NEGenWeb Project
PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
News From 100 Years Ago
(July, 1902 - )


The Columbus Journal, December 31, 1902
Mrs. Lucy Hulst of Omaha visited her son Garrett here, returning home Monday. She was accompanied by her two young grandsons, the children of _rve Latham. Mrs. Latham died a few weeks ago in Phoenix, Arizona, after a prolonged illness, and her two sons aged _ and 7 years will make their home with Mrs. H ulst.
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Citizens of Omaha have been investigating the condition of the Douglas County hospital and find a deplorable state of affairs. Frank Preiss, son-in-law of John Eusden of this city, for the past seven years has been a paralytic and a patient at the institution. The Omaha News speaks about a published statement of Mrs. Preiss to the effect that her husband has not had proper treatment.
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Miss Julia Vineyard of Hastings is visiting her sister, Mrs. Snow.
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Walter Schroeder dropped in from Laramie to eat Christmas turkey at home.
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Mrs. McCann of Fremont came up last week to visit her mother, Mrs. Kumpf.
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Miss Emma Kuntzelman of Omaha is here visiting relatives through the holidays.
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Mrs. Osborn went to Council Bluffs Wednesday to visit her daughter, Mrs. Steinbaugh.
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Lester and James Boodry of Cairo visited their uncle, Dr. Paul, returning home Sunday.
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Mrs. Jacob Schram and daughter Miss Jessie spent Christmas with the Jens family in Humphrey.
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Mr. and Mrs. W.H. VanAlstine went to Omaha Wednesday where they spent Christmas with their son, Charles.
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Miss Petite Martyn is home from Chicago where she has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Terry, several months.
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Miss Maud Longton of Beatrice visited Miss Lillie Keating, Christmas. Miss Longton is a cousin of Mrs. John Keating.
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Louis Lightner, who is attending the law department of the State university, is spending his vacation with his uncle, Hans Elliott.
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Mr. and Mrs. Hans Hansen of Harlan, Iowa, came last week to visit relatives of Mrs. Hansen. The latter was formerly Miss Jessie Swartsley.
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Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Benham spent Christmas with Mrs. Benham's parents in Kansas. Mrs. Benham has been there for several weeks where her husband joined her last Tuesday.
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Arnold Oehlrich is spending the holidays at home with his family from his ranch near Clarks.
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Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Davis returned home from Lincoln last week. Mr. and Mrs. Ben Davis, Mr. Walter Collinsworth and Mrs. Jurgensen came with them and enjoyed a family reunion at the Davis home. Mr. Collinsworth and Ben Davis will return home Friday.
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Spencer Rice returned Monday from a Christmas visit to home folks in Ogalalla. He was accompanied on his return by his brother-in-law, James Liviston, of Wyoming, who comes here for medical treatment.
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Mr. and Mrs. George Mentzer and family leave this week for Blue Springs where they have purchased a farm and where they expect to make their home. Good wishes of their many friends here go with them.
The Columbus Journal, December 24, 1902
By the change in the U.P. time table on the Albion and Cedar Rapids branch, postal clerks George Baird and Joseph Benesch will be compelled to move their families to Columbus. Mr. Baird will probably not make the change until spring.
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Judge J.M. Curtis visited part of last week with his sister, Mrs. Lee Beaty, in the Monroe neighborhood.
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Charles, son of Aaron Cue, has been seriously sick with typhoid pneumonia the past two weeks, but is now somewhat better.
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Will Farrand is taking part of his father's route this week selling groceries. The Farrand family will spend Christmas this year with relatives in Kearney.
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A letter to friends from Miss Louise Trader, a graduate of the Columbus High school, and a niece of Mrs. J.D. Brewer, tells of the successful "proving up" of her homestead farm claim in Oklahoma. Her land is in a basin supposed to be the crater of an extinct volcano and recently excavations have been made for ore. A mining village has been incorporated on Miss Trader's land which has been named Craterville. Her sister, Palma, has also a valuable claim.
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The public sale of Henry Huntemann on the 9th was largely attended and everything sold well. Horses brought $165 a head. Cows an average of $30 and one year old hogs sold for an average of $10. The farm machinery and household furniture did not bring quite so high prices but all together the sale was very successful.
The Columbus Journal, December 17, 1902
C.H. Sheldon is visiting relatives in Evanston and other places in Illinois. He expects to be gone about ten days.
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Ed. Gluck is expected home Friday from Culver, Indiana, where he is attending military school.
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Mrs. Lizzie Fitchner of Chicago, cousin of Mrs. N.D. Wilson, who has been visiting here and in Madison, was called home Sunday by the serious illness of a son.
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David Schupbach has severed his connection with the Geo. A. Hoagland lumber yard and G.W. Viergutz is now manager. Mr. Viergutz has a wide acquaintance in and around Columbus and he will no doubt conduct the business satisfactorily.
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J.J. Murphy of Rogers, son-in-law of E.D. Fitzpatrick, has moved his family to Columbus where they will reside in the future. Mr. Murphy has accepted a position as traveling salesman for a Council Bluffs machinery house, starting in his new work Monday.
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We see by the St. Edward Sun that D.N. Jennings has rented his farm and yesterday had a sale of his machinery, stock, household goods, etc. After a visit in Lincoln and Denver Mr. and Mrs. Jennings will go to Washington and if they like the country may locate there. These good people are well known to many readers of The Journal who will regr to see them leave Nebraska.
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Thomas McTaggert, one of the night policemen of this city was found lying unconscious, a little before 8 o'clock Saturday evening, between the tracks at the Union Pacific railroad crossing on L street. He was first discovered by Joe Baumgartner and a brakeman on the Union Pacific passenger train who reported immediately at the depot. It is thought he had been lying in that condition for perhaps fifteen minutes before found. His head was cut badly in several places, his eyes and neck swollen and he was bleeding freely. It was several hours after he was taken home before he gained consciousness, and he is still quite sick from the effects of the bruises and cuts. It is not known who made the assault but the guilty man will probably be apprehended as soon as Mr. McTaggert is able to talk to those about him.
The Columbus Journal, December 10, 1902
Miss Muzetta Wheeler, formerly of Columbus, who has for several years been teaching in Creston, is now in Potomac, Montana.
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The Clarks Enterprise says that Miss Mildred Davis of Silver Creek has accepted a position as compositor in that office. Miss Mildred is daughter of D.F. Davis formerly of Columbus.
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Paul Roth has purchased the residence building of L. Schreiber which was a few months ago moved into the street from his lot south of the Second ward school to give room for the new building erected there. Mr. Roth has moved the house to his lots one block south of the court house where it is being repaired ready for occupancy.
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Mr. and Mrs. H.S. Bradley, who have been visiting Mrs. Bradley's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Elston, left for the west Monday, intending to visit in California and other western states. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley have been visiting since last spring in England, Ireland and Canada, and are on their way to the west where they will reside. Mr. Bradley was connected with the government telegraphic signal corps and at his work spent about four years in Porto Rico and Cuba.
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Rudolph Plugge, who lives in Shell creek precinct, Colfax county, leaves in a few weeks for Cordova, Maryland, where he has bought a 100 acre farm which he takes possession of January 1. The family of H. Huntemann will also go with Mr. Plugge and his family, and the two families will reside near each other and within two miles of Cordova. Land in that community ranges in price from $10 to $300, according to the state of cultivation of the land and improvements. Mr. Plugge says they intend farming the land with modern methods, many of which have never been introduced in that section. On the Huntemann farm there is a fine 25 acre peach orchard. Platte and Colfax counties will lose two of their good families but their friends wish them prosperity and happiness in their new home.
The Columbus Journal, December 3, 1902
Louis Gietzen of St. Louis has taken a position with the Gray Mercantile Co. Mr. Gietzen's parents live in Humphrey.
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Ella Otterpohl of Madison came Sunday to make her home with her aunt, Mrs. Ewing. She expects to attend school here.
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Frank Schram and wife have moved to Columbus from Tarnov where they have been for several months in charge of I. Gluck's store. Frank has not decided what work he will engage in.
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Peter Duffy, John Early, George Wilson and Miss Mattie Post, all State university students, came up last Wednesday to visit at home. George Wilson is visiting his sister, Mrs. Carl Johnson.
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Judge J.M. Curtis has returned from his western trip and is now visiting his sister, Mrs. Lee Beaty, near Monroe.
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Mrs. Chas. Shields of Shelby, visited friends in Columbus Tuesday. She is on her way to Ft. Collins, Colo., to join her husband who has lately bought land and expects to locate there. Mrs. Shields is a daughter of R.W. Finecy.
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The home of N.D. Wilson was the scene of a family reunion on Thanksgiving day. The following named relatives met with their kin here: Mrs. P. Smith, David City; Mrs. John Kruchen, near Beatrice; Mrs. Benninghart, Julesburg, Colorado; George and Mike Horst, Osceola; G.E. Smith, Rockdale, Wyoming; Irwin and Hillyard Wilson, St. Edward, and Myron Wilson, Platte Center.
The Columbus Journal, November 26, 1902
Basil Gietzen returned Wednesday from Lincoln where he has been working at book keeping.
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Miss Hattie Baker was unable to attend to her duties in Hulst & Adams' store last week, on account of sickness.
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Sherman Gilmore and wife came down from Columbus to see Mr. Gilmore's father who is seriously ill.--David City Press.
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Frank Falbaum visited his brother Gus and old friends here last Friday. Frank now resides in Kearney where he moved about a month ago, and travels for the Kearney Flouring Mill.
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Mrs. Florence Humbert, who came here a few months ago and established hair dressing parlors next door to the public library, left Friday for Cheyenne where she will go into business.
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Among the candidates already announced for offices in the state, are E.M. White of Creston for deputy oil inspector and Miss Lyda McMahon of this city for matron in one of the state institutions.
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Mrs. Ed. Morrow went east last week to be with her mother in Iowa, who is seriously ill.
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John Seipp writes to his brother Henry from a logging camp near Tacoma, Washington, that he has been in a hospital for treatment on account of a wound on his shin caused by an ax blade. He is now at work again, the wound giving little trouble. The accident will stop his intended visit home this Christmas.
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W.H. and F.B. Eimers of Humphrey, who have made Platte county their home since childhood, were in Columbus Wednesday last with their families on their way to Los Angeles, California, where they expect to make their home in the future, and where they will engage in business. They will retain their business interests in Humphrey. C.W. Jens will have charge of the store in Humphrey. They were accompanied out by Misses Katie Moackler and Mary Lachnit.
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Adolf Luers and his mother returned last Friday evening from Oklahoma where he has been proving up on his homestead of 160 acres, within four miles of Lawton, a city of 10,000 inhabitants. Mr. Luers left here last December. For the past nine weeks he has been sick with typhoid fever, and his mother was called to attend him. He now looks very thin but as soon as he is acclimated he will be out to greet former acquaintances. Having rented his farm he intends making Columbus his home.
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Mr. and Mrs. B.R. Cowdery and daughter Miss Alice of Leigh are in the city the guests of friends. Miss Alice left this Tuesday for the Philippine Islands where she will be married about Christmas to Mr. Stewart who is in the government employ there. She will be accompanied there by Captain and Mrs. Culver of Milford and a young lady who goes to become the bride of Captain Culver's son, who is also in the Philippines. Monday afternoon Mrs. C.D. Evans entertained the whist club for Miss Cowdery, and in the evening Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Gray and Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Gray received guests at the home of the former. Mrs. E.H. Chambers also gave a breakfast this Tuesday morning in honor of the ladies.
The Columbus Journal, November 19, 1902
James Fagan of Omaha, nephew of V.A. Macken, is visiting relatives here.
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Dr. N. Newman of Chicago, a cousin of D.N. Newman, visited here Sunday on his way to Dakota.
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Clyde Scott and Otto Staab returned last week from their western trip driving a band of six hundred horses from Cheyenne into the Black Hills country. They left here last summer.
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The separator station at Boheet has been suspended, at least for the present. The cream will be gathered hereafter from the neighborhood and shipped to the Nebraska & Iowa creamery company at Omaha. Isaac Brock, who has been the manager of the plant for some time, comes to Columbus, having purchased with his brother-in-law, Fred. Ernst, the Reynolds livery barn.
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Mrs. C.B. Tomlin and daughters left Sunday for Petersburg, Va., where they expect to make their home, and where Miss Louise has been for more than a year past. Friends of the family wish them well in their new home.
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Roy Lucas, formerly of Columbus, whose family now live in Fremont, we understand, is a member of the orchestra with the "Elmdale Farm" company which appears here this (Wednesday) evening.
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Mrs. Taylor of Genoa, Mrs. Hogsett of Ohio and Mrs. Whipple of Denver were guests of Barclay Jones and his wife last week. Mrs. Taylor is Mrs. Jones' mother and the other two ladies are his sister.
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Patrick Meehan has resigned his position as mail carrier on rural route No. 2, and will engage in other work. Paul Duffy takes his place, but will also continue to have charge of the feed store.
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The postoffice at Oconee was moved onto the John Dawson farm last week, causing residents of the village to walk about a mile for their mail. There are other places besides Columbus.
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N.J. Alexander and wife of St. Lawrence county, New York, are expected here Thursday for a few days' visit with H.J. Alexander and family.
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W.B. Kenney, formerly in the U.P. employ in Columbus, now an operator in Canon City, Colo., has been visiting the Shannon family for several days.
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Miss Clara Robinson of Genoa took the teachers' examination before Sup't Leavy Saturday, and visited her grandmother, Mrs. Baker.
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H.H. Huntemann, one of Platte county's oldest settlers, has advertised his stock, farm implements and household furniture to be sold at public auction on Tuesday, December 9, at his farm at Neboville. Mr. Huntemann sold his farm several months ago and in January will move his family to Cardoval, Delaware, where they will make their future home. The many friends of Mr. Huntemann and his family will be sorry to see them leave our community, but will wish them health and prosperity in their new home.
The Columbus Journal, November 12, 1902
Mrs. Elizabeth Erb has been very sick the past few weeks with pneumonia and liver trouble, but is now much better.
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Mrs. Celia Ewing was brought home from Kearney a few days ago on account of sickness. Her brother, August Wagner, went to accompany her back.
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L.L. Searles, a few years ago a resident of Columbus, now of Salt Lake City, was here last week. Mrs. Searles and children are visiting relatives in Lincoln.
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Mrs. Hulst and son George of Omaha, are guests of Garrett Hulst. Geo. Hulst is now superintendent of the refining department of the Omaha smelting works.
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John W. Sissle, living three miles west of town, was a business caller at this office last Wednesday. Although Mr. Sissle is 72 years old, he is a very active man.
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Robert Welch and George Schram began Monday putting up the street number signs. They will be placed on telegraph or telephone poles, corners of buildings or posts set for the purpose.
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E.T. Everett, manager of the Independent telephone line, expects to have several phones ready for use by the 20th of this month, and about all the city and country lines completed by the last of December. Work on putting in the poles north of town to Shell creek and from there to Platte Center and return will begin at once.
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Al. Rickly of Oklahoma was here over Sunday visiting relatives and friends. He was looking in excellent health. Al. is in the implement business at his home and is well pleased with the country.
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"Jim" Turner, a former partner of J.C. Echols of this city, at the recent election was chosen clerk of Benton county, Indiana. His old-time acquaintances here will be pleased to hear of his success.
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Sunday being John J. Eisenmann's 76th birthday his friends to the number of twenty or more took possession of his home while he was at church, and he had an agreeable surprise indeed upon his return. He was so filled with emotion that he could hardly speak, but quickly dropped into the same vein as the others and a very pleasant day was spent. Among the crowd was three sons and two daughters.
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Otto Merz returned Monday of last week from his visit of several months to his mother in Germany. This was his first trip home in thirteen years and his aged mother who is now 72 years old was delighted to have him with her. Mr. Merz thinks Germany is a good country to live in for pleasure, but America is better for those who are looking for work. The cost of living is cheaper there but everything is sold on a closer margin of profit. The popular prices for entertainments is from 7 1/2 to 50 cents, the latter is the highest admission charged in the cities.
The Columbus Journal, November 5, 1902
The county board of supervisors met Tuesday and Wednesday of last week. Among other business transacted was the granting of a saloon license to Borowiak & Koglowski for the village of Duncan. The inhabitants of Cornlea petitioned the board for the incorporation of that place as a village, which was acted favorably upon and the following persons were named trustees: Jacob Olk, William Berg, H.C. Bender, John Terdus and L.S. Marty. ...
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John Fulton, a farmer near Lindsay had the marshal of that town, John Bolt, arrested for breaking his, Fulton's, nose in an attempt to arrest him while drunk several days ago. The case was tried before Justice Wagner last Thursday and the case dismissed with a decision of no cause for action. About sixteen witnesses were examined at the trial and about twenty people interested in the case were present from Lindsay. The marshal had previously preferred charges against Fulton for resisting an officer and the case had been carried to the district court.
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During a dance at David Kluck's farm residence near Richland one night last week, a man named Young, about 25 years old, was seriously stabbed during an altercation with a man from Schuyler. His assailant has not yet been apprehended, but the Colfax county officers claim to know who he is and are after him.
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James Austin, a former business man of this city, now of Lincoln, was in the city Wednesday last visiting relatives.
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Skene McKellar of Cedar Rapids was in town Saturday on his way home from Omaha where he accompanied his mother and sisters on their way to San Antonio, Texas, where they will make their home. Mr. McKellar will be in Cedar Rapids for several months yet.
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Master Archie, son of Robert Saley, who broke his arm last summer while visiting in Fullerton, will have to undergo some special treatment for the injured member. The bone has not knit properly and his arm was left in a stiffened condition.
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Mr. David Redpath of Marengo, Ill., is here looking after his land interest in Polk and Butler counties. He will be remembered by many Journal readers as having formerly lived here.
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Mrs. Celia Ewing left Sunday for Kearney, where Mr. Ewing has a position on the Hub.
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Ed. Early was in Lincoln over Sunday visiting his brother John and attending the football game.
The Columbus Journal, October 29, 1902
Chris Wuethrich is able to be around the house again. It will be remembered that he suffered a severe stroke of paralysis about five weeks ago.
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L.A. Ewing has secured a good position on the Kearney Hub. His wife and baby go this week, where they will make their home.
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Miss Rebecca Becker, sister of Wm. Becker and Mrs. Bauer, arrived here last week from Columbus, Ohio. Miss Becker and Mrs. Bauer will move into the Rusche residence just west of the Episcopal church, where they will make their home.
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S.S. McAllister of Humphrey has commenced action for divorce. His wife was formerly Emma M. Millett.
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The body of Patrick Whalen who died at the hospital last Thursday and of which we have mention elsewhere, is still in the undertaking rooms of Henry Gass. Relatives of the deceased live in Ashland, Ill.
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Mrs. Katherine Wermuth and daughter Miss Kate, of Downer's Grove, Ill., who have been visiting friends in the city several weeks, started for their home Thursday. Mrs. Wermuth is a sister of W.B. Dale.
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Mrs. Fitzner of Chicago was the guest of Mrs. John Schmocker Friday on her way to Madison where she visits her mother, Grandma Horst.
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The Misses Aden of Rising City returned to their home Thursday after a visit to their aunt, Mrs. J.L. Sturgeon and family.
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Mrs. Paynter of Omaha is visiting her daughter, Mrs. O.L. Baker.
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Mrs. C.E. Jones, a former Columbus resident, now of Omaha, is visiting Mrs. Henry Lubker.
The Columbus Journal, October 22, 1902
John Grossnicklaus, a former Platte county farmer but for the past few years living in Madison county, has moved to this neighborhood again. There is not much better farming land anywhere than Platte county can produce.
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Robert Welch began Saturday to take orders for number signs for houses in this city. After the houses are numbered, which will be in about six weeks, we will be in a position for a free delivery of the mail.
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Frank Baird, one of the pioneer settlers of this county, left Monday evening for his new home in Washington where his many friends here will hope that the change may prove beneficial to his health and that success attend his undertakings.
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Mrs. O'Hearn of Omaha came up to attend the funeral Saturday of her aunt, Miss Kate Sullivan.
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O.C. Shannon attended the funeral of his father in Marshalltown, Iowa, last Saturday returning home Sunday.
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Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Reed of Riverside, California, old-time residents here, are expected today (Tuesday) on their return home from a visit to Ohio. They will remain but a few days, visiting the family of H.B. Reed.
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Mr. and Mrs. Mark Burke were in Goehner last week to attend the funeral of Mr. Burke's mother who died last Tuesday, from dropsy. Funeral services were held at Beaver Crossing, Rev. Hayes conducting services and the remains were buried in Mount Calvary cemetery.
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J.E. Shaffer, known to his friends around Platte Center as "Kirk," who was adjuded insane about a week ago by the insanity board, was taken to the Lincoln asylum this Tuesday morning, by Sheriff Byrnes.
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J.W. Maher came up from El Reno, Oklahoma, Wednesday evening to visit with his family for a few days. He reports everything in fine shape down in Oklahoma....Charles Moelle and wife were down to Columbus Wednesday to attend the marriage of Miss Finnetta Van Horn and Herman Harzke of Schuyler. The bride is a sister of Mrs. Moelle. Judge Ratterman performed the ceremony.--Humphrey Democrat.
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Mrs. A.J. Smith and son Jay, went to Denver Monday, where they will attend the wedding of Miss Celia Madden and Mr. E.H. Smith on Wednesday. Miss Madden is a sister of Mrs. Smith and the groom is a brother of Mr. Smith. Mr. Smith is a conductor on the Colorado Southern railroad and the couple will reside in Pueblo. Miss Madden has many friends here who know of her excellent qualities and who will wish her a very happy future.
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A number of good farms changed hands last week, all among old settlers and influential farmers. The farms sold at prices ranging from $55 to $60 an acre. Wm. Lusche bought of Wm. Schroeder 200 acres about eight miles northeast of town. Mr. Lusche also purchased 240 acres from John Ahrens. Wm. Schroeder bought a half section from Fred. Stenger about seven miles northeast of the city. John Grossnicklaus, who several months ago sold his farm and moved to Madison county, has returned and purchased last Thursday the 360 acres of Albert Stenger, known as the D. Carrig farm, ten miles northwest of town.
The Columbus Journal, October 15, 1902
W.C. Heiden of Omaha was here Thursday and Friday on business. Back in 1882 he was a clerk in Friedhof's store.
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Mr. and Mrs. W.F. Jessup will move the latter part of this month to Pacific Junction, Iowa. Mr. Jessup has been transferred to the position of express messenger from that city to Colorado.
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Mr. Wills, about 75 years old, living near Oconee, had a limb badly fractured in a runaway accident last Thursday. A swarm of bees lit on the heads of a team of horses he was holding by the bridle, when they became frantic, throwing Mr. Wills to the ground, the loaded hay wagon passing over his limb. He is now in St. Mary's hospital receiving treatment.
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Mr. and Mrs. Swan Nilson and niece Miss Emma Ericson of Linne, California, and Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Westrope and their niece Miss Emma Archer of Modesto, California, were in the city Friday on their way up the branch road. The Nilson's will visit relatives and friends near Monroe, their former home, for about two months. Mr. Westrope takes his wife and niece to North Star, Nance county, where he has purchased a farm and where he expects to engage in raising fine cattle. Mr. Westrope has returned within a few months from the Sandwich Islands where he lived for over three years, part of the time overseer of a sugar cane plantation of 8,000 acres. After traveling many different sections Mr. Westrope thinks he has found the country of his choice in Nance county. Mr. Nilson lives on a farm in California, one son helping him, his other two sons engaged in other pursuits.
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Mrs. W.H. Winterbotham and daughter, Miss Maud, of David City are visiting relatives here.
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Mrs. C.L. Mitchell of Clarks came down Wednesday to visit her daughter, Mrs. Garrett Hulst.
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Theodore Schupbach of Omaha came up the first of the week and visited with his brother David Schupbach.
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P.F. Beebe of Michigan arrived here Wednesday on a visit to his sisters, Mrs. A. Haight and Mrs. Sparhawk.
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Mrs. E.D. Sutton of Elm Creek, Neb., returned to her home after a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Beecroft.
The Columbus Journal, October 8, 1902
Peter Schmidt, the jolly Shell creek miller is feeling a little more jovial just now than usual on account of the completion of his mill dam and a new bridge all at a cost of $3,000. The dam, he is quite sure, will cause him no further trouble. A large number of piles were driven, earth, brush, etc., filled in making it a very solid piece of work. In case of very high water a flood gate has been arranged so that the extra flow can easily be carried away, without endangering the side banks. While in Omaha last week Mr. Schmidt had an eye open to business as well as pleasure and disposed of twenty tons of flour and brought back with him forty-nine head of cattle.
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Columbus was well represented in Omaha last week at the Ak-Sar-Ben festivities. Among whose present were: E.D. Fitzpatrick and son Jerome, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Stillman, Bert Stillman, Wm. Bucher and family, Mrs. Lucy Terry, Mrs. Fred Stevens and daughter Hazel, Mr. and Mrs. H. Murdock, Mrs. Frank VanAlstine, F. Asche, Bird Ellis, Homer Robinson, Frank T. Walker, A.L. Koon, G.W. Phillips, Edgar Howard, Sheriff Byrnes, L.J. Lee, Miss Minnie Meagher, Misses Metta and Ruby Hensley, Miss Angie Early, Mrs. A. Oehlrich, Miss Lillie Ragatz, Rev. and Mrs. Luce, Judge and Mrs. Sullivan, Mrs. L.W. Snow, Mrs. E.H. Chambers, Mrs. C.D. Evans, Mrs. A. Heintz, Mrs. Paul Hagel, Fred Stenger and family, Mr. and Mrs. Farrand and two children, Mrs. C.A. Pollock, Mrs. George Phillips.
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Joseph Sokol, living south of the Loup, while driving home from Duncan Saturday was thrown from his wagon and broke his left leg.
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Mr. and Mrs. Bey Martyn arrived in the city last week from Denver where they have been for several weeks. Mr. Martyn has bought a sheep ranch in Colorado and expects to take possession soon.
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Lawrence McTaggart, son of Mr. and Mrs. B. McTaggart of this city, who has been working in Omaha for about a year, left Friday for Norfolk, Va., where he will join the U.S. navy. Mrs. McTaggart went to Omaha a few days ago to persuade her son not to go, but Lawrence had started on his trip before she reached him.
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John M. Honahan, a former Columbus business man who left here a little over a year ago and located in Boise City, Idaho, has returned to Nebraska and was here last Friday. He went up the branch Saturday morning and iwll look around some before deciding on a new business location.
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Mr. and Mrs. A.H. Aden of Garrison, Mr. and Mrs. H.L. Aden of Raymond, Mr. L.H. Aden, Mrs. John Aden and Mr. Eyestone and son all of Rising City, Mrs. Dey and children of Gresham and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mathews of Schuyler, were all in the city Sunday to attend the funeral of J.L. Sturgeon.
The Columbus Journal, October 1, 1902
W.R. Jones, an old settler of Platte county but now of Wayne, was in the city several days last week. He reports the corn crop of his section as considerably damaged by frost.
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Word was received here Monday that Adolph Luers was lying seriously sick with typhoid fever in a hospital in Oklahoma. Mrs. Henry Luers has gone to be with her son.
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Olie Britell came down Monday from St. Edward where he hs been spending the summer, and left in the evening for Chicago. He has six months yet in the Rush Medical school before finishing his course. He then expects to locate somewhere in the west.
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The bowling alley on Twelfth street owned by George Heller was opened to the public Saturday and was well patronized by local bowlers who pronouce the tracks all right. Ed. Hegemann will have the management of the hall.
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A week ago last Thursday, Lester Jenkinson, a pupil of Mrs. U.S. Mace in the Second ward school, was punished for disobedience by Prof. Lake at the request of Lester's teacher. The following Monday, comlaint was filed with the county judge by the boy's father, R. Jenkinson, for assault, against Prof. Lake, and the case was brought up for hearing Saturday afternoon, continuing until 12 o'clock Saturday night and Monday morning, when at noon the complaint was withdrawn before the case was left to the decision of the jury. It is deplorable that such an affair should be brought into court. Lester had received his punishment after school on Thursday and the same evening did his regular work of driving the town herd of cows. He has not been absent from school any day and although the complaint stated that the punishment had been very severe, no scars or bruises were visible on his body a few days after. As a result of the strain for several days and of being on the witness stand for over two hours Mrs. Mace is ill and will be unable to teach again. Her father and sister were telegraphed for arriving Monday, and will take her home with them as soon as she is able to travel.
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Friday's Omaha Bee contained the following in regard to a former Columbus boy, now of Fremont, whose friends here will hope for his speedy recovery: "Otto Pohl, a Sixth street druggist, met with a serious accident this noon, burning his face badly. He was unpacking and marking some metallic sodium, when from some cause or other it exploded. His face and neck were burned, his collar being completely burned off. His eye lids were injured considerably, but it is not thought that his eye sight is in any way impaired. It is not known what caused the explosion, but it is supposed that the sodium in some way came in contact with some water. He will probably be confined to a dark room for some time."
The Columbus Journal, September 24, 1902
Mrs. Amanda Russell has been appointed postmistress at Schuyler. Mrs. Russell is widow of the late H.C. Russell who was postmaster at the time of his death, a few months ago.
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Matt Volz, a former resident of Platte county, now of Merrick county, was in the city Saturday and Sunday.
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William Bodenson, who has been clerk at the Thurston hotel for several years, is now employed in the Gray shoe store.
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Joseph Shields and wife of Harvard, Illinois, and Mrs. T. Keating, of Columbus, Nebraska, left for their homes Tuesday. The ladies are sisters of Wm. Sullivan and had been here visiting their brother.--Albion Argus.
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J.M. Gondring during his recent western trip went as far south as Los Angeles, California, and north to Seattle, Washington. In Boise City, he found N.S. Hyatt doing well on a farm. John Bolt is in a livery barn and John Honahan has a shoe shop.
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R.W. Finecy and son Henry, formerly of Dixon, Ill., were in the city a couple of days last week visiting relatives. Mr. Finecy was on his way to Ft. Collins, Colo., where he expects to engage in the real estate business. The remainder of his family will follow in a few weeks.
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Mr. and Mrs. Bacilius German aged respectively 77 and 75 years, with their niece, Miss Hines, of Princeville, Illinois, arrived in Columbus last Wednesday, en route for Humphrey where they will visit for three weeks with their sons Frank and Stephen German and other relatives. While in the city they called on their former Illinois neighbor, B.P. Duffy.
The Columbus Journal, September 17, 1902
Charles L. Stillman left Monday for Glenwood Springs, Colo., where he goes to return home with his mother and sister, Miss Lela. Mrs. Stillman has been seriously afflicted with sciatic rheumatism. The five years since Mrs. Stillman and her daughter left Columbus have been passed in California until the last few months.
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Mrs. Fuller, grandmother of Dr. Paul, visited her relatives here about two weeks, returning to her home in Cairo, Nebraska, Saturday.
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Mr. and Mrs. Kinnear of Seattle, Wash., are here visiting Mrs. C.A. Woosley and family. Mrs. Kinnear is a sister of the late Mr. Woosley.
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Ed. Coolidge left Thursday for Rapid City, South Dakota, where he will enter a mining school, expecting to take a four years' course.
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Swartz Brackney, who for several months has been employed in L.G. Zinnecker's barber shop, moved his family last Wednesday to Newman Grove, where he has purchased a shop.
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Owen McGann was brought to the hospital Friday from his farm home northeast of town. He is suffering severely with lung trouble.
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Emil Kumpf received a painful wound on his face caused by a horse striking him with his front feet, last Wednesday. Will Mitchell took his place in Ragatz' store 'till his return Monday.
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Miss Alice Cowdery of Leigh was the guest of friends in the city last week. Miss Cowdery will leave the first of October for the Philippines. On her arrival there she will be married to Mr. Stewart who has a government position in Uncle Sam's new possessions.
The Columbus Journal, September 10, 1902
Peter Duffy has decided to take a literary course in the State university and expects to go to Lincoln this week to enter the school. Paul Duffy will conduct the business in the feed store which has been so successfully started by his brother Peter.
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Miss Gertrude Stull of Marengo, Ill., who had been visiting her cousins, C.C. and A.A. Stull on the valley left for her home last Friday morning. She is the daughter of Ghordis Stull who was one of the early settlers of this county.--Osceola Record.
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Mrs. K.A. Kehoe of Platte Center was in the city Saturday to meet her cousin, Mr. Frank Coffey, who comes from Australia to attend an American college. He has not yet selected his school, and will visit other relatives in Canada before taking up his studies.
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Charles Wake, jr., on old-time Columbus boy, who for several years has been head clerk in a store at Newman Grove has resigned his position there and accepted a better one at St. Edward to which place he will soon remove his family. Mr. Wake will have a position in Nels Hasselbach's large store.
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Mrs. Clark Cooncy and family of Council Creek are making preparations to move out to Washington where they bought a farm about a year ago. They expect to depart next week, says the Genoa Leader. They formerly resided in Platte county and their many friends here will wish them well in their new location.
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Friends and relatives from out of town who attended the Hansen-Swartsley wedding last Wednesday were: Mrs. Fred. Scofield and children, and Mr. Ralph Swartsley of Stuart; Mr. and Mrs. Myers Hansen and Miss Anna Hansen, Council Bluffs; Miss Tillie Hansen, Harlan, Iowa, and Clark Kingston, Central City.
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J.R. Hilliard, of near Oconee, has recently sold his farm and will look for a location further south.
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Mr. Alexander of Columbus has accepted a position as clerk in the hardwaare store of L.F. Holloway & Co., and will move his family to this place the latter part of the week.--Fremont Herald.
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Lee Beaty has sold his 40 acre farm near Wattsville for $50 per acre to Thomas Hoare. Mr. Beaty has bought 80 acres within two miles of Cedar Rapids and expects to move to his new home next March.
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D.D. Johnson, a well-to-do farmer living one and a half miles from Leigh, in Platte county, became demented Sunday and was brought to Columbus for safe keeping.
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Mrs. Jennie Walker and Gene Condon left Monday for Nebraska City, where Mrs. Walker is teacher in the state institution for the blind. Gene is a pupil in the same school.
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K.O. Kohler of Ellensburg, Washington, is expected here about the 16th on his way home from Chicago where he has taken cattle for the market. Mr. Kohler is a son-in-law of Mrs. John Stauffer.
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Joseph Gross of Chicago and son, Edwin Gross of Milwaukee, were in the city Monday a few hours on their way home from a visit in Madison, where the elder Mr. Gross has a brother. Mr. Jos. Gross is a successful inventor of a gas flat iron, and Edwin is an attorney of Milwaukee. It has been seventeen years since Mr. Gross was a grocery merchant in Columbus.
The Columbus Journal, September 3, 1902
Prof. I.H. Britell sold his residence property on east Tenth street to Mrs. Miles Ryan last Wednesday and he has moved his family to the Robert O'Brien residence on Nebraska Avenue, which had been recently vacated by W.W. McFayden.
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H.L. Locklin, a former printer of Columbus, is now editor of the Bristol, Nebr., Argus.
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A letter from W.H. Selsor, a former Platte county farmer, later of Geneva, tells us he has sold his farm at Geneva and that he and Mrs. Selsor are now on their way to Oregon and California.
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J.C. Swartsley returned Friday from his eastern trip, to be present at the marriage of his daughter, Miss Jessie Swartsley, which takes place at the Presbyterian church today, Wednesday.
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F.B. Lenhart, coming from Illinois, has secured a license from the city to conduct a candy, pop-corn and nut stand on the vacant lot between Geo. Hagel's and Mrs. Jay's business places on Thirteenth street.
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P.B. Darrington returned Saturday from Chanute, Kansas, where he had been to attend the funeral of his brother Frank, who died from injuries received in a railroad accident, his age being 33 years. His brother carried $2,000 insurance with the Workmen and $1,200 with the Trainmen.
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Ludwig Eslinger was run over and badly bruised about the head and body by a horse which became frightened at a threshing machine, last Friday morning. Mr. Eslinger was crossing the street in front of Schreiber's blacksmith shop and having defective hearing did not hear the animal approaching until he was struck. He was laid up for a few days, but will resume work again this week.
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Lon Miller, while in the city last week, informed us that he is interested with his brother Charles in mining, their property being located within a few miles of Prescott, Arizona, with good prospects ahead. They have penetrated the earth a distance of 200 feet, and last year they put in place a stamp mill, engine, etc., etc., at a cost of several thousand dollars and Lon is quite confident they will in time strike it rich. Mr. Miller is also president of the school board of South Omaha and remained in town only a day, having to return to be present at the opening of the schools. George Westcott, brother-in-law of Mr. Miller, was also in town Thursday and Friday. Both Mr. Miller and Mr. Westcott are prominent business men of South Omaha.
The Columbus Journal, August 27, 1902
J.H. Crann started Thursday for Manawa, Wisconsin, where he went to visit the country with a view of buying a farm.
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F.T. Klebba of Humphrey purchased the Cruickshank stock of general merchandise from Elliott & Speice and last week moved the goods to that place.
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Miss Lizzie Farley went to Lindsay where she attended the wedding of Miss Elizabeth Deegan to Mr. William Lewejohnn on Monday, which took place in the Catholic church in that village.
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Mr. and Mrs. Emil Hyer, who have made their home here for a number of years, will leave next week for Milwaukee, Wis., where they expect to reside.
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Lloyd Neator, the eight year old son of Frank Neator, was playing with powder and matches last Wednesday and as a result he received severe burns about the head.
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G.W. Mentzer recently took a trip into the southern part of the state, and bought an 80 acre farm in Gage county, about two miles from Blue Springs. Mr. Mentzer expects to move his family to their new home about next February.
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Lamont Inlay was in the city a few hours Monday greeting his old acquaintances. Mont was returning from a trip to the Coeur d'Alene mining country in northern Idaho. He said the family now lived in Glenwood, Iowa, and that all were enjoying good health when last he heard from home.
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Mrs. Mary H. Williams and daughter Miss Ethel Henrich and Mrs. Williams' mother, Mrs. Alexander, leave the latter part of this week for Palo Alto, California, where they will make their home for a few years at least, and near where Miss Ethel will attend the Stanford University. The Columbus people will greatly miss these good citizens, and will hope for their return to Columbus some time in the near future.
The Columbus Journal, August 20, 1902
J.E. Moncrief, a former citizen of Columbus and county superintendent of schools, now of Grand Island, was in town Thursday on his way to Monroe.
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J.P. Cruickshank, who for several months has had a general merchandise store in the east half of the building west of M.C. Cassin's, has traded his stock, through Elliott & Speice, for a farm in western Nebraska.
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W.W. McFayden has moved his family to Bonesteel, South Dakota.
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Louis Groteluschen of Aububon, Iowa, is here visiting relatives. He was called home by the death of his father, John Groteluschen.
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Andy Thomas and sister, Mrs. J.E. Hossey, of South Bend, Indiana, Will H. Thomas and wife of El Paso, Texas, arrived here the first of the week, called by the serious illness of their mother, Mrs. Martha J. Thomas, who lives south of the Platte river. At last accounts, we are pleased to note, Mrs. Thomas was somewhat better.
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W.G. Seeley, of David City, will be sent here in a few weeks by the Foster & Smith company to take charge of their lumber business in this city, in place of J.B. Gietzen who resigned several weeks ago. Mr. Seeley has been in the lumber business for several years past and understands it thoroughly.
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Rev. H.A. Shuman, formerly of the Wattsville congregation, recently of Rising, has been transferred to Burwell, Nebr. His son George was here Monday, driving across the country. He says crops in Polk and Butler counties are something enormous.
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Ulrich Langenegger has purchased the Lindell hotel property on Eleventh street of Mrs. Nancy Hulst, taking charge of the business last Friday. Mr. and Mrs. August Merz, who have been the lessees of the hotel the past three and a half years, moved last week to their newly built home west of the court house. The Lindell has been a well patronized hotel and will continue to be under the new management. Mr. Langenegger expects to put repairs on the building some time soon.
The Columbus Journal, August 13, 1902
Miss Lyda McMahon went to Silver City, Iowa, Friday, where she has a position as cashier for a stock of goods purchased by Elliott, Speice & Co., of this city.
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Maurice Mayer, a former Columbus clothing merchant, now of St. JOe, Mo., arrived in the city Monday and will remain a few days greeting old-time friends and meeting new ones.
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H.D. Shaff, formerly a teacher in the High school of this city, also brother of D. Shaff, will succeed O.G. Smith, resigned, assistant superintendent of the Kearney Industrial school.
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Charles Evans, a nephew of Henry and Ed. Hockenberger, arrived here Saturday from Georgia and will remain if he is pleased with the country. His mother may possibly move her family to Columbus. Mr. Evans is engaged in Hulst & Adams' store.
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Bert Briggs, a former Columbus boy, now of Idaho, passed through the city one day last week on his way to Washington, D.C. Mr. Briggs is now an influential man in his state and those who saw him at the station say that he was looking remarkably well.
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Theopile Walter arrived here Thursday from Giswyl, Switzerland, and expects to make this his future home. His father is still a citizen of Austria, and in order to avoid being obliged to serve in the army of that country, he comes to America to make his home with his mother who came to Columbus several months ago.
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Frank Fugard is in the city. He is now employed in a creamery at Washington, as a process butter maker, but is west taking a vacation. It has been reported that he was married a few weeks ago to Miss May Thurston, a former Columbus girl and sister of Mrs. Lee Draper, who is a stenographer in Scribner, but Mr. Fugard denies the allegation.
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Charles A. Gerrard of Monroe, this county, has been granted a pension of $6 per month. He served in the war with Spain.
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Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sheets of Pittsburg, Pa., are here visiting Mrs. Early, who is a cousin. They had not seen each other for thirty years.
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J.H. Drinnin started Monday for Wyoming, Illinois, where he will visit his mother and other relatives for about two weeks, and attend the annual meeting of the old settlers association. Mr. Drinnin's mother is 84 years old and he has not seen her for twenty years.
The Columbus Journal, August 6, 1902
Mrs. T.E. Clark of Clarinda, Iowa, was in the city last week to attend the funeral of Martha Howard. Mrs. Clark is a sister of Mrs. Howard.
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Mrs. Wm. Burke and little daughter of Council Bluffs were in the city Friday, returning home Saturday. Mrs. Burke has sold all her property here and has purchased a home in the Bluffs.
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George J. Hagel went to Omaha Thursday to see the Wild West show, and while there he placed an order for three fine bowling alleys for his new building on Thirteenth street which will soon be ready for occupancy.
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Mrs. W.J. Williams and daughter, Miss Ethel Henrich, and Mrs. Williams' mother, Mrs. Alexander, expect to leave Columbus in about three weeks for San Francisco where Miss Ethel will attend Stanford university. Mrs. Williams has rented her home here to Frank Rorer and Mr. Ramey who will occupy the house together.
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Mr. Stevenson, who had leased the North opera house, moved his family Monday to Hastings where they will reside.
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Dr. Hans Petersen is happy over the arrival of his wife and one of his sons from Chicago, last Saturday. The doctor has been in the city for several months without his family. They will begin housekeeping at once in the Goodale residence on west Fourteenth street, and the balance of the family will arrive soon to make this their future home.
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John Berringer of Raton, New Mexico, is visiting his sisters, Mrs. E.M. Eiseman and Mrs. Charles Hudson. Herman Berringer and wife of Washington, D.C., who have been visiting the same relatives, have gone to Nebraska City to visit Mrs. Loeb before returning home. Mr. John Berringer will also stop there prior to his return to New Mexico.
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During his recent visit to the Pacific coast Henry C. Bean met several different parties who used to live in Columbus. At Santa Monica, Cal., he saw James Jones at the soldiers' home; at Clovis, same state, he had an interview with Dr. T.R. Clark; at Salt Lake City, Utah, he met Erastus Freston, who favored him by pointing out the many places of interest in that beautiful city; and Cheyenne, Wyo., he chatted with the ever-accommodating, affable John Keating. Mr. Bean tells us that a great change has taken place in that western country since he left it some forty years ago--"wild and woolly" then, now well settled by an enterprising, law-abiding people.
The Columbus Journal, July 30, 1902
Mrs. Fred. Riemer is suffering from a very troublesome abscess on an ankle.
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Harry Clark is spending two weeks in Fremont working at his trade, cigar making.
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John Stoffels, an employe at the Columbia brewery, fell from a ladder Monday of last week, and suffered a dislocation of his left shoulder.
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Michael Levin, a former Schuyler man but more recently of Columbus, has purchased the grocery stock of Frank Jira and will conduct a general store at the old Jira stand, says the Sun.
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Mrs. L.B. Schonlau and daughter, Miss Nellie, and sons Louis and Leo, George Mittaner, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Morse and Hugo Schonlau, all of Omaha, and Mr. and Mrs. Al. Butler of Humphrey, attended the funeral of Adolph Sauer here Thursday.
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When Hulst & Adams shall have completed the re-arrangment of their fine store, they will have a floor space of fifteen thousand one hundred and twenty square feet, making it the largest store in the city.
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Mrs. E.H. Naumann entertained about twenty young lady friends Friday evening in honor of her niece, Mrs. Rev. Hayes (nee Jessie Williams), who has been visiting here several weeks. ...
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Herman Berringer, who some eight years ago worked at the printing business in this city, but who of late years has held a position in the government printing office at Washington, D.C., arrived here Monday last and will visit the family of his brother-in-law, E.M. Eiseman, for several days. He was accompanied by his wife and mother, the latter having been living with her daughter, Mrs. Loeb, at Nebraska City. Mr. Berringer tells us that his brother Charles, another old-time Columbus boy, has a position in the Waltham Watch factory at Waltham, Mass. Mr. Berringer has a vacation of six weeks, the most of which time will be spent in the west prior to returning to the capital city.
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John J. Dickinson, living south of Monroe on the Loup, received a few days ago his papers in proving up on a homestead. Mr. Dickinson's parents were old settlers in the same neighborhood but the homestead just proved up on had never been taken from the government in all these years. The farm as it now stands is suitable more for grazing than any other purpose, but is well worth the cost the government asks for obtaining possession. The Journal, is now publishing a final proof notice of Mary Drozd who has a homestead near Duncan. It has been a good many years since the homestead days in Platte county, and the publication of these notices has caused considerable ___ent and recollections of pioneer days by the old settlers.
The Columbus Journal, July 23, 1902
Wm. Poesch has added a baker's oven to his confectionery store. This will make the fifth bakery in the city. Pretty near as many as there are newspapers.
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In a recent letter from S.E. Marty, who has been visiting his old home in Wisconsin the past two weeks, he states that with the exception of two days it has rained every twenty-four hours since he arrived there and that crop prospects are in a much more critical condition than in Nebraska. This is Mr. Marty's first trip home in 18 years.
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J.P. Abts of Columbus, who was visiting the Abts family here a few days, returned to his home yesterday. Mr. Abts came to Nebraska in 1878 and located in Stanton county.--Madison Chronicle.
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John Barnish, living north of Tarnov, had his barn struck by lightning the 13th and the building with all its contents, consisting of a span of horses, a span of mules, 100 bushels of corn, harness, etc., were burned. Loss about $1,000, insurance $700.
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G.W. Galley, sr., recently received a letter from his daughter, Mrs. John P. Button of Slateville, N.Y., in which she tells of their making 100 pounds of butter each week from seventeen milch cows. Butter brings 23 to 25c per pound to the farmer in that locality. Mr. Button's son, George, who lived here with his grandfather two years ago, is now managing a creamery plant at Charlemont, Mass.
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Stark county, Illinois, celebrate the 14th of August as old settlers' day. Each year this county makes great preparations for their annual re-union, so much so that excursion rates are secured on many lines of railroad. Hundreds of people living in southern Nebraska attend these gatherings and visit their relatives. There are several families in the neighborhood of Monroe also J.H. Drinnin and Thomas Dack of Columbus, who came from Stark county, may visit their boyhood home during the celebration this year.
The Columbus Journal, July 16, 1902
Workmen began the papering and renovating of the Methodist church Monday morning.
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Rev. Olcott has purchased the residence property, third house north of the Methodist church, belonging to Mrs. Frank O'Donnell, now of Sioux City.
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Charles and George Whaley expect to move into their new laundry building north of the Clother hotel some time next week. The machinery is being placed ready for use.
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Mrs. R.S. Dickinson of Columbus left yesterday after a short visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. O.S. Holden--Silver Creek Times.
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George W. Mentzer, four miles north of town, is among the first in the neighborhood to thrash grain. He began today.
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Louis Schreiber's residence opposite the Second ward school house is all enclosed and when completed will be one of the largest and handsomest homes in the city.
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Fred. Hollenbeck, who handles freight at the U.P. depot fell between the platform and a car Monday evening and badly bruised his left arm, causing him to take a ten days' lay-off.
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George Stevenson, the new manager of the North opera house, moved his family last week from Council Bluffs to the Hohl residence on Thirteenth street. Mr. Stevenson has a family consisting of wife, two sons and two daughters.
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William O. Williams, brother of Mrs. Parks, left Thursday morning for the west. He will look over the states of Washington and Oregon for a suitable location. If he fails to find such he will return to Columbus.
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Chester Clark of Cadiz, Ohio, came up from Omaha Wednesday where he has been filling a position in the Union Pacific yards, and is visiting relatives, the Turner families. Chester has the distinction of being the first American soldier to land on Cuban soil in the recent war with Spain.
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Miss M.A. Lamb, who has been studying fine embroidering the past seven years in London, England, is visiting her sister, Mrs. J.D. Stires. Miss Lamb spent a few weeks in Colorado before coming to Columbus and from the effects of the high altitude she has been suffering severely from heart trouble.
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Jesse Bisson, living north of town, the young man who was so badly hurt several months ago by having his arm almost torn from his body by a corn shredder, has completely recovered his health and is able to assist in work on his father's farm. Mr. Bisson had his arm amputated near the shoulder and for many months took treatment in the hospital.
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Elmer Sheets of New York City who has been spending a few weeks with his family in Schuyler, came up Wednesday to visit his half sister, Mrs. Mary Early and family. Mrs. Sheets had been called to Schuyler by the sickness of her father, Hon. H.C. Russell. Dr. Sheets was a Columbus boy some twenty years ago and after leaving here was a practicing physician in Denver until ten years ago when he compounded a medicine which he calls "Antiphlogistine." Since that time he has been engaged in the manufacture and sale of this invention which has already made him a fortune. Dr. Sheets has branch offices now established in many foreign countries and nearly every drug store in the United States have it on their shelves. Dr. Sheets has the chance of becoming a millionaire, and his old-time friends here will wish him continued success.
The Columbus Journal, July 9, 1902
The rainfall as reported by C.C. Gray for the month of June, 1902, was 7.92 inches. For the same month last year 3.34 inches.
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Hans and Paul Eggli arrived here on Thursday from Berne, Switzerland. They are brothers of Mrs. Schacher and will make this country their home.
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Mrs. John Freeman left last Wednesday for Holt, Michigan, called by the serious illness of her daughter, Mrs. F.A. Coleman, who is reported much better the past few days.
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Peter Laughlin came down from Willow Island to spend the Fourth with his family. He says farmers are paying as high as $2.50 per day for farm hands in that locality.
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Monday evening L.G. Zinnecker received from the east and placed in position the new fixtures for his barber parlor on Thirteenth street, and it is now one of the neatest and up-to-date places of the kind in the state.
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William Graves returned Monday of last week from a business trip of over two months in northwestern Iowa. During the storm at Blanco a few days ago he saw three cars standing on the railroad tracks overturned by a small "twister", falling on a man who when released was found to be crushed to death. Mr. Graves tells us that his son George, who has been at Sheridan, Wyoming for some time, has gone to the Thunder Mountain country.
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The following from the Platte Center Signal may concern a good many of our readers and if heeded may save them trouble and expense: "Numerous complaints have been made by farmers living along lower Shell creek about the dangerous and inexcusable nuisance of throwing dead animals into the creek. A petition has been circulated among the prominent farmers of lower Shell creek and business men of Columbus, which petition sets forth that unless the practice of throwing dead animals into the creek is abated the malefactors will be arrested and punished according to law. We extend this warning to the farmers living along Shell creek in this part of the country for the reason that the petitioners have a stringent law on their side and they are determined to enforce it. The habit of throwing dead animals into streams is a criminal offense and should not be tolerated in a civilized community. It spreads contagion of disease to man and beast, and the quicker an example is made of a wrong-doer in this direction the better it will be for the community."
The Columbus Journal, July 2, 1902
Carpenters began Monday the addition of a room to the south side of the residence of J.E. Kaufmann.
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Wilbert T. Town and bride arrived in Columbus Thursday last and are keeping house in the Weaver dwelling on Fourteenth street.
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Clyde Frazell has gone to South Omaha where he will take a position as collector for a telephone company, beginning work the 1st.
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Mrs. Mary Plumb Dunlap and children came down from St. Edward Saturday where they visited relatives, and will leave this week for their home in Franklin county, this state.
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A.W. Clark, who passed his sixty-third mile stone on June 11th, was presented by his children with a fine gold watch. It is an Elgin and finely engraved with name and date on inside of case and a present to be proud of.
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W.T. Allen of Council Bluffs was in the city several days last week shaking hands with his numerous friends. He tells us he has disposed of his business interests in the Bluffs and will soon move back to Columbus to live.
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Aug. Oschatz, a citizen of this city twenty-one years ago, spent last Wedesday with his old time friend, A. Heintz. Mr. Oschatz has lived in several western states and is now returning with his family to Germany to engage in his former profession as architect. He left his family at Seward while he visited here.
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George Zinnecker will leave next Monday for Greenfield, Ohio, to work in his brother's barber shop. He expects to be gone two years.
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Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Wescott were called to Silver Creek Saturday by the serious illness of Mrs. Wescott's mother.
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Henry Darling, an old-time citizen of Platte, but now residing in Rock county, this state, arrived in the city one day last week and will take in the big Fourth of July celebration here before returning home.

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