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Merrick County

Merrick County News

 

Scrapbook of Mrs. C. J. (Elizabeth) Dittmer

Assumption - that all these were published in the Clark's Enterprise ...
or the newspaper of Shelby, IOWA
None of the articles bear a publication date or name of newspaper.


Scrapbook, page 13

     Sept 26th, Dear Mother - Will write you a few line to let you know how I am getting along. I am feeling just fine and hope all you folks are the same. We are having some fine weather here now, tho it rains once in awhile. I am leaving the hospital today, going to the convalescent camp then back to the company. Have been here quite awhile. I could have stayed here all winter had I wanted to but I'd rather be with the outfit. Has any of you folks heard from the others boys? I haven't seen or heard from any of them for a long time.
     I'd like to see all of them again but I can't see all of them now, for they aren't all there but I guess its all in war.
     News is pretty scarce here. Haven't been paid for a long time but I should worry, will probably get all soon. Got four months pay coming now. Can have a big party all by myself.
     Well mother I'll close for this time. Haven't had any mail for a long time. Hope to hear from all soon.

Harry

My address is
Corp. Harry E. Patterson,
   Co. F 816th U. S. Inf.
      42nd Div. 84 Brig.
Amer. Exped. Forces, France

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

FIVE YOUNG MEN ENTER
   TRAINING AT THE UNIVERSITY

      Five young men left Tuesday noon over the Burlington for Lincoln, where they will take special training for war service at the state University. Owing to the prevalence of the influenza in the city the Home Guards and the customary crowd of towns people did not gather to see them depart. Following are those who entrained: Malin Metzer of Silver Creek, Truman A. Gee of Palmer, Frank R. Miller of Central City, Jas. Nielson of Clarks and Daniel E. Donovan of Chapman.

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     A remittance from L. W. Powell of Minatare this week conveys the news that two more former Clarks boys are in the service. Delbert Powell is in France, and Francis is at Camp Funston, Kansas. The family used to live east of town, moving away two years ago.

Lid Blows Off And     
     Clarks Celebrates

Monday morning when Number 4 went through the engineer had a spasm or two with his whistle, and shortly after the telephone bells began to ring, with news from Central City that the armistice was at last signed and that hostilities were to cease at six that morning.
     Soon the fire bells and church bells were ringing, the old shot guns were brought out, the kids hopped from bed, refused their breakfast and started out to celebrate. At ten o'clock the home guards fell in and started a parade around town. The Red Cross ladies in uniform, the section men with a banner announcing their purpose to "bury the kaiser," and practically every person in town joined the bunch and marched around the different streets.
     In front of the Ross Noble home the guard halted, and when Ross came to the door, fired a salute in his honor. From there they marched to the Hanna Kokjer home where Mrs. Kokjer was given a salute and honors. Then down to the train where they fired a dozen rounds or so while the train going east was in town.
     At twelve o'clock the guns were put away and the guard dispersed until two-thirty. The noise, however, didn't let up. The kids were going strong and it only took a few minutes for them to eat their dinner and cut loose again. At two-thirty the guards fell in again and gave a demonstration of their ability to dodge mudholes in the street for an hour or so.
     At seven o'clock a monster bonfire, with an effigy of the kaiser sticking about ten feet above it was lighted, and the people watched the German gentleman with the "ex" before his name burn.
     At seven-thirty A. J. Dunlap of Central City was introduced, and told some of the results of the war and some of the reasons that got us, the deciding factor, in it. The only unpleasant features of the day were the fact that considerable firewater had found its way into town during the day, and quite a few people allowed it to do the talking for them.
     The lid being off, it was not thought best by the town authorities to

-=-=-=-=-=-=-

(NOTE: Armistice was signed 11 Nov 1918, at 11 a.m.

lay too heavy a hand on the offenders and for this reason the officials came in for a lot of bitter censure.
     Desultory bell ringing, and shouting kept up until after midnight, when the town quieted down and people went to sleep.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Where They Stand
In Classification

     This week the local board received back from the district board the classifications of a number of the young men who registered on June 5, of this year, which are as follows:

CLASS ONE I

     Lloyd Leamons, Thomas K. Shively, Fred Schmale, Lee E. Robinson, Fred W. Meyer, Joseph B. McMahon, John A. Torcson, Carl C. Meier, Walter Lindauer, Edward Klingenberg, Louie C. Helzer, Glen R. Housley, Thomas B. Farrell, John Echert, John Eaton, Guy W. Anderson, Lee Stouter.

CLASS TWO C

     Harvey D. Able, William Dittmer, Walter R. Fogland, Linord Johnson, Rankle C. Kostman, Paul Mattison, George Deerts, Lloyd Nitzel, Ewald Leffelbein, Louie P. Wegner, John G. Clauff, Adolf Grotzky.

CLASS THREE J

     Adolf Cerny, Joseph T. Pullen, Soren W. Jorgenson.

On Tuesday the men who were placed in Class I were called before the examining board in this city for the physical examination.
-- C. C. Nonpareil

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

     John and Will Mangelson who have been stationed in the Philipines as members of the 27th Div. U. S. A., are presumed to be with the expeditionary forces recently landed in Russia.


Scrapbook, page 14

Mrs. Wilson Chooses
     Pure Indian Names
          For American Ships
     
This is not a prize puzzle list, but the names selected by Mrs. Woodrow Wilson for the 120 vessels to be built at the Hog Island shipyard for the United States. Mrs. Wilson was asked to choose the names, and she made these selections because of their pure Indian origin. Each one of them represents the name of a place in America. It may interest you to read the list over, see how many of them you recognize, how many you can locate, and how many you can pronounce:

Eight Nebraskans Named
     in Casualties Overseas
     
Two Nebraskans, Corp. Carl C. Mogensen, of Boeleus (sic), and Private Hans H. Dittmer of Clarks were reported killed in action in the casualty list given out by the War department Saturday. Ray W. Savage of Nebraska City was reported missing in action. Corp. Bert T. Scott, Falls City, and Privates Mathias Colling, Indianola, and Roy Simon, Brewster, were reported severely wounded. Private Charles W. Van Cleave of Homer was wounded, but the degree has not been determined. Private Julien E. Applegate of Union, enlisted in the marines, was severely wounded in action.

CLASS I MEN UNDERGO
   PHYSICAL EXAMINATION
     The following young men were given their physical examination this week to determine their fitness for military service:
Thomas E. Shively, Fred Schmale, Lee E. Robinson, Joseph B. McMahon, Fred W. Meyer, John A. Torczon, Carl C. Meier, Walter Lindauer, Edward Kingenberg, Louie C. Helzer, Glenn R. Houseley, Thomas B. Farrell, John Echert, John Eaton and Guy W. Anderson.

-----R-----

OUR SOLDIERS IN FRANCE
--------
Minnie Irving in Leslie's.

Since brother put the khaki on
   And sailed away to fight,
The smile has fled from mother's lips
   And left her sad and white.
But of her troubles not a word
   Creeps in by any chance
When mother writes a letter to
   Our soldier boy in France.

She goes about the livelong day
   As quiet as a ghost:
But nights when he cam home from work
   She misses him the most;
Though you would think that life for her
   Was just a song and dance,
If you could read her letters to
   Our soldier boy in France.

He has enough of hardships now
   Beyond the wide gray sea.
Where everything is death and pain
   And must and misery,
He must not know we sold the cow
   to bury sister Nance,
Or how we have to scrimp without
   Our soldier boy in France.

She tells him Johnny learns so fast
   Next year he'll graduate,
And how the hens are laying fine
   And Jimmy fixed the gate,
And Mamie at the factory
   Has had a slight advance,
And how the town will honor him
   When he comes home from France.

Oh, while our army over there
   Is facing gas and steel,
Where red the rivers run beneath
   The kaiser's iron heel,
The mothers here in freedom's cause
   Can also break a lance
By writing cheerful letter to
   Their soldier boys in France.

     -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-  

No Word Yet of
        Missing Soldier
     In order to set at rest persistent rumors in regard to the present standing of Thomas B. Shonsey, reported since July as "Missing in action" this newspaper wants to say that no further word in regard to him has been received by his father.
     Mr. Shonsey has caused advertisement to be inserted in the newspapers in London, England, Paris, France and Berne, Switzerland, in an effort to discover anything that could lead to locating him, but so far has heard nothing.

-----R-----

MINOR CHANGES MADE   
     IN OCTOBER LIST

   We published last week a list of the men who will go to Camp Kearney, Calif., some time between October 21 and 25. A few changes have since been made in the list. The names of Ernest Schinkle, Wm. Leo Douglas and Archie Merritt having been dropped and that of Roy Sturm (757) of Silver Creek being added. Mr. Schinkle and Mr. Douglas have recently undergone operations. Mr. Merritt was found to be physically dis-qualified.

-----R-----

ARMY AND NAVY

The navy always sails,
   The army always tramps,
And fires the great big shells
   Upon the German camps.

The navy uses torpedoes,
   The army uses shells,
The navy fires at submarines
   And blows them all to -- well!

Before the army starts
   On some of those big raids,
They load up their cannon,
   And take some hand grenades.

The army and navy together
   Will get the Kaiser's head,
And when conceited Wilhelm
   Will be done for and be dead.

And then all over the U.S. A.
   Big dinner there will be
Because the Kaiser has been hung
   Upon the gallows tree.

---- Eugene Carraher.

     -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Red Jacket
Sac City
Sacandaga
Saccarappa
Saco
Sagaporack
Sago
Saguacha
Sahale
Saluda
Sangamon
Sapinere
Sarcoxie
Satartia
Saucon
Saugertice
Saugus
Scantic
Scantacock
Schenectady
Schodack
Schoharie
Schoodic
Schroon
Scitico
Schooha
Schamcek
Sebethe
Sebewa
Sebewaing
Seekonk
Senatobia
Shakepee
Shameng
Shandaken
Shanneck
Shaume
Shavano
Shawan
Shawangunk
Shawano
Sheboygan
Shepaug
Shoshequin
Shetucket
Shickahinny
Shinnecock
Shintaka
Shivwitz
Shoccorea
Shobokia
Shopola
Shope
Sinnenahonning
Sinainawa
Siskowit
Sisladobaia
Sisseton
Sitkum
Skamania

Skanawono
Skaneateles
Skippack
Skilticock
Skokomish
Skowhogan
Skunkscut
Scapeena
Socatean
Solana
Somonauk
Souhegan
Souneunk
Squam
Squamico
Succasunna
Suleun
Sunapec
Suspecaugh
Taghkanick
Talladega
Tamaron
Tampa
Tankhanene
Taopi
Tarkio
Tatamy
Tatonka
Tawawa
Taycheedah
Tehama
Takoneha
Tonino
Teton
Tintah
Tippah
Tishomingo
Tiskilwa
Tobsecfka
Temah
Tomasaki
Tomoka
Tombicon
Tonganoxie
Tonica
Totowa
Totoganic
Totoket
Toulbah
Towaliga
Tucson
Tulare
Tullahoma
Ugiah
Unalaska
Unadilla
Wabeno
Waconia
Wahoo
Wahpeton


TO SOLDIER BOYS IN FRANCE

          -----------

We are in this war for freedom
   And will fight until it's won;
Blow in your dimes and nickels
   To help us down the Hun;
Buy all the bonds and stamps you can --
   Thank God you have the chance --
To raise three billion dollars
   For our soldier boys in France.

Shall we lay back in safety here.
   And lead a life of ease
And fail to do our duty
   By the boys across the seas --
The boys who offer up their lives
   To freedom's cause advance?
So don't forget you duty
   To our boys in France.

We have girls across the water,
   Where the shells fall thick and fast,
Who nurse a dying soldier boy
   Until he breathes his last;
Their names on history pages
   Will be traced in golden floss;
She is known as mercy's angel
   And she wears a crimson cross.

Here's to the nurse, God bless her,
   In her sorrow and her joys;
She's on the bloody fields of France
   To cheer and help our boys.
In ten thousand homes this evening
   As they kneel in silent prayer,
We are asked to do our duty
   By the boys that's over there.

So let us do it nobly,
   And do it with a will.
For every bond or stamp we buy
   Is a spike in Kaiser Bill,
And the day is not far distant
   Till we have him in a trance;
We will raise one hundred billion
   For our girls and boy in France.

Omaha           - - J. S. HUNTER


Scrapbook, page 15

Plow Man 30 Taking a Grade at High Speed

Photograph

According to Mr. Rose of the Van Brunt Auto company, the tractor is fast reaching the
state of perfection. The accompanying picture was taken on the Herman Dittmer farm west
of Avoca, Ia. The tractor, a Plowman "30," is credited with pulling a three-bottom plow
over a 25 percent grade in high gear. The plow shares are set for a furrow seven inches deep.

 

     From the Columbus Daily News of last Saturday we learn that a marriage license was issued to Earl Mustard, son of Oscar Mustard, who is now located at Camp Funston, and Miss Dorothy Dittmer of Clarks. They were married by County Judge Gibbon. This is the first war-bride, from this vicinity.

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     The very sad news reached Shelby Tuesday afternoon of the death of Howard Mowery. Howard was in France with Co. F, 168 U. S. Infantry. This is the first one of the home boys who has given up his life for the cause of his country. His death is reported to have been the result of gun-shot wounds. The sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing family.
     A Memorial Service will be held at the Presbyterian Church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Congregational

     Doing just a little better each Sunday at Sunday school, and for Sunday let it be a 10c gain.
     We were glad to welcome into the church last Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dittmer, Mr. and Mrs. Joachim Dittmer, Mr. and Mrs. Gus Haman. We look for others soon.
     We will have C. E. Sunday evening at 6:45, so be there and help organize and get ready for a good work.
     The Pastor's class of boys, has planned to give a Magic Entertainment next month to ear their dollar for the dollar social to be given by the Aid.
     Union prayer meeting on Thursday evening.
     Preaching Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. Open Forum meeting at 7:30. Topic, "Over the Top".

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

EXTRA! TRAIN HITS
     SANTA CLAUS WAGON!

Special Dispatch to the World Journal --
     Shelby, Ia., Dec 24 -- Henry Blumer, a farmer living hear here, came near being killed while acting as Santa Claus tonight.
     Blumer had purchased a stock of Christmas presents for his family and was on his way home in his wagon when it was struck by an eastbound passenger train and utterly demolished. Blumer, however, escaped with nothing worse than bruises, and was able to collect his toys and proceed homeward.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

     Herman Dittmer of Clarks and Ruth Brown of Fairmont were married at Geneva by the county Judge of Filmore county on Wednesday of last week. The Enterprise joins their many friends about Clarks with best wishes.

Geneva, Neb., Oct 28 -- Herman Brown 21, and Miss Linnie Domieer, 23, were married here this evening at the bride's home by Judge W. R. Fulton. Only relatives of the contracting couple were present. Mr. and Mrs. Brown will live on a farm near Fairmont -- World Herald.


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