Platte Co., NE - 1902 News (January - June) NEGenWeb Project
PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
News From 100 Years Ago
(January, 1902 - June, 1902)


The Columbus Journal, June 25, 1902
Miss Hattie Selsor spent Sunday in Schuyler. She will leave here Friday to remain at home in that city.
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Mrs. Barge of Central City, sister of Mrs. J.B. Gietzen, is at St. Mary's hospital taking a course of treatment.
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Miss Celia Matthews of Albion, a former pupil in the Catholic school here is visiting Miss Grace Fitzpatrick, coming down to attend the commencement exercises of the school.
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Mike Hoffman had the middle finger on his right hand so badly mashed Monday that amputation was necessary at the second joint. The accident occurred at Papillion where Hoffman was employed on the track gang of the Union Pacific.
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Martin Buck, who was a former pupil in our High school, and who has been superintendent of the school in Bellwood, has resigned his position there and will attend the State University law school.
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Master Leonard Wagner entertained forty of his boy and girl friends Monday afternoon in celebration of his eleventh birthday.
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Dr. Snyder, who has been an assistant of Dr. Johnson, one of the best osteopath physicians of Omaha, has located here to practice his profession. Dr. Snyder comes highly recommended in his work. His office is in the Barber building, Thirteenth street, recently occupied by Dr. Voss.
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An exchange says: "The parlor has had its day, and we are all thankful for it. It was never anything but a torture chamber and the home is better for its elimination. We understand that light is preferable to darkness, and that it is not good to have a room in the house which has much the characteristics of a tomb."
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Sheriff J.C. Byrnes returned Saturday evening last from his trip east, having in custody Alexander C. Cozlosski, of Duncan, this county, who is wanted charged with statutory assault upon one Agnes Mostik of Duncan, aged 17 years. Cozlosski had joined the navy April 29, and was found on board the United States ship Columbia at Brooklyn navy yard when arrested.
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Wilber T. Town, one of Columbus' most popular young men, employed at E. Schostag's, left the city Saturday afternoon for his old home in Hamburg, Iowa, where this (Wednesday) will occur his marriage to miss Lillian Brower, a charming young lady of that city. After a short wedding tour the young couple will come to Columbus and make this their home. The many friends here will wish the young people the very best of all that the earth affords.
The Columbus Journal, June 18, 1902
The following from Sunday's Omaha Bee will be of interest to the many friends of Miss Lamb, who spent her childhood days here: "On Tuesday, June 10, occurred the marriage of Miss Anna Lamb, formerly of Columbus, Neb., later of Omaha, to Mr. T.B. Hillard of San Francisco."
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Gerhard Voss returned home Sunday from a trip to his old home in Germany. He had left here about Christmas, and this makes his fourth trip across since his moving to America in 1884. Mr. Voss visited the home of J.H. Johannes and brought back the sad news that Mr. Johannes' mother was very sick.
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The St. Frances Academy commencement exercises which will be given next Monday in the lecture room of the school will be unusually interesting. There will be only one graduate this year, Miss G. Niemoller, who completes both the literary and musical courses of the school. Miss Niemoller's oration address will be "The End Crowns the Work." Those who will take part on the musical program are Misses K. Maben, E. Granneman, G. O'Bryan, G. Niemoller, L. Eckroat, A. Kepple, A. Hurley G. Disher, E. Homan and Master H. Matthews. Those who will play violin selections are Misses G. Disher, A. Maben and Master T. Vogel. Miss Maben will assist in two selections with her guitar. The commencement exercises are not public, only those who have special invitations being admitted. There will be no flower offerings.
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The commencement exercises of St. Francis Academy, the Catholic school, next Monday calls our attention to the institution and its work. The school this year enrolls 270 pupils, about 70 of whom are from a distance and who board and room in the building. Sister Agnes, who has had charge of the music for so many years, and who has become so beloved by everybody who is under her instruction, has had 73 different pupils in the several branches of music since last September. There are seventeen Sisters in the building to carry on the work, ten of these being teachers. The building, although being enlarged several times, is still found to be crowded. There are besides halls and other rooms, three dormitories, five large school rooms, seven music rooms, three reception rooms, a large chapel, three dining rooms, a laundry, kitchen, etc. The good name this institution has established will still continue to attract patrons from near and far.
The Columbus Journal, June 11, 1902
W.J. Belknap of Creston was in the city Friday. He lost his wife by death about two weeks ago.
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William Hewitt was appointed as an extra policeman to help preserve order, for Saturday and Sunday.
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Theo. Friedhof is making some substantial improvements on his residence property which, when completed, will add much to the appearance and convenience of his home.
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C.A. Whaley's new two-story brick building on Nebraska Avenue to be used as a steam laundry is nearing completion and presents a fine appearance. The workmen are now ready for the roofing to proceed.
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M. Savage has resigned his position with the Union Pacific at Valley and has removed his family back to Columbus to remain, and is now occupying his residence corner of Olive and Sixteenth recently occupied by E. Schostag who removes to the new Wilken property on Olive street.
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Steve Ryan spent last week in Holt county where he was looking after his land interests.
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Next Sunday morning at 11 o'clock in Saint's chapel, Elder Hudson will preach a memorial sermon for Miss Hannah Shefford, who died about one month ago.
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Henry Gass, sr., who has been making an extended trip through the west, was last week visiting in Ellensburg, Wash., where K.O. Kohler and Albert Geiger reside.
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A farewell dance party was given Misses Elsie, Zura and Mary Morse and Miss Madge Cushing, Monday evening in Maennerchor hall. The families leave today (Tuesday) for their future home in Wenatchee, Washington.
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Commencement exercises of the Platte Center High school were held last Wednesday evening in that village, when Walter A. Bloedorn and Miss Etta C. Hoare received diplomas. Prof. O'Connor of Norfolk delivered the address of the evening.
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Barney Beverstock, of Shelby, Ohio, a former Columbus boy in the '80's, arrived here Saturday evening and was kept busy shaking hands with old-time friends until Sunday afternoon when he left on his return home. A little grayer, but still the same genial Barney as of yore.
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James Haney made his semi-annual visit to Schuyler Wednesday and called at the Quill office. Mr. Haney has resided on his farm between this city and Columbus for many years, and is one of the oldest living settlers in this part of the state. He says he has been here too long to leave.--Schuyler Quill.
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Miss Alma Schonlau was called to Humphrey Sunday by the sickness of her sister, Mrs. Al. Butler.
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Dr. Berthold Tiesing expects to leave this (Wednesday) for a five weeks' visit to his old home at New Haven, Conn.
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Mrs. W.M. Cornelius and Miss Olive Dodds will leave in about a week for Pennsylvania where they visit relatives. Miss Dodds will remain about a year.
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Mr. and Mrs. John George of Perry, Iowa, returned to their home Friday. They were called to the city by the death of Mrs. George's brother, M.K. Turner.
The Columbus Journal, June 4, 1902
The late Michael Morrissey, an account of whose death is printed in another column of today's Journal, was a cousin of F.T. Walker of this city.
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P.T. Walton has resigned his position with the Osborn Implement Co., to accept a similar position as traveling salesman for the Kingman Implement Co.
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August Schack received a letter from Frank Fugard last week, in which he stated that he liked his new position in Washington, D.C., but intimated that some time he might return to his old stamping grounds in Nebraska.
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Miss Edith Williams is here from Indiana and will spend the summer with relatives. Prof. Fred Williams is also here from Syracuse where he has been teaching the past year, and Miss Marjorie is expected home in a few weeks from Ohio where she is attending college.
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E.D. Brink has been promoted by the Nebraska Telephone Co., and hereafter his work will require him to be on the road most of the time, establishing new switches, starting new offices, etc. His headquarters will probably be in Omaha, and this city may lose both he and his family. A Mr. Holliday takes his place here.
The Columbus Journal, May 28, 1902
Frank Fleming, one of the Civil war veterans, has made application for an increase of pension. He has been drawing $8 per month. He served with a Wisconsin regiment.
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Grace Fitzpatrick will spend her vacation wit her sister, mrs. J.J. Murphy, at Rogers, Nebr.
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David Thomas and son David, jr., of Postville started Wednesday last from here on a trip to Wales and England where they will visit relatives until about October. Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Benjamin accompanied them this far on their journey. Their many friends will wish them a pleasant time and safe return.
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Roy Page was arrested in Clarks last Tuesday by Sheriff Byrnes, charged with forging the name of Henry Lubker to an order on E.D. Fitzpatrick for $12.50 worth of graphophone records. When arrested he was also in possession of a horse and buggy stolen by him from parties in Omaha. He was taken there for trial.
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A farmer named Bedinger, living near Humphrey, was fined $10 and costs in the county court Thursday last on a complaint preferred by Detective Vizzard of the Union Pacific. Bedinger was charged with stealing a load of railroad ties valued at $12. The property was returned, and altogether it proved a rather unprofitable experiment.
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Mrs. Mary Dunlap and children and Henry Plumb of Upland, Nebraska, are here, called by the serious illness of their father, John Plumb.
The Columbus Journal, May 21, 1902
The following is taken from last Friday's Humphrey Democrat: "One of the most distressing accidents which has ever happened in Humphrey took place this afternoon shortly after 1 o'clock wherein the large grind stone at Unger & Grenbemer's blacksmith shop exploded, and as a result Henry Unger, the senior member of the firm is lying with an ugly wound in his head, and grave fears are entertained of his recovery. Just how the accident happened nobody seems to know, but it is very evident that the large grind stone, which is run by a gasolene engine, was running at too high a speed. Mr. Grenbemer was in the shop at the time, and he says that Mr. Unger had started up the engine and turned on the belt to the grind stone to do some grinding, and before the stone had hardly gotten to its full speed, it flew to pieces, one piece striking Mr. Unger in the forehead. Help was immediately summoned and the injured man was carried to Dr. McKinley's office where he now lies in an unconscious state."
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B.T. Towner, one of the proprietors of the Twelfth street billard hall, had stolen from him Sunday three cashed checks amounting to $19.32 and about $5 in silver. The money was in a shot sack in the owner's coat pocket lying on a shelf back of the counter. The money advanced on the checks was to railroad men, and the company has been notified to stop payment thereon. Mr. Towner came here recently from Silver Creek.
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Thursday evening last the hour when M.K. Turner, editor of The Journal, left the office for his residence at his farm north of the city, he was suffering considerably from the effects of hernia, (which has caused him more or less trouble for some time) and his condition since has been such as to cause his family and friends considerable anxiety. Employes in the office will use their best endeavors in taking his place until such time as he is able to resume his labors or other arrangments are made.
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The graduating class at Platte Center this year contains but two pupils, Etta Hoare and Walter Bloedorn. The exercises will be held on the evening of the 4th of June.
The Columbus Journal, May 14, 1902
Quite a few base-ball enthusiasts met Friday evening at Zinnecker's Midway barber shop for the purpose of organizing a club for the season. The following officers were elected: J.W. Fauble president and manager; Carl Hoehen vice president; Wm. Zinnecker secretary-treasurer; Wm. Baker corresponding secretary; Harry Lohr captain. The players have not yet been selected. Another meeting for the completion of the organization will be held tomorrow (Thursday), evening at Judge Curtis' office, after which, we presume, games will be arranged for, one or two of which the management will endeavor to have played here during the meeting of the state druggists the first week in June.
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There is always opportunity for the exercise of a man's genius. We had even supposed that the street-crossing west of Niewohner's on Olive street was intended by the authorities to show those who pay the city's bills what might be done at every crossing, for the price available in the treasury, but when we came to talk with Jacob Glur, commending his work for all the good apparent, viz: the deep foundation of brick-bats, pounded down; the strong, thick layer of cement, which with proper time given to set, will increase in solidity as time goes by, we found that his ideal mental picture of a crossing, costing less perhaps, considering all things, than the actual one under our feet, was a long stride forward. Stand up for the city.
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About two weeks ago Anton Nelson ___ from his slaughter-house some __ty dollars' worth of pork, about three-fourths of the fresh pork he had hung up the evening before it was stolen. Notwithstanding the efforts made, and notwithstanding that he thinks he knows who got the pieces taken, there have not, as yet, been developments enough to lay the foundation for prosecution.
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The 60-foot wooden bridge on the Union Pacific one and a half miles east of Schuyler was so badly damaged by fire Friday last that it was considered unsafe for the passage of trains, and this condition continued for nine hours, trains going round in the meantime on available routes. Conductor Murphy was the first to notice the burning bridge. The supposition is that a spark from some passing train had found lodging and fuel in the bridge.
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Frank Yates went down to Omaha Tuesday and purchased through an agent in that city 160 acres of land in Canada. Dr. Hewit has also purchased a couple of sections of land there and a whole lot of people around Bellwood now have the Canada fever. Some of the widows are even talking of emigrating.--Bellwood Gazette.
Columbus Journal, May 7, 1902
Mr. Hardy of Leigh was visiting with his son C. C. of this city Wednesday.
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We are informed that Miss Esther Johnson is to teach again the coming year, the Barjenbrock school.
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Miss N.M. Bruner has sold her millinery store to Mrs. M.J. Rodman of Fremont, who took possession Monday. Miss Bruner has gone to her home in Kansas.
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The telephone systems making Monroe a suburb of Columbus is an assured thing, so says Zeigler....Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Welch of Columbus came up yesterday to visit with their son Will, west of town...Isaiah and Fannie H. Lightner and Wm. Webster were in attendance at Friends' meeting in Lincoln, returning home Tuesday....Ernest A. Gerrard came up on Monday for a visit, and to go up to his farm on upper Looking-glass creek. He looks hearty and says he has gotten used to New York city, feels at home there.--Monroe Looking Glass.
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We have it from a pretty reliable source that Frank Bougger, a former resident of Center township but now of David City, has been swindled out of about $8,000. An oily-tongued stranger, claiming to be Mr. B's. cousin and who seemed to be well acquainted with all his relatives, dropped in on him a few weeks ago for a short visit. Before taking his departure he mentioned the fact to Mr. B. that there was a good chance for him to make a few thousand very easy by investing in some southern oil wells, etc. Mr. B., thinking this supposed "cousin" of his was all o.k., bit at his game and eager to make a few dollars in an easy way sent $2,000 down with him to invest in his money-making scheme. His supposed "cousin" after arriving in the south either wrote or telegraphed to Mr. B. saying that the $2,000 wasn't enough, that it would take about $8,000 to make any kind of a showing, and wanted to know of Mr. B. if he should express the $2,000 back to him or would he like to go the full amount? Mr. B. decided to invest the full amount so sent him $6,000. Only a few days had passed by when he received a very short letter from his supposed "cousin" thanking him very much for the $8,000 and also adding this remark "that there was a sucker born every minute."--Brainard Clipper.
Columbus Journal, April 30, 1902
Mrs. John Wiggins was taken seriously sick this Tuesday morning, and friends had despaired of her recovery.
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George Hagel has purchased the lot east of Cassin's on Thirteenth street and will erect on it a brick building, two stories high, for use as four bowling alleys. Everything will be in first-class style. The building is to cost $3,000, and James Pearsall and James Fauble have the contract.
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This week Hulst & Adams are going to put in forty more hitching posts near their store to accommodate their fast increasing trade. There are now about fifty hitching places on both sides of their store but a visit to their large store on any Saturday will convince one that even forty more posts will not be too many.
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Herman and Joseph Gross of Milwaukee, Wisc., were in the city last week on their way to transact business at Madison and Battle Creek. Herman made a pleasant call at Journal headquarters, and both will probably come this way on their return home. These were among Columbus' best business men in the early '70's, and to see them is to renew the old times.
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G.W. Barnhart, a former citizen of Columbus in the early '70's, was in the city several days last week, starting for his home at Ft. Worth, Texas, Monday. George says his section of the south is prospering. Two large packing houses are soon to be erected in his city, which he says will give them a better and nearer market for their cattle and hogs. Two weeks ago they were enjoying strawberries, and the grass is now three or four inches tall.
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The Local board of Nebraska Children's home association consists of Rev. Munro, president; H.E. Babcock, vice president; J.D. Stires, treasurer; Mrs. Way, secretary. Any one wishing to know about a child, can apply to either of these for information. Miss Lorena M. Hathaway of Omaha was here last week, and placed a little boy with Mrs. Wm. Terrell. ...
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An amended petition has been filed in the case of the county against the bondsmen of James W. Lynch, former county treasurer, setting forth the fact of the death of Thomas Lynch, one of the bondsmen, who is said to have left a large estate, and leave was granted to proceed against the executor of his will unless cause is shown within five days why such procedure should not be made. The alleged shortage is some $16,000. A special session of the board of supervisors is called for April 24, to consider the offer of a compromise settlement with the bondsmen.
Columbus Journal, April 23, 1902
Mrs. Born, whose home is four miles west of the city, is reported very seriously ill.
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August Fredericks had his collarbone broken in a runaway on Monday, while driving a single horse which became frightened and ran, throwing Mr. Fredericks out of the buggy.--Creston Statesman.
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Joseph Ryan has been out several times and up town, but has not yet recuperated from his late illness. In the meantime he has grown a full beard which has so changed his appearance, that his friends scarcely know him.
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The 11-year-old daughter of P. Adamson, who lives two and a half miles south of town, dislocated her elbow Tuesday evening while playing. Dr. Stensgaard reduced the dislocation and the girl is getting along as well as could be expected.--Newman Grove Herald.
Columbus Journal, April 16, 1902
Garrett Hulst expects to move into his new home just east of H. Hockenberger's this week, and C.E. Pollock will move to the Sheldon house, now occupied by Mr. Hulst.
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W.W. Mannington of the vicinity of Monroe was in the city Monday, for the first time since last fall.
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A. Luth has been employed at a salary of $20 a month to keep Frankfort square in good order for six months commencing April 15.
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John Schram, formerly of this city, but for a number of years lately one of the chief business men of Seattle, Wash., has recently sold his business there, giving possession April 1. We believe the consideration is something more than $100,000.
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F.E. Fugard has written to a friend from 27 M street, N.W., Washington, D.C., saying that he had a pleasant trip to the capital city, and that he likes the place very much. He is manager of a process butter-making concern, and his many friends here will wish him well in his new situation.
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Frank Eimers is down from Humphrey for a few days on business. Mr. Eimers and his family returned a few weeks ago from California, where they had spent the winter. They are delighted with the country and expect to some day make their home there.
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William Seiffe is now in the county jail at David City, under a charge of bigamy. A dispatch says: From the evidence it seems that some time during the summer of 1901 Seiffe met Miss Nellie Engeart of Bellwood in Omaha and made love to her, saying he was a single man. Some time later in the season Seiffe came to Bellwood and, as he says, married Miss Engeart, not in the usual way, but each signing an agreement to take each other for better or worse, alleging this to be a common law marriage. Some of Miss Engeart's relatives suspicioned that the marriage was crooked and began an investigation. They allege to have learned that Seiffe has a wife and two children about 12 and 14 years of age now living in Chicago.
Columbus Journal, April 9, 1902
S.M. Brackney, with wife and three children, has recently moved here from Fullerton; Mr. Brackney works for Louis Zinnecker at the barber business.
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Mr. Adler, who in 1870 kept a wholesale liquor and cigar store, near the corner of Ninth and Washington Avenue, under the firm name of Adler & Heller, was in the city Monday.
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Andy Erb goes out to Alliance this Tuesday to go into the ranch business with his brother George.
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Parky Doody, formerly of Platte Center, now of Lookout, Wyoming, is in this vicinity visiting old friends.
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A special to the Lincoln Journal the other day, from Osceola, reported that John Janing, who went home from here, has the measles instead of the smallpox, as before reported.
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The Genoa Leader says that Charlie Cooney has returned from his trip west, and reports that he has bought a farm near Daisy, Washington, to which he will return in the near future.
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Irvin McFarland, on Monday morning about half-past eight had an accident that might easily have proven fatal to him; as it was, he was considerably bruised about the head and sides, and especially the back. No bones were broken. On Thirteenth street his team was fightened by dogs and began their race eastward. On a cross-street he was thrown between the horses and one of the front wheels passed over his head. Going on either side of a telephone pole, the horses stopped, the reach of the wagon was broken and the harness wrecked. It was a narrow escape for the man.
Columbus Journal, April 2, 1902
Alfred Palme, who for the last two years has been employed at the Clother House, left Monday for St. Edward, where he will be engaged at carpenter work.
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Hon. J.M. Gondring's premises were quarantined Saturday last for smallpox, his son John, jr., about eight years old, having been taken with the disease in a light form.
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Word has been received from Albert Luth since his safe return to his home in Washington. He found one Columbus man who, some months ago moved west, is about to return--doesn't like the country, at all.
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Dr. Arnold expects to pay his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Arnold at National City, California, a visit some time next month.
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John Janing, a barber in the employ of L.G. Zinnecker, who had been ailing for some ten days, was taken to his home at Osceola Friday last accompanied by Dr. Tiessing, since which time his case has developed into smallpox. John's numerous friends here hope he will soon recover and be at his post of duty again.
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Albert Giger and family left Monday for Ellensburg, Wash., where they will make their future home. Mr. Giger was for many years employed in the wooden shoe factory.
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Frank, son of Mr. and Mrs. B. McTaggart of this city, has been promoted by his employer, M.E. Smith, a wholesaler of Omaha, from a clerkship, to be a representative of the home as a traveling salesman, with headquarters at Spokane, Washington. Thus the Columbus boy pushes forward and upward.
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The Schuyler Quill says that ... W.H. Widener and J.M. Murphy and family departed this week for their future home at Harrisburg, Oregon.
Columbus Journal, March 26, 1902
James Haney has accepted a position with Hulst & Adams, to take the place of Ed. Kavanaugh, who goes out to their farm in the northwest part of the county.
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C.K. Davies limped into The Journal office Friday on business, and said that his share and his condition were caused by the fact that in chasing cattle on the ranch his horse fell down with him and rolled over him. No bones broken.
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Arnold Gerber and Thomas Schleckt left Monday for Spokane, Washington, to make their home. They were accompanied by Henry Alder of Fairbury, who, some ten years ago, also lived near Duncan.
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Mrs. Young has a slight attack of smallpox; her daughter, Miss Ruby, is reported as being more seriously afflicted, but not at all dangerous. The premises had been quarantined some days ago because of Mrs. Young's son Ray, who is recovering very nicely.
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C.W. Sherman who came here last Saturday from near Sibley, Iowa, is probably the oldest inhabitant Fullerton has ever had. The 10th of October he will round out one century though he looks no older than sixty-five, has a fine memory, gets around pretty well and can see to read the papers. Mr. Sherman attributes his longevity to the care he has taken of his health and the good habits he has always maintained. He has never used tobacco or liquor in any form and was for many years a sailor, so had plenty of fresh air and exercise. Mr. Sherman talks very entertainingly of the places he has visited in his travels and the differences in the mode of living now and ninety years ago. He and his wife will live here in town while his son Oscar and family will move into the Burley property.--Fullerton Journal.
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Mrs. Freeman Shaw who lives in Hackberry precinct was taken very sick Monday evening and at this writing (Tuesday) is not expected to live....John Burgess, who lives about six miles north of town, met with a serious, if not fatal accident, while on the road home from Silver Creek last Saturday. He got out on the tongue to fix something about the harness, fell under the horses and was badly trampled. One kidney is very badly injured and he is not improving very much.--Osceola Record.
Columbus Journal, March 19, 1902
La Vern Merriman, son-in-law of E.H. Funk, was taken suddenly with painter's colic Friday evening in front of Grays' store and was seriously ill all night long.
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W.L. Cook, formerly with Carl Kramer when he was a dry-goods merchant on Eleventh street, was in the city Wednesday last. He now is a traveling man representing two Kearney manufacturing establishments.
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Frank Dischner starts this Tuesday evening for an extended trip through the western states and Canada. He wants to see for himself if there is a better country to live in than Nebraska.
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Several members of the Harris family of Central City, Henry Gietzen and family of Humphrey, Mrs. Kombrink and Father Delfoss of Central City were in the city Friday to attend the funeral of Mrs. J.C. Byrnes.
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Frank Baker returned Monday from his trip as far west as Seattle. He was much pleased with parts of the country, but seems to still think Nebraska better, as he has accepted a position with the Union Pacific and will go to Kearney about May 1, to begin work.
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Andrew Richter loaded a car on Monday with household goods, implements and stock and that evening started them for his new home near Colfax, Washington. His two sons accompanied this car, and on Wednesday Mr. Richter and the rest of the family followed.--Platte Center Signal.
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L. Hahn and his two sons Louis and Fred have opened their new bakery and restaurant in the Jaeggi building on Thirteenth street formerly occupied by Mrs. Calland. Mr. Hahn, sr., is the baker and as he is at his work of years ago, before he moved to his farm, the bakery is sure to be in good position to do well in Columbus.
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Carlsten Petersen of the vicinity of Platte Center was in the city Wednesday last. By the way, The Journal's first subscriber was J.B. Senecal, and at Mr. Senecal's farm northwest of this city, Mr. Petersen worked for four years after he came here, beginning in 1870. He homesteaded where he now lives, and that land today, is worth $50 an acre to him, doubtless, besides what other he has bought since he acquired title from Uncle Sam. It may well be believed that Mr. Petersen is a lover of this country.
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Charles Morse, S.E. Cushing, wife and son Lute, Mrs. Thomas and family, and the family of Frank Scott all started Sunday evening for Wenatchee, Chelan county, Washington, where they will make their future home. Jay Cushing and Frank Scott left on Thursday with the household goods and stock of the families in four cars. The family of Mr. Morse and Miss Madge Cushing will go out in June. All these people are old settlers in this community and their friends are very sorry to see them leave.
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At the mass convention Saturday evening in Firemen's hall, the democracy of the city was present in strong force. Walter Phillips presided and Editor Johannes was secretary. The following ticket was nominated: Louis Held for mayor; Wm. Becker, clerk; Carl Hoehen, treasurer; councilmen, First ward, Louis Phillipps; Second, Wm. Poesch; Third, J.M. Gondring (who afterwards declined to run, but whose place has not yet been filled by the committee); R.L. Rossiter, city engineer; H.J. Hudson, police judge; W.N. Hensley, member of school board. The central committee are: At large, Edgar Howard; First ward, August Dietrich; Second, L.H. Leavy; Third, Frank Gleason.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, March 12, 1902
The hunters at the wolf round-up on the south side of the river Wednesday got one lone wolf for their pains.
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All the school buildings in the city were thoroughly fumigated, and disinfectants used, last Saturday.
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The residence of Jacob Glur on Eighth street was quarantined Saturday last, his daughter, Bertha, aged 15, being afflicted with a light attack of smallpox.
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Charles Matthews returned last week from Omaha and is again at his post as janitor of the Third ward school, after several weeks' illness caused by a collision with a street car.
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J.L. Sturgeon moved his family last week to their residence in town, the first house east of the Third ward school. George Kay of Clarks moved onto the Sturgeon farm south of town.
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The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Gus Priebe has the smallpox.
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Will, Clifford and Miss Ethel Galley are down with the smallpox, all light cases.
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Ray Young was taken with smallpox and a quarantine was placed on the house, one mile north of town, last Wednesday. His case is light. He had been sick several days before it was known that he had the smallpox.
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Herman Boetkie and family started this Tuesday morning for Endicott, Washington, where they will make their home.
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George Winslow moves this week to Holt county. The Journal goes with him, and shall always be glad to hear of his welfare.
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While butchering Friday of last week and frying out the lard, the little 5-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Hemling, residing four miles southeast of Humphrey, accidentally tipped one of the kettles in which the lard was being rendered toward him, throwing its entire contents on his right limb, literally cooking that member. Dr. Metz was summoned and at last reports the little one is doing as well as could be expected.--Humphrey Leader.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, March 5, 1902
Frank Baker and Jim Fauble started Saturday for Seattle, Washington. Mr. Baker expects to invest in land somewhere in the west, if he finds suitable conditions, and Mr. Fauble will return in a few weeks.
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August Meyers, who has been employed in Friedhof's store for several months, leaves tomorrow, Thursday, for Montana.
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H.H. Hunteman has been appointed postmaster of the Neboville post-office, in place of Theo Brugger, who goes this week to Oregon.
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Otto Merz purchased of Stephe Ryan his saloon stock and fixtures, and leased for a term of five years of the heirs of William Ryan, the Eleventh street building which has been occupied by Steph Ryan, and has disposed of a half-interest in his contract to Marcus Vogel, who thus becomes his partner in the business to be conducted. They take possession April 14.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, February 26, 1902
Tony Schafik, a farmer south of the Loup, has moved to Wheatland, Wyo.
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A.H. Ives moves his family today (Tuesday) to Carson, Iowa, where they will make their future home. Mr. Ives has lived near Columbus for twenty years, and the community will miss a good citizen.
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About sixty of Henry Backenhus' friends came in upon him last Saturday, at his home seven miles northwest of the city, and constituted a veritable surprise party for him, it being the 61st anniversary of his birthday. A long table was spread, and the seats were occupied for the fifth time in accommodating the company. The occasion was a very enjoyable one. F. Brodfuehrer was the only representative present from the county seat.
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Myron J. Brown of Polk county visited a couple of days last week with C.E. Morse before Charley starts for his new home in Washington. Mr. Brown has labored long and patiently with trotting horses, and it is a source of great pleasure to old friends to hear him speak of his promising filly, "Lilly G," who with very little training last year, was one of the best in the state. Myron certainly deserves success, and here's hoping that it comes to him in abundance.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, February 19, 1902
Fred. G. Dierks, five miles northeast of Platte Center, advertises a sale of stock, farm implements, etc., tomorrow Feb. 20. He expects to move to Washington with his family about the first of March.
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John Dawson of Oconee was at St. Edward Thursday, and tells us that the public school was closed because of the smallpox scare; wherever three men were found together, they were asked to disperse; A.D. White and two daughters are afflicted with the contagion; four children of G.I. Clark of Woodville are also afflicted, as likewise a man at Boone, whose name was not learned.
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Ed. Wescott moves his family the 29th from Silver Creek to the Schneider farm east of town.
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George Duffy, who is now in Grand Island, has accepted a position with a paper in Salida, Colorado, where he will go this week. Mrs. Duffy will visit relatives here a few weeks before going west. J.S. Hatfield, formerly of Columbus, also lives in Salida.
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At a meeting of the city school board Monday evening, Miss Alvina Luers was elected to teach the 3rd and 4th grade work in the Third ward school in place of Miss Pearl Mosgrove who has resigned. Miss Fannie Geer has been teaching for several days past as substitute teacher. Miss Mosgrove resigns and we understand will be married about the 26th to a gentleman in Valparaiso. Miss Luers is now engaged in teaching a school near Leigh. She is a graduate of the Columbus schools, and is a girl of unusual ability as a teacher.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, February 12, 1902
Albert Snyder of Loretta, Nebraska, was in the city last week. Mr. Snyder was formerly on the Tannahill farm for some time.
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From Washington reports of original pensions issued to Nebraska, we see that Abraham Tschudy, Columbus, who was a soldier in the War with Spain, has been granted a pension of $8.
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John T. Morris of Creston has just moved his family to Fremont, they having taken possession of the Kelly place northwest of town. Mr. Morris is one of the solid business men of his town and Fremont makes a distinct gain in security him as a resident.--Tribune.
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On Friday last there was a select gathering at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kelley, west of town. It was in honor of the seventieth birthday of Esquire Kelley, and was one of the jolliest gatherings we have attended in years. May he live to enjoy many happy returns of the day....Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Hendryx celebrated their golden wedding yesterday, they had their new house full of guests, parties from Grand Island, Schuyler, Columbus, Genoa, Ewing and Lincoln were present to do honor to the occasion. The presents were varied and valuable. The bride and groom were at their best and a notably good time was enjoyed by all.--Monroe Looking Glass.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, February 5, 1902
Albert Luth returned Sunday from Washington where he has been the past several years.
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The Leigh World says that the dwelling of John Ponlas, twelve miles southeast of Leigh, is quarantined, Mrs. Ponlas being afflicted with small-pox.
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Ed. Moncrief was in the city Friday, going up the branch road on business. He looks somewhat older than when he lived here, and says he recently sold two tracts of land to Platte county purchasers. Mr. Moncrief is engaged in the real estate business in Grand Island.
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Sam Curry arrived here Friday from Battle, Wyoming, and is visiting friends. He looks as though the mining country agreed with him.
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A young man named Harris, who had been working for Mr. Buschman, is quarantined for smallpox at the corner residence, opposite and west of the Presbyterian church, the quarantine being placed Saturday. The young man's father is with him. The case is a light one.
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Postmaster Kramer has been authorized by the postal department to take the names of applicants as letter-carriers for a free delivery. This is all that is known so far, but it is presumed that the rural delivery will soon follow, either on the road north going out toward H.H. Hunteman's or on a north and east route past Drinnin's. The government officials say the examination, so far as scholarship is concerned, will be extremely simple and practical, only sufficient to test the applicant's ability to read and write, and must reside directly on or within the territory to be supplied by the proposed route.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, January 29, 1902
Jess Becher expects to go, the first of February to Minneapolis, where he will take a position as secretary in the office of the Peavey Grain company.
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V.C. Connelly, held to district court, and, in default of bond returned to prison, is now at liberty temporarily, his uncle, Samuel Connelly, having entered into recognizance for his appearance.
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In a business letter from Fred. Henggler of the vicinity of Bellwood, he adds that he will be with friends and relatives in this city, February 2, on the eighty-third anniversary of his mother's birthday.
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A petition numerously signed here has been forwarded to Gov. Savage, asking the issuance of a proclamation by him, to raise funds for the benefit of the suffering Boer women and children.
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H.E. Babcock will accompany Fritz Jaeggi to New York next week, where they will interest capitalists in the promotion of the power canal. There seems no doubt now that some time in the near future Columbus will have a great power. The business men of this as well as other cities are deeply interested.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, January 22, 1902
J.H. Drinnin, notwithstanding that he is somewhat along in years, came to town Monday for the first time on his bicycle. This was his first extended ride, although he had been wabbling around for some time at home. "Never too old to learn."
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L. Hahn has entered into contract with Leopold Jaeggi for the E. 1/3 lot 7, block 58 on Thirteenth street, and will occupy the premises for a bakery. He is an expert in that line, among the first bakers of Columbus, and was employed by Marshall Smith.
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V.C. Connelly, who is charged with assault with a razor, upon Andrew Christianson at a livery barn night of December 31, at Lindsay, had his preliminary hearing before Justice Hudson Monday. Bond to district court was fixed at $1,000, in default of which, the accused was returned to jail.
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David Anderson, a former resident of this city, now of South Omaha, expects to start this Tuesday, accompanied by Mrs. Anderson, for a winter trip including New Orleans, Houston, old Mexico, Cuba and Florida. In a business letter to The Journal, he says: "We are quite aged for so long a journey, but we hope to enjoy ourselves."
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John Harsh, son of George Harsh of Osceola, had a hand and arm seriously mangled in a corn shredder at the farm of Sam Clifford, three miles southeast of Stromsburg Friday. The arm was amputated just below the elbow. He was feeding when the accident occurred. He held an accident policy in the Nebraska United Insurance company.
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Messrs. McAllister & Cornelius have received from the Province of Madras, India, a legal document, certifying the probate of the will of the late John Scudder, formerly resident of Creston township, Platte county, Nebraska. Mr. Scudder was a missionary to that far away land, dying at "Kodaikanal on or about May 23, 1900." Many of the older readers of The Journal will remember Mr. Scudder as a genial, earnest christian and an able minister.
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Mr. and Mrs. Frank O'Donnell, former residents of Humphrey but now of Hastings, this state, arrived in Humphrey Saturday to visit with Mrs. O'Donnell's sister, Mrs. Jos. Gilsdorf. They will visit here for a short time and then go to Newman Grove, there to visit with relatives and friends several weeks after which they will again return to Humphrey for a week or ten days and then return again to Hastings. [Humphrey.]
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, January 15, 1902
Charles Miner now has a good position in the B.& M. shops at Alliance, Nebr. Mrs. Miner went last week to their new home.
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Albion has another case of smallpox under quarantine up-stairs over Nevels' saloon. The patient is Mrs. Summer and while she has been pretty sick is getting along well. She returned from a trip to Iowa about two weeks ago, and undoubtedly contracted the disease on her trip home....Making final proof on homestead claims which used to be common are now exceedingly rare in Boone county. Dedrich Luth made his proof last Saturday, and there are not very many more to follow him.--Albion News.
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Henry Blasser of Butler township was in the city Saturday on business. He is one of the sturdy young farmers who are doing so much to improve the country in every respect, the men who make an honest living in a straight-forward way, improving all opportunities for forwarding not only their own individual interests, but the welfare of the community in which they live.
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Rev. E. Russ Leedom called on us a moment Monday. While he has lost his voice to such an extent that he has to give up public speaking, yet his common conversation is not seriously affected. The difficulty seems to be that one of the vocal chords is drawn and remains curved. The ailment is permanent so the doctors say. He will move soon on Mrs. King's place near Boone and try farming.--Albion Argus.
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Mrs. George W. Stevens, in a letter addressed to The Journal from Loma Alta Ranch, Minamar, San Diego county, California, sends greeting to her old Columbus friends, and wishes The Journal many a happy and prosperous New Year. If California has this winter a more congenial quality of sunshine and air, briefly called climate, than Nebraska has, it certainly must be something wonderful for sunshine and flowers.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, January 8, 1902
John Hinkelmann has returned from Fullerton and takes his old position with Mike Abts.
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George, son of Henry C. Bean of this vicinity, has recently engaged as foreman of Buffalo Bill's ranch at North Platte.
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John Born of the vicinity of Duncan moved over Friday his personal effects and rents of W.T. Ernst for the coming year.
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Mrs. J.C. Echols entertained her brother, Horace Hudson, and family of Silver Creek, also relatives of this city on New Year's day.
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Peter Letchgens, brother-in-law of Max Elias, is quarantined at the residence of Mr. Elias in the west part of the city. He returned from California several weeks ago, coming here on a visit during which the disease developed, a light case of smallpox.
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Fred. Schmid had a sale Saturday of his household goods, and has gone, accompanied by his family, to Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
Columbus Journal, Wednesday, January 1, 1902
Schuyler has one case of smallpox, Harlan Clayton, in the southwest part of the city.--Quill.
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D. Erskine who is making his home with his son, J.E. Erskine of this city, while visiting another son in Norfolk last week, had the misfortune to fall and break his wrist.
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I.W. Holmes and family remove here from Lincoln today to make this city their home. He is fireman on the passenger train making the run between Columbus and Lincoln.
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David Dowty, some years ago a resident of this city, now a traveling salesman for a wholesale drug establishment in St. Paul, Minn., was in the city two days last week. He looked in good health, and was heartily greeting by many of his old friends.
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Jack Keating left Sunday for Cheyenne, Who., where he has the position of head baggage man for the Union Pacific. Fred Gerber, who has been the assistant here, is taking his place temporarily. Mr. Keating has held his position here for fifteen years, and is known all along the line as one of the most efficient men in the service.Tthe traveling public will miss him for his genial, accomodating services. The place he ___ is a distinct promotion and we understand his salary will be about $100 a month.

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