerald, where he purchased a pleasant residence standing in the midst of eight acres of land. He then retired and has since enjoyed a well earned rest, having leisure to engage in those things which are of most interest and pleasure to him. In June 1880, Mr. Adams was married to Miss Katherine Kinney, of Wellsville, New York, where she was born March 14, 1859. They never had any children of their own but reared an adopted daughter, Emma Trumbley, now the wife of Ira Davison, residing in Denver. 

The religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Adams is that of the Baptist church and he gave an acre of ground to serve as the site upon which to build a house of worship. In politics he is independent and fraternally he is connected with the Masonic lodge of Lincoln. His has been an active and useful life in which diligence and earnest purpose have brought him his success. While upon the farm he spent eighteen years in dairying as well as in general agricultural pursuits and his life record proves what may be accomplished when energy and enterprise lead the way. 


CHARLES HENRY ARMANN 
Charles Henry Armann, who is successfully engaged in farming the family homestead in Centerville precinct, Lancaster county, has never had occasion to regret his choice of an occupation, for he has found agricultural pursuits congenial as well as profitable. His birth occurred in Zaleski, Vinton county, Ohio, on the 10th of May, 1878. His father, Henry Armann, was born in the city of Bremen, Germany, March 21, 1838, and remained there until he was sixteen years old, when he came to the United States, landing in New Orleans. For a short time he resided in Cincinnati, Ohio. There he followed the cabinetmaker's trade, which he had learned in Germany, and later he went to Portsmouth, Ohio, where he worked in the mines and also as a wagon maker in the employ of the mining company. 

Subsequently he went to Kentucky, where he followed his trade for some time, after which he returned to Ohio. He worked in the coal mines there and also gave some attention to cabinet work, specializing in making coffins. Following the outbreak of the Civil war, he enlisted in 1861 in the Fifty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and remained at the front until the close of hostilities. He fought in the engagement at Fort Donelson, participated in the capture of Fort Henry, in the battles of Shiloh and Corinth and in the Vicksburg campaign. In the engagements which preceded the taking of that Confederate stronghold he was twice wounded, losing part of one finger and being shot through the head. 

He recovered from his injuries, however, and after the close of that campaign was assigned to convey prisoners to Ship Island. During the early period of his military service he was in General Hancock's corps and General Osterhaus' brigade, but he was at length transferred to General Banks' command and went on the famous Red River expedition. He also served under General Franz Sigel and was a member of what was known as the Pioneer Corps. He was in all of the battles of the Red River campaign, including that of Pleasant Hill, and subsequently went to New Orleans, where he was discharged in December, 1864. He returned to Cincinnati and soon afterward went to Scioto county, Ohio. In 1865 he reenlisted for another year, this time becoming a member of the Eighth United States Regiment. 

He was assigned to the defense service and remained with the colors until the end of the war. Mr. Armann then returned to Ohio and took up his residence in Vinton County, where he conducted a general store. Later he removed to Portsmouth, Ohio, and operated a brewery there for some time, but at length removed to Zaleski, where he was employed in the car building shops of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad until 1880. He then came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and  purchased two hundred and forty acres on section 17, Centerville precinct, which was unimproved railroad land. He soon returned to Ohio, and in 1883 came with his two eldest sons to Lancaster county and began placing his homestead under cultivation. They also erected a residence and in the following spring Mrs. Armann and the other children arrived here. 

Mr. Armann was actively engaged in farming until 1899, when he retired, but he resided upon the homestead until 1910. He then removed to Lincoln and there he made his home until his death, which occurred on the 12th of May, 1916. On the 18th of April, 1866, he married Miss Mary Deutchel, who died February 22, 1875. Of the five children born to them one died in infancy and another at the age of seven years. Those still living are: Frank, a resident of Wheatland, Wyoming; and Mrs. Dora Betten and Abraham, both residents of Martel, Nebraska. Mr. Armann was again married in September, 1876, his second union being with Mrs. Ruhamah Livingstone, a sister or his first wife and a native of Walsa, Germany. She was nine years of age when she accompanied her parents to Ohio, where her father worked in the furnaces for a time and later turned his attention to farming. She is still living and makes her home in Lincoln. 

The children of the second marriage are: C. H. Armann and Mrs. Emilie Wittsbruck, both of Martel. By her first marriage Mrs. Armann had four children, who are still living, namely: Mrs. H. H. Sieck, of Lincoln; Mrs. S. F. Griffin, of Martel; and Frank and John Livingstone, both of Martel. Besides these children there is also a foster son, William Siecksmeyer, of Martel. Charles H. Armann has resided in Lancaster county since 1884 and received the greater part of his education in the public schools here, although he attended school for six months in Ohio. As a boy and youth he assisted his father on the home farm and after reaching mature years continued to work for the latter until he was twenty-six years old. He then took charge of the operation of the homestead and has since farmed that place, with the exception of one year, which he spent on the Pacific coast. 

He understands thoroughly the methods of farming which are most efficient in this section and as he is energetic and businesslike he has met with a gratifying measure of success. He grows the usual crops and also raises shorthorn, Red Polled and Holstein cattle and Hampshire hogs. Mr. Armann was married in Lincoln on the 19th day of March, 1903, to Miss Emma Mae Griffin, who was born in Centerville precinct on the 14th of September, 1883. Her parents, S. S. and Mary Emma (Walker) Griffin, were both born in Iowa. The mother has passed away, but the father is still living and is recognized as one of the leading citizens of Lancaster county, Nebraska. 

He founded the village of Martel and owns and operates a grain elevator there and also conducts a general store under the name of the Martel Mercantile Store. To Mr. and Mrs. Armann have been born two children: Delton Leroy, whose natal day was the 24th of  October, 1903; and Esther Treva, born March 12, 1905. Mr. Armann is a stanch republican in politics and for two years has served in the office of deputy tax assessor. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally belongs to Damocles Lodge, No.60, K. P., at Hickman, in which he has served as master at arms, and he was formerly identified with the Modern Woodmen of America at Martel. He is not only respected for his energy and ability, but is also highly esteemed because of his integrity and public spirit.


CARL H. BECKER 
On the list of Lancaster county's native sons appears the name of Carl H. Becker, who was born in Middle Creek precinct April 14, 1879, his parents being Carl F. and Mary (Kloeckmeyer) Becker. The father was born in Wisconsin and the mother in Illinois. Carl F. Becker was a farmer by occupation and in 1867 came to Lancaster county, where he purchased land. He made the trip with his parents, who also bought land, and he became the owner of the farm which is now operated by his son, Carl H. Becker. His diligence and determination were soon manifest in the changed appearance of the place, which he set about improving, operating the farm until 1903, when he retired. 

He was also engaged in grain business at Emerald for eighteen years and both branches of his business proved profitable. He is now retired, making his home in Emerald, no longer finding it necessary to resort to active business in order to provide for support as he has accumulated a competence sufficient for his remaining days. Carl H. Becker was reared and educated in this county and continued under the parental roof until he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he began farming on his own account by renting the old home place of one hundred and fifty acres.. There he continued to reside until 1911, when he purchased eighty acres of that tract-the farm upon which he was born, on section 26, Middle Creek precinct. 

He has made splendid improvements upon the place and today has one of the fine farm homes in the county. In addition to cultivating his own land he also cultivates a rented farm of one hundred and fifty acres, and carefully, systematically and wisely are his interests carried on that a gratifying measure of success has crowned his efforts. He is now conducting a dairy, milking about twenty head of cows, all high grade Jerseys. He is one of the directors of the Lancaster Milk Producers Association and has been one of its stockholders from its organization. He was also formerly a stockholder in the Emerald State Bank. 

On the 31st of January 1901, Mr. Becker was married to Miss Mary Nobbmann, a daughter of Christian and Wilhelmina (Wendt) Nobbmann, both of whom were natives of Germany. They came to America in an early day, settling in Iowa, where the father engaged in farming for a number of years, and later they arrived in Lancaster County, Nebraska. There the father purchased land, which he continued to cultivate throughout his remaining days, his death occurring August 28, 1904. His widow still survives and occupies the old homestead in Middle Creek precinct. 

Mr. and Mrs. Becker have became the parents of three children: Otto C., born November 17, 1901; Walter J. H., born April 3, 1903; and Berdina W., born March 2, 1908. Politically Mr. Becker is an earnest republican and for four years he served as assessor of his precinct, while for six years he was road overseer. His religious faith is that of the German Lutheran church and in its teachings he finds the guiding principles of his life, shaping his relations with his fellowmen. Those who know him esteem him highly, recognizing in him one who can be relied upon to follow the dictates of his conscience and to shape his course according to the recognized commercial and business standards.


CHARLES CHRISTIAN BETTENHAUSEN
Charles Christian Bettenhausen, the popular and efficient cashier of the Princeton State Bank, was born in Princeton on the 4th of July, 1888. a son of Christian and Katherine (Hein) Bettenhausen. The father came to the United States with his parents when fourteen years of age and the family located upon a farm in Witt county, Illinois. In early manhood he farmed for some time in Benton county, Iowa, but in 1879 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska; having purchased one hundred and sixty acres on section 12, Buda precinct, the year previous. The place was originally railroad land but he bought it from Henry Schraeder, who had made some improvements thereon.

Mr. Bettenhausen brought all of the land under cultivation as soon as possible and is still engaged in farming there. His wife came to America in girlhood and they were married in Benton county, Iowa. She, too, survives. Charles C. Bettenhausen was educated in the district schools of Buda precinct and gave his father the benefit of his labor until the fall of 1915, when he was chosen cashier of the Princeton State Bank, which position he has since filled. He has fully demonstrated his fitness for the place and under his careful management the business of the bank has grown steadily. He recognizes that the first essential of successful banking is to safeguard the interests of depositors and stockholders and thus merit the confidence of the public, and his policy while progressive has been tempered. with conservatism. 

His brother, Fred J . Bettenhausen, is now serving as assistant cashier of the bank. Charles C. has recently opened a lumber yard in Princeton and is meeting with success in this new venture. l\1r. Bettenhausen is independent in politics, voting for the best candidate .without regard to his party affiliation. In religious faith he is a German Lutheran. He occupies an important position for one of his years and his continued success seems assured. 


EDWARD F. BOHL 
Edward F. Bohl was a successful farmer of Centerville precinct and his demise, which occurred in 1904, was recognized as a loss to his community. A native of Lancaster county, his birth occurred in Highland precinct on the 7th of January 1878, and he was a son of Nicholas Bohl. He passed his boyhood and youth upon the home farm and when not attending the public schools devoted his time to assisting his father. On reaching mature years he determined to make farming his life work and purchased eighty acres of land on section 20, Centerville precinct, on which he made his home until called by death on the 11th of October, 1904. He made many improvements upon his farm and his well directed labors as a farmer and stock raiser were rewarded by a good financial return. 

Mr. Bohl was married in Lincoln on the 22nd of January 1901, to Miss Amelia Frohn, who was born in Centerville precinct and is a daughter of William Frohn, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. To this union were born two sons, Elmer William and Clarence Nicholas. Mr. Bohl was a stanch advocate of the principles of the democratic party and loyally supported its candidates at the polls, but never sought office. He had a wide acquaintance throughout the county and was most highly esteemed where best known as his dominant qualities were those which characterize the highest type of manhood. His wife resided in Martel for a number of years after his death in order to afford her toils the advantages of the schools there, but in the spring of 1910 returned to the farm. Mrs. Bohl is a member of the Centerville Methodist church and highly respected in her community.



Mr. & Mrs. John Frederick Brahmstadt

JOHN FREDERICK BRAHMSTADT 
John Frederick Brahmstadt was a well known farmer of Olive Branch precinct and his demise was the occasion of much sincere regret. A native of Germany, he was born in Mecklenburg on the 7th of November 1838, a son of Frederick Brahmstadt, who engaged in blacksmithing in Germany. Our subject remained in the fatherland until he was seventeen years old, when, in company with his brothers, Henry and William, he came to America and made his way to Chicago, Illinois. He worked as a laborer there for a time and subsequently was employed as a farm hand. Following his marriage, which occurred in Chicago, he farmed in Cook county for several years and then went to Effingham, Illinois, where he established a general store. 

He engaged in business there for a number of years but at the end of that time lost his store by fire and in 1870 he became a resident of York, Nebraska, which was then but a tiny hamlet. He built the second house in the town and started a general store, which he conducted for eight years. In 1878 Mr. Brahmstadt removed to Cherry county, Nebraska, and became the first settler in that county. Previous to his arrival there the only white residents of the county were the soldiers in the fort, and he experienced all of the hardships and dangers incident to life upon the western frontier. For fourteen years he operated a cattle ranch but disposed of that place in 1892 and went to Blair, Nebraska, where he purchased ten acres of orchard land. 

Eight years later, in 1900, he came to Lancaster County, Nebraska, and began farming three hundred and twenty acres of land in section 9, Olive Branch precinct, which belonged to his wife. He concentrated his energies upon the operation of that farm during his remaining years, dying there on the 6th of November 1913, and was buried in the Methodist cemetery at Kramer. Mr. Brahmstadt and Miss Henrietta Fritz were married in 1857 in Chicago, Illinois. She was born in Germany but emigrated to America in her girlhood and located near Effingham, Illinois. She passed away in Chicago in 1876, leaving six children: John, who is a horse trainer by occupation; Gustave, who is farming in Idaho; Edward, deceased, who was a rancher of Cherry county. Nebraska ; Louis, who is operating a sawmill in Arbor, Washington; Emma, the wife of Henry Hollman, a farmer of Olive Branch precinct, Lancaster county Nebraska; and William Henry, who is operating the home place in Lancaster county. 

Mr. Brahmstadt's second marriage occurred on the 2nd of May 1877, on the old Kramer farm in Olive Branch precinct, his bride being Mrs. William Hollman, nee Sophie Kramer. Her parents, Henry and Margaret (Schaeper) Kramer, were born in the province of Westphalia, Germany. The latter engaged in farming there for some time but in 1845 came to America and first located in St. Louis, Missouri, whence he went to Clayton county, Iowa. There he bought government land which he farmed until his removal to Lancaster county, Nebraska in 1865. He filed On ninety acres of raw land on section 9, Olive Branch precinct, and at once began improving his place. For three years he lived in a dugout but at the end of that time erected a log house. 

He resided upon the homestead during his remaining days, his death occurring on the 6th of January, 1914, when he had reached the venerable age of ninety-three years. He was buried in the Methodist cemetery at Kramer. His wife passed away on the 6th of August 1900, and was also buried at Kramer. He gave the land on which the town of Kramer is built to the Missouri Pacific Railroad and the town is named in his honor. 

Mrs. Brahmstadt was born in Clayton county, Iowa, on the 2nd of April 1852, but when thirteen years of age came with her parents by wagon to Lancaster county, Nebraska. By her marriage she became the mother of eight children, of whom four survive, namely: Benjamin, who is operating an elevator in Kramer; Sophie, the wife of Frank Thompson, who is depot agent at Kramer ; Elsie, who married Edwin Hollman, a farmer of Gage county; and Justus Fred, who owns the elevator at Kramer in connection with his brother.

Mr. Brahmstadt was a republican in his political belief and was one of the first commissioners of Cherry county, Nebraska, and also served on the school board there. His religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church and he often filled the pulpit at Kramer when the regular minister was absent. His life measured up to high standards of morality, and his genuine worth gained him a high place in the estimation of all who knew him. 


CHARLES M. BRANSON
Charles M. Branson, living on section 10, Yankee Hill precinct, where his time and energies are given to agricultural interests, was born in Fulton county, Illinois, July 19, 1853, a son of Zebulon and Rachel (Braucher) Branson, both of. whom were natives of Ohio. The paternal ancestors came to America in 1628 from Wales and in the maternal line he is descended from "ancestors who came from Holland about 1760. His father was a farmer by occupation and in 1820 removed to Illinois, settling in Sangamon county. He afterward became a resident of Fulton county, that state, and in 1862, when forty-five years of age, he enlisted as a member of Company I, One Hundred and Third Illinois Infantry. 

He became captain of Company B and met death in the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, in Georgia. He had participated in nineteen regular engagements and his uniform at Lookout Mountain was pierced with twenty-seven bullets. Charles M. Branson was reared and educated in Illinois, being graduated from Hedding College, at Abingdon, in 1874, with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, while in 1877 the master's degree was conferred upon him. Going to New York he taught school there for a year. After a year spent in the east he returned to Illinois where he again engaged in teaching until 1878. The last school of which he was principal was that at Altoona, Illinois. 

On the 22nd of August, 1877, Mr. Branson was united in marriage to Miss Ida D. Currier of Bureau county, Illinois, a daughter of Jonathan T. and Martha J. (Hoblit) Currier, who were natives of Vermont and Ohio respectively. The father, a farmer by occupation, removed to Bureau county, Illinois, at an early period in the development of that locality and there he engaged extensively in farming for many years, adding to his holdings from time to time until he became the owner of many farms. He died in February, 1908, but his widow still survives. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Branson have been born four children: Lois Stewart, the wife of Frank S. Camp, of Lincoln, by whom she has one son, Daniel Branson Camp; Bernice Marie, an illustrator, living at home; Charles Blaine, a dentist of Seattle, Washington, who married La Vinia Young and has two children, Rachel Marion and Bernine Elizabeth; and Joe Braucher, living at home. In 1878 Mr. Branson, after his marriage, began farming in Stark county, Illinois, but in 1880 returned to the old home in Fulton county, Illinois, where he remained until 1883. In that year he came to Lancaster County, Nebraska, and purchased his present farm of two hundred and fifty acres on sections 10 and 11, Yankee Hill precinct.

He has made splendid improvements upon the place and now has one of the attractive farm properties of the county on which ate three sets of buildings. This is known as Riverside Place and was first developed by T. H. Leavitt, of the Burlington Railroad. Mr. Branson began dealing in shorthorn cattle and has continued in that business for many years, being widely known as a breeder of shorthorn cattle and also of Poland China hogs. He has had on hand as many as two hundred and fifty head of fine shorthorn cattle at a time. Since taking up his abode upon his farm in 1883 he has resided continuously thereon save for a period of eight years which he spent in Lincoln to educate his children. 

In 1913 he was sent to Panama as revenue collector and thus served until the Adamson act came into effect in April 1914. To his farm property he has added by further purchase until he is now the owner of over three hundred acres of finely improved land. Mr. Branson is well known in the Masonic fraternity, being a member of Lincoln Lodge, No.19, A. F. & A. M., Lancaster Chapter, No.6, R. A. M., and Lincoln Commandery, N 0. 4, K. T. He is also identified with the Mystic Shrine. He votes with the democratic party.


THYS BROEKEMA 
Thys Broekema, a member of the firm of George Broekema & Company, furniture dealers and undertakers of Hickman, is one of the reliable, energetic and successful business men of the town. He gives the greater part of his time to the management of his business affairs, which are in a prosperous condition, as George Broekema & Company are accorded a large share of the public patronage in their lines. He was married on the 22nd of August  1909 at Maysville, Missouri, to Miss Lois Kline, a daughter of Wel and Mary (Stevens) Kliner, natives of Ohio. To this union has been born a daughter, Anna Gertrude, whose natal day was September 6, 1913. He supports the republican party at the polls and takes a commendable interest in the welfare of his community, but is not an office seeker. He is vice president of the Southern Lancaster County Old Settlers Association and is also a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias. 


JOSEPH SINCLAIR BROWN was born in Kentucky in June 1870. His parents, Benjamin Franklin Brown and Judith Morris Brown, were also born in Kentucky. Joseph probably arrived in Lincoln about 1890 or 1891 as he is listed in the Lincoln City Directory as a student at the Lincoln Business College in 1891 and 1892. 

In 1893 Joseph becomes Assistant Manager of the Inter-State Newspaper Company, which was located at 1118 M Street. The Inter-State Newspaper published the Denton Record in addition to several other area newspapers. Joseph was Assistant Manager for only one year, as he became manager of the newspaper company in 1894.

Joseph became a Mason and was initiated into Lancaster Lodge #54 on Dec 14, 1894. He received his Fellowcraft Degree on Jan 14, 1895. On Feb 22, 1895, he was raised to a Master Mason. 

Jan 15, 1896, Joseph Brown married Amy [Edith] West. Joseph was 25 years old and Amy was 23 years. It was a quiet wedding in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Homer West at 1418 F Street. Rev. Lewis Gregory performed the ceremony. After the wedding the "company partook of a sumptuous wedding feast." The bride wore a dress of white silk trimmed in pearls and real lace. Amy carried a bouquet of crimson rose buds. The Nebraska State Journal stated, "Mr. Brown is one of Lincoln's bright young businessmen as is shown by the responsible position which he holds as business manager of the Inter-State Newspaper union." The newly weds spent four weeks traveling to Chicago, Galesburg and other eastern cities. (From: Nebraska State Journal, Sunday, Jan 19, 1896, page 4, column 2.) 

* The original article is copyright © 2002 by Kathie Harrison for Southwest-Lancaster County Genealogical Society & the Denton Historical Society of Nebraska. The additions and corrections entered in brackets in the main text and Howard G. Aylesworth, Jr. compiled footnoted material. Footnoted sources are: Marion Aylesworth Murch (formerly Marion Brown Aylesworth; nee, Marion West Brown; and also known as “Moo Moo” by her grandchildren and great grandchildren) and family documents. 

The 1900 Nebraska Census shows Joseph Brown and his family living in Lancaster County, 5th Ward. Joseph is head of the family; 28 years old and married for 4 years. His occupation is listed as a publisher and he owned his own home. Amy Brown, his wife, is 26 years old. Amy was born January 1872 in Illinois. Amy's father was born in Illinois and her mother was born in New York. Harley F. Brown, son of Joseph and Amy, is 5 years old and was born April 1895. 

The 1910 Nebraska Census lists Joseph as the Publisher of a newspaper. Harley is now 15 years old. Mrs. Homer West, Amy's mother, is living with them. She is 69 years old and a widow. Anna Burk, 21 years old, is living with the family. Her occupation is listed as a servant. 

The 1920 Nebraska Census lists Joseph as Publisher of a newspaper. Joseph and Amy now have a 4-year-old daughter named Marion W. Marion was born in Nebraska and attended school. Lydia Finkey, 27 years, is living with the family and is listed as a roomer and as a stenographer for a lawyer. 

Amy Brown dies in February 1921. Her funeral was Monday, February 7, 1921, at the family home at 1448 B Street. Dr. W.W. Bolt, of Plymouth Congregation Church, conducted the service and Miss Lenore Buckett sang. The pallbearers were J.A. Richenbach, Colonel F.D. Edger, Colonel J.P. Bratt, C.F. McCain, Edward E. Gustin, and M.L. Williams. She was buried at Wyuka Cemetery. (From: The Lincoln Sunday Star, February 6, 1921, page 2, Columns 1 & 2.) 

The 1924 Lincoln City Directory shows that Joseph has married Marion O. Marion came to Nebraska in 1890 from Illinois, where she taught school as a young woman. She taught in the Schuyler Schools and then moved to Minnesota, where she taught at Virginia, in the iron regions of northern Minn. She returned to Nebraska when she married Joseph in 1924. She was a member of the First Plymouth Congregational Church. 

In 1927 Joseph is no longer working for the Inter-State Newspaper. He is now Department Manager of the McKelvie Publishing Company, which was located at 1400 P Street. 

[One Saturday in 1932] Marion and Joseph went to the theater and after returning had sat on the porch visiting. When Marion retired for the evening she complained of severe pains in her head and lapsed into unconsciousness. She suffered a paralytic stroke and died Mon, Sept 19, 1932, at the family home at 1448 B Street. Her survivors were listed as her husband, Joseph; a daughter, Marion, at home; a son, Harley, of Los Angeles; a sister Mrs. Clara Colvin, of Sparta, Minnesota; and a brother, Thomas West, of Galesburg, Illinois. 

The newspaper stated, "Mr. Brown, a prominent pioneer resident of Lincoln, is head of the legal advisory department of the McKelvie Publishing Company.” Funeral services for Marion were held Wednesday, Sept 21 at Robert's Chapel. Rev. Ben F. Wyland officiated at the service. She was buried in Wyuka Cemetery. (From Lincoln Star, Mon, Sept 19, 1932, p 1, c 7, and Tues, Sept 20, 1932, p 12, c 6.) 

In 1938 Joseph S. Brown retired from McKelvie Publishing Company. 

In 1939 the Lincoln City Directory lists Loretta M. as Joseph's wife. They resided at 1448 B Street. 

Joseph received his 50-year membership medal from the Masons in 1945. On Oct 31, 1958, he received the Bronze Jordan Medal for the oldest living member of Masonic Lancaster Lodge #54, which he retained until his death. 

May 1960 … Joseph's third wife, Loretta, died. She was a member of the First Plymouth Congregational Church. Rev. Paul C. Johnston conducted the funeral and Mary Alice Macy was the accompanist. Survivors included her husband, Joseph; daughter Mrs. Charles Wilpan of Los Angeles; sister, Mrs. John Hollingsworth of Lincoln. Loretta's memorials were used to create a bed of roses in her memory at the Capitol City Rose Garden. (From: Lincoln Star, May 30, 1960, page 9, column 7 and May 31, 1960, page 14, column 7.) 

Joseph died June 12, 1966, in Wilmette, Illinois [eight days shy of his 96th birthday]. He was a member of the First Congregational Church for 50 years. Survivors included his daughter, Mrs. Howard Aylesworth of Wilmette, Illinois; and one granddaughter. [ix] His service included Masonic rites. He was buried at Wyuka Cemetery. 

Notes 

Marion Brown Aylesworth gives the following account. Benjamin F. Brown (b. May 5, 1832, d. October 22, 1905) and Judith Morris (b. 1836, d. 1892) were married in Russellville Kentucky. Judith Morris was the niece of Robert Morris, a financial backer of the Revolutionary War. He was a political participant during the formation of the Republic and was present during the framing of the Constitution. Of their thirteen children ten lived: 

John Loren (had children); Hiram Allen (a doctor, son is Claude Brown); Sarah Louise (married a Baugham); Cynthia (married a Simms, son Claude, Pacific Grove); William Thomas Claudius (died at birth); Harriett (married Ben Thornburg); Joseph Sinclair (b. June 20, 1870); Nancy (married an Ogden, Portland OR); Mary Winston (“Molly”, married a Norris, Armstrong MO); Margaret (married a Hensel, California in 30’s); Zantippa Julizanne (“Tippy”, married Frank Theobald, Fort Collins CO). 

Although they owned slaves they did not support slavery and were associated with the underground railway during the Civil War period. This, and perhaps their activities during Reconstruction, was the basis for being asked to leave Kentucky. 

In March 1961, now living with his daughter and family in Grand Rapids MI, “Joe” Brown wrote the following letter to his nephew Claude. The original text is: 

“It was on Oct. 31, 1879 we left Kentucky. I was nine years old. I clearly recall the wagon all packed and ready for ten of us to get in and move on. in our back yard was a large Coffee tree making wonderful shade, under which sat my Grandfather, a rather stern quiet man who was emotionally shaken by seeing us go knowing he would never see us again. He died about a year later at age 72. 

“The real cause of Dads going west was little Joe. I had been suffering with the ague for months. Every other day it would attack me and I was about skin and bone. It left me when we got to Kansas, at which time a slice of bacon cooked at the campfire blaze on a green stick was wonderful eating. 

“Getting into Nebraska the first thing that got me were a half dozen Indians setting on a bench in front of a store. As I remember Beatrice it had perhaps a population of about 600, with just one main street. 

“We got into Western about sundown that evening. I distinctly recall one rather larger house over to the extreme East side. I believe it was where the Thornburg boys Father lived at that time there was only one store, and to call it a store would be rather flattering it as the big end of the business was selling whiskey. It was located where Sawers Bank building and owned by Mr. Billie Bench. 

“Well it was now getting almost dusk, but on we went two miles North, one mile West, one mile north, then just one half mile West. On the left side of the road was Uncle Binks home where all ten of us piled out to be welcomed by our good Uncle Sinclair and Aunt Mary. Oh how I did love them. Where they put us away at night I do not know, and we were there for a few days. 

“In a few days we all moved to a place Uncle had rented for us which is two miles North of Western and one mile West and the house was about a quarter mile South on the East side of the road about three city blocks from the Kasbler home. 

“And right here was the tragedy of my life. Mother and Father had gone to your Fathers house to be away a few hours leaving us children to care for things. So we thot we would have some popcorn. Well the stovepipe went through the second floor with a sort of protector to hold it from the wood, but we got the pipe hot and it didn’t protect. 

“The house burned down with every thing we had in the World but what we had on our backs. But there were good people around there than as they are to day, and they came in force in a few days they had built two sod houses, and they were really very comfortable. at any time in my life when I thot I had trouble I only had to think of Mom & Dads faces at the time they were looking at that hole in the ground with every thing the had in ashes and my troubles soon vanished. 

“Most folks around Western were poor as the word implies, but we were dreadfully poor. These Trade Union guys we are supporting right now (so they can have their beer) are rich as compared to my Dad left without a dollar and a big family to support. It was hard for young folks to get work. My oldest sister had a job as (hired girl) with a family for a dollar and a half a week. Her saving from that went down in the fire. 

My second sister got a job to teach in the Laudenslacher district. I believe she boarded with them five days a week. Wage $25 dollars a month. I don’t know what she paid for board, but I am sure it was very reasonable as she thot a lot of the family. If I am not mistaken they are sorter related to Lena. We made the trip in just 31 days 1500 miles, which was said to be very good. 

“Of course we had to have something to burn to keep us warm that following winter. Had no money for coal & so it was dead wood as there were, and thin out where trees were crowding using his own judgment as to the thinning process. In that way we got our wood and kept warm. 

“It was good of Mr. Eable and I took the occasion to tell him so when he was on the excurism to the North west with the Nebraska Farmer. I had a part in conducting that excursion. I also told him what nice folks you and Lena were, & ‘ bygoley ‘ he agreed with me. It was also on that trip I was sworn in as a member of the tribe of Black Foot Indians by Chief Two Gun Whitecap. I have his picture in my room right now with me so I consider myself part Indian and respect the history of my tribe and very much dislike Setting Bull who by help from another tribe drove my people from the good grass & Buffalo country into the hills of Montana. It was a dirty trick. 

“Your Father came to Nebr. about six months before we did he lived as I remember about three miles west and one mile another on what I remember become the Jack Sims farm. it was east of Old Joe [??]kanies Section one mile the north side of the road. One thing I can recall, he became so confiding to the GOOD neighbor and thereby lost a nice cured smoked ham that was in a cave not far from his house. He DIDN’T like it but he did not have absolute proof, or their would have been a hair puling. Good thing as you know he didn’t have too much to take a chance on loosing. 

“Well Claude I needed a little practice and that is all the cause of this preamble. It don’t read very pretty but it’s the truth in so far as I remember, and I could go on & on and could be a little more optimistic. The say one shouldn't think back, but when there is no special reason for looking forward to me thinking back I find a pleasure by just skipping the bad spots. And if you get any thing out of this rabble it’s worth writing, and good practice. Joe” 

As for the errors in the letter, now 91 years old, Joseph was an educated and articulate man typing with poor eye sight and with only one hand suitable to the task. According to Marion Aylesworth Grandpa Brown’s father had owned a lumber business and Joseph worked there hoping one day to manage it. One day a log got jammed on the sluiceway leading to the circular ripping saw by which the logs were cut into planks. Seeing the operator was about to be injured as the saw sprang backward, Joseph reached and pulled him away. In the process he lost the four fingers on his left hand. 

From the “The Denton Record” website: 

“The 1893 Lincoln City Directory lists Joseph Sinclair Brown as assistant manager of the Inter-State Newspaper Company … [He] became Manager of the newspaper company by 1894.” 

“American Newspaper Annual and Directory by N.W. Air & Sons, Volume 1920, reports … The Interstate Newspaper Company printed … the following newspapers: Advance, [in] Alvo; Courier, [in] Ceresco; Mirror, [in] Davey; Record, [in] Denton; Herald, [in] Garland; Gazette, [in] Greenwood; Nebraska State Democrat, [in] Lincoln; Messenger, [in] Malcolm; Leader, [in] Martel; Review, [in] Raymond; and Watchman, [in] Waverly. In 1920 The Inter-State Newspaper had a circulation of 8,160 for the eleven newspapers they published.” 

Joseph S. Brown recounted that one of his major objectives was to increase the circulation of the papers. During his tenure he established the policy of politicians paying for advertising in his newspapers. Although they bridled against this, they needed the papers to convey their message to the people of Nebraska. 

Harley was Joseph Brown’s nephew, one of four children of Hiram Brown and Margaret. When Hiram died Margaret could not care for the four children. Joseph and Amy offered to adopt one of them with the understanding Margaret would retain all the privileges of motherhood. 

The following text was in the original article but is placed here to emphasize the chronology of Joseph Brown’s life. 

“In 1912 Harley was a student at the University of Nebraska and was living with his parents at 1448 B Street. In 1913 Harley was a student at Lincoln Business College. Harley returned to the University of Nebraska and was a student from 1914-1916 where he graduated from Teachers College. In 1917 Harley was working for Rudge and Guenzel Company while still living at home with his parents on B Street. Rudge and Guenzel Company sold clothing, hardware and furniture and the business was located at 1021-1045 ‘O’ Street and 121 S 11th Street. 

Harley only worked at this job for one year as he became a soldier in 1918 and went to fight in World War I. … [He] moved to Calif after serving in World War I. June 1959, Harley died in Reseda, Calif. The newspaper reports that Harley was a member of the A. T. O. [fraternity] and the American Legion. His survivors are listed as his wife, Anona; father, Joseph S. Brown, of Lincoln; and sister, Mrs. Marion Aylesworth, of Grand Rapids, Michigan. (From: Lincoln Star, June 6, 1959, page 13, column 8.) 

Marion Aylesworth Murch states Anna was her nanny. 

Marion Oliver West was the sister of Amy Edith West, Joseph Brown’s first wife. 

The Lincoln City Directory reports, “Joseph continued as manager of the Interstate Newspaper Company until 1926. Joseph S. Brown left the Inter-State Newspaper Company to go to work for McKelvie Publishing as a Correspondent.” 

The following text was in the original article but is placed here to emphasize the chronology of Joseph Brown’s life. 

“Sam R. McKelvie had an interesting life. He married Martha. Sam started out with the Omaha Bee as an editor. In 1905 Sam became editor of the Nebraska Farmer and in 1907 he purchased the company. He succeeded in building the Nebraska Farmer up to be the leading farm paper in the state. Sam became a distinguished Nebraskan. He pursued three very successful careers--publisher, politics and ranching. His company published the Colorado Rancher and Farmer as well as the Nebraska Farmer. Sam loved politics. He served on the Lincoln City Council for a term in 1908-1909. Then he served in the House of Representatives in the Nebraska State Legislature. In 1912 he was chosen Lieutenant Governor and served from 1913-1915. At the age of 37 years Sam was elected Governor. At that time he was the youngest governor in the nation. He was called ‘Nebraska's Boy Governor.’ He was elected to a second term as governor. As governor, Sam authorized the new state Capitol building. Sam died January 6, 1956.” 

According to Marion Aylesworth Murch, between 1935-37 she worked for former Governor Sam McKelvie as his Personal Assistant. At that time he was head of the Nebraska Republican Party and during the 1936 Presidential Campaign she would accompany him around the Nebraska political circuit and then to the Republican National Convention in Chicago, which she found exciting. She recounts that in addition to her secretarial duties, sometimes while on the circuit she would need to whisper to Sam the names of individuals he could not remember. Grandpa Brown told me that she had a very good head for faces and names, and all the social graces. 

Marion recounts that one day she received a call for Mr. McKelvie from President Hoover saying that he had just gotten into town and would be right over to see him. At the thought of meeting the former President of the United States she got so nervous that all she could think to do was to go into the lavatory and wash her hands. When she came out Mr. McKelvie asked her to sit down. Once seated he looked her in eye and said that the President washes his hands just as she had done; that he was just the same as she was. She had a wonderful time meeting the President who later sent her a copy of his book, which he had autographed. 

In August 1929 Joseph Brown and 248 other tourists went to Glacier National Park via the Great Northern Rail Road. The September 7th edition of The Nebraska Farmer has a front page article where Francis A. Flood writes: 

“We climbed off the train into that bracing mountain air and ran across the grass to the hotel entrance where Chief Two Guns White Calf, himself, Blackfoot Indian Chief, dignified and straight, every inch a chief in his white buckskins, solemnly shook hands and welcomed us to the reservation. 

“Chief Two Guns is the original nickel Indian from whose classic likeness the die for the Indian design on the buffalo nickel was cast. He represents the highest class of North American Indian and as such his majestic poise dignified the greeting he gave us at the Lodgs [sic]. … 

“That evening, before dinner in the big log Lodge, the Blackfoot Chiefs decided to initiate four members of our party into the Blackfoot tribe. We gather down by their tepees, their interpreter explained the history and significance of some of their ceremonial dances and their lore, and then [the initiates were] summoned to Chief Two Guns himself. … Jos. S. Brown, manager of The Nebraska Farmer Protective Services, who is enjoying a vacation with his farmer friends, was taken into the tribe under the name of ‘Chief St. May’s Lake,’….” 

Rather than “St. May’s Lake” as reported by here, Grandpa Brown wrote on a picture from the trip, “Initiation into Blackfoot Tribe of J S Brown Chief ‘St Mary’.” 

Marion Aylesworth Murch recounts her stepmother Marion’s death had a devastating effect on both her and her father. She had recently graduated from Stephens College with a two-year degree and was beginning her first year at the University of Nebraska. Rather than live on campus she moved back home to stay with her father and become a “townie”, greatly curtailing her campus life as a member of the Tri-Delta sorority. Yet, she could not keep her mind on school and nearly flunked her courses. Her father advised her in no uncertain terms that she could do anything she wanted but she was going to finish college. Marion transferred to Lincoln Business College and graduated in 1934. Later she encountered Sam McKelvie through a chance meeting on the street. He later called her at home and asked that she come to his office, whereupon she was offered employment. 

Omitted are one grandson, his son-in-law, my father Howard Aylesworth Sr. and myself whose straight thinking and integrity Grandpa Brown greatly respected. Joseph Brown lived by the ideal that “a man’s word is his bond”, a term that perhaps today seems quite pedestrian but is true nevertheless. 

Joseph and Howard Sr. were the product of a period where a persons “bond” was the key to life regardless of what their station was. Communities were more insular and there were no credit agencies or mass communication channels to chronicle and disseminate information on how individuals lived their lives. A person’s introduction to those who they did not know and their ability to conduct personal and business affairs was determined by their character and their standing among those with whom they worked and lived. The summary of social relationships contained in the phrase “A man’s word is his bond” has many subtlies and meanings, but in essence is the embodiment of trust, honor and responsibility. 

For example, Howard Sr. submitted his application to the U.S. War Department for an appointment as a flying cadet with two letters of referral enclosed. The first, signed by H.H. Loring, President of the State Bank of Valparaiso, states: 

“I have known Howard G. Aylesworth, now residing at Kendalville, Indiana during the last eighteen years, and know him to be a young man of excellent character, the best of habits, moral and industrious, and honest in every way. I cheerfully recommend him worthy of confidence and consideration in the line of endeavor sought by him.” 

The second, signed by B. L. Kinne, Assistant Cashier at Farmers State Bank, states: 

“I have personally know Mr. Howard Aylesworth, the bearer, for several years and consider him a young man of excellent qualities, industrious, clean, and ambitious. He comes from one our best families, and bears a good name in this community. I cheerfully recommend him for consideration in any application he may make." 

Each of these people were willing to stake their good name and standing in support of my father; and in asking them to write on his behalf my father was obliging himself to uphold the credit of their name. In short, the letter of reference was the moral obligation between the parties to work to the benefit of each other and their community; Dad’s word was accepting the responsibility to carry out what he said he would do; and, his bond was the accumulation of what he had done in his life and how he had done it. This is what Joseph S. Brown believed, how he lived and what he taught others. This is what he respected. The same can be said of my father and mother.


FRIEND BUEL, JR.  
Friend Buel, J r., who is one of the most progressive and efficient of the younger stock raisers of Lancaster county, resides on section 33, Centerville precinct, and is engaged in feeding cattle for the market in partnership with his father, Friend Buel, Sr., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. . He was born in Saltillo precinct, on the 9th of July, 1885. and he passed his boyhood upon the family homestead. He early began assisting his father, but his education was not neglected, as he attended the district schools and also the schools in the town of Hickman. Following his marriage he engaged in operating the home place for a year, and then took up his residence upon his present farm, which comprises two hundred and ten acres on section 33, Centerville precinct, and which also belongs to his father. He gives his attention to stock raising, specializing: in feeding cattle for the market, and is associated with his father in that business. 

He has already gained a gratifying measure of prosperity and his energy, his knowledge of stock raising, and his good business judgment insure his continued success. Mr. Buel was married in 1911 to Miss Julia Brokema, a native of Cook county, Illinois, and a daughter of Nicholas and Anna Brokema, the former an undertaker at Hickman. Mr. and Mrs. Buel have become the parents of two children, Marion and Blanche. Mr. Buel discharges to the full all the obligations resting upon him as a good citizen. He has passed his entire life in Lancaster county and his staunchest friends are those who have known him intimately since boyhood. He possesses many admirable qualities and is one of the most valued residents of his community. 


BYRON CLAY CHARLTON 
Byron Clay Charlton, who is representative of a well known pioneer family of Lancaster county, is successfully engaged in farming and stock raising in Centerville precinct. He was born in that precinct upon the Charlton homestead, on the 25th of September 1874 , son of William and Mary (Lidolph) Charlton, the former born in Bonaparte, Iowa, on the 10th of August 1845. When a young man of eighteen years he went to California and there engaged in farming and stock-raising for five years. At length he returned to Iowa and thence came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and bought a fine farm on section 26, Centerville precinct. He purchased other land from time to time and became one of the most extensive land owners of the county. 

He specialized in feeding cattle for market and derived a handsome income from that business. In 1906 he retired from active life, but still resides upon the home farm. He was married on the 13th of May 1872, in Bonaparte, Iowa, to Miss Mary Lidolph, who passed away upon the home farm in Centerville precinct, on the 3rd of March 1877, and. is buried in the Centerville churchyard. Byron Clay Charlton received a good education, attending the schools of district No.77 and also the city schools of Lincoln and supplementing the knowledge thus acquired by study in business college at Lincoln. 

He also gave much of his time during his boyhood and youth to assisting his father and gave him the benefit of his services until he was twenty-six years of age, when he was married and began farming for himself, taking charge of two hundred acres of land in section 25, Centerville precinct, which was given to him by his father. He is still operating his place and is meeting with gratifying success as a stock-raiser. He annually feeds large numbers of cattle for the market and also breeds registered Poland China hogs. He keeps informed as to the results of experiments in regard to the grade of stock and is a factor in development of stock- raising interests in Lancaster county. 

In 1914 he erected a fine two-story residence which is the handsomest farm house in Centerville precinct, and which is provided with steam heat, hot and cold water and gas light from a private gas plant, and all of the furnishings are of fine quality and attractive design. The barns and other buildings and the general appearance of the place is in keeping with the house and his farm demonstrates how attractive country life may be made. Mr. Charlton was married on Christmas day 1900, at Roca, to Miss Dora Coral Pepple, who was born near Findlay, Ohio on the 4th of October 1881, and is a daughter of Rufus and Clara Pepple, natives respectively of Michigan and Ohio. 

Her father removed to the Buckeye state and there engaged in farming until 1885, when he came to Nebraska and turned his attention to railroading. He is now in the mechanical maintenance department of the Union Pacific Railroad and has charge of the water supply for the railroad at Roca. His wife grew to womanhood in Ohio and engaged in teaching school there for some time. After her removal to Lancaster county with her husband and children she taught in Centerville and Saltillo townships and followed the teaching profession in all for over two decades. 

She also still survives. Mrs. Charlton was but four years of age when she was brought to Lancaster county and was educated in the public schools of Roca and in the Lincoln high school and the State University at Lincoln. She has become the mother of four children: Clay William, who was born on the 14th of August 1901, and is now attending school; Marjory May was born on the 1st of March 1906, and is attending school; Dorothy Elizabeth, who was born February 7, 1912; and Ruth, November 22, 1913. 

Mr. Charlton is a republican in politics and takes the interest of a public- spirited citizen in affairs of local government. Both he and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally he is connected with Damocles Lodge, Knights of Pythias, at Roca, in which he has served as prelate several terms and has also held other offices. His interest in the public schools is indicated by the fact that he has served as treasurer of district No.94 for two years. He believes in progress along all lines of endeavor and can be counted upon to support any movement seeking the advancement of his continuity. 


WILLIAM H. CHARLTON 
William H. Charlton, who is operating three hundred acres of the Charlton homestead on section 26, Centerville precinct, is a native of Bonaparte, Van Buren county, Iowa, born on the 15th of February, 1873. His father, William Charlton, was also born in that town on the 10th of August, 1845. He remained at home until he was eighteen years of age, when he went to California, where he engaged in farming for eight years. He returned to Iowa, but at length removed to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and turned his attention to farming on section 26, Centerville precinct, near the town of Roca, where he remained for many years, but in 1906, having acquired a competence, he retired from active life, although he still lives upon the home farm. 

He purchased tracts of land at various times and acquired title to fourteen hundred acres of land in Centerville precinct. He supervises the operation of all of his farms and at one time specialized in breeding shorthorn and Hereford cattle but during the greater part of his active connection with stock raising interests in this county engaged in feeding large herds of cattle for the market. He managed his extensive business affairs well and is now a man of independent means. He was married at Bonaparte, Iowa, on the 13th of May 1872, to Miss Mary Lidolph, who died on the 3rd of March 1877, on the Charlton homestead on section 26, Centerville precinct. 

William H. Charlton was but a year old when he was brought to this county by his parents and his education was acquired in the district schools. He early began assisting his father with the farm work and gave the latter the benefit of his labor until he attained his majority, when he took charge of one of his father's farms and began operating it on his own account. He now lives upon the homestead on section 26, Centerville precinct, and is operating three hundred acres of his father's land. He grows the usual grains and also feeds stock extensively for the market, deriving a gratifying financial return from his labors. 

Mr. Charlton was married at Beatrice, Nebraska, January 25, 1904, to Miss Elizabeth Oltjenbruns, who was born in the grand duchy of Oldenburg, Germany, on the 28th of May, 1884, a daughter of Christ and Margaret (Libben) Oltjenbruns, both natives of the fatherland. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, settled in this county with his family, in 1888, and followed agricultural pursuits here for some time. At length, however, he removed to Pierce county, Nebraska, where he purchased land, which he operated until he retired from active life in 1914. 

He has since made his home with Mrs. Charlton. His wife died in Pierce county, Nebraska, on the 28th of September, 1910. Mrs. Charlton was four years of age when she was brought to America by her parents and received her education in the public schools of Lancaster county. Mr. Charlton is a republican in politics and in religious faith is a Methodist, while his wife belongs to the German Lutheran church. They have a wide acquaintance in the county and have gained the warm friendship of many. 


EVERARD S. CHILD 
Everard S. Child was for a number of years engaged in the real estate business at Arapahoe, Furnas county, Nebraska, but the last years of his life were passed at Fitzgerald, Georgia, where he engaged in the nursery business for a time but later again became active in the real estate field. Following his demise his wife took up her residence in Bethany, where she still lives and is well known and highly esteemed. His birth occurred in Portsmouth, Scioto county, Ohio, on the 7th of January, 1842, and his parents were Dr. Abel and Margaret (Tozier) Child. The father was a physician and practiced his profession in Bethel, Vermont, and Manchester, Indiana, until 1859, when he removed with his family to Cass county, Nebraska, purchasing land on which he resided for a number of years. 

At length he retired from active life and removed to Plattsmouth, where he made his home until the death of his wife. He then went to Kansas City and lived with a son until he, too, was called from this life in 1886. Everard S. Child was reared in Ohio and remained at home until 1861, when, at the age of nineteen years, he enlisted in Company A, First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until the close of the war. On being discharged from the army he returned to Cass county and began farming on his own account. He was also postmaster and county surveyor. Later he removed to Frontier county, where he took up a homestead which he operated for a considerable period. 

Later he removed to Arapahoe, Furnas county, and began dealing in real estate. He was successful in that connection, gaining a large clientage and negotiating many important realty transfers. After a few years, however, he went to Fitzgerald, Georgia, where he engaged in the nursery business for two years, and then re-entered the real estate business, which he followed during the remainder of his life. He passed away in Fitzgerald n August 1901. Mr. Child was united in marriage on the 2nd of August 1865, to Miss Hannah Elizabeth Thorndike, a daughter of George and Abbie (Prescott) Thorndike, natives of New Hampshire and pioneers of Cass county, Nebraska, removing there in 1858. The father took up land under the homestead law and operated his farm there for many years, after which he removed to Iowa, where he followed agricultural pursuits for a decade. 

At the end of that time he returned to Frontier County, Nebraska, and farmed in this state until his demise in 1900. He was survived for two years by his wife. Mr. and Mrs. Child became the parents of three children, namely: Lorena P., born June 2, 1866, who married Charles Hayes and resides at Fitzgerald, Georgia; Earl L., who was born February 18,1869, and died October 21,1887; and Elmer, who was born December 31, 1881, and was graduated at Cotner University. He was married in 1901. He and his wife are now home missionaries and reside in San Antonio, Texas. 

Mr. Child cast his ballot in support of the republican party, believing firmly in its principles, and he could be depended upon to further movements seeking the civic advancement of his community. He held membership in the Grand Army of the Republic and found much pleasure in associating with his former comrades in blue. Fraternally he was connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His religious faith was indicated by the fact that he held membership in the Christian church and his life measured up to high standards of manhood. In 1903 his wife removed to Bethany, where she built a good residence and where she still lives. 




Mr. & Mrs. Dietrich Cramer

DIETRICH CRAMER 
Dietrich Cramer, who resides on section 27, Buda precinct, formerly concentrated his energies upon farming but is now giving much of his time to dealing in real estate, buying and selling on commission. He has been very successful in all that he has undertaken and has invested heavily in real estate, holding title to over one thousand acres in Lancaster and Gage counties. He was born in Hanover, Germany, on the 2nd of November, 1866, a son of George and Elizabeth Cramer, also natives of that country. The father, who was a farmer and tax collector, died when our subject was four years of age and he was then taken by strangers. 

Dietrich Cramer grew to manhood in his native country but in 1884 decided to try his fortune in the new world and came to the United States. He located in Lancaster county, Nebraska, and for seven years worked as a farm hand, receiving a wage of nine dollars per month. Following his marriage he bought eighty acres of land and engaged in cultivating that tract and also in operating a farm belonging to his wife. His thorough knowledge of agricultural pursuits, his industry and his perseverance enabled him to prosper from the start, and he is now one of the capitalists of Lancaster County, holding title to over one thousand acres in this county and in Gage county, Nebraska. 

About 1905 he turned the operation of his land over to others and has since bought and sold real estate on commission. His thorough knowledge of realty values, his wide acquaintance and his keen business sense have made him very successful in this connection. Mr. Cramer was married in May 1891, to Mrs. Wilhelmina (Severin) Rausch, also a native of Germany. 

He was reared in the Lutheran faith and is still affiliated with that church. He supports the democratic party at the polls but has never taken an active part in politics. When he came to Lancaster County it was still a frontier region and he has watched with interest its rapid development and has the satisfaction of knowing that he has contributed in no small measure to its advancement along agricultural lines. 


ARNOLD EGGER 
Arnold Egger, who owns and operates a good farm on section 3, Buda precinct, is raising shorthorn cattle and Duroc- Jersey hogs. A native of Switzerland, he was born in the canton of Bern, on the 22nd of June 1866, and is a son of John and Anna Maria (Gygli) Egger, of whom further mention is made in the sketch of J. F. Egger, on another page of this volume. Our subject was brought to America in infancy, the family arriving at Pekin, Illinois, on the 24th of December, 1866. After farming in that state for two seasons they removed to Cass county, Nebraska, by wagon. 

The father engaged in farming near the old town of Rock Bluffs for two years and then began operating a tract of land on which the town of Sprague is now located. He followed agricultural pursuits there during his remaining years, passing a way on the 11th of February, 1909. Arnold Egger received his education in the schools of district No.77 and district No.36, Centerville precinct, and early became familiar with farm work through assisting his father. Following his marriage he began his independent career and took charge of one hundred and twenty acres on section 3, Buda precinct, belonging to his father. 

The land was under cultivation, but there were no buildings upon the farm when he took charge. He has since erected a substantial residence, good barns and outbuildings and has made many other improvements upon the place, which he now owns. He also holds title to one hundred and ten acres on section 34, Centerville precinct, and likewise cultivates that land. He seldom fails to harvest good crops of grain and also raises high grade shorthorn cattle and Duroc- Jersey hogs, from the sale of which he derives a gratifying addition to his income. 

He is interested financially in the Martel Telephone Company and was one of the organizers of the Bank of Sprague and also of the Farmers Grain & Lumber Company of Sprague. Mr. Egger was married in Lincoln on the 5th of January, 1893, to Miss Josephine Pfleger, who was born in Jackson, Ohio, on the 28th of March, 1870. She was reared and educated in the Buckeye state and in Indiana, but in 1890 became a resident of Lancaster county, Nebraska. She passed away on the 7th of March, 1909, and was buried in Princeton. 

She was the mother of two children, namely: Edward Albert, who was born on the 16th of November, 1893, and is farming with his father; and Cora, who was born April 25, 1896, and is at home. Mr. Egger is an independent democrat, paying greater attention tote qualifications of a candidate than to his political allegiance. He is strongly in favor of such temperance legislation as will protect those who have not sufficient will power to withstand the temptation to drink to excess. 

He has always manifested a keen interest in educational affairs and for fifteen years was a member of the school board in district No.129 and for three years served in a similar capacity in district No.77. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally he is connected with Sprague Camp, No.1577, M. W. A., of which he is a charter member and in which he held office for years. His dominant qualities are such as invariably win respect and regard, and the circle of his friends is almost coextensive with that of his acquaintance. 


FREDERICK ALBERT EGGER
Frederick Albert Egger is one of the leading residents of Centerville precinct, and has gained an enviable reputation as a stock raiser, specializing in breeding registered shorthorn cattle, Percheron horses and Duroc Jersey hogs. A native of Lancaster county, his birth occurred in Saltillo precinct, on the 13th of July, 1881, and he is a son of John Frederick and Matilda (Grossman) Egger, natives respectively of Canton Bern, Switzerland, and Pomerania, Germany. The father grew to manhood in his native country, but in 1866 came with his parents to the United States. In 1869 he became a resident of Nebraska and has met with gratifying success as a farmer and stock raiser in Lancaster county, his holdings now comprising one thousand acres of improved land. 

He was married on the 30th of April, 1880, to Miss Matilda Grossman and they have ten children: Frederick Albert, Emma Mary, Anna Mary, Rudolph John Jacob, William John, Alta May, Edith, Bertha Louisa, one who died in infancy, and Hilda Marie Johannah. Further mention of John F. Egger appears elsewhere here in this work. Frederick A. Egger completed the course offered in the public schools of Saltillo precinct and was also for two years a student in the College of Agriculture at the State University of Nebraska. After leaving that institution he began farming for his father on the old Egger homestead on section 31, Saltillo precinct, but after his marriage took charge of a three hundred acre farm on section 27, Centerville precinct, which also belongs to his father. He is still operating that place and is concentrating his energies upon stock raising, growing only enough grain to feed his stock. 

He breeds full blooded shorthorn cattle and his herd of registered shorthorns is as large as any in the county. He also raises registered Percheron horses and Duroc Jersey hogs and ships a number of carloads of hogs annually. He thoroughly understands the importance of scientific feeding and housing and is one of the leaders in that line of activity in eastern Nebraska. He also has other business interests being one of the organizers and treasurer of the Farmers Grain & Lumber Company at Sprague ; a director and stockholder of the Bank of Sprague, which he also helped to organize; a member of the Sprague Hardware Company; and a stockholder in the Farmers Telephone Company at Martel. On the 6th of March, 1906, occurred the marriage of Mr. Egger to Miss Mable Wilterding, at the bride's home in Buda precinct. She was born in that precinct and is a daughter of John and Emma (Lorton) Wilterding, natives of the Netherlands. 

On emigrating to the United States they homesteaded in Buda precinct, but after living there for many years removed to Muleshoe, Texas, where the father died in 1913 and where the mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Egger have become the parents of four children: Bernard, Delbert, Donald and Myra, all natives of Centerville precinct. Mr. Egger casts his ballot in support of the candidates and measures of the democratic party where national issues are at stake but otherwise votes independently. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his wife also belongs, and she has served capably as superintendent of the Sunday school at Sprague. 

Mr. Egger is much interested in the public school system and for five years has been a member of the school board of district 77. Fraternally he belongs to Hickman Lodge, No.256, A. F. & A. M., to Damocles Lodge No.60, K. P., and Rosemary Chapter 0. E. S., to which his wife also belongs. It is such men as he, young, enterprising, progressive and businesslike, who are rapidly making Nebraska one of the leading stock raising states of the Union.


NOAH EGGER, JR. 
Noah Egger, Jr., is one of the best known residents of Princeton, where he operates an elevator, conducts a hardware store and is also filling the office of postmaster. A native of Illinois, his birth occurred in Tazewell county on the 16th of November, 1863, and he is a son of Noah and Mary (Pflager) Egger, natives respectively of Ohio and New York city. The father was educated in the district schools of the Buckeye state but in early manhood went to Tazewell county, Illinois, and engaged in farming near Pekin. 

In the fall of 1868 he came overland to Lancaster county, Nebraska, accompanied by his wife and four children, and the family located upon a homestead of eighty acres on section 2, Buda precinct. Their first residence in this county was a structure half frame and half dugout, and the first barns on the farm were dugouts. The father placed his land under cultivation and later added to his holdings. He replaced the first crude buildings on the farm with commodious and substantial structures and otherwise improved the place. 

In 1881 he retired from active life and took up his residence in the town of Princeton. He has since traveled all over the United States and now divides his time between Princeton and the state of Georgia. His sons operated the farm from 1881 until 1900, when they, too,  moved to town, and thirteen years later the homestead was sold. The wife and mother, who was reared in Ohio, also survives. Noah Egger, Jr., has passed practically his entire life in Lancaster County as he was but five years old when the family located here. During his boyhood and youth he attended the district schools in Buda precinct and also gained practical knowledge of farming through assisting his father. 

When nineteen years old he began his independent career and devoted his time to agricultural pursuits until 1900, when he left the home farn1 and removed to Princeton, where he still lives. He secured a position as clerk in an implement al1d hardware establishment and served in that capacity for a number of years. In March, 1916, however, he purchased the store from A. E. Van Berg and has since been sole proprietor. He also owns the local elevator and both enterprises yield him a good profit. From 1900 until 1907 he filled the position of deputy postmaster but in the latter year was appointed postmaster and is still serving in that capacity; proving very accurate and systematic in the discharge of his duties. Mr. Egger was married in Buda precinct on the 5th of February, 1885, to Miss Mary Steele. 

She was born in Tazewell county, Illinois, and is a daughter of William and Mary (Potts) Steele, who in 1881 removed from Illinois to this county, where both passed away. The father was a farmer by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. Egger have six children: Edwin, who is working in his father's store; Maggie, the wife of E. F. F. Dohe, a mechanical draftsman, who is in the employ of the United States government in the Panama Canal Zone; and Alva, Noah C., and Noel and Nora, twins, all at home. Mr. Egger is a stanch advocate of democratic principles and loyally supports the candidates and measures of that party at the polls. 

For five years he served on the school board but is not now connected with that body. Fraternally he is a member of Princeton Camp, No.2022,  in which he has held all of the offices, and has now served as clerk for fifteen years. He is affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church at Princeton and in the teachings of that organization are found the principles which govern his conduct. He is industrious and possesses sound judgment, and the success which he has gained is due to the exercise of those qualities. 


WALTER SAMUEL EIS 
Walter Samuel Eis owns and operates two hundred and forty acres of fine land on section 2, Centerville precinct, and is specializing in raising registered Poland China hogs and high grade cattle. He was born near Fairport, Muscatine County, Iowa, on the 24th of January, 1858, a son of Jacob and Mary (Irwin) Eis. The father was born in Prussia, on the 21st of November, 1829, and remained in that country until he was seventeen years of age, when he emigrated to America. He first located in Ohio, where he worked on the canal but in 1852 he removed to Muscatine, Iowa. He farmed there for many years and at the time of his demise, which occurred on the 27th of November 1906, he was one of the substantial men of that county. 

He is buried in Paris cemetery, near Pleasant Prairie, Iowa. His wife was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, in 1830, but when fourteen years of age became a resident of Iowa. She passed away in Muscatine county, when only thirty years of age and is buried in Paris cemetery. Walter Samuel Eis received his education in the district schools of Muscatine county and farmed with his father until he was twenty-three years old. He then began his independent career and for a year worked by the month, but in 1882 removed to Otoe county, Nebraska, where his father owned a half section of land in South Russell precinct. He received eighty acres of that place as a gift from his father and as soon as he was able added to his holdings by purchasing an additional eighty acres of the same section. He followed agricultural pursuits in Otoe County until 1906, when he disposed of his farm there and bought two hundred and forty acres on section 2, Centerville precinct, Lancaster county, his farm comprising the southeast quarter and the south half of the northeast quarter of that section. 

The place was well improved when it came into his possession and he has kept everything in excellent repair, so that it is one of the attractive and valuable farms of the precinct. He breeds registered Poland China hogs and also raises high grade cattle and finds ready sale, at good prices, for his stock. Mr. Eis was married at Muscatine, Iowa, in 1882, to Miss Effie Baker, who was born in that city on the 2nd of June, 1862. She was a daughter of Andrew and Mary (Eaton) Baker, both of whom were natives of Indiana, whence they removed to Muscatine, Iowa, in the early days of the history of that county. The father engaged in farming there and both died there. Mrs. Eis passed away in Otoe county, Nebraska, on the 12th of October 1885, and is buried in the Hopewell cemetery in that county. 

She was the mother of two children : Jacob Hugh, who was born in Otoe county, on the 29th of January 1883, and is now engaged in the automobile business in Austin, Texas; and Boardman, who was born in Otoe county, Nebraska, on the 4th of May 1884, and is now farming near Moorcroft, Wyoming. On the 10th of November, 1886, Mr. Eis was again married, Miss Jennie Palmer becoming his wife. She was born in Fowlerville, Michigan, on the 5th of June, 1863, and remained there until she was ten years old when she accompanied her parents to Burlington, Iowa, whence she came to Nebraska in 1886, locating in Nebraska City where her marriage occurred. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eis have five children: Guy Ransom, who was born in Otoe county, on the 10th of September, 1887, and is now farming near Davenport, Nebraska; Grace May, who was born in Otoe county on the 23rd of September 1889, and was married May 17, 1916, to Llewellyn Tate and lives in Yankee Hill; Hattie Leona, whose birth occurred on the 28th of October 1891, and is the wife of George Damrow, a farmer of Grant precinct, Lancaster county; Elary Beryl who was born in Otoe county on the 23rd of April 1896, and is assisting his father; and Glenn William, who was born in Otoe county, on the 21st of May, 1898, and is also aiding his father in the operation of the home farm. 

Mr. Eis is a stanch republican and does all in his power to further the success of that party at the polls. He served for twelve years as a member of the school board, while living in Otoe county and made a highly creditable record in that capacity. He belongs to Douglas Camp, No.735, M. W. A., at Douglas, Otoe County, and has served in all of the chairs, and is a member of Lincoln Lodge No.138, I. O. O. F. at Lincoln, having transferred to this lodge from Panama lodge at Panama. He was a charter member of Douglas Lodge, No.276, at Douglas, Nebraska, in which he served in all the chairs and which was later consolidated with Panama Lodge. 

He also affiliates with the Royal Neighbors at Rokeby, and his wife and daughter Grace are connected with that organization. Mrs. Eis was formerly a member of the camp at Douglas, in which she held the office of oracle, and is a charter member of the Rokeby lodge and has served as oracle therein. Her daughter Grace has held a number of minor offices in the camp. Mrs. Eis belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and takes a keen interest in its work. During the ten years in which the family have resided in Lancaster county they have become widely known and have gained a wide circle of friends. 


WILHELM FISCHER 
Wilhelm Fischer is successfully operating a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 1, Centerville precinct, and has accumulated more than a competence. A native of Germany, he was born in the grand duchy of Olden burg, on the 21st of April 1854, a son of John Henry and Annie Sophie (Renkin) Fischer, both of whom were born in the fatherland, where they passed their entire lives. The father was a farmer. Wilhelm Fischer received a good education in his native land and farmed there for a number of years after attaining his majority. 

In May, 1881, he emigrated to America and landed at Baltimore, whence he came direct to Lincoln, Nebraska. He and his wife worked one year for John Dunbar, who resided in Centerville precinct, near Roca. Later Mr. Fischer was employed for two years in the stone quarry at Roca, and in 1884 rented a fifty acre tract of land in Centerville precinct. After operating that place for a year he leased eighty acres belonging to Adam Heuple, in Saltillo township, north of Hickman. He farmed there until 1888, in which year he rented the southwest quarter of section I, Centerville precinct, where he followed agricultural pursuits for six years. 

In 1894 he invested his savings in forty acres of that place. In 1897 bought another forty acres, in 1900 purchased forty acres more, and subsequently bought the remaining forty acres, making his holdings one hundred and sixty acres. He has remodeled the residence and otherwise improved the place, and derives a good income from the cultivation of his land. He not only raises the usual crops, but also feeds cattle and Poland China hogs for market, and has found both branches of his business profitable. In addition to his home farm he owns one hundred and sixty acres of section 7, Saltillo township, which his son William is operating. 

On the 7th of June, 1881, at Lincoln, Mr. Fischer was married to Miss Cathrina Oltjenbruns, who was born in Oldenburg, Germany, on the 2nd of October 1858. She and her husband were natives of the same place and went to school together. Her father, Frederick Oltjenbruns, passed his entire life in the fatherland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fischer have become the parents of eleven children, as follows : John, who was born on the 3rd of October 1882, and is farming in Lancaster county; Margaret, born December 24, 1884, now the wife of David Berry, also a farmer of this county; Kate, who was born March 29, 1886, and is the wife of Ed Berry, a farmer of this county; William, whose birth occurred on the 9th of September, 1888, and who is farming in Lancaster county; Frederick, born on the 20th of February 1891, assisting his father; Annie, whose birth occurred on the 10th of January 1893; Lena, who was born on the 18th of December 1894, and is now the wife of George Crabtree; Lizzie, who was born on the 23rd of February 1897, and married Harvey Werger, at Martell; Johanna, born April 6, 1900, at home; Sophie, who was born on the 21st of April 1902; and Rosie, who was born May 27, 1906, both in school. 

Mr. Fischer casts an independent ballot as he refuses to follow the dictates of party leaders. He is a communicant of the German Lutheran church and seeks to conform his conduct to the teachings of that organization. His life has been one of well directed activity and the prosperity which he enjoys is fully deserved. 


ANTON DIEDRICH FLACHMAN 
Anton Diedrich Flachman was connected with railroading as section boss for many years, but during the latter part of his life concentrated his energies upon farming. He owned one hundred and twenty-three acres of good land on section 8, Olive Branch precinct, and there he passed away on the 10th of November, 1911. He was born in Westphalia, Germany, December 7, 1851, a son of Anton Flachman, who was a lifelong resident of the fatherland, where he engaged in farming. 

Anton D. Flachman learned the baker's trade in Germany and followed that occupation there until 1883, when he came to America. He was employed in Lincoln, Nebraska, for some time, and later followed his trade in New Mexico, but in 1888 came again to Lincoln. Subsequently he worked as a baker at Seward and Fairm0nt, Nebraska, and still later he was section boss at Kramer. He held that position until 1903, and during the greater part of the time also engaged in farming. He made his home, however, in Kramer and lived in the first residence built in that town. 

In 1903 he bought one hundred and twenty-three acres of land in section 8, Olive Branch precinct, and gave up his railroad work and devoted his entire time and attention to agricultural pursuits. He engaged in farming and stock raising there for eight years, or until his death, which occurred on the 10th of November, 1911. He was buried in the Methodist cemetery at Kramer.  Mr. Flachman was married on the 2nd of September, 1888, in Wilber, Saline county, Nebraska, to Miss Anna Bittner, who was born in Bohemia, Austria, on the 12th of March, 1869. 

Her parents, James and Mary (Tisvey) Bittner, were also natives of that country, but came to America with their family in 1885, taking up their residence upon a farm in Olive Branch precinct, where the father subsequently passed away. The mother survives and makes her home with Mrs. Flachman. The latter was sixteen years of age when she came to this country, and has since resided in Nebraska. She still lives on the Flachman homestead, which adjoins the town of Kramer, and has erected a beautiful modern home on the farm. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Flachman were born ten children : Mary, the wife of George Limbeck, who is farming in Lancaster county; Gustina, the wife of Elmer Hollman, a farmer of Buda township; James and Charles, who are operating the home place; Barbara and Lydia, at home; .Joseph, Margaret and Frederick, all of whom are attending school; and Frank, who was born in New Mexico and died in Kramer. 

Mr. Flachman supported the democratic party at the polls and was for fourteen years a member of the school board of Kramer, serving in that capacity until his death. He was identified with the Modern Woodmen of America at Crete and in religious faith was a Methodist. He was a man of progressive spirit and could be counted upon to further projects calculated to promote the general good. He was highly esteemed and his friends still cherish his memory. 


HON. WILLIAM FOSTER 
William Foster, who has resided in Lincoln for eight years, has been holding an important position with the State Fair since 1909 and has made an excellent record in that connection. Re is also a member of the state legislature and his service during his first term received endorsement in his nomination for a second term at the party primaries in the spring of 1916. He engaged in farming previous to his removal to Lincoln and also met with a gratifying degree of success in that occupation. 

His birth occurred in Iowa City, Johnson county, Iowa, on the 29th of May, 1865, and he is a son 0£ William Henry and Darcena (Cambridge) Foster, the former a native of Erie, Ohio. They settled in Iowa in the early history of that state and the father concentrated his energies upon farming there. William Foster remained in Iowa City until he was twelve years of age, but in 1877 came with his parents, by wagon, to Lancaster county, leaving Iowa City on the 1st of October and arriving in Lancaster county on the 28th 0f that month. The family home was established on one hundred and sixty acres of raw land on sections 1 and 2, Centerville precinct, which William Foster assisted his father in operating. 

He received thorough training in agricultural pursuits during his youth and on reaching mature years decided to follow the occupation to which he had been reared. He continued upon the homestead and for many years engaged in farming and stock raising. He kept in touch with the latest methods in agricultural work and his enterprise and progressiveness enabled him to gain a gratifying return from his labor. In 1908 he rented his land and removed to Lincoln in order to give his daughter the advantages of the excellent schools here. He has since lived at No.2011 South Eighteenth street and is one of the most valued residents of the town.

In 1901, while still living on the farm, he was appointed general superintendent of the Nebraska State Fair at Lincoln and in 1902 was made superintendent of the state fair grounds and superintendent of construction. His duties in these connections required a great deal of his time and attention and the success of the fair, which has become an important factor in the advancement of the agricultural and stock raising interests of the state, is due largely to his energetic and careful attention to details. He is also secretary of the Lancaster County Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company and his business acumen and sound judgment have been important factors in the management of that corporation. 

Mr. Foster was married on the 24th of November, 1886, at Saltillo, Lancaster county, to Miss Mary E. Damrow, who was born in La Fayette, Indiana, on the 24th of June, 1867, and is a daughter of John and Catherine (Geyer) Damrow. Mrs. Foster became a resident of this county in 1881 and has since resided here. By her marriage she has become the mother of a daughter, Wilma, who was born in Yankee Hill precinct, on the 2nd of December, 1900, and is now a student in the Lincoln high school. Mr. Foster is one of the leaders of the democratic party in eastern Nebraska and has been honored by election to the state legislature. 

He served during the session of 1915 and 1916 and proved an able working member of the house. He was on the committee on state institutions, on the miscellaneous committee, on the committee on agriculture and on the sifting committee, which has as its functions the sifting of the various bills before the house. Mr. Foster not only did efficient work in the committee room, but also gained a reputation as a forceful worker. He introduced a number of bills pertaining to agricultural matters and was also the author of the bill which provided for buying the site for the Home for Dependent Children. 

His course in the legislature has met with the approval of his constituents and in the primaries in 1916 he was nominated for re-election. In 1900 he was appointed steward of the State Hospital, at Lincoln, by Governor Poynter and held that important office until 1902. He is also well known through his connection with the Knights of Pythias, as he has not only held all of the chairs in the local lodge at Hickman, but has also represented the lodge of Roca, with which he is now identified, in the grand lodge and is now serving as a member of the finance committee of the grand lodge. 

He is also affiliated with Rokeby Lodge, No.1955, M. W. A., and with Jamaica Lodge, NO.292, in which he has filled all the offices His religious faith is that of the Methodist church and its teachings are the guiding principles of his life. 


HENRY FREYE 
Henry Freye, a highly esteemed, retired farmer, living on section 29, Centerville precinct, was born in Jackson county, Ohio, on the 7th of February 1855. He is a son of Henry and Elenora (Schakr) Freye, both natives of Hanover, Germany. When fifteen years of age the father came to America and made his way to Jackson county, Ohio, where he hauled iron ore for a company for some time. Later he purchased land in Jackson and Scioto counties which was totally unimproved when it came into his possession. He cleared the land of timber and as time passed brought it to a high state of cultivation. 

In 1868 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and bought a relinquishment to a homestead in section 23, Centerville precinct. He further improved the place and engaged in farming there until his death, which occurred on the 30th of December 1873. He is buried in Centerville cemetery. When eleven years of age his wife came to America with her parents and grew to womanhood in Scioto county, Ohio. She survived her husband for many years, dying in Lancaster county in 1908, and she too is buried in the Centerville cemetery.

Henry Freye received his education in the public schools of Scioto county, Ohio, but when thirteen years of age came with his parents on their overland journey to Lancaster county, arriving here on the 27th of March 1868. He remained upon the home farm to the operation of which he devoted his time until he was twenty-four years old when he bought eighty acres of railroad land on section 11, Centerville precinct. In 1897 he purchased one hundred and sixty acres in section 29, and has since made his home upon that place. He was very successful as a farmer, gained a competence and has lived retired since 1915, renting his farm to his son. 

He aided in establishing the grain elevator at Sprague and is still financially interested in that concern. Mr. Freye was united in marriage, on the 22nd of February 1883, to Miss Mary Carolina Krull, who was born in Otoe county, Nebraska, on the 3rd of June 1861. Two years later she was brought by her parents to Lancaster county, settlement being made on Salt Creek. Her father, Fred Krull, was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, but in early manhood came to the United States. On arriving in Lancaster county he homesteaded land on sections 23 and 26, Centerville precinct, eighty acres of his farm lying in each section. He passed away in 1888 and is buried in Centerville precinct. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Dorothea Haas, was also a native of Germany and she survived him for many years, dying on the 9th of November 1909. 

Mr. and Mrs. Freye have become the parents of eight children, namely: Frank, who is operating the homestead ; Elmer, who is ranching in Montana; Clara, deceased; Ernest A., a carpenter living in Lancaster county; Walter W., deceased; Fred H., who is farming in this county; Gustave Adolph, who is assisting his brother Frank in the operation of the home farm; and Dorothea Eleanora, at home. Mr. Freye is a republican and for forty years, or until 1914 served as school director, his long service in that capacity indicating his ability and conscientiousness. He is a member of the German Methodist Episcopal church and his many excellent traits of character gain him the unqualified respect of all who know him. As a farmer he was energetic and up-to-date and the leisure which he now enjoys is well deserved. 


HUBERT FROHN 
Hubert Frohn, who owns and is operating a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres on section 22, Centerville precinct, was born upon that place on the 9th of February 1874, a son of William Frohn, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement of his education attended the public schools. After the time that he attained his majority he was an experienced farmer, as he assisted his father during his boyhood and youth, and he determined to devote his life to agricultural pursuits. For five years he and a brother, William Henry Frohn, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume, operated the home farm in partnership, but Hubert Frohn now owns the place. and is fanning it alone. 

The buildings are modern and commodious and the land is in a high state of cultivation. He raises both grain and stock, filling such a course more profitable than specializing in either, and he derives a good income from his well directed labors. The farm comprises two hundred and forty acres and is one of the valuable properties of Centerville precinct. Mr. Frohn was united in marriage in 1901 to Miss Lena Krull, a daughter of Fredrich Krull, a farmer of Centerville precinct, and to this union have been born four children, namely, Edna, Leona, Hubert, Jr., and Dorothy. 

Mr. Frohn votes independently and is interested in all that pertains to the public welfare but has never sought office. His wife is a member of of the Methodist church and both conform their lives to high standards of morality. Mr. Frohn has gained a competence through his energy and good judgment and he has also won a high place in the estimation of his fellow citizens as his dominant qualities are such as invariably command respect. 


WILLIAM FROHN 
Among the enterprising and self-reliant men who settled in Lancaster county in early days and who laid the foundation for its present prosperity was William Frohn, who became the owner of several hundred acres of land here. He was born in Muenchhausen, near Koeln am Rhein, Germany, on the 29th of November 1839. When he was ten years of age he accompanied his parents. Gottfried and Cecelia (Klank) Frohn, to the United States, the voyage being made on a sailing vessel, which required forty-six days to cross from Bremen, Germany, to New York city. The family located in Clayton county, Iowa, which had been thrown open to white settlers only a short time before. The father bought land from the government and passed his remaining days upon his farm. 

William Frohn grew to manhood in Clayton county and as a boy and youth divided his time between attending the public schools and helping with the farm work. In 1869 he came to Lancaster county and purchased two hundred and forty acres of wild prairie land in Centerville precinct which he at once began to bring under cultivation. As the years passed his resources increased, for he was a practical and efficient agriculturist and seldom failed to harvest large crops. He invested his capital from time to time in more land and at his death held title to several hundred acres. Mr. Frohn was united in marriage on the 14th of June 1860, in Clayton county, Iowa, to Miss Amelia Kreuger, who was born in Westphalia, Germany, on the 27th of March 1841, and was a daughter of Frederick Kreuger. 

Her death occurred in 1878 and later Mr. Frohn was married to Mrs. Elizabeth Lepsey. His living children are as follows: Mary, the wife of William Obermeyer, a resident of Lancaster county; William, who is living in White City, Kansas; Ernestine, the wife of Fred Reiss, of Oklahoma; Cecelia, now Mrs. Hubert Kann and a resident of Oklahoma: Henry and Hubert, both of whom are living in Lancaster county; and Amelia, the widow of Edward Bohl; Lancaster county. 

By her former marriage Mrs, Frohn had a daughter Mary, and by the second marriage there is a son Gottfried. Mr. Frohn cast his ballot in support of the democrat party and was never remiss in any of his duties as a citizen. However, he never sought public office as his farming interests demanded his undivided time and attention. He gained financial independence and in 1896 removed to Lincoln, where he lived in honorable retirement until his demise, which occurred in October 1915. He was a communicant of the Roman Catholic church and his many sterling qualities gained him the sincere respect of all who came in contact with him. 


SAMUEL SYLVESTER GRIFFIN 
Samuel Sylvester Griffin has resided in Lancaster county since pioneer days and is one of the three men of Centerville precinct who still own the farms which they took up from the government as homesteads. In 1900 he purchased the land on which the town of Martel is located and still owns the greater part of the town site. He not only established the town, but has also been a most important factor in its development. He rebuilt the grain elevator, which he still owns and operates, and in 1910 he purchased a general store which he is now conducting under the name of the Martel Mercantile Store. He has been very successful in his business ventures and is a man of independent means. 

Mr. Griffin was born near Colesburg, Delaware county, Iowa, on the 8th of September, 1850, of the marriage of Edwin and Harriet (Lewis) Griffin, natives, respectively, of Franklin, New York, and of Sangamon county, Illinois. The paternal grandfather, Sylvester Griffin, was born on the 28th of September 1800, and served in both the Mexican and Civil wars. During the latter conflict he was a member of Company F, Twelfth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and his death occurred on the 26th of May 1862, as the result of a wound received in the battle of Shiloh. He was one of the men who went to California in the search for gold, walking from Davenport, Iowa, to the gold fields, but he returned by the water route. While in Utah he worked for three weeks in the employ of Brigham Young. 

His wife, who bore the maiden name of Matilda Austin, was born in Vermont, on the 14th of October, 1800, and died on the 7th of May, 1857. Their son Edwin Griffin was born on the 24th of September, 1828, and received his education in the Empire state, but in 1842 accompanied his parents to Jackson county, Iowa, where he devoted his time to agricultural pursuits until 1846, when he enlisted in an Iowa regiment for service in the Mexican war. He was at the front until the close of hostilities, and then returned to Iowa where he continued to farm for a number of years. In 1865 he took up his residence in Gentry county, Missouri, and subsequently removed to Nodaway county, Missouri, and still later to Jasper county. After he retired from farming he still maintained his home in Jasper county, but his death occurred at Shelton, Buffalo county, Nebraska, in 1908, when he was visiting a son and he is buried at Grand Island, Nebraska. 

His wife, who bore the maiden name of Harriet Lewis, was born in Sangamon county, Illinois, on the 1st of May 1831, a daughter of Samuel Lewis, whose birth occurred in Pennsylvania, in February 1766. He left the Keystone state in early manhood and became a pioneer settler of Sangamon county, Illinois. At the time of the War of 1812 he enlisted for service in the American army and at the close of hostilities was discharged in New Orleans and walked from that city to St. Louis. He was a man of splendid physique and lived to be more than one hundred years old, passing away in July 1866, in Delaware county, Iowa. Mrs. Griffin, the mother of S. S. Griffin, was reared in Sangamon county, Illinois, but was married in Delaware county, Iowa, where she continued to reside until her death on the 4th of July 1857. 

Samuel Sylvester Griffin was reared upon the home farm in Delaware county, Iowa, and as a boy divided his time between attending the district schools and assisting his father, with whom, in 1865 he went to Tecumseh, Nebraska, making the journey with ox team and wagon. Later in that year he hauled government freight from Nebraska City to Fort Kearney, which was then upon the western frontier. He arrived in Lancaster county, Nebraska, in April 1869, and homesteaded eighty acres of raw land on section 4, Centerville precinct. He erected a frame house, twelve by fourteen feet, and at once started to bring his land under cultivation, farming there for thirty-one years, or until 1900, when he rented the place. He still owns the farm, however, and derives there from a gratifying income. 

In 1900 he purchased a tract of land in Centerville precinct and founded the town of Martel, which is now a growing village. He still owns the greater part of the town site and also owns and operates the grain elevator, a harness store and the general store, which is conducted under the name of the Martel Mercantile Store. He is the leading citizen of Martel and supports heartily any project calculated to advance community interests. Mr. Griffin was married on the 2nd of September 1869, at Savannah, Missouri, to Mary Emma Walker, whose birth occurred in Iowa, on the 11th of March 1848. Her father, John Staman Walker, was a native of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and for many years followed the harness makers' trade in Savannah, Missouri, In 1869 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and passed his remaining years here, dying in the vicinity of Martel in 1905. 

He married Miss Margaret Wadley, a native of Iowa. Mrs. Griffin died March 2, 1892, leaving five children: John Edwin; Samuel Henry; Frederick Earl; William Lewis, now deceased; and Emma Mae. On the 14th of February, 1893, Mr. Griffin was married, at Martel, to Miss Selina Livingston, who was born in Ohio. She is a second cousin of Dr. David Livingston, the great African explorer. Mrs. Griffin is a lady of refinement and high character, whom it is a pleasure to meet. Mr. Griffin is a stanch advocate of democratic principles and for twenty years was a member of the school board of district 29, and for eight years held the office of justice of the peace. 

He was a charter member of the Knights of Pythias lodge of Sprague, in which he filled all the chairs, but is now affiliated with Damocles Lodge, No.60, at Hickman. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in all relations of life he has conformed his conduct to high moral standards. In all of his business dealings he has been scrupulously honest and the large measure of prosperity which has come to him is the result of his keen insight, his enterprise and initiative. There are few men more widely known in the county and none who are held in higher esteem. 


ANCIL L. FUNK 
Ancil L. Funk occupied a position of prominence in commercial circles as a traveling salesman, having the management of twenty states. He represented a clothing house and was familiar with every phase of the trade, while at the same time he possessed a genial nature and cordial disposition that added to his business ability and enterprise, made him very successful in his chosen field of labor. Success and advancement came to him as the merited reward of earnest and intelligently directed effort and his example proves what may be accomplished when determination and energy point out the way. 

Mr. Funk was born in Greenville, Darke county, Ohio, December 25, 1849, a son of Isaac and Eliza (Dearduff) Funk, who were also natives of the Buckeye state. The father there followed the occupation of farming and gave his entire life to that work. His death occurred in 1893, while his wife passed away in 1883. Ancil L. Funk was reared and educated at Lebanon, Ohio, and in early manhood took up the profession of teaching, becoming quite prominent as an educator. He taught in the University of Virginia for some time and about 1878 removed to Red Cloud, Nebraska, where he took charge of the public schools, remaining there for seven years. 

He. taught, however, for only three years during that period and at the end of that time turned his attention to the agricultural implement business, which he followed until 1890. He then removed to Lincoln, where he conducted a real estate office but afterward went upon the road as a traveling salesman. A few years later he went to Colorado, where he became connected with mining interests but lost his health in that state and returned to Lincoln, after which he again went upon the road. He traveled as a salesman for fifteen years or until his death and had a large business, being manager of twenty states and employing all the salesmen in that territory for the house which, he represented. 

He was connected with the clothing trade and was regarded as one of the most efficient salesmen in that line in the country. His ability was widely recognized and it would have been easy for him to have secured a position with almost any house. He was prompt, systematic and reliable, studied the wishes and wants of his patrons and was always courteous and obliging. Thus he won a constantly growing patronage and at the same time he gained the friendship and regard of those with whom he was associated. 

On the 20th of March, 1883, Mr. Funk was married to Miss Laura Ellen Thornburg, a daughter of Dr. George W. and Mary (Wright) Thornburg, who were natives of Ohio. The father was a physician and practiced medicine in Ohio for many years, passing away in 1870, while his wife died in 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Funk had but one child, Robert T., who was born June 5, 1887, and has succeeded to his father's position in business. He is married and resides in Lincoln. The family circle was broken by the hand of death when Mr. Funk passed away very suddenly April 23, 1914, at the age of sixty-four years. 

He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His political endorsement was given to the republican party and religiously he was a Methodist, being a very active and helpful member of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal church. In the Sunday school he taught a class of one hundred young men and his teaching and example were a most forceful element in their lives.  His career was an exposition of the cheer of Christianity. He saw the beauty and joy of life and gained much happiness there from. 

He never regarded Christianity as a depressing influence but a force that counted for the expansion of one's power and the development of one's resources, so that life was fuller and better for those things which have true value. He held friendship inviolable and always appreciated sterling worth in others, while to those who needed assistance he generously extended a helping hand. Of him it might be said:  "His life was gentle and the elements So mixed in him that Nature might stand up and say to all the world: This was a man." 


MARTIN TALMADGE GILBERT 
Martin Talmadge Gilbert of Denton precinct is devoting considerable attention to raising thoroughbred Berkshire hogs and has been very successful in that connection. His farm is thoroughly improved and his home, provided with all modern conveniences, is the most attractive residence of the locality. He was born near Peru, in Bureau county, Illinois, on the 23rd of September, 1862, a son of  Daniel A. and Sarah F. (Coon) Gilbert. The father was born in Saratoga county, New York, was there reared and educated, but became a resident of Bureau county, Illinois, in the early days of that section. 

Subsequently he conducted a grocery store in Boone, Boone county, Iowa, for nine years, and in 1872 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and established a grocery store in Lincoln, on the corner of South Eleventh and N streets. In 1882 he sold out and in partnership with Maxey Cobb took charge of the Cobb homestead, comprising ten hundred and forty acres of good land in Denton precinct. They engaged in raising stock until 1890, when Mr. Gilbert again turned his attention to merchandising, establishing a general store in Denton. He remained active in that connection until 1906, when he retired. 

His remaining days were spent at the home of his son, Martin T., and his death occurred on the 8th of April, 1913, when eighty-three years old. He was married in Saratoga, New York, to Miss Sarah Coon, who was a native of Saratoga county, and taught school there previous to her marriage. She passed away in Denton in March, 1911. They had seven children, as follows: James C. and Charles A., both deceased ; Carrie B., who became the wife of Maxey Cobb of Lancaster county, both now deceased; Willis I., deceased; Martin T. ; Lillie, deceased; and Mattie F ., the wife of R. H. Moffett of Moberly, Missouri. 

Martin Talmadge Gilbert was ten years of age when the family removed to Lincoln and received the greater part of his education in schools of that city. He assisted his father in the grocery store there and later was associated with him in the conduct of a general store at Denton. For six years after his father's demise he continued to manage the business, but at the end of that time sold out. In 1913 he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 28, Denton precinct, which is part of the old Cobb home place, and here he has erected an up-to-date residence which is conceded to be the finest home in the precinct. 

It is equipped with all modern improvements and is beautifully furnished. All of the other buildings upon the place are well designed for their purpose and of modern construction, and in his work Mr. Gilbert follows the latest  methods. He does general farming, 'but specializes in raising Berkshire .hogs, which he sells for breeding purposes, and it is his intention to devote his entire time to the raising of hogs in the near future. He is farming in partnership with his nephew, Harry M. Gilbert, the son of his brother, Charles A. Gilbert, who owns a half interest in the place. Mr. Gilbert was married at Denton on the 22d of March, 1914, to Miss Marie Dawson, who was born in Wisconsin, but came to Lincoln in girlhood. 

He supports the democratic party at the polls but has never been an aspirant for public office. He has concentrated his energies upon the management of his private interests, which have returned a good profit, and he now ranks among the substantial men of the county. He has conformed to the highest standards of business ethics in all of his business transactions and his many good qualities have enabled him to win and retain the friendship of those who have been closely associated with him. 


SAMUEL SYLVESTER GRIFFIN 
Samuel Sylvester Griffin has resided in Lancaster county since pioneer days and is one of the three men of Centerville precinct who still own the farms which they took up from the government as homesteads. In 1900 he purchased the land on which the town of Martel is located and still owns the greater part of the town site. He not only established the town, but has also been a most important factor in its development. He rebuilt the grain elevator, which he still owns and operates, and in 1910 he purchased a general store which he is now conducting under the name of the Martel Mercantile Store. He has been very successful in his business ventures and is a man of independent means. 

Mr. Griffin was born near Colesburg, Delaware county, Iowa, on the 8th of September, 1850, of the marriage of Edwin and Harriet (Lewis) Griffin, natives, respectively, of Franklin, New York, and of Sangamon county, Illinois. The paternal grandfather, Sylvester Griffin, was born on the 28th of September 1800, and served in both the Mexican and Civil wars. During the latter conflict he was a member of Company F, Twelfth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and his death occurred on the 26th of May 1862, as the result of a wound received in the battle of Shiloh. He was one of the men who went to California in the search for gold, walking from Davenport, Iowa, to the gold fields, but he returned by the water route. While in Utah he worked for three weeks in the employ of Brigham Young. 

His wife, who bore the maiden name of Matilda Austin, was born in Vermont, on the 14th of October, 1800, and died on the 7th of May, 1857. Their son Edwin Griffin was born on the 24th of September, 1828, and received his education in the Empire state, but in 1842 accompanied his parents to Jackson county, Iowa, where he devoted his time to agricultural pursuits until 1846, when he enlisted in an Iowa regiment for service in the Mexican war. He was at the front until the close of hostilities, and then returned to Iowa where he continued to farm for a number of years. In 1865 he took up his residence in Gentry county, Missouri, and subsequently removed to Nodaway county, Missouri, and still later to Jasper county. After he retired from farming he still maintained his home in Jasper county, but his death occurred at Shelton, Buffalo county, Nebraska, in 1908, when he was visiting a son and he is buried at Grand Island, Nebraska. 

His wife, who bore the maiden name of Harriet Lewis, was born in Sangamon county, Illinois, on the 1st of May 1831, a daughter of Samuel Lewis, whose birth occurred in Pennsylvania, in February 1766. He left the Keystone state in early manhood and became a pioneer settler of Sangamon county, Illinois. At the time of the War of 1812 he enlisted for service in the American army and at the close of hostilities was discharged in New Orleans and walked from that city to St. Louis. He was a man of splendid physique and lived to be more than one hundred years old, passing away in July 1866, in Delaware county, Iowa. Mrs. Griffin, the mother of S. S. Griffin, was reared in Sangamon county, Illinois, but was married in Delaware county, Iowa, where she continued to reside until her death on the 4th of July 1857. 

Samuel Sylvester Griffin was reared upon the home farm in Delaware county, Iowa, and as a boy divided his time between attending the district schools and assisting his father, with whom, in 1865 he went to Tecumseh, Nebraska, making the journey with ox team and wagon. Later in that year he hauled government freight from Nebraska City to Fort Kearney, which was then upon the western frontier. He arrived in Lancaster county, Nebraska, in April 1869, and homesteaded eighty acres of raw land on section 4, Centerville precinct. He erected a frame house, twelve by fourteen feet, and at once started to bring his land under cultivation, farming there for thirty-one years, or until 1900, when he rented the place. He still owns the farm, however, and derives there from a gratifying income. 

In 1900 he purchased a tract of land in Centerville precinct and founded the town of Martel, which is now a growing village. He still owns the greater part of the town site and also owns and operates the grain elevator, a harness store and the general store, which is conducted under the name of the Martel Mercantile Store. He is the leading citizen of Martel and supports heartily any project calculated to advance community interests. Mr. Griffin was married on the 2nd of September 1869, at Savannah, Missouri, to Mary Emma Walker, whose birth occurred in Iowa, on the 11th of March 1848. Her father, John Staman Walker, was a native of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and for many years followed the harness makers' trade in Savannah, Missouri, In 1869 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and passed his remaining years here, dying in the vicinity of Martel in 1905. 

He married Miss Margaret Wadley, a native of Iowa. Mrs. Griffin died March 2, 1892, leaving five children: John Edwin; Samuel Henry; Frederick Earl; William Lewis, now deceased; and Emma Mae. On the 14th of February, 1893, Mr. Griffin was married, at Martel, to Miss Selina Livingston, who was born in Ohio. She is a second cousin of Dr. David Livingston, the great African explorer. Mrs. Griffin is a lady of refinement and high character, whom it is a pleasure to meet. Mr. Griffin is a stanch advocate of democratic principles and for twenty years was a member of the school board of district 29, and for eight years held the office of justice of the peace. 

He was a charter member of the Knights of Pythias lodge of Sprague, in which he filled all the chairs, but is now affiliated with Damocles Lodge, No.60, at Hickman. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in all relations of life he has conformed his conduct to high moral standards. In all of his business dealings he has been scrupulously honest and the large measure of prosperity which has come to him is the result of his keen insight, his enterprise and initiative. There are few men more widely known in the county and none who are held in higher esteem. 


HENRY GRIMM 
Henry Grimm, now living retired, is a cabinet maker by trade and for a number of years worked as a coach builder for railroads and also engaged in farming in Yankee Hill precinct. His birth occurred in Hesse-Dannstadt, Germany on the 3rd of January 1839, and he is a son of Louis Grimm. His mother died when he was a year old and when eight years of age he accompanied his father to the United States, settlement being made at Baltimore, Maryland. There he grew to manhood, received his education and learned the trades of ship joiner and cabinet-maker. 

When twenty years old he went to West Albany, where for ten or fifteen years he worked in the coach building department of the New York Central Railroad. In 1876 he decided to try his fortune in the middle west and accordingly came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and purchased eighty acres of railroad land in Yankee Hill precinct. At that time the place was totally unimproved but he at once began to break the land and bring it under cultivation and erected a frame house sixteen by twenty feet, containing two rooms, which remained the. family home for many years. At length, however, it was replaced by a commodious modern residence. 

For a number. of years after coming to this county he was employed as a coach builder for the Burlington & Missouri Railroad at Plattsmouth and later did repair work at Lincoln. He was also a member of a wrecking crew here for some time. The family however, never left the farm. When not engaged in railroad work he gave his attention to the cultivation of the soil and the raising of stock and derived a good income from his land. A number of years ago he retired from active life and he now lives with his daughter, Mrs. A. F. Steinhausen, in Yankee Hill precinct. In 1865 Mr. Grimm returned to Europe and was married in Switzerland to Miss Marie Suter, who was born in that country on the 20th of April 1844. She passed away on the 9th of October 1914. 

To them were born seven children: Mrs. A. F. Steinhausen; Henry G., who is a railroad baggage man with a run on the Burlington Railroad between Omaha and Denver; Mrs. P. P. Kauffman, a resident of Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Louis; Mrs. C. V. Reddish, of Rokeby, Nebraska ; Mrs. Edom Sittler, of Centerville precinct, this county; and William, who died on the 17th of September, 1914, and whose widow and child now reside at Steele City, Nebraska. Mr. Grimm has seventeen grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He is a republican in politics and in religious faith is a Lutheran. Although he has reached an advanced age he is still vigorous in mind and body and takes a keen interest in the affairs of the day. He has at all times striven to conform his conduct to high standards and the respect and honor in which he is held are fully deserved. 


JAMES HOCKING
James Hocking was a highly esteemed resident of Denton precinct and his demise was recognized as a distinct loss to his community. During his latter years he farmed but in early manhood engaged in engineering work being connected in an important capacity with the building of a number of tunnels in the United States and Canada. A native of Cornwall, England, his birth occurred on the 12th of April, 1845, and he was the fourth in order of birth in a family of fifteen children born to John and Anna (Belmont) Hocking, also natives of that county. He received a meager education as he began work when ten years of age. He was at that time living in Pennsylvania as the family had emigrated to the United States two years previously. In 1865 removal was made to North Adams, Massachusetts, and the father had charge of the building of the Hoosac tunnel. Our subject was superintendent of construction of that tunnel, working under his father, and afterwards held a similar position in connection with the building of the Union tunnel at Baltimore, Maryland. 

In 1876 Mr. Hocking came to Lincoln, Nebraska, with a number of people from North Adams, who planned to establish a city in Lancaster county. However, this project was not carried out as a number became discouraged and returned to the east, while others located elsewhere in this section. Mr. Hocking purchased railroad land on section 15, Denton precinct, and built a frame house and placed the wild prairie land under cultivation. He was not satisfied with, agricultural pursuits, however, and returned to engineering, becoming associated with John Fitzgerald, of Lincoln. They assisted in building the Alpine tunnel in Colorado, a tunnel in the Black Hills of South Dakota and also the St. Claire river tunnel in Canada and the Chicago river tunnel in Chicago. 

Mr. Hocking then returned to his farm in Denton precinct and for twenty-three years he resided there, devoting his attention to the raising of grain and stock. He was successful in that connection and gained more than a competence. His death occurred on the 25th of September, 1912. Mr. Hocking's constructive and mechanical ability were not wholly expressed in his efficient work as an engineer but also in the invention of a number of articles, including an automatic brake for buggies and wagons and a fire extinguisher to put out fires in stoves in railway coaches in case of accident or collision. This latter invention was pronounced by those who examined it to be of superior merit, but as steam was then being installed to heat coaches it consequently never came into use. 

Mr. Hocking was married on the 11th of November, 1868, to Miss Mary Ellen Hicks who was born in Cornwall, England, in 1848, a daughter of Richard and Mary Ann Chapman (Barrett) Hicks, also natives of England. They emigrated to America in 1855 and located in Massachusetts, where the father's death occurred. He was a wool sorter by occupation. The mother passed her last years at the home of our subject and died in Lancaster county in 1893. To Mr. and Mrs. Hocking were born six children namely: John Francis, a carpenter and contractor of Denton, who is married and has five children; James Edward, who died at the age of four years and nine months; Sadie, the wife of Harry Smith, a farmer of Denton precinct; Walter, a carpenter and contractor of Denton, who is married and has two children; Arthur J ., who is operating the home farm; and Frank C., who married Mary Underwood, and is a carpenter and foreman for Harry Dobbs of Lincoln. 

The village of Denton includes part of the Hocking homestead, and several of the sons have built homes upon land once a part of the home farm. Mr. Hocking was a stanch republican, as are all of his sons, and he did all in his power to further the success of that party at the polls. He was also a Mason and his life was guided by the teachings of that order and the principles of Christianity although he was never a member of any church. His integrity was above question, and no man ever lost a cent through him. 

He held a high place in the estimation of all who knew him and was one of the most valued citizens of his precinct. His widow is now living in Denton, where she has many warm friends. She belongs to the Holy Trinity Episcopal church in Lincoln, but as she is too far away to attend services there she attends the Methodist church in Denton and contributes generously to its support. She belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star at Lincoln. 


FOREST M. HOSFORD
Death called a valued citizen when Forest M. Hosford was summoned to the home beyond. He had for a considerable period been actively identified with farming interests in this county and his widow still resides on section 27, Yankee Hill township. He was born in Monroeville, Huron county, Ohio, April 12, 1853, and is a son of John and Jane (Messenger) Hosford. The father was born in London, England, April 9, 1830, and was a harness maker by trade. When fourteen years of age he was brought by his parents to the new world and at the outbreak of the Civil war the firm of Hosford & Fanning entered into a contract with the government to furnish saddles for the Third Ohio Cavalry. 

He continued in the harness business for some time after the war and later engaged in the manufacture of fanning mills for several years, but finally retired from active business. He passed away in 1905 while his widow, who was born in Monroeville, Ohio, died in July 1913. F. M. Hosford was reared and educated in the Buckeye state and there resided until 1875 when he removed to Detroit, Michigan, where he studied chemistry with his uncle. Not liking the drug business he returned to the old home at Monroeville, Ohio, and there became identified with manufacturing interests in connection with his father. They were makers of the Buckeye fanning mill, which had an extensive sale, and their output also included churns and other manufactured articles. In 1880 Mr. Hosford came to Lancaster county with the purpose of establishing a branch factory at Lincoln, but after looking over the country decided it was too new for manufacturing enterprises and therefore turned his attention to farming. 

He purchased a quarter section of land five miles east of Lincoln on Holdrege street which he improved and which he cultivated for nineteen years. The place was situated in Lancaster precinct. He afterwards sold that property and for two years resided in Germantown, at the end of which time he purchased eighty acres of land on section 27, Yankee Hill precinct which he operated for fifteen years. He then determined to abandon active farming and erected a modern residence on the place-a home which would be a credit to any city. It is of attractive style of architecture, commodious, convenient and comfortable. Just five days after removing to the new home he was taken ill with pneumonia and in spite of the efforts of three physicians and a trained nurse he died on the 28th of December, 1915, at the age of sixty-two years. 

He was a devoted and loving husband and father and his many deeds of kindness will long be remembered by all with whom he came in contact. It was on the 30th of July, 1877, that Mr. Hosford was united in marriage to Miss Ella A. Healy, a daughter of Patrick and Ella A. (Butler) Healy, who were natives of Ireland. The father was a merchant tailor and came to America at an early day, living for a time in New York, while subsequently he removed to Canada conducting business at Sarnia. It was there that Mrs. Hosford was born in February, 1861. Her father continued in business in various places in Canada for a number of years but finally retired and for five years made his home with his daughter in Lancaster county. He was then taken to a hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for medical treatment and there passed away February 11, 1884, having for more than five years survived his wife, who died in December 1877. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hosford became the parents of one child, Blanche Irene, who was born March 23, 1891, and is the wife of Walter L. Shaner, a mechanic who is employed by his father in the automobile business in Lincoln. Mr. Hosford made a specialty of raising thoroughbred Jersey cattle and had a large herd of fine stock. He was the first man to begin bottling milk in Lincoln. His cattle were always placed on exhibition at the state fairs and won many prizes. He operated a milk route in Lincoln for some time and this proved one of the profitable branches of his business. 

Fraternally he was connected with the Modern Woodmen of America and also with the Farmers Club. In politics he was a republican, while his religious faith was that of the Christian church. His religious belief permeated his entire life. He was a man of splendid qualities and characteristics, straightforward and reliable in all of his business dealings, conscientious in every act, kindly in spirit and generous in disposition. Warm friendship was entertained for him by all and his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. His family is held in high esteem and the home of Mrs. Hosford is without doubt the finest country residence in Lancaster county. It is richly and tastefully furnished and moreover is the abode of a warm hearted hospitality which is one of its chief charms. 



Sarah Kincheloe & Daniel Hoy

Daniel HOY 
Daniel Hoy, who is farming on section 31, Grant precinct, has never had occasion to regret his choice of an occupation for he has found agricultural pursuits both congenial and profitable. He was born in Pennsylvania in March 1843, the son of William and Elizabeth ( Cowell ) Hoy, natives of Pennsylvania. The father, who was a farmer, removed to West Virginia in early manhood and located in Wood county, where his death occurred in 1848. The mother survived for more than half a century, dying in 1900. Daniel Hoy was reared and educated in West Virginia and in 1862, at the age of nineteen years, enlisted in Company D, Fourteenth West Virginia Volunteer Infantry with which he served for two years and ten months, or until the close of the struggle between the north and the south. 

He then farmed in West Virginia until 1872 when he removed to Kansas, whence he went to Missouri. After farming in the latter state for nine months he returned to West Virginia where he remained until 1883, in which year he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska. He bought eighty acres of land in Saltillo precinct, which he operated for five years, but at the end of that time purchased a similar tract on section 31, Grant precinct, to which he later added an adjoining eighty acres. He also purchased eighty acres on section 32 and has brought all his land to a high state of development, making all of the improvements upon the farm, which has become one of the valuable properties of the locality. He is still operating his land and derives a good income from the sale of his grain and stock. 

Mr. Hoy was united in marriage on the 30th of January 1866, to Miss Sarah Kincheloe, a daughter of Lawrence and Lettie (Stagg) Kincheloe, natives of Virginia. To Mr. and Mrs. Hoy have been born twelve children, namely: Lawrence B., who is farming in Grant precinct; Mary, the wife of L. E. Renard, a resident of Council Bluffs, Iowa; Violet, who married C. E. Butterfield, a resident of Oregon; William, who died on the 24th of February, 1914; Myrtle, the wife of J. H. Kincheloe, a resident of South Dakota; Gertrude Elizabeth, the wife of Elmer Jenkins, of Mitchell, Nebraska; Albert, also a resident of that town; Ernest W. and James B., farmers of this county; Charles Otto and Andrew M., who are associated with their father in the operation of the home place; and Mazie L., who died in 1913. 

Mr. Hoy is independent in politics, refusing to follow the dictates of a party leader, and he studies carefully the questions and issues of the day so that he may cast his ballot intelligently. He served as assessor of Grant precinct for one year and made an excellent record in that capacity. For twelve years he was a member of the school board. His religious faith is that of the United Brethren church and he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and the Grand Army of the Republic. His farming operations demand the greater part of his attention but he has also served as agent for the Lancaster County Farmers Mutual Insurance Company for twenty years, and has secured many policy holders for that organization. He is in excellent circumstances and in addition to his farm owns stock in the Bank of Roca. The success which he has gained is doubly creditable in that it is the direct result of his own efforts. Submitted by Kathie Harrison (descendant of Sarah Kincheloe Hoy's sister, Iva Kincheloe Clark).


E. E. HOMRIG 
E. E. Homrig, who makes his home in Lancaster precinct, was born in Ohio, on March 24, 1849, a son of Lewis and Sarah (Glick) Homrig, who were also natives of the Buckeye state. The father was a physician and farmer who at an early day went to Indiana, where he practiced medicine and carried on general agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of his life. It was in 1856 that he removed to that state and there he passed away in January, 1873, when fifty-five years of age. His widow long survived him, her death occurring August 28, 1897.

E. E. Homrig was a little lad of seven years when his parents removed to Indiana, in which state he was reared, remaining at home until be reached the age of twenty-seven, when he rented land and began farming on his own account. He followed that pursuit in Indiana until 1883, which year witnessed his arrival in Lancaster county, Nebraska, at which time he purchased land near Prairie Home, in Stevens Creek precinct. After cultivating that tract for four years he sold out and removed to Lancaster precinct, where he farmed for two years. 

Next established his home in Yankee Hill precinct and bought eighty acres on section 22. Immediately he began the further development of that place and has since cultivated it, covering a period of twenty-seven years. He has brought this land under a high state of cultivation, the fields annually produce good crops, and the neat and thrifty appearance of his place is an indication of his careful supervision and practical, progressive management. He is likewise a stockholder in the Lancaster Milk Producers Association. 

Mr. Homrig was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Cooper, a daughter of Joseph and Ellen ( Michaels) Cooper, who were natives of Indiana. The father was a minister of the United Brethren church and engaged in teaching for forty-four years, most of the time in Indiana. He died in November 1908, while his wife passed away at the age of seventy-eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Homrig were married on the 27th of September 1877, and have become the parents of three children: Laura, who was born September 5, 1879, and is employed in the office of W. J. Bryan; Sybil, who was born October 4, 1882, and married W. A. Westcott, of Lincoln; and Sarah E., who was born February 6, 1887, and died the 28th of February, 1889. 

Mr. Homrig is the present assessor of his precinct and has filled that office for four years. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party; his religious faith is that of the Congregational church; and his fraternal relations connect him with the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. His life has been one of intense activity and throughout the entire period he has been identified with agricultural pursuits, winning his success along well defined lines of labor. 


EDWARD HULING
Edward Huling, a well known resident of Waverly township, where he owns one hundred and sixty acres of good land, has passed much of. his life west of the Mississippi river and has been a pioneer of California, Iowa, South Dakota and Nebraska, meeting all of the experiences incident to life upon the frontier. He was born in Wisconsin, October 29, 1837, the oldest of six children born to R. Collom and Johanna (Eastman) Huling, natives of New York and Ohio respectively. In 1827 the father accompanied his parents to Grant county, Wisconsin, and there grew to manhood. He was a horse dealer and in 1853 went to California where he resided until his death which occurred in 1895, when he had reached the age of eighty-six years, as his natal year was 1809. 

He served as a soldier in the Black Hawk war, and in days of peace manifested his patriotism by placing the public welfare above his private interests. His wife, who was born in 1816, died in this county in 1900. Edward H. Huling attended school in Grant county, Wisconsin, but his educational opportunities were limited as when only nine years of age he began working for others. In 1852 he became a resident of California, and there he engaged in the cattle business for a number of years. He also freighted across the Humboldt desert into Nevada, and later kept a trading post and freighting station in Honey Lake valley, near Susanville, California. After thus engaging in business for three years he turned his attention to cattle raising but at intervals freighted to the Humboldt. mines, one hundred and seventy-five miles distant. He was at the mines when the first discovery of gold was made and was thoroughly familiar with life in the western mining camps. 

In 1865 he returned to Wisconsin and after operating a threshing machine there for one year, went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he kept a freighters' tavern for about six months. He then engaged in teaming and in buying wheat for a mill, but soon went to Omaha, where he remained a short time. He next entered the employ of a general contractor who was engaged in the construction of Union Pacific railroad lines, and Mr. Huling worked for him for about three months, going as far west as the Black Hills. Subsequently he returned to Omaha. When he passed through Fort Kearney there was considerable excitement as the Indians had burned several towns in that vicinity, had killed a family and had taken twin boys and two girls prisoners. The captives were later recovered in British Columbia. 

Mr. Huling operated a threshing outfit in the vicinity of Omaha for about three months and then turned his attention to the produce business in Iowa. Later he went to Wisconsin where he spent the winter, but in the spring he again took up his residence in Council Bluffs, Iowa, and began bringing a tract of wild land under cultivation. As soon as he had erected a residence he sent for his wife, who joined him, and for about four years he followed agricultural pursuits there, raising both grain and stock. On leaving Council Bluffs he located near State Center, Iowa, and for three years engaged in farming and cattle raising there, but at the end of that time went to Eureka, California, where he cultivated land and also conducted a transfer business for nine years. He then returned to Iowa but only remained in that state for a few weeks, after which he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and settled on the farm where he still lives. 

He purchased the land for seven dollars per acre and has realized a handsome profit on the investment, as it would now command a high figure if offered for sale. He has made many improvements on the place and is still actively engaged in farming, although he has reached the age when most men prefer to live a life of leisure. Mr. Huling was married in 1866 to Miss Sarah Carhart, whose birth occurred in Platteville, Grant county, Wisconsin, and who died in this county in 1871. They became the parents of four children, namely: Charles, who is farming in Nebraska, near Sioux City; George, a farmer of Lancaster county; Lulu, who married Lon Toland, a farmer of Oklahoma; and Addie, deceased. 

In 1876 Mr. Huling was again married, Miss Mary Carter becoming his wife. She too was called to the great beyond in 1890. By his second marriage Mr. Huling has the following children: Veva, at home; Ernest, a resident of Colorado; and Harold M. C., who is a graduate of the State University of Nebraska, although only nineteen years of age, and is now teaching near Holdrege. Mr. Huling supports the republican party when national issues are at stake, but at local elections votes independently. He has many interesting stories to tell of conditions in various parts of the west in the early days and his dominant qualities are those which have always characterized the pioneer. He is highly respected and his circle of friends is almost coextensive with that of his acquaintances. 


FRANK KRULL 
Frank Krull was a well known and prosperous farn1er of Centerville precinct and his death, which occurred in 1911 when he had reached an advanced age, was deeply regretted. A native of Mecklenburg, Germany, he was born in 1834, one of a family of eight boys and two girls, and remained in the. fatherland until he was eighteen years old, receiving in the meantime a thorough education. On leaving Germany he emigrated to the United States and located near La Forte, Indiana, where he worked by the month. He carefully saved his earnings and at length invested his capital in farm land. Subsequently he accompanied his brothers and sisters to St. Joseph; Missouri, where they purchased a farm and there he was married. Later he became a resident of Dubuque county, Iowa, and worked as a farm hand near the city of Dubuque. 

He came to Lancaster county in 1876 and, after renting land for a time, bought a quarter section of school land in Centerville precinct which he operated for about nine years. He then sold that place and purchased one hundred and sixty acres on section 33, where he engaged in fanning until called by death in 1911. He was seventy-seven years of age at the time of his demise, but retained his health and vigor in remarkable degree until a short time before his death. His widow holds title to eighty acres of the farm and their son Fred owns the other eighty acres. Mr. Krull was married at St. Joseph, Missouri, to Miss Adaline Turow, who was born in Salina, New York, in March, 1840. When about ten years of age she was taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, and there she lived until her marriage. 

Following Mr. Krull's death she removed from the farm to the town of Sprague, where she bought a residence and where she still lives. She rents the eighty acres which she owns and derives there from a comfortable income. Mr. and Mrs. Krull had ten children, five sons and five daughters, but only three are now living: Lena, the wife of Frank Spellman, a retired farmer residing in Sprague ; Frederick, who is farming in Lancaster county; and Lula, the wife of Arthur Spellman, a farmer of this county. Mr. Krull gave his political allegiance to the republican party but was not , an aspirant for public office. He was a man of high principles and his many admirable qualities won him a warm place in the regard of his fellow men. When he came to this country he was practically penniless, but by hard work and careful management he accumulated more than a competence. His widow is a member of the United Presbyterian church and is highly esteemed by all who know her. 


JOHN FRED KURTZ
John Fred Kurtz, an active partner in the Sprague Hardware Company, and also president of the Farmers Grain & Lumber Company of Sprague, is ranked among the energetic and successful business men of his town. He was born near Mount Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa, on the 9th of July, 1865, a son of Frederick Kurtz, whose birth occurred in Wurtemberg, Germany, where he remained until he was nineteen years of age. He then came to America and bought three hundred and twenty acres of railroad land in Olive Branch township, Lancaster county, Nebraska, on which he erected a frame house, fourteen by sixteen feet in dimensions. He at once began the task of breaking his land, which was virgin prairie, and after bringing it under cultivation devoted his time to the raising of grain and stock there until 1889. He then disposed of the farm and removed to Salem, Oregon, where he bought land which he devoted to the growing of fruit. 

He is now living retired in Salem, enjoying leisure made possible by his former well directed labor. He was married in Jefferson county, Iowa, to Miss Carolina Pfifer, who was born in that county. She also survives. John F. Kurtz was reared upon his father's farm in Lancaster county and was associated with him in agricultural pursuits until his marriage in 1888. Following that event he took charge of one hundred and sixty acres of the home place, which he purchased from his father and which he operated for several years. On selling that farm he bought eighty acres on section 16, Centerville precinct, which he farmed successfully until 1915, when he sold and removed to Sprague, where he built a fine residence. He joined with four other men in organizing the Sprague Hardware Company, in which he still owns a fifth interest. 

He gives much of his time to the conduct of that business but also has other interests as he is a stockholder in the Bank of Sprague, which he aided in organizing, is president of the Fanners Grain & Lumber Company of Sprague, which he organized, and is interested in the Martel Company, which he helped to organize and of which he was manager for five years. Mr. Kurtz was married on the 9th of September, 1888, in the Centerville church, to Miss Bertha Sonnemann, who was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. September 17, 1866. Her parents, John and Christina Sonnemann, were both natives of Germany but were early settlers of Sheboygan, whence they came to Lancaster county in 1868. The father took up a homestead in Centerville precinct and engaged in farming there for many years. 

The last twelve years of his life. however, were spent in the home of Mrs. Kurtz, who was two years of age when brought to this county by her parents and has since resided here. She is a member of the German Methodist Episcopal church and is very active in foreign missionary work, having served for twenty-one years as secretary of the Topeka branch of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of that church. At a conference held at Lincoln in 1915 she was presented with a handsome linen drawn work table set made by hand in India. She is recognized as an authority upon all matters pertaining to foreign missions and has proved very capable in the discharge of the duties of her important office. 

Mr. Kurtz votes independently at local elections but. where national issues are at stake supports the republican party. He belongs to Sprague Camp, No. 1577, M. W. A., and has served as banker and adviser. His religious faith is that of the German Methodist Episcopal church. He and his wife took up their residence in Salem, Oregon, two separate times but only remained there for nine months at one time and for six months at the other time. They have thoroughly identified their interests with those of Sprague and expect to make their permanent home here. Both are widely known and are held in the highest esteem. 


CHARLES W. KURTZER
Charles W. Kurtzer, who owns and operates a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Centerville precinct and a similar tract in Middle Creek precinct, was born in Germany, on the 26th of April 1863, a son of Adolph and Carolina (Karrow) Kurtzer, both natives of the fatherland. In 1865 the former came with his family to the United States and for some time engaged in butchering and railroading at Watertown, Wisconsin. Subsequently he arrived at Columbus, Wisconsin. While working on the section he was given the name John by which  he was thereafter known. In 1880 lie became a resident of Lancaster county, Nebraska and purchased eighty acres of land in Centerville precinct, on which his remaining days were spent, his death occurring on the 7th of December 1914, when he was eighty-two years old.

His wife and two sons died within two months in 1882 of typhoid fever. Besides C. W. Kurtzer there are two sons living: William, a resident of Red Lodge, Montana; and Robert, who lives on a ranch near Lorain, Oregon. Both lived at Sprague, this county, many years ago and manufactured brick there when all molding was done by hand. These sons were born of the father's first marriage. For his second wife Adolph Kurtzer married Miss Alma Woltersdorf and to them were born five daughters, Anna, Lizzie, Tena, Elsie and Alma, alto a son, Henry, and one child who died in infancy. The sisters are all living in Lancaster county except Tena, who is a resident of Missouri. 

Charles W. Kurtzer began working by the month as a farm hand when nineteen years of age and later rented land which he operated for two years. At the end of that time he had sufficient capital to purchase the S. Y. Hill homestead in Gage county and he devoted five years to the improvement and development of that place. He then returned to Lancaster county and now owns one hundred and sixty acres of fine land on section 8, Centerville precinct, and also a quarter section in Middle Creek precinct. He has erected a fine residence and barns upon his home place and has also set out orchard and shade trees which now add much to the attractiveness of the farm. He raises grain and stock and derives a good profit from both branches of his business. 

Mr. Kurtzer was married on the 9th of December, 1886, to Miss Emma Kassing. Her parents, Fred and Mary (Freye ) Kassing, were born respectively in Ohio and Germany. The father has passed away, but the mother is living at Clatonia, Nebraska, where she has made her home since pioneer days. The father was a soldier of the Civil war and was wounded, being shot through the mouth, after which he was in the hospital for eight months, subsequent to which time he was honorably discharged. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kurtzer have been born nine children, namely: Elmer, who is connected with the hospital at Lincoln; Irvin, who is married and resides upon his father's farm west of Lincoln; William; Robert; Sarah; Sophia; Louise and Alice, all at home; and Fred, who died when four years old. Mr. Kurtzer is a strong republican and served acceptably as school treasurer for some time. Both he and his wife have belonged to the German Methodist church since childhood and are now affiliated with the congregation in Highland precinct. They are widely known throughout Lancaster county and their many admirable qualities have gained them the sincere friendship of all who have been closely associated with them. 


WILLIE EDGAR LAMB, M. D. 
Dr. Willie Edgar Lamb, successfully engaged in the practice of medicine at Sprague since 1908, was born at Middlebranch, Knox county, Nebraska, January 22, 1881, a son of John Ezra Lamb. The father was born in Lafayette county, Wisconsin, July 25, 1849, and was a son of Ezra Lamb, a native of Perry county, Indiana. The latter's father was born in Onondaga county, New York. John Ezra Lamb was only a year old when he accompanied his parents to Iowa in 1850, and after spending one winter at Council Bluffs the family located on the Little Sioux river, one hundred miles north of that city. 

In 1866 they removed to Linn county, Iowa, and there John Ezra Lamb was married in 1869 to Miss Arabelle Wright, who at that time ,vas only sixteen years of age. In 1871 they became residents of Coffey county, Kansas, but the following year returned to Linn county, Iowa. In 1877 Mr. Lamb went to the Black Hills, .South Dakota, driving across the country in company with Curtis Lamb, Dewitt Lamb and Henry Butterfield. They spent the summer at Deadwood and Rapid City. In 1879 John E. Lamb removed to Knox county, Nebraska, where he made his home until 1887, when he became a resident of Rock county, this state. 

In 1907 he went to Crook county, Oregon, but in 1915 returned to Nebraska, this time locating in McPherson county. Dr. Lamb acquired a common school education at Morrisville, this state, there pursuing his studies to the age of eighteen, after which he pursued a business course in the Rhoeball Business College of Omaha. Subsequently he took academic work in Lincoln and after completing that course entered the Lincoln Medical School. A year later he transferred to the Nebraska College of Medicine, in which he completed his course, being graduated there from with high honors on the 8th of May, 1908. 

Following his graduation he removed to Sprague, where he has since continued in practice save the time which he has spent in post-graduate work in Chicago, attending the clinics of Dr. J. B. Murphy, also Rush Medical College and in the Post Graduate and Cook County Hospitals, where he has pursued special courses in physical diagnosis. His ability is widely recognized and he has made steady advance in his profession, being acknowledged as one of the leading physicians and surgeons of the county. 

On the 16thof May, 1904, at Lincoln, Dr. Lamb was married to Miss Aseneth D. Kirlin, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Kirlin. The father is a native of Zanesville, Ohio, born in 1856. He resided there until seventeen years of age, when with his parents he removed to Bedford, Ohio, where he afterward married Miss Issabell L Hardenbrook 0n the 11th of February, 1878. She was born near West Carlisle, Ohio, December 13, 1859. 

In 1891 Mr. and Mrs. Kirlin with their family of seven children removed to Douglas, Nebraska, where they lived for two years and then went to Lincoln, where they remained until 1903 In that year they took up a homestead at Oshkosh, Nebraska, where they are now residing Mrs. Lamb received her education at Martinsburg, Ohio, in the school, which is a branch of Ada College, and also spent one year at the White Oak school. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Lamb has been born a son, Willie Dwight, whose birth occurred December 7, 1910. Dr Lamb is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Following his return from Chicago he served as one of the stewards of the church for seven years and was also superintendent of the Sunday school for three years, in which period he put forth most effective, earnest and resultant effort to develop and up build the school His many sterling traits of character as well as his professional worth have given him high standing in his community. 


GEORGE W. LEE 
A life of intense activity, carefully and honorably directed, has given George W. Lee place among the respected and valued citizens of Lancaster county. He makes his home in Emerald, where he has a pleasant residence situated in the midst of two and a half acres of land. At different times he has followed farming and merchandising and he has also filled various local offices, the duties of which he has discharged with promptness and fidelity. He was born in Freeport, Illinois, August 10, 1840, a son of Lorenzo and Charlotte (Rich) Lee, who were natives of Massachusetts and Long Island respectively. 

The father devoted his life to farming, blacksmithing and merchandising and upon his removal westward in 1836 settled in Stephenson County, Illinois, where he purchased land which he improved and cultivated throughout his remaining days. His death occurring January 2, 1861. His wife survived him for a decade, dying on September 5, 1871. George W. Lee was reared and educated in Stephenson county, Illinois, and remained with his mother until her death. He afterward rented land and engaged in farming for a number of years and in the winter months worked at the carpenter's trade. Subsequently he purchased eighty acres, which he improved, residing thereon until 1874, when he came to Lancaster county and purchased a half section of land in Middle Creek precinct. 

With characteristic energy he began its further development and improvement, owning the farm until 1900. He operated it until 1884, after. which he rented it. In that year he removed to Emerald and opened a store, which he conducted until 1893, and later he concentrated his attention upon the business of buying and selling stock and grain for several years. In 1905, however, he retired from active business and has since made his home in Emerald, enjoying a well earned rest. He is pleasantly situated in a comfortable residence that is surrounded by two and a half acres of land. On the 11th of October 1871, Mr. Lee was united in marriage to Miss Adeline Spencer, a daughter of James D. and Agnes (Barry) Spencer. 

They became the parents of a daughter, Mary W., who married Fred Schmidt and died in November, 1904, leaving five children, George E., Freda A., Curtis W., Winifred and Agnes. Mrs. Lee passed away in March 1891, and in September 1895, Mr. Lee married Arvilla A. Aspinwall, a daughter of John and Lucy (Shemway) Aspinwall. 

Politically Mr. Lee is a republican and has filled various local offices, serving at different times as assessor, road supervisor and as postmaster of Emerald for a number of years. His religious belief is that of the Methodist church, to the teachings of which he loyally adheres. His course has ever been upright and honorable and wherever he is known he is held in high esteem because of the fact that he is a successful business man whose success has been worthily won and also owing to the fact that in every relation of life his course has measured up to high standards. 


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