The NEGenWeb Project
2000 by Leona Gustafson


Snippets from Early Furnas County Newspapers

TRANSCRIBER'S NOTES:  All of the items here came from partial pages.  Anything beginning with three dots (. . .) begin mid-column. Things ending with three dots (. . .) end mid-column.  Some copies are very difficult to read; a bracketed question mark ([?]) will indicate that the word is the transcriber's best guess.  Bracketed words and letters indicate a transcriber's addition to the text.

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Arapahoe Public Mirror
July 15, 1897   Sept. 17, 1908
Oct. 26, 1922   Nov. 2, 1922
Arapahoe Pioneer
July 16, 1897   Jan. 28, 1898
March 4, 1904   Sept. 18, 1908
Beaver City Times - Tribune
March 23, 1906   May 12, 1912
  The Hendly Delphic
Friday, January 12, 1912
 

  Arapahoe Public Mirror

Thursday, July 15, 1897 - Page 5


     . . . Dr. J. B. BALLARD, Dentist, will be in Arapahoe the 2nd and 4th Mondays of each month.


     Rev. AUSTIN MORGAN, of Kearney, will conduct services at the Episcopal Church Sunday night.


     Mr. and Mrs. D. N. PRIME were visited last week by their daughter Mrs. F. O. GRAY, of Indianola.


     The Kid Baseballists met the enemy at Oxford on Tuesday and were theirs to the tune of 17 to 7.


     E. N. ALLEN informs the MIRROR that he expects Mrs. A. and daughter home from California on Sunday next.


     W. LORIMER, of Orleans, is assisting Station Agent EDWARDS in looking after the B. & M. interests at this point.


     D. N. PRIME is being visited by his sister, Mrs. JORDAN, and daughter, of O'Brien county, Iowa, who came last Wednesday.


     Elder A. A. ARTHUR has resigned as pastor of the Christian Church and will devote his time to lecturing on Palestine.


     Business has been decidedly quiet since the Fourth, partly owing to the fact that farmers are very busy in the harvest field.


     You can buy more and better Envelopes for less money at this office than any place in Furnas county. Any size desired.


     Rev. CRIPPEN and family are visiting relatives at Wannetta and imperial, and expect to be absent from home a week or longer.


     Attorney E. STANSBURY, of Williamsport, Ind., is in the city visiting his brother, LEE, and other relatives. He arrived here last Friday.


     The attendance at the Summer School is growing and the management is to be congratulated on the success of the undertaking.


     Spring wheat harvest is now occupying the time and attention of our farmers, and the yield is reported to be unusually large and quality extra large.


     FRED USHER, of Gosper county, received a shipment of 15 cars of cattle from the west Tuesday morning, and will fatten the herd on Gosper county corn.


Summer School notes.


     The second week of Summer School finds the enrollment increasing.
     All branches required for a first and second grade certificate are being taught.
     There is also a splendid opportunity for a teacher to review.
     Sup't DOLING aided by Instructors OATES and LYNE intend making the Summer School here second to none in the west.
     A list of all students enrolled will be published next week.


     The happiest man in Arapahoe at the hour of going to press is EMIL HARTMAN. It's a girl, and was born last night.


     Begg's Little Giant Pills cures Constipation, Sick Headache and the many other complaints caused by indigestion.       R. H. BELLAMY.


     WILHELM SCHIEVELBEIN died on Tuesday, aged 83 years. The funeral services take place at 10 a. m. to-day, Rev. MERZ officiating. Deceased was the father of WM. SCHIEVELBEIN, Mrs. F. WINDLAND [WENDLAND], Mrs. F. MELCHERT, Mrs. G. BLOCH and Mrs. JULIUS HINZ. The family and relatives have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.


     The news from Washington concerning the tariff bill is to the effect that there are no signs of agreement between the Senate and the House conferees on the many differences in the measure as passed by the House and Senate. The House conferers stand stubbornly by the original measure on all the important items, while on the other hand the Senators have not as yet shown any disposition to yield. How long it will take for them to "get together" is a matter of speculation at this writing.


     Prof.. MULLEN of Clifton, Kan., who was recently elected principal of the Arapahoe High School, has tendered his resignation to the Board of Education and the same has been accepted. This information comes to the MIRROR from a trustworthy source, and is of interest to the patrons of sour schools, but notwith- . . .


Arapahoe Pioneer

Friday, July 16, 1897 - Page 5


     . . . B. F. DOWNER, who shipped a car load of hogs for the members of the Farmers' Business Association, obtained the highest market price. He will make another shipment next week.


     The supreme court has refused the rehearing in relation to the matter of the Free Attendance High School Case. Many of the children in our rural districts will be deprived of a higher education.


     When you come to Arapahoe do not fail to visit HARRIS's gallery. Cabinet sizes $2 per dozen. Other sizes in proportion. Best of instruments. Pictures permanent. One block north of B. & M. depot.


     Rev. E. B. CRIPPEN, wife and family started Monday overland for Greeley, Col. The expect to be absent about three weeks. This is the first time in four years that his reverence has absented himself from his parish duties.


     According to last week's Tribune all the main and outbuildings were damaged by the hail and wind, and that one of the most expensive structures was carried bodily over the six foot iron railings which surround the Furnas County Agricultural Fair grounds.


     Owing to the resignation of principal PAT MULLEN, the school board is wrestling with another batch of thirty-three applications, and the end is not yet. The newly elected officers of the Arapahoe High School are THOS. BLOODWORTH, president; JOHN EVANS, treasurer, and G. V. MISNER, secretary.


     E. E. and DICK EMMETT, CHARLEY ATKINSON and TOM DAVIS loaded their goods and chattels and made a bee line for Shindler' Pond last evening where they struck their tent and will enjoy an outing for a few days. The wild scenery, good shooting and fishing make that part of Nebraska one of the most enjoyable places for rural enjoyment.


     . . . JOHN H. MOONEY has been ill in his Ohio home for two weeks. As soon as his health permits he will return home. LATER--MR. MOONEY returned last evening from his Ohio home, still believing that Nebraska is the finest spot on earth.


     The article signed B. was written, not by the editor, but by E. R. BULKLEY, now of Oklahoma, but formerly a resident of Arapahoe. Any correspondence or comment the Mirror wishes to make on said article B. will be fully able to answer.


     W. H. REED owns the oldest bicycle in the county which he bought of his son CHARLES, and the same man who wrote that article on extravagance, owns since the date of the aforesaid sale, the neatest and prettiest bike in town.


     W. C. SCHIEBELBIEN [SCHIEVELBEIN] of Elk Creek, Gosper County, died Tuesday at the ripe age of 83 years, 2 months and 8 days, surrounded by his children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. He was a good citizen, honored by his friends and neighbors for his fair dealings and many other sterling qualities. He was born in Germany and came to the United States in 1874. A few years ago he settled on Elk Creek, surround by his large family. He was laid to rest in the Emanuel [Immanuel] cemetery in Gosper county, Pastor A MARTZ [MERTZ] officiating. A large concourse of people followed the remains to the cemetery.


Money to Loan.

     I have money to loan on first class improved real estate, from one to three years. No delays.-- J. W. TOMBLIN.


Dressmaking.

     Mrs. E. TRUE, East Locust street is ready to do dressmaking and plain sewing.


Low One-Way Rates to All Points East.

     Via the Burlington Route. July 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, and each Friday and Monday thereafter until August 13.
     Go east on any of the above low rate days and you save enough to cover all the incidental expenses of travel--berth in sleeping car, meals, transfers, etc.
     See nearest B. & M. R. R. Agent, or write to J. FRANCIS, G. P. A., Omaha, Neb.


Program July 18, at 8:30 p. m. at the Christian Church..

Prayer...............................................Elder SKINNER
Song......................................................Congregation
Reading of Scripture and Prayer.........Mrs. SKINNER
Solo...............................................MABEL COLVIN
Report From Fields--Paper...........ANNIE DISBROW
Song.....................................................Male Quartet [Sic.]
Girls of India......................................NORA MISNER
Recitation--
   Who Bids for the Children............STELLA SHERER
Duet......................MADGE and MAUDE DISBROW
Results of Mission Work in Foreign Lands --
         ......................................................ADA PRIME
Solo.................................................FRANC(?) REED
Recitation......................................"UNCLE DANIEL"
Prayer..............................................STELLA ALLEN
Song...................................................Ladies Quartette [Sic.]


Arapahoe Pioneer

Friday, January 28, 1898 - Page 5


     . . . Dr. WEIRICH the oculist and aurist of Hastings will meet eye and ear patients in Arapahoe, Saturday February 12th at Dr. COOPER's office.


     Mr. and Mrs. E. N. ALLEN with their daughter STELLA entertained for dinner Sunday the Misses N. LALLY[?] and K. FREED[?], Messrs. GRAHAM B. COLVIN and FRED KREGIOW[?].


     Don't annoy others by your coughing, and risk your life by neglecting a cold. One Minute Cough Cure cures coughs, colds, croup, grippe, and all throat and lung troubles.      R. BELLAMY.


     FRED HEMANN who underwent an operation at the St. Emanuel hospital at Omaha returned home yesterday totally restored to his usual health.


     Those who will be unable to bring their milk to the seperator station are requested to inform the president of the association here so that regular routes for gathering the milk may be laid out.


     County Treasurer HANNING went to Lincoln Tuesday to settle with the state treasurer. From there he went to Iowa to visit relatives. Messrs. KEYES and BLACKMAN have charge of the office during his absence.


     Mrs. J. SCHIEVELBEIN died at her residence Monday after a long illness. Rev. A. METZ officiated at the funeral services. The afflicted family have the sympathy of their friends in this their sad bereavement.


     What pleasure is there in life with a headache, constipation and billousness? Thousands experience them who could become perfectly healthy by using DeWitt's Little Early Risers, the famous little pills.      R. H. BELLAMY.


     C. HORTAN has received a communication requesting him to try and raise some food for the suffering and starving Cubns [sic.]. He therefore requests those charitably inclined to meet at W. D. PRUITT's office Saturday at 2 p. m. to formulate some plan whereby some means may be adopted to share our abundance with suffering humanity.


     Mrs. STROHM returned to Arapahoe this week and called at this office explaining how she had been misrepresented by eastern papers when she did so much for suffering humanity in '94 and '95.. . .


     . . . Children and adults tortured by burns, scalds, injuries, eczema or skin diseases may secure instant relief by using Dewitt's;s Witch Hazel Salve. It is the great pile remedy.       R. H. BELLAMY.


     MCGEE Bros. have added to their already large collection a pair of stuffed cedar birds, sometimes called wax wing, and in Europe the Bohemian warbler. Hundreds of them migrated to this part of the country about three weeks ago. They fee mostly on cedar berries, hence their name.


     Whooping cough is the most distressing malady; but the duration can be cut short by the use of One Minute Cough Cure, which is also the best known remedy for croup and all lung and bronchial troubles.   R. BELLAMY.


     Station Agent GRAY, of Indianola[?], accompanied by his brother, a successful miner from the Klondike region, who struck it [rich] this year, and who will return there next month via San Francisco, visited us Tuesday. Knowing our silver proclivities he did not exhibit any of the yellow metal.


     After years of untold suffering from piles, B. W. PURSELL, of Knitnersville, Pa., was cured by using a single box of DeWitt's Witch Hazel Salve. Skin diseases, such as eczema, rash, pimples, and obstinate sores, are readily cured by this famous remedy.   R. H. BELLAMY.


     The amount of milk brought to the creamery is steadily increasing, not only in the number of patrons, but the butter fat is largely in excess in proportion to the amount of milk brought during the first week. This plainly shows that the cows are receiving better care. A cow is, literally speaking, but a machine; the better she is [f]ed with cream producing food the larger the reward for the dairyman.


     D. VINCENT celebrated his sixty-fourth birthday yesterday by giving a dinner party to a few of his many friends. The tables were loaded with all the delicacies of the season, and all present did ample justice to the feast. Those present were Mrs. W. A. MCGEE, Mrs. CURTIS, R. J. FINCH, Mr. and Mrs. Prudden and son, . . .

Arapahoe Pioneer

Friday, March 4, 1904 - Page 8


At Rest.

     Mrs. W. [C.] SCHIEVELBEIN died at the home of her daughter in Gosper county, February 29th, 1904, surrounded by her children, aged 85 years, 10 months and 15 days. MARIA KOEPKE was born at Brohmstied provence of Pommern, April 14, 1818. In 1849 she was married to W. [C]. SCHIEVELBEIN, from this union 9 children were born. In 1874 she with her husband and children emigrated to the United States. Deceased was a dutiful wife, a loving mother, a kind neighbor and a good christian. Six children survive her, her husband and three children having gone before. Services were held at the Elk Creek German [Immanuel] Lutheran church, Rev. BADER officiating with interment at the Elk Creek cemetery.


Coming Events.

     Annual meeting of the Farmer's Business Association, Saturday, March 5th, at 1 p. m.
     SANFORD DODGE Dramatic Co., in Shakespear's play "Hamlet" Saturday, March 5th at 8 p. m. Opera House.


     The RUSSEL Musical Novelty Co., Friday, March 11th. Opera House. . . .


Beaver City Times - Tribune

Friday, March 23, 1906 - Page 8


Dead in The Snow.

     WM. SCHIEVELBEIN, of Gosper county was found dead in the snow at Arapahoe, on Tuesday morning by the mail carrier, SAM SEXSON, at about 6 o'clock. The body was discovered near the hitching rack on the east side of the main street. SCHIEVELBEIN was a resident of Gosper county, but was well known on this side of the line. His death presents some elements of mystery. While he was found in the snow and it was reported that he froze to death, yet a contusion on the head shows that he either fell from his wagon or was waylaid. He was last seen Tuesday morning at about 1 o'clock, when it is presumed that he prepared to go to his home.
     The report of the jury, impanneled [sic.] by Coroner HOPPING, made the following report:
     At an inquest holden at E. N. ALLEN's undertaking rooms, Arapahoe, Furnas County, Nebr., on the 20th day of March, 1906, before me C. E. HOPPING, coroner of said county, upon the body of WILLIAM SCHIEVELBEIN, lying dead, by the jurors whose names are hereunto subscribed, the said jurors upon their oaths do say that WILLIAM SCHIEVELBEIN came to his death from alcoholism and cold.


Has Tried Both.

     An Nebraska exchange printed last week says the wind was so strong that day that school had been dismissed, a plate glass window in a store blown in and the morning train delayed by the storm. Wonder if JOHN JACKSON and FRANK KUEHN and W. L. MILLER don't think regretfully of Forest Grove on such days?--Forest Grove, Oregon, Times.
     The above refers, no doubt to the TIMES-TRIBUNE, which is read from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The facts are that there was a slight breeze that week, but the school house has been condemned on account of poor architecture and the plate glass Ron had just been installed and the putty was not dry. On being interviewed, JOHN JACKSON says that he enjoys a Nebraska breeze in comparison with the troubles experienced in Oregon. He had a dream but woke up. See "Only a dream" in this issue.


Harmonious.

     The republican editors of the Fifth congressional district formed an association on March 13. Not to be outdone in the matter of organization, the populist editors of the Fifth district have also organized. The organization was perfected at Arapahoe on the same date. J. H. MOONEY, editor of the Arapahoe Pioneer, was elected secretary-treasurer. Every populist editor in the Fifth district was present and participated in the work of organization. At the conclusion of the work the entire association returned to its work as editor of the Arapahoe Pioneer. It was one of the most unanimous meetings ever held in the state.--W. M. MAUPIN in Lincoln Star.


Advertised Letters..

     The following letters remain uncalled for in Beaver City postoffice for the week ending March 22, 1906:      J. M. KINNARD.      CHAS. LANES.      C. W. OGLE.      NED ROGERS.      These letters will be sent to the dead letter office March 29, 1906, if not delivered before. In calling for the above, please say, "advertised," giving the date of list. --- T. A. BOYD, PM.


     The annexation of unincorporated additions will in all probability have to be done through the district court, as it appears that a paper has been circulated and signed by most of our suburban (unincorporated) citizens protesting against the proposed annexation. If the court's aid must be invoked to bring about this forward step in our municipal development now is as good a time to begin proceedingsas any date in the future. Let 'er go, GALLAGHER for a Greater Arapahoe -- Arapahoe Mirror.


     Standard talking machines free. You can get one as SHIMEALL's.



Arapahoe Public Mirror

Thursday, Sept. 17, 1908 - Page 1


The City Council.

     Last Friday night the council got busy on three graft games and revoked they licenses. The chief con man was put out of business by the clerk after he operated one day. He was trying to clean out the boys too quick and broke the terms of his permit. The town was free from open games of chance on the last day of the tournament.
     The following bills were allowed:
FRANK ELAND, insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.50
OSCAR FREEZE, labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.00
HENRY KENNEDY, labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.00
JOS. EINSTEIN, mds.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .30
PERRY & BEE CO., Lbr.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.05
W. H. TYRRELL, salary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60.00

Gus Bloch.

     GUS BLOCH died a[t] the farm home ten miles north of Arapahoe Sept. 8, as a result of a second stroke of paralysis. He was nearly 56 years of age and a pioneer of Gosper county, homesteading there 27 years ago and has lived on the same place ever since.
     His first attack of paralysis was three months ago and the second about a month ago. He was apparently recovering, but a few days before death failed rapidly.
     The services were conducted at the residence Sept. 10, by Rev. W. BAEDER of the North German Church [Immanuel Lutheran Church]. Interment was in the cemetery at that place.
     Gus was a sturdy German of strict integrity, and many friends join the widow and children in mourning his demise.

Give the Hen a Chance.

     Not long ago every paper in the county and every daily paper that comes to this office published the law and penalties regarding the sale of stale eggs. The reports covered the pure food law thoroughly. But what's the use?
     A certain Holbrook grocer bought his usual batch of eggs, butter, etc., last Saturday and when he opened shop Monday morning the store resembled an incubator. Two chicks in a top layer of eggs, in one case, had just broken through the shell and were calling lustily for breakfast. Evidently some one wanted to make an even count and borrowed a couple from the hen on the nest.

Off for Benkleman.

     ROBT. HOLLINGSWORTH left Monday morning for Benkleman, where he has accepted a position with the JOHN SMITH Dry Goods Co. Bob has been in the large EINSTEIN store since the MCKENNA store closed and has worked two years without losing a day. This is his first position away from home and we expect him to be a frequent visitor, but he will not forget to attend to business first and make good in his new position.

Fish Bone in Leg.

     SEIBERT, the 12-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. WM. LEE, south of town has been troubled the past two years with a "bad" leg. At times it would fester and run, then apparently heal. Last week the sore became suddenly worse and a hard substance protruded from the wound which was running freely. The mother removed the obstacle and it proved to be a fish bone. The boy's leg is healing readily and will be in as good shape as ever.

Arapahoe Pioneer

Friday, Sept. 18, 1908 - Page 1


DEATH OF GUSTAVE [SIC.] BLOCH.


A Good Man Removed From Our Midst.


     Gustav Bloch was born Dec. 25, 1852 at Kamionke, Posen, Germany. At the age of 19 he emigrated to America and first settled in the state of Wisconsin. Soon, however, he moved to Nebraska and first lived near Columbus then removed to Washington county. Here in the year 1876 he got married to Miss Emilie Schievelbein. This union was blessed with seven children, two sons and five daughters of which the youngest, Clara, died one and one-half years ago. In 1881 he moved to Gosper county and settled ten miles north of Arapahoe. On May 10th, he suffered a stroke of paralysis from which he never fully recovered, being unconscious the last few weeks. He died Sept. 8th, and was buried Sept. 10th, from the German [Immanuel] Lutheran church, of which he was one of the founders. His age was 55 years, 8 months and 13 days.
     Gustave Bloch was an industrious man giving close attention to his own affairs which consequently were prosperous. He was well liked by his neighbors and highly respected by all the people of his acquaintance in Arapahoe and vicinity.
     The funeral service was held by Rev. Bader in the presence of a large attendance of sorrowing relatives, neighbors and friends. In his death the community suffers the loss of a good man. . . .


ELWOOD BULLETIN. (partial)


     ROY TIBBETTS was at Springfield, Mo., last week looking the country over with a view of purchasing land.
     RAY VANDERHOFF of Arapahoe, spent Saturday here.
     Mrs. GEORGE BLUE of Arapahoe, spent last week visiting at the home of her son, HARRY HALL, at Elwood.
     W. E. and T. G. CARTER of near Arapahoe, were in Elwood Tuesday on legal business, connected with their father's estate, JOHN CARTER, deceased, transferring 80 acres of land in Iroquois county, . . .


What Our Neighbors Say About The Big Tournament.

The Arapahoe Pioneer made a strike this week by issuing a daily during the base ball tournament. Strike one was received at this office and is a credit to the Pione[e]r printery from the managing editor to the mailing clerk.--Beaver City Times.


     The Daily Pioneer, a four column four page well edited and neatly printed paper emanating from the wigwam of Col. MOONEY of Arapahoe, drifted into our office Wednesday evening. The four days' base ball tournament now being pulled off down there is attracting state-wide attention and lovers of the national sport have been flocking that way in droves. The hustling people of Arapahoe never do things by halves, and Editor MOONEY is no exception to his fellow-townsmen.--Bartley Inter-Ocean.


     The Arapahoe Pioneer issued a daily during the four days base ball tournament. Being a first-class article it could not get in the mails as second class matter.--Bertrand Herald.


     The Arapahoe Pioneer is printing a four column folio daily during the base ball tournament there and Editor MOONEY's facil[e] comments on the games and happenings of the day, make it eagerly sought for in that town.--McCook Republican.


R. J. Harper.

     ROSS HARPER used to walk from Arapahoe to Beaver City to attend district court. He had to be economical for he had a mother to support. He saved his earnings and today could ride in a $5000 automobile of his own if he desired. He has looked after his personal affairs as he would look after Furnas county's if he were elected county attorney. Vote for HARPER. ...


Arapahoe Pioneer

Friday, March 4, 1904 - Page 8


At Rest.

     Mrs. W. [C.] SCHIEVELBEIN died at the home of her daughter in Gosper county, February 29th, 1904, surrounded by her children, aged 85 years, 10 months and 15 days. MARIA KOEPKE was born at Brohmstied provence of Pommern, April 14, 1818. In 1849 she was married to W. [C]. SCHIEVELBEIN, from this union 9 children were born. In 1874 she with her husband and children emigrated to the United States. Deceased was a dutiful wife, a loving mother, a kind neighbor and a good christian. Six children survive her, her husband and three children having gone before. Services were held at the Elk Creek German [Immanuel] Lutheran church, Rev. BADER officiating with interment at the Elk Creek cemetery.


Coming Events.

     Annual meeting of the Farmer's Business Association, Saturday, March 5th, at 1 p. m.
     SANFORD DODGE Dramatic Co., in Shakespear's play "Hamlet" Saturday, March 5th at 8 p. m. Opera House.


     The RUSSEL Musical Novelty Co., Friday, March 11th. Opera House. . . .


Beaver City Times - Tribune

Friday, March 23, 1906 - Page 8


Dead in The Snow.

     WM. SCHIEVELBEIN, of Gosper county was found dead in the snow at Arapahoe, on Tuesday morning by the mail carrier, SAM SEXSON, at about 6 o'clock. The body was discovered near the hitching rack on the east side of the main street. SCHIEVELBEIN was a resident of Gosper county, but was well known on this side of the line. His death presents some elements of mystery. While he was found in the snow and it was reported that he froze to death, yet a contusion on the head shows that he either fell from his wagon or was waylaid. He was last seen Tuesday morning at about 1 o'clock, when it is presumed that he prepared to go to his home.
     The report of the jury, impanneled [sic.] by Coroner HOPPING, made the following report:
     At an inquest holden at E. N. ALLEN's undertaking rooms, Arapahoe, Furnas County, Nebr., on the 20th day of March, 1906, before me C. E. HOPPING, coroner of said county, upon the body of WILLIAM SCHIEVELBEIN, lying dead, by the jurors whose names are hereunto subscribed, the said jurors upon their oaths do say that WILLIAM SCHIEVELBEIN came to his death from alcoholism and cold.


Has Tried Both.

     An Nebraska exchange printed last week says the wind was so strong that day that school had been dismissed, a plate glass window in a store blown in and the morning train delayed by the storm. Wonder if JOHN JACKSON and FRANK KUEHN and W. L. MILLER don't think regretfully of Forest Grove on such days?--Forest Grove, Oregon, Times.
     The above refers, no doubt to the TIMES-TRIBUNE, which is read from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The facts are that there was a slight breeze that week, but the school house has been condemned on account of poor architecture and the plate glass Ron had just been installed and the putty was not dry. On being interviewed, JOHN JACKSON says that he enjoys a Nebraska breeze in comparison with the troubles experienced in Oregon. He had a dream but woke up. See "Only a dream" in this issue.


Harmonious.

     The republican editors of the Fifth congressional district formed an association on March 13. Not to be outdone in the matter of organization, the populist editors of the Fifth district have also organized. The organization was perfected at Arapahoe on the same date. J. H. MOONEY, editor of the Arapahoe Pioneer, was elected secretary-treasurer. Every populist editor in the Fifth district was present and participated in the work of organization. At the conclusion of the work the entire association returned to its work as editor of the Arapahoe Pioneer. It was one of the most unanimous meetings ever held in the state.--W. M. MAUPIN in Lincoln Star.


Advertised Letters..

     The following letters remain uncalled for in Beaver City postoffice for the week ending March 22, 1906:      J. M. KINNARD.      CHAS. LANES.      C. W. OGLE.      NED ROGERS.      These letters will be sent to the dead letter office March 29, 1906, if not delivered before. In calling for the above, please say, "advertised," giving the date of list. --- T. A. BOYD, PM.


     The annexation of unincorporated additions will in all probability have to be done through the district court, as it appears that a paper has been circulated and signed by most of our suburban (unincorporated) citizens protesting against the proposed annexation. If the court's aid must be invoked to bring about this forward step in our municipal development now is as good a time to begin proceedingsas any date in the future. Let 'er go, GALLAGHER for a Greater Arapahoe -- Arapahoe Mirror.


     Standard talking machines free. You can get one as SHIMEALL's.


Arapahoe Public Mirror

Thursday October 26, 1922 - Page 1


DAVID W. LOAR DIED TUESDAY


     DAVID W. LOAR, aged 69 years and 22 days, died at 8 o'clock p. m., Tuesday, October 24 at his home in Beaver City, after an illness of about ten days of heart trouble. Deceased was an old and respected resident of the south side of Furnas county, being in the drug business in Hendley for years and afterward moving to Beaver City, where he was in the drug business for a number of years and later went into the real estate business. Deceased was born in Greensburg, Pa., in 1853, and came to the west when a young man.


Red Along Highways Should Mean "Danger"

     Drivers on the public roads are all familiar with the preference for red paint shown by advertisers. Some agencies systematically use round red signs lettered with white. As an additional trick to attract attention the signs are placed at crossings, before curves or near the approaches to bridges. The frequency with which these signs occur reduces the chance of a real warning being noticed to a dangerous minimum, and has given rise to a sentiment opposing the use of red paint on anything but warning signals. It is t be hoped that the sentiment may crystallize [sic.] into a definite movement and that we may in the near future see the removal of all misleading signs. A red sign and the word "stop" should mean one thing, and only one, to the driver.


VOPAT-HAHN

     Mr. GEORGE HAHN AND Mrs. DORATHY VOPAT were married at the Methodist parsonage at McCook by Rev. DAY on Tuesday, October 24th. Mr. and Mrs. HAHN returned to Arapahoe Wednesday morning and will go to housekeeping in the home of the groom east of town. The Mirror joins their many friends in best wishes. . . .


GOSPER CO. OLD SETTLER DIES


     JULIUS FREDERICK ZIEBELL, aged 84 years, 9 months and 2 days, died at the home of his son WILLIAM, on Monday evening at 9 o'clock, from ailments incident to old age. Deceased had been a resident of Gosper county forty-one years and was one of the founders of the Elk Creek [Immanuel] Lutheran church and in the early days of the county was a prominent personage. He leaves to mourn, four sons and four daughters, as follows:  WILLIAM, HENRY, FRED and HERMAN ZIEBELL, Mrs. JOHN ESSLINGER, Mrs. WILLIAM ESSLINGER, Mrs. WILLIAM MONTER and Mrs. GEORGE HAUSSLER.
     The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at the Elk Creek [Immanuel] church and was largely attended by friends and neighbors. Rev. SCHABACKER paid a splendid tribute to his memory in stating that he had for years been a pillar of the church and had lived a consistent and useful Christian life. Interment was made in the church cemetery.


Business Change

     The Bon-Ton restaurant has again changed proprietors, C. G. STEINHOUR selling the business to JASPER RANDOLPH, who took charge of the restaurant the first of the week. Mr. RANDOLPH is advertising a public sale of his farm equipment and will move to town. . . .


Farmers Marketing Convention Monday

     On Monday, October 23, was Farmers' Day in Arapahoe, and members of the Equity Union assembled in the opera house at 1:30 in the afternoon to hear an address by C. O. DRAYTON, on the subject of "A Marketing Machine by the Farmers and for the Farmers." A fair audience greeted the speaker.


Woman's Club Notes

     The meeting of the Woman's Club with Mrs. SAMSON proved to be a very interesting session. The program was carried out as published and was enjoyed by the club members.
     The following program will be given Tuesday evening, November 7th, with Mrs. SWERTFEGER as hostess:
     Citizenship Day--To regard my citizenship as a public trust.
     Roll Call--Nebraska Law.
Paper, "The Future of Woman's Vote"--MARGARET MOORE.
     Topic--Primaries and why they are important to you. How the President is elected. Taxes. How and by whom spent.--BLANCHE KNIGHT.
     Paper, Ways in which Women are Serving their Country--TENA HUDSON
     General discussion.


Naught is New

     One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh; but the earth abideth forever. All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again. The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be don; and there is no new thing under the sun. Is there any thing wereof it may be said, See, this is new? It hath been already of old time.--(Eccl. 4, 7, 9, 10)


HIRAM FOSTER DIES SUDDENLY

     The friends and acquaintances were shocked to learn of the death of HIRAM FOSTER, venerable father of Mrs. ROY PHILLIPS, which occurred at the home of his daughter, twelve miles north of Edison, Wednesday forenoon. Mr. Foster had been in Arapahoe a few days ago and seemed in his usual health. He was in Edison the day before his death. ...


Arapahoe Public Mirror

Thursday November 2, 1922 - Page 1


     . . . Late in the evening Dr. KINNEY and Dr. COLE of North Sanitarium and Undertaker BOWERS arrived and made arrangements to have the body taken to Norton Wednesday morning. From these gentlemen it was learned that Dr. HUNTER was 43 years old, and was an ex-service man, and that while in the serivce [sic.] he had contracted tuberculosis. He had gone to a government hospital in Colorado after coming our of the service and had thought the malady had been oversome [sic.]. He then took a position in the sanitarium and seemed to be getting along for a while but symptoms developed which made him believe he could not be cured and he became despondent. He attempted suicide at Norton on Sunday, but was discovered in time to prevent it. Shortly after noon Monday he took his car and left the Sanitarium for a drive and as he did not wear his hat it was thought he was not going far. It seems he drove straight to Arapahoe and registered under a different name so as not to be located before he could carry out his suicidal intentions. He is survived by a wife who is a nurse in the sanitarium.


A Musical Treat

     The Woman's Club of McCook has announced the first number of what the intend to be a series of annual musical treats, staged at great expense for the philanthropic purpose of educating the people of this section of the state, to the finer grades of musical art. Their advertisement in this issue announces that they have procured Miss MACBETH, an internationally famous singer, but a native American, who will appear in concert on Nov. 22. A committee of women will visit Arapahoe in the near future and will tickets and make arrangements for reservations.


Who's the Goat?

     All the boys in Arapahoe between the ages of 4 and 40, lent a hand in decorating the village in order that it would present an even better appearance on the 1st of November than in former years.
     Some pranksters took the goats belonging to N. H. HORNADAY and "parked" them in the assembly room at the high school. ANDREW ARMS, custodian of the building arrived quite early Wednesday morning and hearing a commotion upstairs, thot [sic.] was Coach ROUSE "getting thin to music" and after finishing his work downstairs went home. In a few minutes ROUSE arrived and hearing the same commotion (thot it was "ANDY" ARMS. He had occasion to call to him, but getting no answer, went up to see what was wrong, and found the place infested with "goats." Being Athletic Coach, it was his duty to wrestle said goats to a finish and send them home to breakfast.


. . . witches, black and yellow crepe paper, pumpkins and shocks of corn. Everyone came dressed in a masquerade costume.
     Mrs. KILPATRICK assisted by Miss LOUISE HARTMAN had prepared entertainment for the evening, and the neighbors say from the shrieks of delight (or f[r]ight) it was evident everyone had a good time.
     During the evening we had a number of spectators and Ghosts, Ghosts everywhere. At a late hour a lunch of sandwiches, salad, pumpkin pie, cider, apples and popcorn balls were served.
     The only thing that marred the pleasant evening was the stealing of some of the refreshments. But we don't mind that so much if they will please return the cider jug.
     The Camp Fire Girls and Guardian extend a vote of "thanks" to Mr. and Mrs. ELAND [?] for the use of their house.


Obituary

     JULIUS FREDERICK ZIEBEL was born in Schlenzie Germany, January 21, 1838 and died at the home of his son WILLIAM, in Gosper county, October 23, 1922. In 1867 he was married to AUGUSTA SCHIEVELBEIN. He leaves to mourn his wife, four sons, four daughters. forty-one grandchildren and seven great grandchildren; also one sister Mrs. EMELIA DALKE of Milwaukee, Wis. He came to America in 1873 settling in Washington county, Nebr., and in 1881 took up a homestead in Gosper county twelve miles north of Arapahoe where he lived until [the] time of his death.


The Laying on of Hands

     The above words are found several times in Holy Scripture as descriptive of a Sacramental rite, which is also commonly called "Confirmation." According to the Bible and subsequent Church practice "Confirmation" was administered to baptized persons by an Apostolic Overseer or Bishop and such is the practice of nine-tenths of Christendom today. All Christendom believed and practiced "Confirmation" for fifteen hundred years. The Bishop comes to do what Peter, Paul and John are spoken of as having done. It is for what is called "The Gift of the Holy Ghost" and is really an ordination of the Laity to the Royal Priesthood of all believers. You ought to give it your serious consideration, if not already confirmed. Read the Eighth and Nineteenth Chapters of Acts and Hebrews, the Sixth Chapter and the Rector of St. Paul's will be pleased to tell you all he can about it. Come out next Sunday at 10 a. m. to Church School, and to Public Worship at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m.
     On next Monday evening at 8 p. m. the Bishop will be present and preach. You are cordially welcome to any or all services.     J. C. FERRIER, Rector.


[NOTE: The following is obviously part of an obituary. Unfortunately I don't have the whole thing.--llg]

. . . his children, he leaves his present wife, two brothers and one sister and seven grand-children to mourn his loss.
     He was an old member of the G. A. R. Post of Arapahoe and the oldest member of the Masonic lodge at Holbrook, Nebr. He was one of Gosper County's oldest settlers, taking up his homestead there in 1872.
     He was loved by all who knew him and leaves a host of friends and neighbors to mourn his sudden departure.
     "There is no death. What seems so is transition; this life of mortal breath is but a suburb of the life Elysian whose portal we call death."


BIG FOOTBALL CAME FRIDAY


     The Arapahoe Football team will meet the team of the Lexington H. S. on the local gridiron tomorrow (Friday) afternoon, at which time football dopsters say there will be "something doing." The Lexington team is one of the strongest H. S. elevens in the state and have a victory to their credit from Arapahoe from last year. The game tomorrow is to determine whether Arapahoe stays in the "no-defeat class" this year. The boys are anticipating a good game and already tickets sales predict a record breaking crowd. The Lexington team has defeated North Platte and Holdrege and many other strong teams and are in line for high honors.
     The Arapahoe second team will also play tomorrow, being matched with the team from Stockville. The girls basketball team will play the Edison girls at the school ground tomorrow afternoon also.
     The A. H. S. team traveled to Orleans last Friday and trimmed the H. S> team of the city 31 to 0. The team was accompanied by a number of football enthusiasts from here and they report a game full of sport, notwithstanding the score.


St. Matthew's Luth. Church
G. VIEHWEG, Pastor.

     Sunday, Nov. 5. German Services. Sermon on the Gospel for the 21 Sunday after Trinity: John 4, 47-54. Topic "The Defeats and Shortcomings of Our Faith." (1) Which these are. (2) How the Lord purifies and strengthens our faith
     Sunday, Nov. 12. English services with Holy Communion. Announcement for Communion, Thursday, Nov. 9.
     Sunday evening Bible class. Lesson Gen. 29.
     Everybody is heartily invited.


     If the people want "A Square Deal" they will vote for CHARLES A. RANDALL of Newman Grove for Railway Commissioner.




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