Platte Co., NE - 1901 News (January - June) NEGenWeb Project
PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
News From 100 Years Ago
(January, 1901 - June, 1901)


Columbus Journal, Wed., June 26, 1901
Mr. Klug the new blacksmith, who recently moved here from Columbus and who with his family are occupying the Fred Kimball house, reports that two of his children are down with typhoid fever. It will be remembered that Mrs. Kimball died of the same disease in this same house about a year ago. Dr. Alger, the attending physician, was seen regarding the cases and he says that he is of the opinion that the water is infected with the germ and this together that the building was not disinfected are the principal causes of the disease. Both children are getting along nicely.--Leigh World.
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Two boys, old enough and big enough to know better, were brought up before Justice Hudson Friday on a charge of indecent exposure of person, the occasion being a swim at the river. A small fine, and a severe reprimand were the result, in hope that work of the kind would be stopped without further prosecution.
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Brother Howard of the Telegram purchased one day last week the two-story brick on Nebraska Avenue known as the Whitmoyer building, to which he will soon remove his printing plant. This paper is pleased to make this mention and is sure he will find the new quarters much more convenient and agreeable than the old.
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The barn of M. Cassin at his residence property, Fourteenth street, was burned to a wreck Sunday morning. The firemen were called about 5:30, but the flames had gained such headway as to make it impossible to save the place. It is thought the fire was started by tramps sleeping in the loft, as the flames first came from the hay in the mow. The barn was insured for $150.
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Mrs. Lockhart, her son William E. and daughter, Miss Anna, left Wednesday last for their future home in Monongahela, Pa. The Lockhart family have lived near Columbus for many years and the community will miss them in many ways.
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Hon. S.F. Burtch of Papillion, an uncle of Editor Howard, is here visiting his nehew and will probably make this his home. Mr. Burtch was a resident of this community in the pioneer days, leaving here in 1855.

Columbus Journal, Wed., June 19, 1901
Dr. Conlon, who practiced his profession in Columbus a few years ago, later, in Platte Center, was taken to a hospital in Omaha a few days ago to be treated for blood poisoning, and Sunday word was received here that he was very low.
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Excavation for the new dwelling of Joe Ryan on the lot just east of George Fairchild's, was begun this Tuesday morning. James Pearsall has the contract for the building, which will be a seven room cottage one and a half story with basement.
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L.L. Searles and family left Thursday evening for Salt Lake City where they will make their future home. The Journal together with their many friends would like to have the Searles family remain in Columbus, but wish them a happy life in the west.
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During the storm Saturday the large barn owned by Wm. Fyfe, nine miles south of town near the Ball school house, was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. Ten horses, a number of hogs and farm machinery were destroyed. Loss on barn about $1500, partly insured.
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The force of workers in the Standard Beet Sugar company's fields will in a few days complete their job. M. Jerome has charge of the fields around Columbus and has a pay-roll of 140 people, mostly children. The wages paid are 50c, 75c and $1.25 a day. They take care of 200 acres and have all the fields under irrigation. The earning of money by the children is a good thing and many a boy and girl clothe themselves in this way.
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Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs. Barney McTaggart, was injured by being struck by a base ball at Omaha a short time ago. He is in one of the hospitals there and had to undergo an operation. He is said to be in a weakened condition and Mrs. McTaggart left here Saturday to be at his bedside.
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Frank Hittner took his little invalid son down to the Columbus hospital Monday where he will remain for ten days or two weeks. Saturday an operation was performed on the boy and a pint of pus was removed from his right side. The little fellow's condition is extremely critical and his recovery is considered doubtful.--Humphrey Leader.

Columbus Journal, Wed., June 12, 1901
Cecil Moran, son of O.S. Moran of Creston, attempted suicide Sunday by taking strychnine in chewing gum. Antidotes were administered, and the young man is considered out of danger.
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At the J.N. Dineen sale of horses in the city Saturday, 35 head were sold, colts ranging from $25 to $30; a span of workers $200; for the saddle $100 to $150; a pacer $810. There was a large crowd present.
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Charles Ball with a force of men and teams has completed the work of excavation for the addition to St. Mary's hospital. The excavation is 126 feet long, east and west; the east half is 50 feet wide; the west half 48 feet wide, and all four feet deep.
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On Monday evening, during the thunderstorm, the barn of Paul Gertch, living about 8 miles west of Platte Center, was struck by lightning, killing three valuable horses and destroying the barn and contents. The barn was insured for $500. No insurance was carried on the stock.--Platte Center Signal

Columbus Journal, Wed., June 5, 1901
Ezra Mahaffey just returned from the Philippines after sixteen months' service, has been visiting rlatives in the city. He is a brother of Mrs. George R. Douglas.
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J.T. Cox left here Thursday for a three-month and possibly longer trip to Ireland, Scotland and all important European countries. He went form here to Omaha and will sail on the White Star line from New York on the 13th. Ed J. Hague, a former employe in the B.& M. depot, later agent at Germantown, will take his place as agent during Mr. Cox's absence.
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The policemen Monday night took in three boys that had run away from their homes at North Bend, a fourth one Jas. Miller getting away westward before the telegram to arrest was received. Those detained here till the arrival of an escort home are: Glenn Keeton, Charles Scott and Fred Strayer. The boys, whose ages run from 13 to 15 years, will find that among the best channels for the flow of exuberant strength is steady employment at useful work, with strict attention to duty.

Columbus Journal, Wed., May 29, 1901
There are about ten families quarantined in Norfolk for small pox. The public schools were closed at noon Friday although the rooms had been decorated for closing day exercises. The town seems to be well exposed to the disease. It is best to obey the quarantine law and avoid so much trouble and sickness.
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Frank Hegr a young man employed by Andrew Lambert, in the running of a corn sheller, had the misfortune yesterday afternoon to have his hand caught in the wheels of the machine. The fleshy portions of the palm were all torn off and the entire hand badly lacerated. The accident occurred on the farm of Jos. Smatlan.--Schuyler Sun.
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Miss Anna Trainor, who has been teaching the languages in the High school the past two years left for her home in Chicago Wednesday. Miss Trainor is a graduate of Ann Arbor, and is among the most accomplished teachers the Columbus schools have ever had. She is a fluent linguist and an excellent interpreter of the languages. Her resignation from the school here is a loss to pupils. A large number of friends were at the depot Wednesday to say good-by. Miss Trainor is a sister of Mrs. J.F. Belford.
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Frank Micek has been taken to the reform school under an indefinite sentence. He seemed to have an uncontrollable propensity to take things that did not belong to him, that is, he continually violated the law in that particular, many different people suffering loss of valuables by him. It is to be hoped that where he has gone, he may be taught self-control; mastery of his evil propensities; the value of right employment of his time and talents. There is no doubt but the boy has talent which if rightly self-directed, would make him a useful citizen.
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Mrs. Fred Gottschalk is still very sick, and is being cared for at St. Mary's hospital. She was one of the sturdy pioneers of this country, full of energy, and with large capacity for business.

Columbus Journal, Wed., May 22, 1901
Rev. Weyer will preach his farewell sermon in the Presbyterian church June 2d before leaving for his new charge in Fremont.
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Joe Ryan has purchased the residence lot east of George Fairchild of J.E. Kaufmann, and will build a residence as soon as arrangements are completed.
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Fritz Kohler was taken with a light case of small pox Monday, and, it was supposed he would be taken to the city's hospital this Tuesday. The lad is 14 years old.
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Walter Luers, the 12-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Luers, was badly bit on the right arm by his dog while playing with him last Saturday. No serious results are anticipated as the dog is not ferocious.
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Gotlieb Hirz, about 35 years old, from Boheet neighborhood, was brought in Monday and examined for insanity. He had acted strangely in some particulars. The hearing had not yet been completed as we went to press.

Columbus Journal, Wed., May 15, 1901
Dr. P.H. Conlan, who formerly lived here and later at Platte Center, moved to Spalding last week. Thursday last, making a return trip from Cedar Rapids, his team ran away, the doctor jumped out and sustained severe injuries, probably a hip bone fractured.
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The Board of Health have found in their rounds during the past week the following new cases of small pox, Alfred Stone son of Mrs. William Stone, William Farrell and Will Robertson; the last two are young men who have been employed at the sheep ranch. The board informs us that the quarantine has been strictly enforced wherever there have been any cases and a strict vigilance will be kept of all possible events arising--Schuyler Sun.
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The Columbus Fire Department running team was organized May 1, 1901, for the purpose of attendance at Fremont, July 16-18, to compete for prizes at the tournament under the auspices of the Nebraska State Volunteer Firemen's association. The officers are: Ed. Hageman, president; Will Baker, vice president; Sam Gass, treasurer; Harry W. Lawrence, secretary. The members of the Fire department have subscribed $50.50 to defray expenses. They meet at present every Monday and Thursday, 7:30, for practice with the Armory for headquarters. Mr. Bordon is foreman, and Mr. Merriman, assistant.

Columbus Journal, Wed., May 8, 1901
Leo M. Borowiak and Peter Kozolowski have petitioned for license to retail liquors at the premises recently occupied by Mrs. Pheney on Eleventh street.
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J.M. Curtis was in the vicinity of Monroe Saturday and Sunday visiting his sister, Mrs. Lee Beaty. Every variety of growing grain is doing well, especially winter wheat.
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Dr. Naumann left Monday for Baltimore, Md., where he will meet a niece and nephew, Marguerite and Walter Naumann, who come from Dresden to make their home with Mr. and Mrs. Naumann. The mother of the children died last summer.
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P.H. O'Callaghan was in the city Thursday on business. He has had considerable trouble with his right eye lately, caused by an injury suffered many years ago.

Columbus Journal, Wed., May 1, 1901
John Burrell is reported as slowly improving, and was allowed a few hours out Wednesday to get a shave and draw his pension. He will probably be taken to Lincoln shortly.
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W.H. Slater, a veterinary surgeon, who came to Columbus last fall is so well pleased that he has decided to permanently locate here, and during the summer contemplates the erection of a dwelling house and an infirmary for his horse patients.
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The evening euchre club gave a farewell party Monday evening at the home of J.J. Sullivan for Mr. and Mrs. I. Sibbernsen, who will leave in about two weeks for Omaha, where they expect to make their home. C. Kramer, in behalf of the lcub, presented Mr. and Mrs. Sibbernsen with a handsome set of solid silver forks.
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Wm. Bucher and daughter Pauline will leave here early in June for a foreign tour. They sail from New York direct to Hamburg, and then a most pleasant and leisurely route has been mapped out through Germany, Switzerland, Italy and France. Three months or more will be taken to make the journey.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Apr. 24, 1901
A man named S. Madurski appeared here Wednesday, and showing signs of mental weakness, was taken in charge by the sheriff. He is a wealthy retired farmer, living near Dodge.
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Leo Borowiak has moved his family down from Genoa and is living in the block north of the Congregational church. He intends engaging in some business in this city soon.
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Friday afternoon near J.F. Siems', a man named Thompson of Tarnov, going home from Columbus met with quite a mishap. He was driving a pair of bronchos; the double tree broke; he was thrown out, lighting about six yards away but fortunately not having his neck broke, although severely tried. The bronchos ran twice into a wire fence, one of them having his throat cut, the other cut badly in one fore and one hind leg, and body cut open--both animals dying. Mr. Thompson's conclusion is that he wants no more bronchos.
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Thomas Dack of Platte Center is in the city today, Tuesday. Mr. Dack is contemplating the purchase of the Gus. Speice residence on west Fourteenth street, also the business lot east of Ragatz, the third lot from the corner of Olive and Thirteenth, belonging to J.C. Echols. If Mr. Dack buys the business lot, he intends building a business house for a drug store. He is now engaged in that business in Platte Center. Mr. Dack has been one of the thrifty farmers of Platte county for many years, and Columbus is glad to have such people in their business circle.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Apr. 17, 1901
Adam Smith of Platte Center was in the city Monday. The old sharp-shooter of the Civil war has been troubled with rheumatism.
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Miss Ida Cedar has rented the parlors of the Grand Pacific hotel and will be glad to meet the ladies of the city, who have dress-making work to be done.
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Mrs. C. Pheney and daughter Nellie went Monday to Omaha, where they expect to make their future home. On account of poor health Mrs. Pheney was compelled to sell out her restaurant property on Eleventh street.
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Bert Stillman returned a few days ago from several months' visit in California. Mrs. Stillman and daughter, Miss Lela, expect to return from California this summer, after their several years' stay in the land of sunshine.
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James B. Drake, who waylaid Miss Emma Bohac near Clarkson, while she was going home from the station, but who successfully fought her assailant until rescued, has had his trial for the crime and been sentenced to five years in the penitentiary.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Apr. 10, 1901
Mrs. John Seipp was happily surprised Monday by about twenty lady friends who came to celebrate her forty-third birthday anniversary.
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William E. Walton, formerly of this county, is now a resident of Balitmore, Maryland, and is the secretary and general manager of the Maryland Land & Immigration Co., incorporated in 1899. We had some experience in Maryland some thirty-seven years ago, and have no doubt but there are now many happy homes in its pleasant valleys, in the shadow of its mountains.
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Asche & Ryan will occupy the Henry building for several years used as a second-hand store by Hopkins & McDonald, just east of the Asche & Ryan grocery. There will be a large opening cut between the two buildings. The present structure has been found too small for the increased trade of Asche & Ryan, and the new addition will be found of great value to them.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Apr 3, 1901
Will. Kersenbrock returned Saturday from Fremont, where he completed a term in the commercial course of the Normal. He will assist his father in his office business at the brewery.
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Monday Gus. Plath, one of the Union Pacific bridge gang, had a narrow escape from death. Sustaining a fall across the track, the engine was stopped just in time to save him from being cut in two.
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V.A. Macken has sold out his business to Gottlieb Launer of Hooper, Nebraska, who expects to take possession in a few days. Mr. Macken has been in the saloon business here eighteen years.
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Mrs. Arthur Betonrnay departed this afternoon for Columbus, Nebraska, on receipt of a telephone message announcing the serious illness of her sister, Mr. John Keating, a well known resident of that place.--Beatrice Times.
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Mary E. Knox, living near Richland, used a 32-caliber revolver Thursday morning, in an endeavor to kill herself. She begged to be killed after she had wounded herself. She is about 35 years old, and has had some trouble with her husband, leaving him December last.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Mar. 27, 1901
Platte Center's three saloon keepers, D.H. Carrig, J.H. Frevert and George Klanke are made defendants in an action brought by Mrs. Louis A. Hilliard, for $2,000 damages for selling intoxicating liquor to her husband, contrary to her orders, depriving her and their three children of support on account of her husband's habitual drunkenness the last two years.
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Tuesday afternoon, March 19, at 2 o'clock, at the German Lutheran church, Rev. H. Miessler officiating, took place the marriage of Frank Aerni and Miss Martha M. Mueller of this vicinity, the wedding festivities following after, at the residence of the bride's parents, enjoyed by a host of their friends, who, with The Journal, wish them abundant happiness through life.
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Mrs. Mary Clark entertained several friends of her daughter, Miss Grace, Saturday evening. Miss Grace came down that day from Pierce, where she is teaching, to spend a few days' vacation, and the gathering of her friends to take supper with her was a surprise to her.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Mar. 20, 1901
Mrs. George Willard of St. Edward well known in Columbus is seriously sick at her home. Miss Jennie Wiseman went up Monday to help the family for a few weeks.
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Miss Della Wells of Plattsmouth is working on the Argus, to take the place of Homer Locklin, who was called to Lincoln with Co. K, to act as a guard at the state penitentiary.
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Mrs. Theodocia Hussey of Minnesota, Mrs. Mary DeRusha of Colorado, Mrs. Julia Scott of Minnesota, are in attendance at the funeral of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. McFarland. These, and the two older children Mariah Elldridge of Penna., and John McFarland of Mich., besides Samuel and George, survive the death of their parents. The bodies are to be placed in one grave, and his comrades of Baker Post will attend the funeral in a body.
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Dan Schram was called to Elizabeth, Colorado, last week on account of the sickness of his brother George, who has been confined to his bed for six weeks with lung trouble. The physicians advised his removal here so the two arrived in Columbus last Friday. The invalid is at the home of Mrs. J.P. Becker.
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C.E. Chapin of Oconee, was in town Saturday and made this office a business call. He passed part of his time last summer in raising seed for the Western Seed and Irrigation company at Waterloo, Neb., and says that the industry is certainly one that pays well on Platte valley soil with favoring conditions. The following is a very brief summary of what was done last season: Watermelon seed, 300 pounds to the acre; squash, 200, muskmelon, 300. Sweet corn, 25 bushels to the acre.
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F.A. Matson, formerly of Monroe, later of Omaha, has quit the road and bought out an implement business at Madison. Mr. Matson is among the best of men, and The Journal commends him to the good people of our northern neighbor as a man thoroughly equipped for business and good citizenship.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Mar. 13, 1901
Creston has established a fire limit, prohibiting the erection of frame buildings within what is now regarded as the business center of the town. A number of new, brick houses are being planned to be built when the season is ripe.
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Rev. W. Sherman Hunt, formerly minister of the Congregational church in this city, was married Thursday, March 7, at Salt Lake City to Mary E. Hall. The friends here, who remember Mr. Hunt, will wish the couple happiness in their wedded life.
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Mr. and Mrs. Sam Munger have purchased property in Columbus, and will leave here next week for their new home.--[Silver Creek Times]
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Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Foster, who have for some time been at the Soldiers' home, Grand Island, have returned to this city. Mr. Foster has re-purchased his old home in the western part of the city, has it entirely free from incumbrance, and feels and looks "as happy as a clam at high tide."
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The best wishes of their numerous friends go with Isaac Brock and Miss Katie Oldings, who were married February 28, Rev. L. Frank officiating. Mr. Brock, whose succession to the management of the Boheet creamery was noted some weeks ago in The Journal, will make his home at the creamery.
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The seal of secrecy has been removed from the announcement of the marriage of Frank Aerni, jr., and Miss Martha M. Mueller, which is to take place Tuesday, March 19, 2 o'clock p.m., at the Lutheran church this city,--reception at the home of Fred. Mueller, after the ceremony. The Journal, in advance of the event, wishes the happy couple abundant happiness and prosperity.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Mar. 6, 1901
Charles Segelke recently added to the machinery at his pop factory a gasoline engine, with which he is much pleased. We are glad to mention this evidence of his growing business. Twenty years ago he started here with an investment of $350, and his plant today is easily worth $5,000. With the assistance of his engine he now saws all the wood for the manufacture of the boxes used in the shipment of his product, besides pumping all the water he uses. He don't think he would care to go back to the old method of doing his work--horse power.
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Dr. J.C. Clark, the dentist, started yesterday for Stanton, which town he expects to make his future home. While here the doctor has made many friends who will be sorry to hear of his departure. He and his estimable family will be missed from the business and social circles of the city. The Journal commends them to the good opinion of the Stanton county people, as in every way worthy of their regard.
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Miss Olivette Bower, an intelligent and most versatile young lady, who for the past two years has held a lucrative position in the office of the Telegram of this city, leaves today, Tuesday, for Schuyler, where for a short time she will visit friends, thence to Omaha for a short stay, after which she goes to Virginia to enter the store of an uncle where she has the promise of a good position. Her many Columbus friends will wish her well in her new location.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Feb. 27, 1901
C.C. McDowell, operator at the B.& M. depot, having, in some way, caughter the small pox contagion, walked out to the pest-house Thursday, and entered it as a patient.
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There is now but the one case of smallpox at the pest house, that of Clyde McDowell. All the patients elsewhere in quarantine are doing nicely.
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Misses Lydia Sturgeon and Louise Schmocker left Thursday morning for Omaha, where they will attend commercial college, learning stenography and typewriting.
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Irene, little daughter of Rev. Sudbrock of Duncan, had an operation performed on her arm some time ago. A sandbur thorn had stuck in one of her fingers, which threatened bloodpoison. It is now improving.
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Charley Robinson of Boone county recently returned from a two weeks' visit to his father at Sterling, Illinois, who was 100 years old the 15th day of last December. He was active in business buying and selling until about two months ago.--Cedar Rapids Outlook.
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Mrs. McAfee (nee Chattie Rice) and son of Colorado Springs, Colo., arrived in the city Wednesday last. It is expected that her mother, Mrs. W.W. Rice, now in Iowa, and so feeble that she is unable to help herself, will be brought home as soon as practicable, and Mrs. McAfee will take the care of her.
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Born, Friday, February 22, to Mrs. Joseph Ryan, two boys. Mr. Ryan usually wears a broad smile, but since the event recorded above the smile has doubled, and is evidently deeper than before. He is receiving congratulations on all sides.
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Con. Eagan of St. Edward, came down Wednesday last, accompanied by his son, who was taken to St. Mary's hospital to be operated upon for appendicitis. Mrs. Egan, who had been at the hospital several weeks for treatment, accompanied her husband home the same day. The lad, Francis, was operated upon Tuesday morning by Drs. Martyn, Evans and Geer.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Feb. 20, 1901
W.D. Askine moved his family, from Lincoln to this city, last week. They are living at the Tannahill place for the present. He expects to engage in the gardening business.
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The Albion Argus says that a letter from H. Rice says he and his mother are in Los Angeles, and that she is getting stronger every day. Both are well known in this city of their former residence.
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Miss Annie Hembd and Louis Michelson were married today (Tuesday) at the home of the bride's parents about fourteen miles north of the city. Quite a number from town attended the wedwing [sic]. The Journal extends congratulations to the happy couple.
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H.B. Fenimore of Oconee is about disposing of his farm, hotel, etc. He expects to go to Iowa.
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Leo Borowiak has sold out his business at Genoa and is going to Humphrey to start a general merchandise store.
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Col. Frank Simms, many years ago a resident here, arrived in town one day last week from Monroe, and says he is back to stay.
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Robert Lewis was in town Monday. He has rented his fine farm on Shell creek and expects to move to our city this spring.
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C.K. Davies' has bought the 120 acres known as the Lute North farm, one and a half miles northwest of the city, and expects to build in the spring.
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Misses Mary F. Borowiak, Jess and Louisa Schram, also a little girl named Mary Wulzy, have been stricken with smallpox and the residences quarantined.
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John Burrell was arraigned Monday and plead not guilty to the crime with which he is charged. His trial will probably begin, after the Gentleman trial is finished.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Feb. 13, 1901
Otto Hembd and Miss Mary M. Adamy were married this Tuesday morning at Saint Bona Ventura church, this city, Rev. Father Marcelinus officiating. The wedding celebration and festivities took place later in the day and evening at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nick Adamy, ten miles north of this city. A host of friends extend their congratulations to the happy couple.
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Nicholas Gentleman was arraigned February 4, on the charge of murder and plead "Not guilty." Since that various motions have been made preliminary to the trial by jury. We understand that the accused is fully prepared for the trial, and it is doubtless begun as we go to press, 2 o'clock this Tuesday, Feb. 12. Earlier in the day a special venire of 50 had been ordered by the judge. Mr. Gentleman's attorneys are: Reeder & Albert and McAllister & Cornelius. For the State, County Attorney O'Brien, J.M. Gondring, Judge A.M. Post and Attorney Dolzell of Fremont. Judge Hollenbeck, presiding.
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Mrs. Nora B. Lewis and her minor children are plaintiffs in a suit against Fred W. Horst and Louis Loerke, saloon keepers of Madison, and George M. Smith of Humphrey, and their bondsmen, are defendants. The petition in the case sets forth that Lewis, her husband, came to town on the morning of August 31 and alleges that he drank in the saloons of the men above mentioned and became intoxicated, and recites the accident and its outcome, in which he was killed. It further states that the deceased made $1500 a year with which he maintained his family. The amount of damages sued for is $10,000.--Madison Chronicle.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Feb. 6, 1901
Last Wednesday at the home of the bride's parents in the west part of the county, Rev. Miessler of this city officiating, Fred. W. Rahmayer of Lincoln county, Kansas, and Miss Louise, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Meedel, were joined in marriage. About a dozen friends from this city were present at the wedding. It was the intention to start either this Tuesday or Wednesday for their future home in Lincoln county, Kansas. They will be followed by the good wishes of all their acquaintance here.
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Last Thursday a serious and nearly fatal accident occurred on the farm of Mr. Bloomquist, ten miles southwest of town. The well was being cleaned and his son Charles was assisting. The piping, with pump attached, had been raised about sixteen feet when the wrenches which held it slipped and the pipe fell and the pump struck the young man on the head and fractured the skull. Dr. Anderson, assisted by Dr. Maister and Dr. Moore of York, performed an operation last Saturday on the injured man, and at the present he is doing as well as can be expected.--Stromsburg Headlight.
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Walter Borowiak, son of Mrs. C.A. Borowiak, and Martin, son of Mrs. M. Borowiak, cousins, were taken to the temporary pesthouse, the town hall north of the city Sunday, having been found to have smallpox. Both young men are about 19 years old. Both live with their widow mothers near the Catholic school and both were taken ill Thursday, but the doctors did not pronounce the cases smallpox until Sunday. The young men are doing nicely and precautions are being taken to prevent any further spread of the disease. The family are unable to find out how they were exposed to the disease. Dr. Baker is the attending physician.
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John Burrell, a well known citizen of the city is in jail as the result of a hearing before Justice Curtis upon the charge of assault upon the 11-year-old daughter of Mat. Allison. The little girl, whose name is Poeli Allison, in the complaint filed, alleges July 15, 1900, September 15, December 12 and January 21, 1901, as the four times of assault upon her. The crime charged is, to all right-minded people, a loathsome and vile offense against decency and law. If guilty he should receive the punishment due for such offenses. If not guilty, and the prosecution is, as Burrell claims, a piece of blackmail, whoever is responsible for that ought to be punished. In either case, it is a bad affair, and the public, never indifferent, should hold opinion until a full, legal investigation of all the facts, circumstances and surroundings, gives definiteness to the case. The bond required of him was for $3,000, which he could not give.
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Testimony was taken Saturday last before Irv. Speice, notary public, in the case of Mrs. Gross, widow of the man who lost his life here in a railroad wreck in the U.P. yards, together with a lot of horses. She now sues for damages. She was represented by C.J. Garlow, and the railroad company by Edson Rich of Omaha. Suit was brought in U.S. district court for Wyoming.
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The following appeared in the Omaha World-Herald of Thursday:
    Harry Callihan, who had been twenty years an engineer on the Union Pacific road and resigned two weeks ago--having reached the age limit--fell under the wheels of an engine this forenoon. Below the Eleventh street viaduct, he attempted to board a freight locomotive that was bound for South Omaha, but slipped and one of his legs was run over above the knee. He was taken to St. Joseph's hospital.
    Callihan has a family and resides at 621 Pierce street.
    Callihan was this afternoon too weak to undergo an operation on the maimed leg and his chances for recovery were considered problematical.
    A corresondent of the Lincoln Journal says his right leg was ground into a shapeless mass from the knee down. The short story of the old engineer to the reporter was "I thought I would go out to South Omaha this morning and see if I could get a job at something and as I climbed on the bumpers of the car my foot slipped and I fell. Two wheels of the car run over me and here I am, dying, dying."
    Later word says that he is improving, after the amputation of the injured (the right) leg.
    Mr. Callihan was a former resident of this city, and for several years engineer on the switch engine in the U.P. yards.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Jan. 30, 1901
The children of Nels Christianson, near Osceola, the other day, were out playing with an air gun, and did not know it was loaded. It exploded, and a little six-year-old boy received the charge in his face. The left eye, it is said, will be destroyed, and may be the right one also.
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Mrs. Ellen Connell has received $2,000 payment of beneficiary certificate in the A.O.U.W. Her husband, Michael Connell, was a member of a lodge at O'Neill, No. 153. He died at Denver, some weeks ago, away from home, under trying circumstances, but was well cared for by the brethren, and now comes to his widow this mememto of his thoughtful regard for his family.
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Anna M. Carter has filed a petition in the district court asking a divorce from her husband, George M. Carter, alleging gross neglect and cruelty. She also says that by stealth and deceit he had obtained possession of their child, a girl of two years, that he was an unfit person to care for her, etc. Judge Grimison made an oder for the production of the child in court February 11.
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The following have received marriage licenses: Percy L. Knight to Miss Ella Barr, both of Polk county; George Winkler to Mary Batliner; Otto C. Hembd to Mary Adamy; Otto Blawat to Mary Meier; John P. Braun to Margaretha Bach; Joseph O. Lisko to Mary Czapla; Henry Melcher to Miss Mary korth; Louis Voss to Miss Lillie Welsh.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Jan. 23, 1901
W.L.P. Wells, formerly of Monroe, was taken up by the officers last night and given a bed in the jail. The old gentleman seems to be slightly demented and an effort will be made to get him to his friends, where he may be cared for. He states that he has a team near Creston. He also says he has a brother living near Marcus, Iowa.--Norfolk News.
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Dr. W.L. Hess of Los Angeles, Cal., who some fourteen years ago lived near Columbus on a farm with his parents, is visiting with his uncle, Lewis Jones, and old friends near Duncan. Dr. Hess has just returned from Europe, where he took nine months' special work in his profession, mostly in Berlin and Vienna. He intends to locate in Los Angeles.
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The following is a list of officers of Baker Post No. 9, G.A.R., elected for the year 1901: P.C., W.A. McAllister; S.V.C., E.H. Funk; J.V.C., M.K. Turner; Adjt., D.N. Miner; Q.M., J.H. Galley; S., George Lehman; C., A.W. Clark; O.D., R.L. Rossiter; O.G., R.W. Young. The following were appointed: Q.M.S., H.T. Spoeery; delegate to state encampment, E.D. Fitzpatrick; alternate, A.W. Clark.
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At the annual election of officers of Pioneer Hook & Ladder Co. held Monday evening, the following were elected to serve the coming year: President, B.J. Galley; foreman, Leopold Plath; assistant foreman, John Hinkelman; secretary, Herman Kersenbrock; assistant secretary, Emil Kumerack; treasurer, George W. Baumgart; directors, Henry Herchenhan, Wm. Baker and Carl Rolla.
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The petit jury for the February, 1901 summoned for February 12, term of the district court, drawn by John C. Byrnes, sheriff of Platte county, and C.H. Gruenther, clerk of the district court, in presence of Mary E. Sheehan, deputy clerk, are: Jonas Welch, E.H. Chambers, Joseph Gutzmer, Wm. Joy, Dick Logaman, A. Kunkle, Andy Batliner, Con Heesacker, John H. Cook, H.J. Werner, John B. Welch, J.W. Palme, Ludwig Anderson, Swan Johnson, Geo. Heany, Otto Kollweit, David Folliott, Bernard Nienaber, Joseph Albracht, John F. Parks, George W. Galley, jr., Jacob Tschudin, Henry Wilke, Herman Ernst.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Jan. 16, 1901
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Reider were treated to a genuine surprise Monday evening by their friends and neighbors who dropped in upon them just as they were about to retire, and reminded them of the fact that they had come to celebrate the twelfth anniversary of their wedding. The details had been perfectly planned and the surprise was complete. About thirty of their friends were present and the evening was passed in a general good social time, games and other amusements being indulged in by the children. Shortly after 11 o'clock lunch was served, after which the friends took their departure, wishing the host and hostess many happy returns of the day.
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The Modern Woodmen held a convention here Thursday afternoon and elected G.W. Phillips and Dan Ziegler as delegates to the state encampment February 12 at Kearney--Daniel Driscoll, alternate. The next encampment is to be held in this city, date to be announced hereafter. The delegates present were, from Monroe, D.W. Ziegler, Bert Priest, C.J. Wagner and E.E. Fellers; Creston, Ed. Leuschen, Oscar Leuschen and Dan Driscoll; Platte Center, William Nay and J.G. Reagan; Humphrey, G.W. Clark, E.A. Stockslager, M.C. Bloedorn and H. Bones; Lindsay, Albert Carlson; Columbus, G.W. Phillips, A.W. Clark, J.E. Hoffman, L. Held, J.H. Johannes, L. Plath, Carl Kramer, E.E. Butler and August Dietrich.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Jan. 9, 1901
W.E. Lockhart has sold his 160 acre farm one mile east of the sheep ranch to Red. Stenger, two takes possession the first of March. The farm sold for $6,400. Mr. Lockhart came to Nebraska September 28, 1885, and he wit his mother and sister have made their home here since. This tract was located as pension land due to heirs of Captain Lockhart, grandfather of William, and a soldier of the war of 1812. The selection was made when Dr. C.B. Stillman was county clerk of Platte county, in 1860. The Lockhart's do not yet know what changes they will make.
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Four cases of smallpox were reported Thursday night in the family of Mrs. Anthony, six miles southeast of St. Edward. The youngest is a child of 4 years the oldest 12. The disease has been in progress more than ten days and members of the family have been present at dances and other public gatherings. The disease is supposed to have been carried there by a daughter of Mrs. Anthony from Leavenworth, Kansas, who thinks she got the germs in the waiting room of the depot at Valley, Nebraska, from a woman whose face showed signs of smallpox. A strict quarantine has been established.

Columbus Journal, Wed., Jan 2, 1901
Miss Etta Wilson, who was housekeeper for R.L. Payne, was accidentally killed in a runaway at Harrington, Washington, recently....Sheriff McLeod went to North Bend Tuesday to arrest C.C. Oren who sold a load of corn belonging to James W. Edgar, a farmer living east of this place, to the Knowlin sheep ranch last Saturday. Oren took the proceeds and left town leaving the horses in one of the livery barns here. Sheriff McLeod, learning that Oren had been seen in North Bend by the city marshal, went to get his man but the culprit could not be found. The exercise of a little poor judgment on the part of some on in North Bend enabled Oren to escape and Mac had to come home empty handed.--Schuyler Sun.
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The teachers from Platte county who attended the State association at LIncoln last week, were: I.H. Britell, Mrs. E.W. Glidden, Mrs. C.A. Brindley, MIsses Grace Clark, Alice Watkins, Alice Luth, G. Scofield, Prof. Garlich and Fred. Williams from Columbus; Prof. Campbell, R.E. Hoose of Platte Ceneter; Isa Maclaren, Ella Coleman and J.J. Walker of Humphrey; Muzetta Wheeler, Creston; Emma Majen and Laura Carstenson, Leigh. The attendance at this session was far in excess of all previous meetings, the number being over eleven hundred.


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