Platte Co., NE - 1901 News (July-Dec) NEGenWeb Project
PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
News From 100 Years Ago
(July, 1901 - December, 1901)


Columbus Telegram, December 20, 1901
Andrew Richter returned last Saturday from the northwest, where he had been for nearly two months buying land and calling upon old neighbors who formerly lived in this county. He bought a 160-acre farm near Colfax, Wash., and contemplates moving out there some time during the ensuing year.
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W.B. Appleman has gone to St. Joseph, Mo., to remain with the home folks until after the holidays. He announces that he will continue in the board of trade business at his present location, in connection with the Floyd Cunningham company, of Omaha. Mr. Appleman says there were no losers in Columbus by reason of the recent failure of Penny Bros.

Columbus Journal, December 13, 1901
Lee Craig has quit cooking in Rickley's restaurant and gone to Los Angeles, Cal.
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Miss Abbie Keating arrived from Norfolk last Wednesday. She has been employed as matron at the insane asylum at Norfolk. She says the institution has not been in condition for the proper treatment of patients since the fire and has been abandoned for the winter. Miss Keating will remain in Columbus for the present.
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Fritz Jaeggi, chief owner of the irrigation interests in Platte county and of the Columbus Elevator mills, arrived from Switzerland last Monday, and will remain here indefinitely. He comes to make one last effort to arouse the interest of Columbus property-owners in the irrigation and water-power problem. Failing to incite sufficient interest here, he will transfer his efforts to Fremont or some other city where the people are awake to their own welfare.
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The 12-year-old son of John Staab residing near Boheet postoffice, was accidentally shot in the leg last Sunday with a bullet from a 22-caliber rifle. Three boys were playing with the gun, and one of them standing behind young Staab attempted to raise the hammer. It slipped from his grasp and discharged the weapon. Reports to the Omaha papers state that blood poison had made its appearance and would probably cause an amputation of the boy's limb, but the latest local information obtained by The Telegram discredits this serious phase of the accident.
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Mr. and Mrs. Judge T.D. Robison were in Humphrey last Monday evening attending a farewell banquet in honor of Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Stockslager, Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Clark and William Illian, who have recently sold their interests in Humphrey and will move to a new field. The two former will move to California some time during the winter, while Mr. Illian announces his intention of becoming a resident of Albion. The reception was given under auspices of Humpnrey secret societies whose membership included the guests of honor, and the success to which it was carried out has been pronounced a happ farewell to the departing friends.

Columbus Telegram, December 6, 1901
While operating a corn-shredding machine on the farm of F.W. Mouden, five miles northwest of Platte Center last Friday afternoon Jesse Bisson had his right arm caught in the feeding apparatus and mangled so badly that amputation at the shoulder joint was necessary. Part of the machine had to be taken apart before the poor fellow could be released. Bisson is a young man nineteen years of age, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E.R. Bisson, residing ten miles north of Columbus on the Meridian line. His parents are well-to-do. Wednesday morning, indications for his recovery were reported favorable by one of the attending surgeons.
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Steve Rogers has been entertaining his brother, William, of Madison, Wis., during the week. William returned home yesterday, and next week Steve will go to Wisconsin to spend the winter.
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W.B. Steen, of Madison, has been in Columbus several days this week, a guest at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H.B. Musgrave.
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O.L. Baker is building a new ice house, 70x30 feet ground dimensions, on the creamery property in the western part of town, and is converting the creamery building into an ice house.
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Al Butler has this week gone to Humphrey to accept a position as distriubting agent for the Standard Oil company. His territory includes all the towns within a ten mile radius of Humphrey.
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Miss Eva Sullivan, who has been a guest at the home of her uncle, Thomas Keating, for several weeks, returned last Saturday to her home at Harvard, Ill.
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Misses Bertha and Kate Kiernan, of Chicago, are the guests at the home of their uncle, S.E. Marty, and will remain in the city during the next two months.

Columbus Telegram, November 29, 1901
Mrs. L.R. Calland left yesterday for Deadwood, S.D., where she will locate in the restaurant and bakery business. She says the Black Hills country is very lively and prosperous this fall. Her family accompanied her to Deadwood.
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Mrs. Ed. Hagemann is receiving a visit from her mother and sister, Mrs. Julia Leonhard and Mrs. Ed. Hahn, who arrived from their home at Deadwood, S.D., last Monday. They expect to remain during the winter.
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Ned Post had two fingers broken last Friday. He was leading his horse to water, and had wound the halter strap around his hand. The animal gave a sudden, strong jerk in an effort to get away, causing the accident.
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Mrs. F.B. Eimers, accompanied by her mother and sister, Mrs. M. and Miss Lizzie Steffes, departed Monday for Santa Ana, Cal., where they will spend a large part of the winter.
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L.A. Ewing has purchased the job department of Col. Dale's paper, the Columbus Times, and will begin business next week on his own account. He will make a specialty of high art printing.

Columbus Telegram, November 22, 1901
Miss Sarah Perkinson and Mr. Ed Perkinson left Tuesday morning for Higgins, Texas, near the north state line. They will each endeavor to secure a quarter section of land under the homestead privilege in Oklahoma.
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Mr. and Mrs. Henry Geitzen, of Humphrey, were guests last Sunday at the home of their son, Dr. C.H. Geitzen.
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Edward Tschudy and Sam Bell, charged with disturbing the peace and fighting, each pled guilty in police court Wednesday morning and were fined $2 and costs. Alfie Heintz appeared as the complaining witness in the first instance, and Ed. Tschudy in the second. In default of settlement Tschudy was committed to jail, but Bell paid his assessment and was sent on his way rejoicing.

Columbus Telegram, November 15, 1901
The creamery at Boheet has become a part of the Nebraska-Iowa company, and will hereafter be nothing more than a station for receiving milk. The churning apparatus was shipped to the Omaha headquarters yesterday.
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The Gray mercantile company has this week substituted electric for acetylene gas lights in all departments of the store.
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Miss Eva Hockenberger arrived from Denver this morning for a brief visit with city relatives.
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Charles Potter, Walter Potter and F.K. Strother, of Monroe, returned Tuesday from a trip to the irrigated lands in Colorado. Walter bought a quarter section with perpetual water right near Snyder, and will move to that country in the spring. The boys declare the upper Platte valley is the best place in the country for a farmer to make money, and make it easy. Fruit, forage and other farm products are a sure crop and easily tended. They say land is selling from $35 per acre.
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Miss Martha Ott returned Monday to her home at Laramie, Wyo. She had been a guest at the home of her uncle, C.A. Schroeder.
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W.H. & F.B. Eimers are closing out their stock of general merchandise here with a view to engage in the wholesale busines in Chicago sometime the first of the year. However they will retain their interests at Humphrey. To a few the move has been an open secret, but to the general public announcement of the proposed change will be received with surprise and regret.

Columbus Telegram, November 8, 1901
Sam Bond has resumed his position as brakeman on the Norfolk passenger train. He had taken a vacation of 60 days and devoted it to travel in the eastern and northwestern states.
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John Brock has recovered from the effects of an encounter with the family cow while trying to teach her how to wear a halter one day last week.
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Dr. H.J. Arnold and Charley Jones spent a couple of days among their duck decoys this week. They report the fall flight very poor.
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Gerhart Loeske and son returned last Monday from their visit to Germany, Switzerland and other European countries. They are in good health and are glad to get home again. During their stay abroad they visited many places of interest, and have many entertaining stories to tell their friends of their trip.
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Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Schwalbach, and son, of Grangerville, Idaho, are visiting friends in this neighborhood. Mrs. Schwalbach will continue on her way to Florida to remain during the winter.
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Miss Hazel Winterbotham last Wednesday visited between trains with relatives here. She was on her way to Genoa, and within a few days will return here to remain longer.

Columbus Telegram, November 1, 1901
Considerable excitement was caused in Lindsay Wednesday when workmen grading down a hill on the village streets exhumed the skeletons of four white men. The bones were found side by side at the top of the hill. No weapons or other marks of identification were found. Many theories are advanced as to how the bones came there, and the one which finds the most favor is that a party of white hunters sought shelter behind the hill from an attacking party of Indians, and four of them were killed. After the Indians had been driven off the dead men were buried where they fell. It is presumed that this was at least fifty years ago, as some of the oldest settlers here have no knowledge of any Indian fight in that vicinity. Dr. Walker, of Lindsay, examined the bones and pronounced them to have been of white men. One skull shows plainly the manner in which death came. A large hole presumably a bullet hole, being above the left temple.
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Charley Johnson, a colored man, was detained here yesterday morning by Policeman Schack on suspicion that he had been connected with a burglary at Schuyler the previous night. Upon his person were found two watches, one of which, corresponding with a description of the stolen property was thoroughly identified by its owner, who accompanied the Schuyler chief of police to this place, when he came to remove the man yesterday afternoon. The burglary had been committed early in the evening when most of the populace was attending a lecture by W.J. Bryan. There were two men in the raid, but one has eluded capture. Evidently they were looking for money, but aside from the two watches nothing of value was secured in a raid upon two houses.
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W.B. Appleman returned yesterday from Hot Springs, Arkansas, where he had been for his health. He has improved very much, and will resume his position on the board of health.
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Fire broke out in Calland's restaurant on Thirteenth street at about 11:30 o'clock last night. The fire was confined to the kitchen alone, and completely glutted [sic] the room. All of the stock was rendered worthless by the smoke and water, and many of the fixtures will have to be replace. Both building and stock were covered by insurance.
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Saturday evening police assistance was summoned to the saloon of Frank Bridel to remove a peace disturbing element said to abide with Alpha Heintz. Mr. Bridel and his employee, Ulrich Longnecker, refuse to talk freely of the episode which prompted them to turn in a police call, and filed no complaint in police court. They simply say that Alpha started in to raise a disturbance and they turned him out. Monday forenoon the lad was arraigned before Judge Curtis, who administered a severe reprimand, and a fine of $1 with trimmings.
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David Jones returned from Portland, Oregon, last night, after being employed there for nearly a year in a mill. He will probably remain in Columbus with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Jones.

Columbus Journal, October 30, 1901
It may be several years in the future when the streets of American cities and towns will not be ornamented by telegraph and telephone and electric-light poles and other poles of a somewhat similar nature, but the time will probably be postponed until present projected improvements in that line are perfected. When they do come, the devices may be so simple and so cheap as to surprise everybody by their very simplicity. Wireless telegraphy is at least suggestive of poleless telephony, even if the time of its advent may be heralded through a long-distance route.
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What seemed very close to a fearful smash-up occurred at the north track of the Union Pacific crossings on North street, Saturday afternoon about 4 o'clock. The yard engine, with flat cars front and rear, was backing eastward, when a team of large horses was noticed on the gallop passing the Schupback drug store. The wagon was loaded with fence posts. Frank Sokol was driving, and John J. Kudron was sitting in the seat beside him. Sokol says that he heard no ring of bell or blowing of whistle, but others near say that there was a continuous ringing of the bell and alarm by one of the trainmen at the end of the car being pushed, but the driver paid no attention. Had the team been driven a shade slower or the train not slowed up some on sight of the team, the probability is that the men and horses would have been killed. As it was, the wagon was overturned, two spokes of the right hind wheel were broken out, but nothing serious in the way of injury. The men were abundantly able to load up their wagon and drive off. It was a closer call than you will wish to have.
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Mr. Eames and family made this office a fraternal call Friday. Mr. Eames comes from central Illinois, where he published a paper for many years and now goes to Denver to engage in job printing. Mr. Eames' brother was a partner of Warwick Saunders in newspaper work in Platte Center.

Columbus Journal, October 23, 1901
We understand that Hans Elliott has sold his farm, a half section adjoining Will Newman's on the west, to Jacob Greisen for $47.50 an acre. Mr. Elliott two years ago bought the land for $27.50 an acre. This transaction shows how land near Columbus has risen in value the past two years.
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Miss Mary Steffes expects to leave in a short time for California to spend the winter. She will be accompanied by Mrs. Frank Eimers, of Columbus, who will also spend the winter in that fair clime....Mr. Thos. Ottis and Miss Mary returned last Saturday from St. Paul where they went to attend the wedding of Frank Ottis. Mr. Ottis says the marriage took place according to arrangements and that Frank and his bride left for Chicago, New York and Boston to spend their honey-moon.--Humphrey Democrat.
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Misses Ethel Elliott, Ruby Hensley, Maud Williams, Louise Haney, Ralph Coolidge and James Browner went Friday to Platte Center, where they attended a dance.

Columbus Journal, October 16, 1901
Jacob Brock, jr., who was conducting the separator station at Oldenbusch for Hagel & Stevenson, goes to Guthrie, Iowa, today to take charge of a station there for the Nebraska-Iowa Creamery company. Mr. Breese will add the Oldenbusch station to his care, and Fred. Ernst will look after Loseke and Boheet. W.K. Lay goes to Omaha this week to do some preparatory work, in his line, for the same company.
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Arthur and Florence Easton attended on Saturday last a party at Otto Kummer's near Silver Creek, for his daughter Stella, in honor of her tenth birthday anniversary.
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D. Brunken of Columbus, Nebraska, is in the city visiting relatives. He has made a visit to some of our large cities in the east and New York, where he has a brother, whom he had not seen for thirty-five years. Mr. Brunken is one of the oldest settlers of Platte county, Nebraska, and reports the crops very favorable in his county. He will leave for his home Friday.--Burlington (Iowa) Hawkeye, Oct. 11. Mr. Brunken returned here Saturday and expressed himself as well pleased with his trip.
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Ed. McDonald, a man about 60 years old, whose home is in Butler county, was injured here Saturday aftenoon by the running away of his team, being thrown from the wagon and dragged. The left side of his head was scalped and there was an injury behind the right ear. He bled considerably. He received attention of surgeons and is now at St. Mary's hospital doing as well as could be expected.
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Under date of Hermosa, So. Dakota October 13, E.M. Thomas writes us that he is to move from there, but does not yet know where he will settle. He sends best regards to all his old friends.

Columbus Journal, October 9, 1901
Mrs. Len Martyn and little child arrived from Vermont last Sunday evening, and now that far away look has disappeared from Mr. Martyn's face. This is the farthest west Mrs. Martyn has ever been, and while everything probably seems strange to her, she will soon become accustomed to the change, and we believe she will be pleased with this country.--Humphrey Democrat.
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J>W. James will have charge of the county poor farm another year, making the fourth for him. He is to pay $2 per acre for the use of the land, and to receive $2.50 per week for the care of each inmate under his charge.
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J.H. Drinnin has a peach orchard containing 600 trees two years old, 100 of which bore fruit this year. We know it was good, because we have been permitted to test it. We are coming to believe that Nebraska excels in the flavor of its fruits of all kinds, which is the specialty upon which it has been awarded premiums time and again at world's fairs for years. By never giving up; by keeping on planting; by using the best methods of planting and cultivating, and by keeping at it, just such men as J.H. Drinnin for this north Platte country are doing what others have done for southeast Nebraska, proving the adaptability of soil and climate to the raising of fruit of all kinds suitable to this latitude.
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Examine the $5 silver certificates you get. The Treasury department has issued warning against a new counterfeit, series of 1899, check letter B, plate No. 37, and bearing the portrait of the Indian chief "Onepapa." The counterfeit is printed from photo-etched plates, of fair workmanship, on good quality of paper, bearing lines in imitation of the silk fiber of the genuine.

Columbus Journal, October 2, 1901
F. Brodfuehrer, Julius Ernst, W.T. Ernst, Dr. Tiesing, Fritz Fluckinger, Werner Schupbach and Wm. Kersenbrock started Sunday with a covered wagon, two buggies and complete camping paraphernalia for a two weeks' outing in Wheeler county.
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Mr. and Mrs. R.Y. Lisco and little son returned home a week ago Saturday from their several months' trip to their old home in Ireland. They had an enjoyable trip, but in going over experienced one of the worst storms on the ocean for years, almost tearing the vessel to pieces.
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J.C. Wilckens, the aged man who lives in the north part of the city, wandered away from home Saturday after noon. He had started for Vogel's restaurant on an errand and seemed to be suffering from mental aberration, for he lost his way and wandered several miles east of town. The family searched for him until about 9 o'clock, when the fire bell was rung and called out volunteers to continue the search. About 200 men responded to the call. C.S. Easton was among the first and succeeded in tracing him to a corn field on the Lawrence farm, where Mr. Wilckens was found and persuaded to return home. He is 77 years old.
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Pierson Smith, youngest son of Pierson D. Smith, St. Edward, while breaking a colt Monday of last week, was carried by him under a tree, Pierson's head striking against a solid branch of the tree throwing him violently to the ground, where he was found a few minutes after, unconscious. The Advance says: "Dr. Ireland was summoned at once. A brief examination was sufficient to show that the injuries were of a very dangerous nature and Drs. Evans, Martyn, Geer and Dr. Dave Martyn of Columbus, were called by telegraph and a special train brought them to St. Edward about eight o'clock that evening. The skull had received a linear fracture from temple to temple and was depressed, causing convulsions. An operation was performed about midnight by trephining. After the pressure was removed the patient rested quietly, and from reports Wednesday afternoon, the doctors in charge expressing strong hopes of the patient's recovery."

Columbus Journal, September 25, 1901
George Lehman is about to erect an addition to his hotel, the Thurston, three stories high with basement, the addition to be 44 feet front and 42 deep. There will be two store rooms fronting south on Thirteenth street. The new structure will add eighteen bed rooms to the Thurston, and be a very considerable improvement to that hostelry.
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Rev. George V. Clark, colored, an ex-slave, who was educated at Atlanta and Howard University, will speak in the Congregational church Thursday evening in the interest of the American missionary association. Rev. Clark is pastor of Plymouth Congregational church of Charleston, South Carolina. He is an excellent singer of his people's songs. There will be no admission charged, but a collection will be taken. Rev. Clark is a recognized speaker of ability. All are invited.

Columbus Journal, September 18, 1901
Miss Anna Tarpy, sister of Miss Mary Tarpy, started Thursday for an extended visit to Ireland, probably remaining all winter. Miss Tarpy had not expected going until a very short itme before leaving, so that her trip will be a surprise to many friends.
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H. Mustard, Ben Baker and Mike Sweeney of this place and Joe Parson, of Petersburg returned Tuesday evening from their trip to Canada. They have all secured a claim and report the country very favorable for their future career. How soon they will leave for their new home is not decided yet.--Lindsay Post.
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John Brugger arrived in the city Monday evening and has been greeting his old friends in Platte county, his former residence for so many years. His present home is a fine establishment just outside the city of Portland, Oregon. He looks in excellent health, and as though he had been enjoying life to the full in the far west. He is the guest of his son M. Brugger of the Columbus State Bank, and expects to return home in three or four weeks.

Columbus Journal, September 11, 1901
Six little orphan children arrived here Saturday on a passenger train, and about as happy a group of women and children as we have seen in many a day were Mrs. John Malone, Mrs. Adam Dieder and Mrs. Martin S. Wagner of St. Bernard, each being supplied with a fine-looking little girl, between two and three years old. Mr. George Wehlin of Madison received a boy four years old. All were guests at William Schroeder's. They were forty-eight hours coming from New York City here. Six orphans got off here, but we did not learn the names of the guardians for the other two. These children were all bright, looked good, and seemed well pleased with their surroundings.
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Judge John J. Sullivan of the supreme court was injured Thursday, the result of a shy of the horse he was driving, when near the sheep ranch north of this city. The buggy being overturned upon himself and his wife, the latter of whom was not injured. The Judge suffered a fracture of the right arm just below the shoulder, and it will probably be six weeks before he will be himself again entirely. He rests easy.
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A letter from E.H. Jenkins dated at Perry, Iowa, Saturday, tells us that their party (Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins and Mr. and Mrs. John George), will leave Perry for Chicago Sunday morning. That part of Iowa is still in the grip of the drouth. Some farmers will have a fairly good crop, while many others will not have half the usual crop. Perry, a town of about 3,000 population, has nearly 70 miles of cement pavements.
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William Bucher and his daughter Pauline returned Sunday from their several months' sojourn in Europe well pleased with their trip and yet glad to get home. Mr. Bucher gives a graphic description of the manner in which the government officials open the hundreds of trunks of the passengers and search the contents for dutiable goods.

Columbus Journal, September 4, 1901
Robert Henry of Columbus was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Bey Martyn several days this week. Mr. Henry is a brother to Mrs. Martyn. [Humphrey.]
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E.M. Blore, in helping move a dwelling-house Wednesday near Oconee, sustained a severe scalp wound by the falling of loose brick from the chimney.
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Among the changes in the stores, C.G. Hickok has accepted a position with the Gray Mercantile company as book-keeper and cashier, and Peter Webber as clerk. Misses Freda Pilling and Alma Gertsch are clerking in E. von Bergen's store. Miss Edith Sterner of Madison is in the photo gallery of Robert Saley. Peter Duffy has left the Gray Mercantile Co., and will engage in business for himself.
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There has been so much complaint lately as to the placing of telephone poles in the city that when next concessions are asked of this city the probabilities are that very strong objections will be made to any location of poles except in alleys. There is supposed to be reason in all things that are tolerable.

Columbus Journal, August 28, 1901
Mr. and Mrs. Bell, Mrs. Carter and Miss Freda Pilling of Columbus attended the funeral of Lilly Pilling here yesterday....On last Saturday morning when Robert Wurdeman, the adopted son of Mr. Ed. Wurdeman, was raking hay, the horses became frightened and ran, the boy was jerked forward and caught on the doubletrees and dragged for a mile. When picked up he was found unconscious and his skull was crushed from the kicks he received from one of the horses. He was brought to town immediately. Dr. McKinley was summoned, and he and Dr. Grable performed an operation removing pieces of the crushed bones. The boy is badly bruised otherwise and is still lying in an unconscious condition. A professional nurse arrived in town a few days ago from Columbus to take care of the child. He is a boy 13 years of age, and is in a critical condition.--Creston Statesman.
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We hear of an ear of corn fourteen inches long from Clarence Gerrard's farm near Oconee....R.B. Sutton returned from Oklahoma Friday last and reports that he has a very valuable claim covered with walnut timber....We understand that Mr. Emerson has sold 75 acres of cucumbers to a firm from Omaha who will gather them for pickles, salting them here and then shipping them to Omaha to pickle.--Monroe Looking-Glass.
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Rev. Schimmelpfenning, pastor of the German Lutheran church eight miles northeast of Platte Center, met with quite a severe and painful accident last Friday afternoon. He was in the act of shooting a dog with a revolver and just as he pulled the trigger the dog jumped between his legs and pushed his, Mr. S's, foot in front of the revolver, and the ball entered the top of his foot. He was driven to town at once and Drs. Pugh and Moore dressed the wound. The ball was taken out from the bottom of the foot. He returned home that evening, and we learn that the wound is healing very satisfactorily. The dog escaped injury.--Platte Center Signal.
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Rev. Munro is slightly improved in his serious condition the past few days, although he is still a very sick man. His brother, Alex. Munro of New York City, who has been here several weeks, left today, and a sister from Omaha arrived to assist as nurse.

Columbus Journal, August 21, 1901
Mrs. Chas. Terry and Mrs. R.B. Sutton returned from the Buffalo Exposition this week, and report a pleasant time. Mrs. Terry's mother and brother from Omaha returned with them. [Monroe.]
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Jacob Ernst tells us that his uncle William Ernst and his son Samuel have returned from a two weeks' trip to Antelope county, a hilly country where the pasturage is good. While there Mr. Ernst bought 800 acres of land at $16 an acre. Land there sells at $12 to $40 an acre, according to quality and improvements.
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John H. Hellbusch, whose death was recorded in last week's Journal, is said to have been the first settler in Grand Prairie township.
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Victor Palmateer returned last evening from Oklahoma. Victor has a good claim 3 1/2 miles southwest of McKnight and 18 miles south of Lawton. He left George Newhoff in El Reno, saw Bert White in the same town, and Victor informs us that Bert is practicing law in Ponca City, Okla.--Creston Statesman.

Columbus Journal, August 14, 1901
Loni Lockamy, a hired man working for Frank Wurdeman, met with a very painful and which may prove dangerous accident Thursday while making hay, a horse kicking him in the stomach of which he is now very ill and suffering badly....Mrs. John Staab and daughter Anna had quite a misfortune Sunday while on their way to church their horse shying and running away. Luckily no one was hurt, only breaking the buggy shafts and otherwise demolishing the buggy.--Creston Statesman.
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Dan Linehan now of Kearney, who with his wife have many acquaintances in this community, will move here this week. Mr. Linehan will be machinist in the U.P. round-house.
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Mr. and Mrs. William Meyer and three children are sojourning with Herman Leuschen of Boheet. Mrs. Meyer is Mr. Leuschen's oldest daughter. Mr. Meyer has been a resident of Sioux county the past fourteen years; he had three quarters of a section of land that he disposed of for $2500, besides which he sold $3500 worth of cattle, and is looking out for another deal.
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Charles Graham of Creston has been granted a pension of $12 and Wallen Cameron of Schuyler an increase to $12.
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W.J. Winston and family have returned to Columbus after several months' absence, and will locate in this city again.

Columbus Journal, August 7, 1901
Al. Rickly, writing from El Reno, Oklahoma, to his brother Sam in this city, among other things mentions having met several of the Reagan family, who are still well-remembered here among the older settlers. Martin Reagan died about a year ago. Mrs. Reagan, Tom, Mary and Bridget live at Newkirk, Oklahoma, and have done well there. Tom is married, and told Mr. Rickly that they had been offered $15,000 for their land.
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On Tuesday afternoon of last week Paul Roen and Gilbert Anderson, lads under 12 years of age, had an altercation of some sort, a company of boys being together. Young Roen got a 22-caliber rifle and fired into Anderson's face. The shot were small, or doubtless the result would have been fatal. As it was, besides the shot in neck, scalp and arm, there was one under the eye that may give trouble.
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Tom Finch of St. Edward met with a serious accident last week. He got his thumb tangled up with a halter strap and lost his thumb as a result. Tom is rather unfortunate as he has suffered from both a broken leg and a broken arm within the last year. [Genoa.]

Columbus Journal, Wed., July 31, 1901
Mrs. George McFarland, who had been ill, is reported as having fully recovered.
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Paul H.D. Hagel returned Saturday from a trip through his district in piano tuning.
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Jim Frazier made a trip to Holt county last week to look after his cattle interests there.
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Harry L. Tripp, while unloading a pistol at Platte Center yesterday morning, was accidentally surprised and hurt by the discharge of a ball into the palm of his left hand, and supposed to be lodged in the fore arm close above the wrist.
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Misses Lulu Plath and Tottie Shannon gave a party Monday evening to about thirty-five of their young friends, at the home of Miss Shannon in honor of her cousin, Miss Irene Leesley of Plattsmouth.
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Mrs. C. Pheney and daughter returned Friday from Iowa, and expect to engage in business here again.

Columbus Journal, Wed., July 24, 1901
D.W. Ziegler has been advanced to a better position with the Rex Remedy company, and will hereafter make Fremont his headquarters. His family will remain in Monroe, says the Republican.
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Will Andrews is on his back at the residence of his parents northeast of Bellwood with a very severe attack of smallpox. Dr. Martyn of Columbus, has charge of him.--Bellwood Gazette.
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John Meyer enjoyed a few days' visit from his nephew, Fred. Kipping of Cambridge, Henry county, Illinois, who started Monday on his return home. He says weather conditions are about the same here as with them.

Columbus Journal, Wed., July 17, 1901
H.J. Tatum arrived here Sunday morning being telegraphed for at Charleston, South Carolina, on account of the serious illness of his wife, daughter of Mrs. Saffron, at whose home here she and son Lee have been visiting for six weeks. Mrs. Tatum was reported yesterday as very much improved.
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A letter home from Miss Zura Morse dated in Portland, Oregon, July 11th gives a glowing account of the beautiful country and climate. Mrs. Morse and Miss Zura were the guests of Mrs. G. Heitkemper at their summer residence on the beach. George, son of Mr. Heitkemper, is married and lives in Portland. Mrs. Morse and Miss Zura are well pleased with what they have seen of the state.
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The St. Edward Sun speaks of Nels Hasselbach (formerly a resident here, but for a number of years now a business man of St. Edward), about to erect there a brick business building 44x78, two stories high costing at least $10,000, and to be in every way one of the finest in Boone county. Nels' Columbus friends are glad to see this evidence of his prosperity.
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Sunday the families of Chas. Watts and E. Nicholson were poisoned by eating ice cream. For a time serious results were anticipated, but at present all are out of danger.--Monroe Republican.
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Miss Mary Reed of Illinois, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Mary Borowiak, will go over to Osceola Saturday. She may teach the coming year in Polk county.

Columbus Journal, Wed., July 10, 1901
Peter Larsson, one of the old settlers of Platte county who has lived near Platte Center, was in the city Monday and was the guest of John Eusden. He had just returned from Chase county, where for years he has had a section of school land, which he had not before seen, but which pleases him well, being good grazing land. Mr. Larsson has sold his quarter section here for $40 an acre, and expects to improve his place in Chase county and make it his future home.
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E. Schostag moved his cigar factory last week across the hall north from his former location, which is to be occupied by the Telegram.
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Wm. D. Wilson of Oconee was in the city Saturday, coming especially to see the Gentry show. He seems to be no older than he was a score of years ago.
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Little Esther, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.M. Newman, suffered a painful accident Monday of last week. A window fell on the closed fingers of the left hand, and the sash was so fastened down that the window had to be broken and sash pried out before the hand was released.
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Wednesday last a fire at J.H. Craun's, five miles north of the city, destroyed sheds amounting in value to $300. Cattle and horses were taken out only ten minutes before the fire. The fire-alarm to neighbors was given by means of the farm-bell, and brought some thirty to the rescue.

Columbus Journal, Wed., July 3, 1901
Carl Staab was called to Columbus Monday on account of the severe illness of his father, L. Staab. Mr. Staab has been ill for some time, but Monday he was taken with a stroke of paralysis which placed him in a critical condition. It is feared that he will not recover. Otto, who has been sailing for the past nine months returned the first of the week and is now at Columbus with his father. Word reached Otto at London, England.--Leigh World.
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Ed. Moncrief, who will be remembered as a former resident of Platte county and for a number of years its county superintendent of public instruction, was in the city Saturday. He now lives at Grand Island and is engaged in the real estate business.
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Supervisor R.Y. Lisco, his wife and their young son started Monday for a trip to the old country, expecting to be gone about three months. Their main object of interest will be Ireland, but other countries will also be visited.
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Miss Emma Wake returned home Friday evening. She had just finished a two years' course of training as a professional nurse, and received a diploma from the Clarkson hospital, Omaha.
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The runaway team of Mike Kukla ran into the telephone pole on Boettcher's corner Saturday evening, turned over the buggy of B.P. Duffy and in the confusion, Mr. Duffy and R.W. Hobart were thrown to the ground, causing some bruises. No other damage.
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William Hoefleman of Grand Prairie had the misfortune to lose his barn and a span of valuable horses during the severe storm Friday night. He carried no insurance.--Humphrey Leader.
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Miss Bertha Schupbach has been engaged to teach the Galley school east of this city. Charles Welch, who has been teaching there several years will have a school farther north and east.


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