Platte Co., NE - 1903 News (May - Aug) NEGenWeb Project
PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
News From 100 Years Ago
(May, 1903 - August, 1903)


The Columbus Journal, May 6, 1903
Mrs. S.L. McCoy of Lincoln, formerly of Columbus, was in town Thursday on her way home from Norfolk where she had been visiting her son Pearl.
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Mrs. Schrock, mother of Mrs. L.W. Weaver, and daughter Joe of Seattle, Washington, arrived here Sunday on a two months' visit to relatives. Mrs. Schrock will also visit in Pennsylvania before returning to the west.
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Henry G. Luschen, jr., is breaking bronchos this week. [Rural Route No. 1.]
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E.H. Funk moved his family last week to Spalding where he has located in business.
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W.K. Lay, formerly of Columbus, was in town Thursday on business. He is now engaged for himself in the mercantile business in Omaha.
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George Baird has resumed his work as mail clerk on the Columbus-Cedar Rapids run after a two weeks' vacation. He is now a resident of Spalding.
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George Barnhart of Ft. Worth, Texas, was in town last week looking after his farm interests south of the river, the Barnum place, which he purchased last year. He left Saturday for his home.
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H.J. Hendryx, father of Mrs. T.W. Adams, stopped in the city last week on his return home from a trip to Maryland and Virginia. He spent considerable time with W.E. Walton, formerly of Monroe township. Mr. Hendryx has not yet purchased land.
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John Schmocker was happily surprised Friday by a visit from his brother, Christ Schmocker of Clinton, Mo. The brothers had not met for twenty-three years. Mr. Schmocker had brought cattle to the Kansas City market and decided to make a visit to Columbus before returning. He started for home Saturday.
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John Hinkleman is erecting a story and a half residence north of the High school building which will cost about $1,700.
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Mrs. Catherine Haycock, formerly Mrs. McGuire, who is perhaps the oldest woman in this city, being in her 94th year, and whose first husband, James McGuire of the Thirty-eighth Indiana infantry was killed in battle at Chattanooga during the civil war, has just received a renewed pension of $12 per month beginning Dec. 16, 1902. The old lady was much in need of it. Judge Duffy was her solicitor.
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Fred Hempleman, who recently had his leg amputated, is recovering nicely and expects to go to Fairbury this week and will have his household goods moved to this city. He will return by way of Omaha and be fitted with an artificial limb.
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The police were busy Monday evening looking for Stephen Corbett of Osceola, a brother of James Corbett of this city. The fellow was not found, although he was in the city and it is supposed here that he returned home. The following telegram appeared in the morning Omaha World-Herald sent from Osceola, dated Monday: "Mrs. Minnie Jones was shot twice this afternoon by Stephen Corbett, and is in a critical condition. The affair occurred at the home of young Corbett, where Mrs. Jones has been staying during the past three months. A quarrel was had between the two, and without warning Corbett drew a 22-caliber revolver and commenced shooting. The first bullet passed through a stocking which Mrs. Jones had around her throat, and made an ugly wound. The second shot was fired while the woman was on the floor, and as she put her hand up before her face the bullet passed through the hand. Corbett then hastened into the yard, and going to the barn, harnessed his horses and drove away. The neighbors were notified and word was brought to Osceola, and the sheriff started immediately in pursuit of the man. It is thought that he will go to Columbus, as he has a brother there, and word brought in says that he was started in that direction. Mrs. Jones is a widow who formerly resided in Omaha. Her parents now reside northeast of Osceola a short distance. She had been keeping company with Corbett, and it was over a matter of jealousy that the trouble started."
The Columbus Journal, May 13, 1903
C.S. Mapes, father of Mrs. F.W. Farrand, has returned to Columbus for the summer.
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Charles H. Dietrichs has been seriously ill with dropsy, but this week was pronounced as improving.
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Charles Stitzer, a former Columbus boy in the '70s, now a prominent druggist of Central City, was in the city a short time today renewing old acquaintances.
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Wm. Schreiber, northeast of Columbus, is having erected on his farm place a fine large two-story dwelling house and some other needed buildings. Frank A. Gores is the contractor.
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Holmes Thompson of Cadiz, Ohio, a cousin of Mrs. M.K. Turner, arrived in the city Friday from Loup county where he had been looking after business affairs. He remained over Sunday visiting with friends.
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Miss Martha Powell who has made her home with Rev. and Mrs. Luce the past two years, left Saturday for Iowa. After a visit there and in Kansas, she will go to Idaho where she will make her home with a brother.
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Samuel C. Smith, a former prominent business man of this city, father of Mrs. J.G. Reeder and Elmer Smith, is reported seriously sick at his home in San Diego, California. Mr. Smith is in the 78th year of his age.
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A.H. Hardy of Hyannis, Nebraska, brother of C.C. Hardy of this city, is expected here about the 24th and will give an exhibition of shooting. Mr. Hardy is to be in Rockford, Illinois, May 30, where he is to shoot a match for the championship.
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George Heller has made a purchase of land in Maryland and will soon move with his family to his future eastern home. We understand that his place joins that of H.H. Hunteman, who with several other Platte county families, moved to that section of the country about a year ago.
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Several cases of sore eyes have been reported here the last two weeks, and the disease seems to be somewhat contagious. Among those who have suffered are Phil and Frankie Echols, Horatio Adams, Harry Jenkinson and C.C. Jones. Mr. Jones has been confined to the bed, and his case seemed quite serious for a time.
The Columbus Journal, May 20, 1903
Mr. John Wittka, brother of Mrs. John Hinkelman, arrived in the city last week after a year's visit to his old home in Austria.
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Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Hendryx of Monroe came down Wednesday to visit their daughter Mrs. T. Adams. They expect to move to Columbus within a few weeks and will occupy the residence of Dr. Geer on east Fifteenth street.
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Carl Hoehen has bought an interest in a drug store at St. Edward. His friends will wish him well in his new location.
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Mr. and Mrs. John Dack, Mrs. James Baker and Mr. Hugh Hill, all of Monroe, started Monday noon from Columbus for a trip to England, Ireland and Scotland, expecting to be gone about three months.
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Miss Grace Shilts, daughter of J.I. Shilts who moved here several months ago from Watertown, South Dakota, arrived here Wednesday. Miss Shilts has just finished teaching for the year and will engage in that profession in Platte county.
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Guy Fox, son of Conductor Fox, passed through Columbus Tuesday of last week on his way to Fort Worth, Texas. He has had charge of the chemical laboratory of the Armour company in Chicago and goes to Fort Worth to take a similar position for that company. Guy received his inspiration to become a chemist in the Columbus High school.
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A crowd of Columbus gentlemen left today, Tuesday, for Pierre, South Dakota, near where they expect to enter homestead claims. Among them are Mort Murphy, Ed. Early, Frank Baker, Will Kersenbrock, Lonnie Gutzmer, W.W. Rubyor, John Huber, Frank Hagel, Bert Engleman, L.F. Phillips, Joseph Busch, Charles Segelke and August Boettcher.
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Carl Herman, a liveryman from Humphrey who was brought to the Columbus hospital for treatment for nervousness only a few days ago, strayed from the hospital Friday noon and has not yet been found. Mr. Herman is 35 years old, 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 150 pounds, has dark brown hair and mustach. When he left the hospital he wore a soft black hat, a dark gray suit of clothes, white shirt with pink stripes and red necktie. He is a Bohemian by birth and talks English with an accent. For several years Mr. Herman was section foreman on the F.E. railroad and was well known in the north part of the county. A reward of $25 has been offered by the family to any one giving information leading to his wherebouts. mr. Herman is a member of the modern Woodman lodge of Humphrey.
The Columbus Journal, May 27, 1903
Dr. Hans Petersen, physician and surgeon, office over postoffice.
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R.B. Cowdery has moved his family from Leigh to Humphrey, where they expect to live.
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Frank Bridell leaves this week with his family for Geneva, Nebraska, where he purchased a hotel and restaurant.
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E.S. Newlon, who is traveling for an Omaha grocery house in southwestern Nebraska, spent Saturday and Sunday at home in this city.
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Ernest Bienz from west of town in at the residence of John Schmocker where he is receiving medical aid for blood poisoning caused from a sand bur splinter in one of his hands.
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Ed. Youkin received a visit last week from his sister and niece of Iowa and his brother from Washington. They are now in Grand Island visiting friends. While in the city they were guests of the Beecroft family who are old acquaintances.
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O. Johnson and son Nels came up from Omaha Saturday. Nels returned to his work Monday but Mr. Johnson is still here helping his family pack their household goods. They expect to leave within the week for Omaha to make their future home.
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Emil Hoehen was arrested this Tuesday morning by chief of police Charles Taylor for desertion from the U.S. Naval service at Mare Island. Emil had enlisted March 5, at San Francisco and deserted April 27. The order for his arrest was sent from the naval department Monday.
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Jap Nichols went to Norfolk Friday to accept a position as cook in a hotel. Mrs. Nichols will follow in a few days.
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Mrs. E.C. Hockenberger and family expect to move next week to St. Paul, Minnesota, where Mr. Hockenberger is engaged in business.
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H.G. Persons is recovering from a badly injured eye. About two weeks ago a scale from a hot piece of iron he was working flew in his eye which has caused him a great deal of pain.
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Mark Burke, who was so severely hurt in Clarks about ten days ago by having a hand car fall upon his shoulder, is still confined to this bed. Trainmen were loading the hand car when it slipped, falling upon Mr. Burke as stated above.
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Miss Katharine Green, who the past year has been employed in our city schools, part of the time as language teacher and since the holidays as a teacher in the extra room provided in the High school, has been engaged as principal of the High school at Wayne for the coming school year.
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Carl Herman of Humphrey, whom we mentioned last week as having left the hospital here and that the sheriff had offered a reward for information concerning him, has been located in Grand Island. Mr. Herman wrote to his wife saying that he was alive and well and had found employment in the U.P. yards in the last named city.
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Henry Gerard, now of Columbus, was in Bellwood last Friday and Saturday and informed us that he had sold his 120 acre farm, formerly known as the Maybe farm, to Geo. Zellar for $60 per acre. He purchased it less than a year ago from J.N. Anderson for $12 1/2 loess per acre than he got for it.--Bellwood Gazette.
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The brick walls for the addition to the rear of H. Oehlrich's building on Thirteenth street, occupied as a saloon, has been almost completed. The addition is two stories high, 22x27 feet, and contains kitchen, wash and bed rooms, sewer connections and other modern conveniences have been added, making the property much more valuable.
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Miss Jennie Gasser, niece of Mrs. J. _. Sturgeon, arrived here Wednesday from Chicago where she has been the past year in the Methodist training school for the missionary work. For several years past Miss Gasser has been engaged as a professional nurse in Methodist hospitals, and is now fitting herself as a missionary. She will spend the summer here and return to Chicago in the fall.
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John Cox, who has been the faithful Burlington agent here for the past thirteen years, has accepted the position of traveling freight agent for the same company with headquarters probably at Alliance. Mr. Cox takes the position only under the condition that he be allowed to return if he does not like the work. His new duties will commence about June 1st. He has not as yet been notified who his successor will be.
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The crowd returned Sunday from South Dakota where they went to see the country with the view of filing on homestead claims. They reported having spent an enjoyable time. Wm. Kersenbrock and Joseph Busch are the only ones who have returned who filed on claims. Mr. Busch filed for himself, Joseph Benisch and another person. Ed. Early is still there. Several of the crowd took a ride up the river from Pierre to a buffalo ranch where a herd of about eighty have a range of 3,000 acres, all fenced in woven wire.
The Columbus Journal, June 3, 1903
Fred Baker and Roy Stires leave Sunday for Fremont where they will take a summer course in the Normal school in that city.
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William Eimers, now of California, was in town Wednesday on his way home. He has been in Humphrey several seeks where he still has his store, and had just returned from a business trip to Kansas City.
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H.J. Hendryx, father of Mrs. T. Adams of this city, and Thomas Branigan, who lives about ten miles south of the city, have purchased of J.E. Kaufmann the property and buildings on Lewis and Tenth street recently used for a lumber yard by the latter. They expect to remodel the buildings and go into the business of bringing in western horses and fitting them for the market.
The Columbus Journal, June 10, 1903
Paul Duffy goes to Coleridge Thursday with the expectation of locating there in some kind of business.
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Michael Welch went to Grand Island last week where he will reside in the future at the soldiers' home.
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Miss Marie Duffy went to Grand Island Monday where she expects employment with the Singer machine company.
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Mrs. G.W. Westcott is expected here today from South Omaha on a visit to her daughters, Mrs. Nichols and Mrs. Clark. Pearl and Orr Nichols, who have been visiting relatives there, will return with her.
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Joseph Mahaffey, who received injuries while playing ball in Fullerton some time ago, and has been in Omaha the past three weeks receiving treatment, arrived here Saturday. He is improving, but will tarry here a week or so with relatives before returning to his work in Fullerton.
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Mrs. Eva Bell has made arrangements to move to Red Oak, Iowa, where she will make her home.
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Henry Fickel of the Rochon neighborhood started Monday for California where we understand he will make his future home.
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Ed. Moncrief, former Platte county superintendent of schools for three terms in the '80s, now engaged in the real estate business in Grand Island, was in the city Thursday.
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H.E. Lamb, one of the former teachers of this county and son of George Lamb of Monroe was in town Monday visiting the teachers' institute. Mr. Lamb is now studying for the medical profession in an Omaha college.
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Margaret, the little five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Olcott in the Rochon neighborhood came near losing three fingers of her left hand Monday, while following a lister in the field. Several stitches were taken in the flesh in order to save the members.
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Leo Gutzmer, who had been in the employ of the Santa Fe R.R. Co. in California the past two years is here on a visit to home folks and will remain a week or ten days longer after which he goes to St. Paul, Minn., where he takes a position with the Great Northern.
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E.D. Fitzpatrick purchased Monday the portion of a lot to the rear of his building on Thirteenth street which is to be occupied by F.N. Stevenson. The property was formerly owned by Patrick Murray which he sold a few weeks ago to several business men of the city and is 22x66 feet.
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Misses Charlotte and Lulu Mathews, daughters of Frank Mathews, came home last week from Schuyler where they remained to finish their term of school after the family had moved to Columbus.
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F.N. Stevenson has leased the Fitzpatrick building on Thirteenth street and will soon start in the creamery business. The building is being improved by a system of waterworks and sewer connection and will soon be ready for machinery which the lessee will place soon. There was no more popular business man in Platte county a few years ago than Mr. Stevenson and all regretted his leaving Columbus, and now that he will make this city his home again, will wish him the best of success in his new business.
The Columbus Journal, June 17, 1903
G.O. Burns is treating his dwelling house to a fresh coat of paint.
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John Berlin of Genoa has been appointed a carpenter at Fort Belknap, Montana, Indian schoo.
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Mrs. Brindley left Saturday for McCook, Nebraska, where she will teach six weeks in the Junior Normal.
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Tom Branigan arrived in the city Saturday with a shipment of driving, work and saddle horses for the market.
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J.J. Murphy has moved his family into the home he recently purchased, the E.C. Hockenberger dwelling in the north part of town.
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Will Boettcher left Wednesday for Grand Island where he has secured a position in a store and will also take pupils for instruction on the violin.
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Miss Pearl Freeman, grand daughter of J.S. Freeman, who was attending the institute was called home east of Platte Center Saturday, by the serious illness of her mother.
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Ed. Coolidge, who came down from Dakota about a week ago to spend his vacation was called Friday to Central City, South Dakota, where work as a carpenter awaited him.
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Frank McTaggert, who has a position as traveling salesman for a clothing house int he states of Washington, Idaho and Oregon, came home Tuesday of last week and will remain until the latter part of this week on a visit to relatives.
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John Fulmer was called Saturday to Omaha by the illness of his father.
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G.G. Larson of Salem, South Dakota, began work in F.A. Beard's barber shop last Friday.
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Louis Schonlau, a former Columbus boy, who is now traveling salesman for an Omaha clothing house, was in town over Sunday and Monday.
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George Wilson, who has been visiting his sister, Mrs. Carl Johnson, the past week left Sunday evening for Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he will work in the railroad shops.
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Charley, the 14-year-old son of C.C. Jones, left home about two weeks ago and after several days was found to be working in a club house in Sterling, Colorado. Mr. Jones left last week for that place and after a visit to Denver is expected home this Tuesday evening.
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W.L. Walker of Albion, Nebraska, on Sunday at Omaha posted a letter to the chief of police of that city, to the effefct that he proposed to commit suicide by drowning and asked that he notify his wife at Albion, his mother, and also his employer D.W. Schaff of Columbus. No trace of Walker or his body has been found since the receipt of the letter.
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O.C. Pennington received a patent Saturday from the government for a weed destroying attachment for cultivators which appears to be practical and may be the means of bringing him a fortune. Mr. Pennington has made and tested the device and friends have pronounced it very successful. The inventor has not yet decided what disposition he will make of the patent but has already received inquiries relative to it.
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The lots across the street east of Friedhof's which were recently purchased from Patrick Murray by several business men, have been divided up for sale again and G.W. Phlilips has purchased the corner lot facing north while Dussell & Son have secured the two south lots which face west. It has not yet been made public what disposition will be made of the property now owned by these gentlemen. The buildings on these lots are now being removed by Mr. Murray.
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The state association of undertakers met in Grand Island four days of last week and Henry Gass, jr., of this city won first prize for dressing a dead body the quickest and neatest in the contest which came off Friday afternoon. There were six undertakers entered the contest, one of them from Omaha, and Henry made the best time, dresing the body from head to goot in twelve minutes. The longest time was thirty-five minutes, and the prize he received was an embalming grip and instruments valued at $35.
The Columbus Journal, June 24, 1903
Mayor John Becher went to Omaha this (Tuesday) morning to visit his mother who is quite sick.
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Mrs. George Scheidel of Platte Center was brought to St. Mary's hospital last week to undergo an operation.
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Adolf Sibler of Crowley, Louisiana, who formerly lived in Platte county is visiting friends and relatives in and near Platte Center.
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August Dietrich has purchased lots just north of Garrett Hulst's residence and will build as soon as plans have been completed.
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Tom Branigan moved his family to the city Thursday, and they are occupying one of Dr. Evans' residences on east Fifteenth street.
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Dr. Chas. H. Platz of Chicago arrived here last week and has located in Dr. Petersen's rooms, to succeed him in his practice. Dr. Platz comes highly recommended by his predecessor.
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Mrs. O.W. Holloday went to Nebraska City Saturday where she was called by the serious sickness of her father, who was injured Wednesday in a runaway.
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The case of Emil Hoehen for desertion from the U.S. navy was brought before Judge Hollenbeck Monday, who, after hearing testimony, took the matter under advisement.
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C.E. Chapin of Oconee was in town Tuesday of last week to meet his sister, Mrs. Haight from Colorado, who comes to Nebraska and may possibly make her home with her brother.
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F.T. Walker sold to Mark Burke his property on Tenth street last week. This is known as the Joseph Ryan dwelling who sold it last winter to J.T. Baughn who in turn sold it to Mr. Walker.
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Rev. H.C. Preston of the Richland M.E. church was in town last week looking up residence property with a view to purchasing. He contemplates leaving the ministry and expects to make Columbus his home.
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Mrs. L.E. Stewart of Silver Creek, a former resident of Columbus, was in town Thursday on busines. Mrs. Stewart was a few weeks ago surprised by a large number of her friends calling on her with basket laden with good things for refreshments to celebrate her seventy-sixth birthday.
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Theodore Steinbach of Woodville township has been bound over to the district court by County Judge Ratterman in the sum of $1,000 on a charge of bastardy, preferred by Ida Lutzke, a young girl living near St. Edward. The young man's mother went on his bond and secured his release.
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The Platte Center Signal says that Prof. E.C. Hicks who has been superintendent of the schools there has gone to Mandan, North Dakota, where he will, in company with his father, enter the real estate business. The older Mr. Hicks has for several years been superintendent of schools in Monroe.
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The storage rooms to the rear of the Henry building on Eleventh street, recently occupied by L. Schreiber are being town down and one new storage building will be erected back of the corner store. Henry Herchenhan who purchased the property east of Mr. Asche, will soon begin the erection of a brick building there.
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W.J. Cain, well known in this city, son of Tom Cain of Monroe township, has formed a partnership with E.E. Fellers of Monroe and will open up a real estate, insurance and loan office in St. Edward soon. Mr. Cain is a graduate of the law department of the State university, and his many friends will wish the firm success in their business venture.
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Mrs. D.N. Miner returned Sunday from an extended trip to Van Wert, Ohio, where she was called by sickness of relatives. Mrs. Miner brought a grand niece home with her from Van Wert whose mother died about three weeks ago. The little girl's name is Eulalia Kieser and she is seven year old. Albert Cummons, a grand son of Mrs. Miner also came home with her from Council Bluffs.
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Mr. and Mrs. T.D. Robinson went to Columbus yesterday where they met Mrs. Robinson's mother, Mrs. Startup, of Albany, N.Y. Mrs. Startup expects to make her home with the Robinson family hereafter...Mrs. E.H. Chambers and Mrs. Homer Robinson of Columbus, are visiting Mrs. B.F. Cowdery.--Humphrey Democrat.
The Columbus Journal, July 1, 1903
Miss Emma Bean will go to Omaha this week to attend business college.
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Miss Anna Sturgeon went to Lindsay Friday where she will have a position as compositor in the newspaper office at that place.
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Claude Finley of Sterling, Kansas, who has been staying the past eight months with the family of his aunt, Mrs. Wm. Graves, returned to his home last Thursday.
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Mrs. John Seipp, her son Walter and daughter Marguerite, Miss Hattie Hecker and Mrs. Hageman all started today (Tuesday) for a visit to relatives in Wisconsin.
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Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gerharz of Lemont, Ill., visited here several days with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gerharz, coming west on their wedding trip. They left Monday for the east, accompanied by Mrs. Frank Gerharz who will visit several weeks with her mother, whom she has not seen in twelve years.
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Leo Gutzmer leaves for St. Paul, Minn., this evening to take a position with the Great Northern R.R. Co.
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Dr. and Mrs. Hansen expect to leave soon for a northern state, hoping it will be of benefit to the doctor who is suffering from rheumatism.
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The Fullerton Post says that a son of Mr. Adamson living at the mouth of Horse creek was on the street one day last week with a human skeleton supposed to be that of an Indian. The body had been buried in a sitting posture as Indians bury their dead. The head of the skeleton was well preserved and contained almost a full set of teeth. This county at one time was the headquarters of a tribe of Indians called the Pawnees and this is probably the remains of one of their past chiefs. Mr. Adamson was digging a cave when he came upon the skeleton.
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Myron Wilson, the fifteen-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. N.D. Wilson, got his left leg caught in the belting of the machinery which runs the ice cream freezer at Poesche's Thursday afternoon about 3:30 o'clock, and before he could be released the limb was badly broken. Both bones below the knee were fractured and one was severely splintered. It is not known just how the accident occurred, but the room in which the machinery stands is small and poorly lighted, and in adjusting the belts Myron became entangled, with the above result. Dr. Voss was called and as soon as possible the belts were cut to release the boy. Several physicians attended to the dressing and setting of the limb.
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Charles Hudson fell from a ladder Sunday afternoon while filling the water tank of a car in the Union Pacific yards, and is now laid up with a very lame back. A round in the ladder on which he was standing, broke, and in falling to the ground he lit on his shoulder, throwing his head backward and almost breaking the neck. No serious injuries have resulted but friends say he had a very narrow escape from instant death.
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Last Wednesday R.Y. Lisco living southwest of town across the Loup had their family horse stolen. The same night D.H. Harrington at Duncan missed his harness and buggy and the thief who had evidently visited both places was traced to Shelton where he had sold the outfit for $50. At that place he expressed a saddle to Kearney and Sunday Sheriff Byrnes caught his man there and brought him back to Columbus. He gave his name as C.F. Beedle.
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Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Askine have been very much worried for several weeks past, having received word that from indication, their son Harry was one of the victims of the Heppner, Oregon, flood several weeks ago. A trunk had been found evidently the property of Harry Askine and as Mr. Askine's son expected to be in that part of the state at that time it was believed that he had been drowned, but the family have received a letter from Harry dated at Livingston, Montana, stating that he was in Yellowstone park at the time of the flood.
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Prof. Watters arrived here Friday from St. Paul and will begin at once to put his rooms, rented above the post-office, in shape for the opening of the business and normal college. He will be assisted in the business department by Prof. H.J. Hoff who is a graduate of the Gregg Commercial college of Chicago, and who has since been a successful teacher in the St. Paul business college. Mr. Watters is a graduate of a normal school and since 1894 has been superintending schools at different places. He was re-elected superintendent of the St. Paul schools for the coming year but resigns to take up the college work here. A town the size of Columbus that has no business or normal college is behind the times, and if there is any enterprise we have needed it is in these lines. The railroad facilities are excellent and there is every encouragement to believe that the promoters will meet with success.
The Columbus Journal, July 8, 1903
Miss Ella Rasmussen left Saturday for Springfield where she has a clerkship in the store of H. Murdock.
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After a long and bitter fight Daniel Murdock has been appointed postmaster at Oconee in place of O.T. Webster, resigned.
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Carl Johnson has removed his commission office from the Niewohner building to rooms on the second floor of Grays' new structure.
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Mrs. Lucinda G. Winslow, an aunt of Mrs. C.J. Garlow, who has visited in the city, was recently appointed postmistress at Badger, Holt county.
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Arthur Bray, living just west of the city, won high honors at the shooting contest at Platte Center on the Fourth. Out of 75 flying targets he hit 73.
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Leo Gutzmer, who went last week to Minneapolis to take a position with the Great Northern railroad returned Saturday and left Monday for Omaha and will later go to California. Leo says Minneapolis is too cold a climate for him.
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Mrs. M. Kuntzelman was called to Omaha today by a telephone message stating that her husband, who is visiting there, in attempting to step from a street car Sunday, fell to the walk and fractured his skull. No further particulars are yet known.
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W.L. Cheonweth returns to Columbus today from Munising, Mich., where he has been for several months. Mr. Chenoweth comes back to take charge of the new dry goods department of the Gray Mercantile Co. He will soon return east to assist in purchasing the goods. His many friends will heartily welcome him to the city again.
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Mrs. E.M. Eiseman left Monday for Nebraska City to join her husband who is engaged in business there.
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Emil Hoehen was released this afternoon from the charge of desertion from the U.S. navy. Judge Hollenbeck presided in the case.
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A. Rans has sold his interest in the Thurston hotel to George Whaley, the change taking place the first of the month. Mr. Rans goes west for the benefit of his daughter's health.
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James R. Hilliard, formerly living near Oconee, made a visit to relatives here starting Monday on his return to Murfreesboro, Tenn. Mr. Hilliard was married some time ago and expects to return here with his wife before long.
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Dr. H.A. Hansen has sold the Winslow ranch northwest of town to McWilliam Bros. of Monroe. The latter, who have been prominent business men of Monroe, sold their hardware and implement stock to A.E. Matson of that place and F.K. Strother of Columbus, the new firm taking charge at once. Mr. Strother has not yet decided if he will move his family from here.
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Wm. Anderson of Kennard, Nebr., visited the family of his brother-in-law, Henry Engel, over the Fourth. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson were sufferers in the Herman cyclone four years ago, losing all their property besides injuring them physically. Mr. Anderson suffered the loss of an eye, and his wife was unconsious for sixty hours following the storm, having been injured by falling debris.
The Columbus Journal, July 15, 1903
Mrs. Susanna Thomas has purchased six lots on east Fifteenth street, where she will soon build a residence.
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Arthur Lamb, from near Monroe, was in town Thursday. Mr. Lamb who was formerly a teacher in the county is now studying medicine in Omaha.
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Mr. Burns of Osceola, father of Mrs. L.G. Zinnecker, Mrs. Wm. Swartsley and Mr. G.O. Burns has been seriously ill for eight weeks, and is still very low. He is 76 years old.
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Miss Ethel Raney is having a six-room cottage built upon her lot west of L. Gerrard's, Sixteenth and North street, and will be for renting. The Scotts' have the contract for the work.
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Will Wagner started Thursday for the west, expecting to go to Hood River, Oregon, where his brother, J.G. Wagner is located. He will go by way of San Francisco. Will contemplates going later to South America to seek a fortune.
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Work has begun on the new dwelling house of Dr. Paul, between the Whitmoyer and Hansen residences. The plans were drawn by Charles Wurdeman and will be built by the Scotts'. The residence will cost about $3,000, and will contain all modern improvements.
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John Staub, one of the old settlers of this county, moved his family today to Custer county where they will reside.
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Mrs. Sauer has sold her residence in the south part of town to L. London who will take possession this week. Mrs. Sauer has purchased lots in the east part of town and will soon build a new home there.
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H.J. Alexander leaves this Tuesday afternoon for his old home in New York state, to visit a few weeks with his aged mother who is in the 84th year of her age, but who still enjoys fairly good health, being able to write a weekly letter to her son.
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F.A. Matson of Madison was in town Friday visiting his father W.M. Matson and family. The Matson families are old settlers of the county, coming here in 1871. W.M. Matson moved from his farm near Monroe last spring to Columbus. F.A. Matson is a prosperous implement dealer in the busy little city of Madison.
The Columbus Journal, July 22, 1903
Dr. Haughawaut, an old-time Columbusite, now of Genoa, was in the city Sunday.
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Howard A. Clark and family have moved here from Gretna and are located in the Stillman residence on Nebraska avenue.
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Carl Neff expects to start for Blackfoot, Idaho, Thursday where he will visit his brothers with the expectation of making his home there. Mr. Neff has been the baker at Vogel's bakery for several years.
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Frank Matthews has gone to Schuyler to take charge of a grocery store for a few weeks.
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Miss Alice Wise is attending a patient in Humphrey, Mrs. McKillip, as professional nurse.
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E.O. Rector is building himself a new residence on his lots just east of Mrs. John Stauffer and west of Otto Merz on east Eleventh street. The building will be 24x24 feet, two stories.
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Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Ogden have returned from their wedding trip to Tina, Missouri, and are now located in their newly furnished home just west of L.W. Weaver on east Fourteenth street.
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Dr. and Mrs. Hansen started Friday for Hot Springs, South Dakota, where they will remain several weeks for the benefit of the doctor's health. They expect to go later to California for an extended visit.
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Miss Beulah Wheeler arrived here Wednesday evening from University Place and will be the guest of Miss Alice Watkins several weeks. Miss Wheeler graduated this year from the Wesleyn university and has accepted a position as principal of a school in Plains, Montana. Miss Musetta Wheeler, her sister, will teach in the same building with her.
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Mrs. S.E. Baker met with an accident Monday morning which has caused her much pain. She was helping lift a boiler full of scalding-hot water from the stove to the washing machine and failing to lift her end of the boiler high enough some of the water splashed on her hand which caused her to let loose of the handle and the water ran into her shoe scalding her foot so severely that the flesh came off. No serious results are anticipated.
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Mr. and Mrs. Charles Miner of Plattsmouth came up Saturday to spend a few days with relatives. Mr. Miner has been engaged as coach repairer with the B.&.M. Railroad Co., but is now receiving treatment for an arm which did not heal perfectly from a fracture received about two years ago. Mr. Miner tells us that his brother-in-law, __nest Wells, who left this city several months ago for Missoula, Montana, to engage in the printing business, is much pleased with his new location and getting along nicely.
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Anton Berney, brother of George Berney and uncle of Joseph Berney, is in the city visiting relatives. He is accompanied by his wife. Mr. Berney came here from Pretoria, South Africa, where he has lived for twenty-two years, going there from Switzerland. He fought during the late war in Africa, spending over three years in the service. He says that the country is left in bad shape on account of the war, which will take year to overcome. Grasshoppers are one of the pests of the farmers of Africa and ants are another destroyer of farm land. They build large mounds of earth which become so compact that it requires a sharp spear to break up the hills. Cattle raising is the most profitable industry of the country. Mr. and Mrs. Berney expect to remain in Columbus and make it their future home.
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Grand Island enthusiasts of a "rest room" for farmers' wives and daughters are agitating the setting apart one room in their new court house for this purpose. Central City has such a place and the Fremont Tribune advocates the same thing for that city. If a few of our city men and women could experience the inconvenience of the majority of the women coming from the country into town on business we doubt not that within a few years not only Columbus but every town would possess a "rest room." A convenient apartment with toilet facilities, comfortable chairs, couches on which sleeping children could be laid and where women could wait after having finished their shopping, would be the means of making a trip to town a pleasure. The men have many places to pass their time in town but there is absolutely no place for the women and children.
The Columbus Journal, July 29, 1903
Frank Neator, conductor on the B.& M., was compelled to lay off from work last week on account of sickness.
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Will Eimers of Los Angeles, California, but who still retains his interest in the store at Humphrey was in town last week on his way to the last named place.
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Paul Rodak, assistant section foreman for the Union Pacific here, was transferred to Valley last week where he will be head foreman for a gang of workmen there.
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Charles Wurdeman has torn down the building on Eleventh street recently purchased of Mrs. Henry by Henry Herchenhan, and will begin work immediately in erecting the new two story brick.
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John Schram of Seattle, Washington, one of Columbus' old-time residents and who settled in the far west as a pioneer of that country, arrived here last week on a few days' visit to relatives. Mr. Schram has sold his hardware business in which he has been engaged. His store was one of the first to ship goods to Alaska.
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Miss Anna Sturgeon is in the Nebraska telephone office this city learning the "central" work.
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Anna, oldest daughter of August Boettcher, has been very sick with appendicitis but is now improving.
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Mr. and Mrs. Fred Shultz of Island precinct were in this city one day this week and transacted the necessary business for deeding their son Albert a fine farm. The old folks contemplate moving to Columbus in the near future.--Osceola Record.
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Misses Maggie and Harriet Hughes were the guests Wednesday of Miss Louise Davis, going to Platte Center the same evening to visit their cousin J.T. Evans. The two young ladies come from London, England, and were on their way to Seattle, Washington.
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The Bismark creamery building recently purchased by Mr. Reynolds will soon be in place on Olive street. It was brought from a distance of about five miles on wheels and passed along Eleventh street this Tuesday morning. The building will be converted into a livery barn.
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The one-story frame known as the Phillipps building just north of the Meridian hotel on Olive street was torn down last week, thus removing another old Columbus landmark. The timber used in its construction was of cottonwood and it was erected some time in the 60s.
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Friends and relatives of Harry Lawerence have been very anxious about him, not having had any letter from him or notice of his whereabouts since he left here five weeks ago. Members of lodges here are making a search for him. Harry left Columbus with the intention of securing work in Council Bluffs.
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L.A. Bennett, F.V. Welch and Charles H. White left here Saturday for Grand Island to enlist in the regular army for duty in the Philippines. All the boys were with the First Nebraska regiment during the Spanish-American war and know what the service means. Bennett failed to pass the physical examination and returned home again.
The Columbus Journal, August 5, 1903
August Wagner was up town Monday for the first time, after having undergone an operation at the hospital for appendicitis.
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Sheriff Byrnes went to Tarnov Monday evening with a warrant for the arrest of Mike Skorupa for selling liquors without a license.
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Ole Olson, a former employe of J.C. Echols, visited friends here last week. Mr. Olson is now traveling for the Midland Glass & Paint Co. of Omaha.
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Miss Lida McMahon returns to Geneva today after a ten days' visit at home. Miss McMahon is matron at the state institution there, and is well pleased with her work.
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Miss Fannie Geer returned Saturday from Marshall, Mich., where she went to visit her sisters. Six weeks of her summer vacation was spent in Iowa City, Ia., at the summer library school where she studied the best methods used in classifying and conducting public libraries.
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Arthur Pohl and wife are in the city visiting Mrs. E. Pohl and family. Arthur has been engaged with H. Murdock in his grocery store at Springfield, but has resigned his position and after a vacation spent here will engage in business with his father-in-law in Springfield.
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Ed. Fitzpatrick, Ed. Kavanaugh, Louis Peterson, Sam Friedhof, Henry Murphy, Theodore Friedhof, Leonard Wagner, Harold Kramer and Jerome Fitzpatrick returned home Monday from a ten days' camping out at McPherson's lake. Another party composed of the families of W.N. Hensley and C.A. Speice also returned Monday from the same place.
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Mrs. George A. Scott and son of Columbus and Henry G. McGath of Prairie Creek visited last Sunday with their sister Mrs. Henry M. Smith and family...--Fullerton News-Journal.
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James B. Kyle and his daughter Miss Marie are enjoying a visit from relatives who came recently from Ireland. One niece of Mr. Kyle, Kathaleen A. Bowman, two nephews, James B. Coen and M.J. Coen and Catherine, the eight year old daughter of James B. Coen. After visiting the Kyles at their home south of Monroe for a short time, the last named gentleman went to the capital city where he has accepted a position under Dr. Green at the Lincoln asylum. The other relatives will remain for some time.
The Columbus Journal, August 12, 1903
Henry Ragatz sold his 960-acre ranch near Cedar Rapids last week to P.E. McKillip. The deal was made through F.T. Walker's real estate agency. Mr. Ragatz cleared over $2,000 on his investment since March 1.
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Wm. Gibson of Cedar Rapids was in the city Sunday to meet his wife and children who had been visiting relatives in Detroit. The family were guests of Mr. Gibson's aunt, Mrs. Susan Lloyd, over Sunday. Mr. Gibson was one of the early settlers of Platte county, his parents living four miles northeast of town and later taking a homestead in Boone county.
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Mrs. Herman Siewert, living across the river, is very sick with inflammation of the bowels.
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John Truelove, an old settler of this county living at Monroe, is very sick, being threatened with typhoid fever.
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Delegates to the republican county convention from Joliet township are: Arthur Lamb, Owen Jones, John Williams, Joe Joseph.
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J.R. Smith, an old settler in Platte county who lives near Monroe, has been very sick for some time. He is 84 years old and his recovery is considered very doubtful.
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H.O. Studley, who lives on the farm of W.E. Cole east of Monroe, has purchased from Dr. Hansen the 120-acre farm known as the Babcock place, five miles northwest of Columbus to which he will move next spring.
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D.E. Geffen, who for the past three years has been proprietor of the Park Livery barn, sold his interest to O.G. Staab and Clyde Scott who took possession Monday. Mr. Geffen does not know yet just what business he will engage in, but expects to remain in Columbus.
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Several tracts of land have changed hands the past week, among them are the Clark farms. A.W. Clark sold his 161-acre farm four miles northeast of town to John Mohlman from Grand Prairie township, for $60 an acre. F.F. Clark sold his 160-acres two miles east of the city, which is known as the Stuart place, to his brother, A.W. Clark, also for $60 an acre. Mr. F.F. Clark in turn purchased a farm east of Creston paying $65 an acre for the place.
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Little Charlie Baker entertained Wednesday afternoon in honor of his two young cousins, Ethel and Cleo Conway of Omaha. The little folks were entertained on the lawn. A grab bag and "pinning the tail on the donkey" were the amusements. Master Arthur Gray won a toy donkey and Mary Pearsall of Omaha a bottle of perfurme for prizes in the game. Refreshments were served.
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John Ahrens has sold his 80-acre farm in Bismark township to Gerhard Loseke for $5,600, just $70 per acre. Five years ago this land could have been bought for $35 an acre and fifteen years ago could have been purchased for $12 per acre. The land is nine miles from town, but is located in the famous Shell creek valley. This is said to be the highest price yet paid for farm land in this vicinity.
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Walter Borowiak returned home last Tuesday from Solomon, Kansas, where he had been working for the Union Pacific company. About six weeks ago Walter had a narrow escape from death while working with the gang on a steam sand shovel. Without warning, the hill through which they were cutting the grade, gave way, covering men and machinery. Walter suffered broken ribs, broken leg and bruised on the head, from which he suffered severely for several weeks.
The Columbus Journal, August 19, 1903
Mrs. Wm. Novell has purchased a bakery at West Point, this state, and has moved there to conduct the business. Her son Wallie, who has been engaged in the Jones bakery will be the baker. The store was purchased from Mrs. David Baker, formerly of Genoa and who is quite well known here. William Novell went to West Point Wednesday.
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David, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Miles, is recovering from a very serious sickness, a complication of diseases.
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Mrs. Thomas Wilson and children left Monday evening for Los Angeles, California, where they expect to make their future home.
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Prof. Watters moved his family today (Tuesday) to the house recently vacated by C.E. Pollock. They come direct from Broken Bow to Columbus.
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Dick Logeman, a farmer who lives near Platte Center, had his back quite seriously hurt a short time ago by the falling of a windmill which he was helping to raise on the farm of Nick Schiltz. He is now recovering nicely.
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Will Brewer was found lying unconscious in the barn at his home Thursday afternoon, and for a few hours was a very sick man. The cause of his sudden illness was appendicitis from which he has been a sufferer for some time. He has now almost entirely recovered.
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Mrs. John Stauffer returned Friday from Ellensburg, Washington, where she went about three months ago to spend the summer with her daughter Mrs. Kohler. Miss Rosa, who went out with her will remain this winter and attend the State normal school which is located there. John Stauffer, who has been there several months, will also remain for some time.
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James McGlinchey was in town Sunday on his way to Primrose where he has been appointed the first Union Pacific agent at that town, which is located between Cedar Rapids and Spalding. Many years ago Mr. McGlinchey was a gunsmith here in the store now owned by L. Phillipps. Since leaving Columbus he has been located as agent for the Union Pacific at St. Edward and Cedar Rapids and now leaves a position in Omaha to go to Primrose.
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Mrs. J.N. Kilian and daughter Eunice and sons Leo and Alfonse arrived here Friday from the Philippine Islands, and remained until Monday visiting Mrs. Kilian's sister Mrs. C.C. Sheldon, going from here to Blair to make their home for the present. Captain Kilian of the U.S. army is stationed at Ilo Ilo, Panay Island, and will remain for one year longer. Mr. Kilian and family left here over a year ago for that country. Mrs. Kilian was not at all pleased with the place. She returns in order to place the children in school, the advantages there being very meagre for educational purposes.
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H.J. Alexander returned Saturday from a visit to relatives in the east, where he has been since July 14. His mother, who is 84 years old, is in feeble health and it was to see her that Mr. Alexander made the trip. In St. Lawrence county, New York, where his brother and mother reside, Mr. Alexander says 96,000 milch cows furnish practically the entire living of the inhabitants. The county is given over to the dairy industry and one-tenth of the cheese in the state of New York is made in that county. The great lakes are a means of much transportation and pleasure excursions, a ride on lake Erie from Detroit to Cleveland costing only 25 cents, which is the regular fare. Mr. Alexander says the best corn along his return route was seen after he left Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and he thinks Nebraska is the best of all in which to make a living.
The Columbus Journal, August 26, 1903
Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Nichols left Thursday for New Virginia, Iowa, where Mr. Nichols has found employment in a restaurant.
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Tony Towns has resigned his position as foreman at Schostag's cigar factory and has packed and shipped his household goods to Hamburg, Iowa, where he expects to engage in business on his own account. Mr. and Mrs. Towns left Monday for their new home.
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For several weeks past this city has been bothered by a burglar or burglars who have entered houses, always in the residence portions. The home of L. Jaeggi was entered one night last week, the burglar gaining entrance through a back window. The man could be distinctly heard down stairs but before the women folks, who were alone in the house, could call aid he was frightened away. At the home of Peter Luchsinger a watch and other jewelry have been stolen. A. Heintz had a gold watch and fifteen cents in change taken last Tuesday night, and about two weeks ago at the Grand Pacific hotel Mr. Brock had a gold watch and nearly $10 in money stolen. Other houses that have been disturbed by some one prowling about are I.H. Britell, Mrs. Miles Ryan, D. Schupbach and E.H. Putman. At the latter place the intruder tried to gain entrance to the house before the family had retired.
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The city council met last Friday evening in regular session. D. McDuffy appeared before the board requesting that the ditch on the north and west sides of block 42 be filled. The matter was referred to the committee on streets and grades. A. Heintz asked the council to enter into a contract with him for the furnishing of electric street lights for a term of years. The request was referred to the committee on public property and waterworks. The council and mayor accepted an invitation by the fire department to appear in parade on firemen's day which will be celebrated September 7th. The council, upon recommendation of the committee on streets and grades, ordered Seventeenth street to be graded. A permanent crossing was ordered made over M street on the north side of Eleventh. C.M. Taylor resigned his position as chief of police and Mayor Becher named Frank A. Hagel as his successor. The appointment was confirmed by the council.

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