Platte Co., NE - 1903 News (Sept-Dec) NEGenWeb Project
PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
News From 100 Years Ago
(Sept., 1903 - Dec., 1903)


The Columbus Journal, September 2, 1903
W.J. Winston, formerly of Columbus, now of Clinton, Sheridan county, was visiting old friends here last week.
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Charles Lutes and family moved to Columbus this week, says Saturday's Central City Republican. Charlie will work at his trade of carpenter.
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Joe Bivins, who has been employed in Pollock's drug store, left today (Tuesday) for Omaha where he will meet his mother and sister and return home witih them to Georgia.
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Mrs. J.L. Sturgeon went to Omaha Sunday, called by the serious illness of her niece, Miss Jennie Gasser, who underwent a surgical operation a few weeks ago at the Methodist hospital there.
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A. Haight returned Saturday from visiting his brother in Michigan. On his way, he visited J.A. Barber and family, formerly Columbus residents, who are now in Chicago. Mr. Barber has a splendid position in the city with which he is well pleased.
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Joe Collidge will move his family this month to Omaha.
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Mr. and Mrs. John Burgenger moved today to Kansas to make their home.
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F.N. Nelson, who came here in January from Valparaiso, moved to Lincoln Monday where they will reside.
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Albert Gieger returned from Switzerland last Wednesday where he has been for the past three months looking after an estate of a relative.
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Hon. George L. Loomis of Fremont, while attending the democratic state convention here last week, was the guest of his nephew F.W. Farrand. Mr. Loomis was chosen chairman of the convention.
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Ivan Holmes has been given a position as switch engineer and hostler at Ravenna, Nebraska, and moved his household effects Monday. Mrs. Holmes leaves today, Tuesday. Mr. H. has been fireman on the B.& M. passenger running from here to Lincoln.
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D.M. Sullivan, for several years yard master here for the Union Pacific and later brakeman on the Norfolk branch, was up from Council Bluffs the first of the week. He is now conductor on the Ft. Dodge division out from Council Bluffs on the Illinois Central road.
The Columbus Journal, September 9, 1903
C.H. Swallow of Humphrey was in town Monday.
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George Barnhart of Ft. Worth, Texas, arrived here Sunday.
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Miss Lillian Belford visited the state fair at Lincoln this Tuesday.
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Miss Jennie Wilson of Ohio is visiting her brother T.F. WIlson and family.
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Miss Golden Rodman of Kearney visited her brother H. Rodman of this city.
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Mrs. Lora Adams and baby returned Tuesday to Omaha after a visit home with relatives.
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Mrs. R. Sauer left Monday for Chicago where she expects to make her home with her son, Gus.
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Mrs. Hardy returned home to Leigh Friday after a visit with her son C.C. Hardy and family.
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Miss Nettie Miller left Tuesday morning for Lincoln where she will work at the millinery trade.
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Mr. and Mrs. Max Elias went over to David City Wednesday to visit the parents of Mrs. Elias.
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Rev. and Mrs. Munro and children returned Thursday from a visit to Mr. Munro's sister in Colfax county.
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B.R. Cowdery, a former Columbus business man, now of Humphrey attended the republican convention here last Wednesday.
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Rev. and Mrs. Karvenstine and children of Wayne arrived here Sunday on a visit to relatives. Mrs. K. is a sister of M. Brugger.
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Mrs. Ben Moore and daughter Helen of Perry, Iowa, visited here a few days last week with relatives, the guests of Mrs. Wm. Terrell.
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Norman Parks leaves today (Wednesday) for San Diego, Calif., where he goes in the hope of benefiting his health. His mother will remain in Columbus for some time.
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Miss Clara Jacobson returned Friday from Onawa, Iowa, where she spent the most of the summer with a sister. She attended a normal school in Des Moines a few weeks.
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J.J. White of Syracuse, N.Y., and his daughter Mrs. Walter Town of Baraboo, Wis., were guests of Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Herrick, leaving for their homes last Thursday. Mr. White and Mrs. Towne are uncle and cousin respectively, of Mr. Herrick. Mrs. Herrick accompanied them as far as Council Bluffs where she visited a few days with Mrs. Mary Williams.
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M. Jenny, of the firm of Jenny Bros. of Neboville, was a caller at this office last Tuesday. Outside of the merchants of Columbus and in the Neboville neighborhood few people in the county know the extent of business that is carried on by this enterprising firm, who reside about eighteen miles northeast of Columbus. The Jenny Bros. have for twenty years been manufacturing brick cheese, and have established a market that consumes all that they can turn out, most of which is sold in Omaha. An average of 1,000 pounds of cheese a week is made by them and there is a constant demand for their product. The brick cheese is made in cakes about the size of an ordinary building brick, which takes but a few weeks of drying to prepare it for the market. It is of a mild, rich flavor, and those who partake of it once are sure to buy it again and again. The Jenny Bros. own about 600 acres of land in Sherman township, most of which they preserve for pasture and hay land. They are now milking seventy-four cows, and this is the dull part of the season for their work.
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Mat Jones of Norfolk was in town Friday visiting former acquaintances, after an absence from town of eight years. Mr. Jones is employed on a stock farm near Norfolk. He says D.B. Duffy, another former Columbus man, is enjoying prosperity, has a half section of land and is getting rich from it.
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Mr. and Mrs. J.E. North returned home Thursday from a visit west. They accompanied "Grandma" North to Wenatchee, Washington, where she will remain with her daughters Mrs. Cushing and Mrs. Morse. "Grandma" was delighted with the country and is satisfied to make her future home there. miss Elsie Morse is recovering from a severe spell of sickness.
The Columbus Journal, September 16, 1903
Albert Colman went to Lincoln Monday where he will attend medical college.
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George Bolz was taken before Judge Curtis Saturday morning accused of drunkenness. He was fined $8.75.
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J.H. Boomstra of Omaha has accepted a position with Hulst & Adams as book keeper. C.H. Bissell, the former employe for the place, has gone to the ranch of W.J. Winston.
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Prof. J.R. Lake returned Wednesday from the south where he ha been spending the summer and has entered the office of C.J. Garlow where he will study law.
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Rev. Quivey of Omaha representing the Nebraska society which finds homes for destitute children, was in town Monday and took six children with him to Kearney where they will be placed in good homes.
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Gus. Speice and L.G. Zinnecker visited the latter's sister, Mrs. I. Janning Sunday, near Osceola. On their erturn Monday they drove through som every deep water that was running across the road in the bottom lands south of the river.
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F. Tremain, a young man from Omaha, opened a pantitorium Saturday on Olive street.
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John McCray of Carrolton, Ohio, left Friday for Missouri to visit before returning home. He was the guest while here of his brother, R. McCray.
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Rev. Halsey has a sister who is a missionary in central Turkey, and on account of the threatened war there her relatives are much concerned as to her safety.
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H. Hockenberger is expected home today, Tuesday, from Georgia, where he went to visit a sister who was seriously sick with typhoid fever. She is much better at present and hopes are entertained for her recovery.
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Joe Collidge left Monday for Omaha, where in future his family will reside. We understand his run hereafter will be on the main line of the Union Pacific, hence the change. The family will be located on Poppleton avenue.
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W.H. VanAlstine is building an addition to his residence on Fourteenth street which is occupied by Mr. Davis. The building has been raised and an addition of 12x22 feet will be built. C.J. Scott & Son have the contract for the work.
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George Barnhart of Ft. Worth, Texas, has returned home after a few days spent in the city. Today (Tuesday) Miss Nellie Barnhart, his daughter, will be married to a gentleman of that city who will, a few months later, enter into partnership with Mr. Barnhart in the live stock business. Miss Frankie Barnhart, who has many friends here, was married last June and lives in Shoshone, Idaho.
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Theophil, brother of M. Brugger, has been visiting relatives here the past week, and will leave, possibly today, for his home in Portland, Oregon, where he is teacher of physics in the city high schools. Mr. Brugger graduated from the electrical engineering course of the State university several years ago, and with Ernest Gerrard made the trip through Europe. Later he went to east Africa where he was employed in the gold mines. After visiting other countries he returned to California and the past four years has been teaching natural science.
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Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jones of Postville were in the city on their way home from a three months' visit to their old home in Wales. This was their first trip to that country in twenty-four years, and the visit to their many relatives was greatly enjoyed. Neither Mr. nor Mrs. Jones would care to return to Wales to live as they believe this country offers more inducements to the common people and both enjoy better health here than there. On their way home when twenty miles out from New York passengers on their ship received messages through the Marconi system in regard to the races between the Reliance ad Shamrock.
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George Fairchild returned home Sunday from Bonesteel, South Dakota, where he went to view the land which will be opened by the government for settlers, probably next summer. Mr. Fairchild says the land is excellent, that the corn crop there this year is good and far ahead of ours now. While at Bonesteel there was a very large crowd of excursionists, and many could not secure beds for the night. Mr. Fairchild was one of the number without a bed. He predicts that there will be a great crowd ready to take all the land that the government will give. He did not see W.B. Backus, formerly of Columbus, who is now practicing law in Bonesteel, but says he understands he is is doing well there.
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Ferd Stires returned home Wednesday from his extended trip to England and Germany. He accompanied his aunt, Miss Lamb, to England about a year ago in the hope of improving his health, and comes back feeling much better. In England Ferd spent most of his time studying medicine, and on the continent he visited some of the wonderful hospitals. In Berlin he was admitted to the operating room of the largest hospital there, which occupies eighty acres for its grounds, and where he witnessed operations. Ferd has been visiting relatives in Philadelphia several weeks on his return home. He will leave next week for Omaha to continue his studies at Creighton college.
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L.R. Kells, who for several months has been manager of the Swift establishment at this place has been transferred to Onawa, Iowa, where he takes a similar position with that company. The change is in the way of an advance to Mr. Kells, the plant at Onawa doing a larger and better business than in Columbus. J.R. Campbell, who has charge of all the branch offices out from South Omaha for the Swift people, is now in charge here temporarily. He has now four men employed who dress and take charge of the poultry, and he expects to engage as many as twenty during the winter months. Mr. Campbell tells us that W.G. Partridge, who will be remembered as manager here at one time for the Swift company, is now engaged in the correspondent department for them at South Omaha, and has one of the best positions in the office department.
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The Genoa Leader is our authority for the statement that Charles Gerrard, at one time a compositor on the Argus of this city, who suddenly disappeared from Elba last February, leaving his wife and two children, has been heard from at Cleveland, Ohio, where he is working at his trade.
The Columbus Journal, September 23, 1903
Miss Mary Jenkinson who was brought from Canada about four weeks ago, is lying very low with dropsy.
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Louis Dowding of Seward is employed in the barber shop of L.G. Zinnecker, beginning work there last Wednesday.
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John Wurdeman, of Columbus, who owns a farm three miles northeast of Clarks, will erect a house thereon this fall. So says the Enterprise of that place.
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Basil Gietzen has gone to Marquette, Nebraska, where he will work on his father's ranch this winter.
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We understand that Eugene Bacon, who for many years lived at Platte Center and vicinity and now resides on a farm east of Spalding, has fallen heir to a fortune of $50,000.
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Harry Lawrence, who has been away from home for some time, writes to his grandmother, Mrs. Warner, from Niles Center, Illinois, that he is enjoying good health. He expects to go soon to St. Louis to remain.
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Wm. Burgess of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, was in the city between trains Saturday on his way east. Friends of Mr. Burgess who knew him as one of the old settlers of this city, said he seemed in excellent health and spirits. He served as U.S. Indian agent for the Pawnees and also edited for some time the Columbus Gazette.
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The many friends of Mrs. Katharine Wermuth of Downers Grove, near Chicago, will be sorry to learn of her serious illness. Monday of last week she suffered a stroke of apoplexy which affected the left side, the effects from which she has not yet recovered consciousness. Mrs. Wermuth is a sister of Editor W.B. Dale. The latter left Monday for Downers Grove.
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H.F. Mielenz has entered into a contract whereby he will sell his photograph gallery to Mrs. E.A. McAllister of Joplin, Missouri, who was here Friday transacting business, and is now in Genoa. Several years ago Mrs. McAllister was a resident of Columbus and conducted a photograph gallery. She has since been in Joplin, but wishes to be nearer relatives, who reside in Genoa.
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One of our exchanges says: "Mrs. Higgins-Sullivan, a former resident of Columbus and author of 'Out of the West,' is now at Omaha with her mother, but will spend the winter in California. She has written another story that will soon be brought out by the Harpers. It is called 'The Purple Shadows,' being a picture of life in a western city which she says will be recognized as Grand Island."
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On Saturday John Hoffman sold his meat market to C.H. Buschmann who takes charge of the place today, Tuesday. Mr. Hoffman will leave next Monday for Sparta, Wisconsin, his old home, where he has made arrangements to purchase the butcher shop of his brother. The Hoffman family have been Columbus residents for many years and the news of their leaving this vicinity will be regretted by many. The family will not move until a few months later.
The Columbus Journal, September 30, 1903
William Bucher is building a large corn crib on his farm northeast of town. ... John Dischner, northeast of town, is building a fine new barn, 32x40 feet in size. ... Walter Scott and three other carpenters went to Monroe Saturday near where they will build a large barn on the farm of John Keeler.
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Mrs. Kate Koop of St. Edward, widow of the late John Koop who died from the effects of falling upon a pitchfork, was in the city Monday and was appointed administratrix of her husband's estate.
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The Columbus Cream Co. have established a station in Sherman township where they will purchase cream for their establishment in this city. Wm. Engelbart formerly in the employ of the Beatrice Creamery Co., has charge of the new station.
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R.S. Grason of Council Bluffs has been sent here by the Swift company to take charge of their business at this place. He began his work Saturday. J.R. Campbell, the manager of the Swift branch offices in this part of the country, who has had charge here for three weeks past, has returned to South Omaha.
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Miss Mamie Studley of Monroe is engaged at the Nebraska telephone office in this city.
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B. McTaggart went to Omaha Saturday where he will remain in a hospital about two weeks undergoing an operation.
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The Neboville postoffice will be discontinued within a few weeks, and the patrons along the route will be supplied by a rural free delivery out from Leigh.
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Carl Rohde, jr., 12 years old, suffered the fracture of an arm Friday afternoon during a game of foot ball on the Third ward school grounds. The lad is getting along nicely under the care of Dr. Tiesing.
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T.W. McKean, who has been located at Shenandoah, Iowa, was in town last week. He expects to start a tailoring establishment here in the near future. Mr. McKean is well known to many of our readers, having lived in this city in past years.
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H.G. Lueschen of the Boheet neighborhood was in town Monday. Mr. Lueschen, who is one of the old settlers in the county, lives about seventeen miles from town, and his trip in on Monday was the first since January. Almost all his trading is done at Creston.
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J.H. Drinnin writes from Wyoming, Illinois, where he was called by the serious illness of his mother, that the doctors gave the family no hope of her recovery. When on his way home, near Marengo, Illinois, the 19th of September, the train upon which he was traveling was badly wrecked and the passengers were all severely shaken up.
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The High school physics laboratory have received an X-ray tube and a Geislers tube. Tuesday of last week a radioagraph was taken of Miss Nettie Gondring's hand, showing a distinct outline of the smaller bones.
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W.B. Dale returned Monday from Downers Grove, Ill., where he was called by the illness of his sister Mrs. Katharine Wermuth. He left his sister much improved and with every indication of her being in excellent health within a few weeks.
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The faculty of the High school have decided not to issue the Reflector the coming year. They feel that the call upon the merchants for funds to support the foot ball team, the lecture course, the oratorical contest and for the entertainment of the North Nebraska Teachers' association during the year is as much as is just to ask from the public.
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Mrs. Miles, mother of Mrs. D.N. Miner, tripped on a wire door mat in front of Zinnecker's shop last Tuesday afternoon, and fell against a garden seat, cutting her face and brusing her right shoulder, the effects from which she has suffered much pain.
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M. Rothleitner is recovering from the effects of a very serious cut in his right leg. About ten days ago he was setting up a hay rake on the farm of George Lewis northeast of town, and in some way the tine of the rake caught in the calf of his limb inflicing a wound two inches deep. He was confined to the house several days.
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Frank Fugard arrived here Saturday from Washington, D.C., and will make a two weeks' visit with friends. He has a young son who makes his home with Frank Hagel and he comes to visit him and will be the guest of Mr. Hagel while here. Mr. Fugard is employed as a butter maker in the capital city, and has among others in the same department, Harry Graves, a Columbus boy.
Jacob Glur is constructing cement crossings between the Thurston hotel and Pollack's and from there south to Grays' corner, and from Grays' to the Commercial bank. The first two crossings have been laid, and the last one will be finished later. All will be six feet wide instead of the regular four-foot walk which the other crossings have. The owners of the adjoining properties have ordered the additional two feet at their own expense.
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H.G. Kemp of Douglas, Wyoming, was in the city Monday on his way to St. Edward on a visit to his parents. Mr. Kemp will be remembered by the older citizens of Columbus as having been in the newspaper business here in the 80's, succeeding A.L. Bixby in the publication of the Platte County Sentinel for a short time. Mr. Kemp is now engaged in the ministry, having charge of the Methodist congregation in the first named city mentioned above.
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Charles Rosencrans, who spent about two years in this city as an employe of the Union Pacific company, leaving about one year ago, figures in a sensational affair at Papillion. Rosencrans has been missing for over a week from his home in that place and his friends thought he had met with foul play. Later indications point to his having been in correspondence with a South Omaha woman, and Rosencrans' best friends say there will be many sensational features of the case.
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Hon. George D. Meiklejohn, of Fullerton, was in town Saturday on his way to Sidney, near where, he with a party of capitalists has purchased a large tract of land from the Union Pacific Co. This syndicate proposes to bring 500 families of Danes to settle on these lands and engage extensively in dairying, the cream to be sent to Omaha and Denver. The Danish Emigration society of Minnesota will furnish these emigrants with ten cows each to start and enough money to erect houses, purchase farming implements and necessaries of life for one year, the money to be paid back in small installments at very low rate of interest.
The Columbus Journal, October 7, 1903
Charles Welch is erecting a neat cottage on north M street in Becher Place addition. ... V.A. Macken is making some valuable improvements on his North street residence property. ... Perry Loshbaugh is erecting a one-story 22x38 dwelling on Olive and Nineteenth street in Pearsall's addition. So many new buildings are going up in this part of the city that it is difficult to keep account of all.
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Frank Anson, formerly proprietor of the Lindell hotel, here, has leased a hotel property in Creston, this county, and is refurnishing and renovating the same for occupancy.
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William Partsch moved to Humphrey Thursday.
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Henry Sturgeon went to Garrison Thursday to be engaged with his uncle during the winter in feeding cattle.
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Mark Burke, who has been conductor on a main line Union Pacific freight, was transferred Saturday to the Albion branch.
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The eight children of J.F. McGuire accompanied by Mr. McGuire's mother, Mrs. Haycock, will leave today, Wednesday, for Riverside, California, where they expect to make their future home. Mr. McGuire has been there for several months. Mrs. Haycock, who is ninety-four years old and a remarkable woman in many ways, expects to enjoy the trip and leaves here for the sunny land with hopes of spending a number of years yet with her family. Although she has reached this extreme old age she is active in motion, healthy and has fewer gray hairs than many women of fifty.
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The L. Phillipps Co. are having erected in the rear of their business place on Olive street a brick structure 22x22 feet in size one story with basement. The same will be occupied by the firm as a work shop and the front room will be enlarged thus giving more space for increasing business. Charles Wurdeman has the contract, Herman Fricke doing the brick work.
The Columbus Journal, October 14, 1903
C.H. Garrison moved to Columbus Saturday from Blair and is living west of the Third ward school.
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Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wise and child of Argentine, Kansas, are expected Thursday on a visit to relatives here.
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The undertaking department of the Gass store has received a valuable addition to their conveniences in the way of a heated apparatus to be placed in the carriages during funerals.
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Paul Duffy was in town a few days last week. He is now working in Norfolk at the tailor trade. Peter Duffy is in Kansas engaged in the insurance business, but will return soon to Lincoln to continue his studies at the state university.
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Mr. and Mrs. Harry Riley were in Schuyler over Sunday, called there by the serious illness of Mr. Riley's mother.
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Will Zinnecker is expected here this Wednesday from Berkeley, California, where he has been for the benefit of his health. He will take his old chair in his brother's barber shop.
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Prof. Waters received a visit last week from his brother H.L. of Dubuque, Iowa, who returned home Saturday. Mr. Waters is interested in the street railway of his home town.
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J.H. Drinnin is expected home Thursday from Wyoming, Illinois, where he was called several weeks ago by the serious illness of his mother, and who died about two weeks ago.
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An explosion caused from chemicals being used in the Hastings high school chemistry class seriously injured two pupils last Friday. The teacher, Prof. P.E. McCoy, a former Columbus boy, had frequently used the ingredients but were never known to have caused any trouble.
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We learn from the Norfolk News that some time in December the Moore hardware store of that city will pass into the hands of new proprietors. W.B. Blakeman of that place and G.J. Hahn of Columbus, having bargained with Mr. Moore for the purchase at that time.
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Frank Thomas, formerly a resident south of the river, now engaged in the milling business at Red Cloud, this state, was here several days last week visiting relatives, his mother having recently arrived from her visit east for a short stay before going to Texas to spend the winter with her son Will. Mrs. Thomas has been sorely afflicted for a long time on account of defective eye sight and we are informed that there has been no perceptible change for the better.
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E.M. Sparhawk has sold his farm south of the Platte river, which consists of 593 acres, to Hans Elliott for the consideration of $26,000 and has purchased the 20-acre farm west of town belonging to W.A. Way for $95 per acre. Mr. Sparhawk will build on his new farm this fall to which he will move in the spring.
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Those of the militia boys who will leave next Saturday for ten days' encampment at Ft. Riley, Kansas, are F. Kotlar, C.H. Rollin, Wm. LaRue, Wm. Fox, E. Wilson, D. Chatfield, J. Drummond, H. Mowery, Charles Pike, Arch. McFarland, Joe McCloud, H. WIlson, J. Trimpy, H. Herring, W. Beecroft, C. Bean and R. Young.
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The Macabee lodge arranged a pleasant surprise on Mr. and Mrs. George Hahn Monday evening at the home of G.O. Burns. THe gathering was in the nature of a farewell party to Mr. and Mrs. Hahn who leave this week for Norfolk to make their future home. The guests brought refreshments and a pleasant time was passed.
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Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Powers returned Saturday from South Omaha where they were making final arrangements for the marriage of their daughter Miss Rose, to Prof. Finnigan of Harvard, Nebraska. The marriage will take place in St. Bridget's Catholic church in South Omaha this Wednesday morning. Miss Powers is well known in the vicinity south of Columbus, as one of the successful teachers of Polk county for several years past. Her friends will wish her a bright and happy future life. Mrs. Thomas Costello of Cheyenne, Wyoming, a sister of Miss Powers, passed through here Monday on her way to the wedding.
The Columbus Journal, October 21, 1903
H.A. Davis, fireman on the Union Pacific, has moved his family here from Omaha, and is residing in the west part of town.
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Tracy Keller, of Fullerton, has a position with Dussell & Son. He recently visited his mother at Fullerton who had just returned from Sweet Briar, North Dakota.
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We learn from the Fullerton News-Journal that Joe Mahaffey, a former Columbus printer, has severed his connection with that paper and has taken charge of the Belgrade Herald.
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Mrs. Adams of Genoa and Mrs. Gibson of St. Edward were in town last week called by the sickness of their mother, Mrs. M.J. Penfield, who was suffering from inflammation of the bowels. Mrs. Penfield is the mother of Mrs. A.G. McAllister.
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L.R. Jones, who has been in the hospital for some time, where he underwent an operation, returned to his home in Fullerton Saturday. Mr. Jones was the head miller in the Jaeggi mills a few years ago and made many friends here, who hope for his speedy recovery.
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A large gathering of country and city people passed Sunday at the farm of Henry Engel, northeast of town, the occasion being a reunion of relatives and friends for Mrs. George Engel, the aged mother of Mr. Engel. Among relatives from a distance present were Mrs. Getz and daughter of O'Neill and Mrs. Henry Gruger of Illinois. About one hundred people took part in the festivities.
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Miss Pearl Nichols, daughter of J.E. Nichols living east of town, is quite seriously sick. Doctors performed an operation upon her Sunday, but she is still in a critical condition.
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Will Hull, who for the past four years has been brakeman on the B.& M. from here to Lincoln, was transferred last week to a run out of Lincoln. His family will move this week to that city.
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Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Jackson moved to Creston last Saturday. They expect to engage in farming, south of that town, in the spring....Mr. E.H. Leach went to Columbus today for a week's visit with relatives.--Humphrey Democrat.
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Homer Robinson of this city has purchased the hardware and furniture store of Olson & Ekman of Newman Grove, and as he is a man of good business judgment and a hustler, will no doubt do well there. His many friends here will wish him abundant success.
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J.P. Abts suffered a stroke of paralysis Wednesday morning which left his right arm and leg in a helpless condition. Mr. Abts is over 70 years old and, this being his first attack, further trouble is feared, although he has improved as rapidly as could be expected. He is at the home of his son Chris.
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E.M. Sparhawk has commenced building a new residence on his 20-acre tract recently purchased of W.A. Way. The house will be large, and contain all the modern conveniences. Charles Wurdeman is overseeing the carpenter work, and Mr. Sparhawk expects to have the place ready for occupancy by March.
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John Staab came down from Custer county the first of the week on a visit to his family, who are still on the Boheet farm. Last spring Mr. Staab purchased a ranch of 1480 acres in Custer county, but it being late in the season, he was unable to move his entire family out there so he did the next best thing. He went up himself and took three of the children with him and left Mrs. Staab and the other children on the Boheet farm. Mr. Staab is much pleased with his Custer county ranch and thinks that Custer is one of the best counties in Nebraska, crops are good there and stock is looking fine.--Leigh World.
The Columbus Journal, October 28, 1903
Dan Echols has a position in the county treasurer's office, and began his work there Monday morning.
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Miss Julia Fox was unable to attend her duties in the telephone office part of last week on account of sickness.
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Eber Smith, who has been herding sheep in western states during the summer, is now at work in Salt Lake City.
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Miss Sarah Baker, sister of Mrs. J.E. Erskine, returned last week from Yankton, South Dakota, and expects to make her home here with her sister.
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Harry Ryan, who has been in Wyoming the past summer, returned last week to Columbus and will remain here during the winter. In the spring he expects to locate permanently in Colorado.
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Mrs. Perry Loshbaugh stepped on a rusty nail Thursday which nearly went through the foot. The limb within a short time after was swollen to the knee, and she has suffered much from it.
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The Catholic church people of Duncan are making arrangements for the purchase of a pipe organ, which they expect to have in place soon. The instrument will be a good one and a credit to the church.
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Mr. and Mrs. Will Davis returned Wednesday from Lincoln where they took their six weeks old babe to be operated upon at the College View Sanitarium. The operation was successful, and the child will be left there a few weeks under the care of nurses.
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Mrs. Peter Klantschy of Duncan is in a very critical condition as a result of a stroke of paralysis last week. She is an old settler and nearly 70 years old.
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Charles Dack moved into his new home last week which he recently purchased from R.E. Jones, and Homer Robinson who occupied the premises has moved to the residence of Dr. Hansen. ... Mike Savage has moved to his recently purchased home, the former property of Mrs. J.D. Brewer. Mr. Batterton of Humphrey moved his family here Monday and will occupy the residence vacated by Mr. Savage. Mr. Batterton travels for the J.I.C. company.
The Columbus Journal, November 4, 1903
November 17, C.K. Davies will have a sale of his shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs.
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T.S. Rector, the new B.& M. agent will move his family into the Hendryx residence on west Fourteenth street.
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George Randall went to St. Louis Sunday where he expects to procure employment in connection with the Fair.
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Wilber Curry, who is attending the commercial college, was called to his home in St. Edward Monday by the illness of his father.
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J.E. Nichols, living three and a half miles east of Columbus, offers his well improved farm for sale. Shade and fruit trees. Inquire at the residence.
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C.J. Scott & Son have the contract for building the new residence of E.M. Sparhawk west of town. The house will be large, containing twelve rooms, with modern conveniences.
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Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Benham have moved from Olive street to rooms in the residence with Mrs. Cash on west Fourteenth street, and will board with Mrs. Cash during the winter.
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John P. Walker, formerly editor of the Humphrey Democrat, now of Weatherford, Oklahoma, was visiting his brother F.T. Walker here last week, going to Humphrey Thursday, where he will make an effort with prospective land buyers to go south. Mr. Walker has been in Oklahoma four years.
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Mrs. Mary Bremer writes home to her daughter Mrs. Fairchild that she reached Portland, Oregon, on the 24th. She is well pleased with the country and says that flowers are in bloom and everything looks beautiful and the climate is fine.
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Among the new pupils enrolled in the business college are Miss Clara Ratterman, Miss Nora Lyons, B.J. Newlon, W. Schupbach, all of Columbus, and Mr. Gould of Ogallala.
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H.F. Mielenz left today with his family for Humphrey where he will visit his parents. Mr. Mielenz has not yet decided where he will locate or what line of business he will pursue, but has several openings in view. His Columbus acquaintances will wish him prosperity in his new home. He makes friends wherever he is known.
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Bert Reynolds, one of the students at the business college is spending this week at his home in Petersburg. Mr. Reynolds is a brother of Miss Edith Reynolds who caused quite a sensation last week by her sudden disappearance from her school where she was teaching near that place, mention of which we have elsewhere in this issue. Miss Reynolds has been located in Denver from where she wrote to her parents.
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The Brock family are certainly a race of soldiers. In talking with J.R. Brock recently, he remarked that his grandfather had fought with Napoleon and participated in the battle of Waterloo. Mr. Brock himself was a soldier through the entire civil war, John Brock, jr., Charles Brock and Isaac Brock, all cousins to each other, were in the Philippine war, and a young grand son of J.R. Brock shows inclinations of the war spirit as he went with the militia boys from here to York this summer as their mascot, and his grandfather believes he will make a soldier some day.
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The village of Creston, this county, was the victim of a very disastrous fire early Sunday morning. The origin of the fire is not known. Editor C.E. Wagner of the Statesman, who sleeps in his office, was awakened about 2 o'clock by flames in his room and was compelled to jump out through a window to escape being burned. The alarm was then given but the fire had gained such headway that nothing could be done with the meager fire-fighting apparatus at hand and several buildings were consumed by the flames. The loss consists of the Creston Bank, Independent Telephone switchboard, a furniture store, Henning's blacksmith shop, the Creston Statesman office and equipment and an implement store. Nothing was saved from any of the buildings with the exception of what was in the vault of the bank. The entire loss is not known but that experienced by the telephone company is estimated at about $150. The buildings were all frame and we understand belonged to Theodore Wolfe. New buildings will be built in their places as soon as possible. The telephone company has men at work putting in a new switchboard and it is hoped that not more than four days service will be lost. C.E. Wagner left Monday for Omaha to make arrangements with a publishing house to do his printing. The other establishments will undoubtedly be replaced soon.
The Columbus Journal, November 11, 1903
Dan Echols went to Cedar Rapids, Nebraska, Thursday where he has accepted a position in the Hadley bank as collector and book keeper.
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Miss Gladys Paul, a teacher of Wayne county, stopped Friday and Saturday with her brother Dr. J.E. Paul. Miss Paul was on her way to Hall county for a visit.
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Attorney S.S. McAllister, who has been confined to his bed with pneumonia at the home of his sister Mrs. W.N. Hensley the past three weeks, is somewhat improved.
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Mrs. Carrig and daughter are visiting the family of Herman Fricke, on their way east. Mrs. Carrig, who is Mrs. Fricke's mother, was taken ill here and is unable to continue the trip for the present.
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The residence on west Fourteenth street known as the McDonald house was sold Monday to Dr. Geer, and the Doctor in turn sold his 20-acre farm west of town, known as the Wm. Staab place, to Henry Gerrard. The consideration for the farm was $2,600.
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Mrs. Merrill and daughter, Miss Maud move this week to Council Bluffs where they expect to make their future home.
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The Creston Statesman says the total loss to Theodore Wolfe by the big fire on November 1, of which we made mention last week, will amount of $10,000, and he carries an insurance of $6,000. The Statesman plant, which was entirely destroyed, was valued at $700 and carried $400 insurance. We understand all the buildings will be replaced with brick structures. The origin of the fire is not yet known.
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Mrs. Hard and daughter Miss Jessie of Medina, Ohio, arrived here Wednesday on a few weeks' visit with relatives and friends. They are on their way to California where they expect to spend the winter with Mrs. Hard's mother, Mrs. Ira Mullen. Mrs. Hard will be remembered here as Miss Mamie Mullen, a niece of J.E. North, and a former teacher of Platte county. It has been seventeen years since the Mullen family moved to California and this is Mrs. Hard's first visit to Columbus since that time.
The Columbus Journal, November 18, 1903
Miss May Stribbling now has charge of the millinery department at Grays'.
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D. H. Harrington, the popular business man of Duncan, was a Columbus visitor Thursday.
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Fred Stevens expects to move about December 1, to Greeley, Colorado, where he will deal in horses. The family will move there when he goes.
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Miss Tapka Aden of Rising City is spending the winter with her aunt Mrs. J.L. Sturgeon and learn ing the dress making trade with Mrs. Murray.
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Stephen Scofield of Grand Encampment, Wyo., spent several days here last week disposing of shares in the Beaver copper mine near that place. He was on his return home from Holt county and left here Saturday for the west. He is an uncle of Fred Scofield.
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Mr. and Mrs. Perry Loshbaugh moved into their new dwelling on 19th and Olive streets last Saturday.
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Lloyd Swain of the Telegram force was in Lincoln several days last week visiting with his mother. He resumed his duties here the first of the week.
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Carl J. Fleming, who for several months has been clerking in Schupbach's drug store, took an examination in Omaha last Wednesday under the state board of pharmacists, and received his certificate as a registered pharmacist Saturday.
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The friends of George Brodfuehrer will regret to learn of his misfortune in business affairs at Cornlea, this county. The Humphrey Leader makes the following mention relative to him: "George Brodfuehrer, of Cornlea, the first of the week 'left his debts and worries behind him,' and left for some unknown place. It is said that he is deeply in debt with a number of wholesale houses and also some of his Cornlea friends, and not being able to satisfy his creditors he took a French leave. He did not even stop to say goodby. The Fred Krug Brewing Co. of Omaha is said to be the greatest loser. He also has some small debts in and around Humphrey."
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Joseph Bucher of San Bernardino, California, is visiting his brother William Bucher, and looking after his two farms northeast of town. Mr. Bucher was formerly owner of the mill now owned by Peter Schmitt, but nearly ten years ago moved to California. He has visted Nebraska several times, but not for ten years has he walked on snow, until Monday morning. Mr. Bucher has three different farms in California, or ranches as they are called there. He has 18 acres in raisin grapes, 10 acres in wine grapes and five acres in olives. He will plant 30 acres more of the wine grapes this winter. One of the most valuable things on Mr. Bucher's farm is an artesian well, which cost him a good round $3,000. The well is 976 feet deep and has a 12-inch iron casing. He uses the water for irrigation purposes on his farm and has a reservoir 40x60 feet, and 5 feet deep, from which he can turn the water into different channels over all of the eighty acre farm. From the wells in the neighborhood of San Bernardino where there are a number of artesian wells, Mr. Bucher says the orange groves at Riverside receive their supply of water. He expects to remain here about two weeks longer.
The Columbus Journal, November 25, 1903
Fred Stevens and family will leave for their new home in Greeley, Colorado, the latter part of this week.
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Miss Petite Martyn went to Omaha last week where she entered the Clarkson hospital to study for a professional nurse.
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The residence of T.P. Mylet southwest of Platte Center was partially burned Thursday morning early. The fire was caused from a defective flue in the kitchen.
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The water pipes in the Thomas Dack residence froze Tuesday night. Mr. and Mrs. Dack are both away from home and the house had not been left prepared for cold weather.
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F.A. Beard has moved his barber shop from Olive street to the basement rooms in the Thurston hotel, making the change last week. The Thurston barber shop has been remodeled, giving a larger room; and two new bath tubs have been added, so that the shop is now in first-class condition to receive customers.
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Julius Hunteman, a former Columbus boy who went with his father H. Hunteman to Cordova, Maryland, last winter, is visiting his uncle August Hunteman near Boheet. Julius evidently has not gone back on all Nebraskans, as a marriage license has been granted to him wed Miss Minnie Korte, who lives in the Boheet neighborhood.
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A few of the pupils of Prof. Alvin E. Pool gave a violin recital Monday evening at the residence of G.O. Burns. The parents and a few friends were invited to listen to the concert and all enjoyed the excellent program rendered. Prof. Pool expects to give these recitals once a month hereafter. Those taking part were; Maud Galley, Arthur Wilson, Helen McAllister, Walter Boettcher, Ernest Merz, Hattie Brodfuehrer, Marion Reeder, Hedwig Jaeggi, Willie Hockenberger, Herman Zinnecker, and Lloyd Cassin. The accompanists were Mrs. Jaeggi, Miss Galley, Miss Slater and Janet McAllister.
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Dr. H.J. Arnold returned last Wednesday from an extended visit to the west. He spent several weeks hunting game in the mountains of Idaho and from there went to Portland and then down to California. In San Francisco he visited his brothers Bert and Arthur and at Vallejo, California, he visited his other brother Chad, who is a practicing physician in that city. Mrs. Mate Wadsworth Griffin, a former Columbus young lady, and a member of the first graduating class from the Columbus High school, is also a resident of Vallejo. Dr. Arnold spent most of his vacation in southern California with his parents in National City. He says both his mother and father and also his grandmother are enjoying excellent health.
The Columbus Journal, December 2, 1903
Myrtle Hoffman, who is teaching the Braun school northwest of town, began school Monday after a three weeks' vacation.
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Paul Duffy goes to Kansas City Wednesday where he will secure a position.
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Henry Niemeyer of Seward, who purchased a farm near Creston last fall, was here last week looking after his property.
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New pupils who have enrolled in the business college within the past few days are: Rosetta Wiseman, Jennie Laughlin, Wm. Kipple, Lee Swartsley, Paul Johannes, all of Columbus and vicinity, and Wm. Hill of Monroe and John Lickley of Silver Creek.
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The dailies of Saturday reported that Congressman McCarthy and Senator Millard would recommend that Columbus be allowed free delivery of mail. Postmaster Kramer says he expects to hear the latter part of the week from McCarthy in regard to the outcome.
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C.E. Rickly, a former Columbus boy, who the past several years has been engaged in business in Oklahoma, spent a day in this city Wednesday last visiting relatives and friends. He informed us that he is very likely to again become a citizen of Nebraska, locating in Omaha. While Charley has some good words for Oklahoma, yet he expresses the opinion that those residing here and fairly located could not better their condition by going to that section.
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Mrs. Rosaline Sauer returned Friday from Chicago where she has been since last September with her son Gus. Gus. is an electrician, and has recently been transferred from Chicago to St. Louis. Mrs. Sauer went east with the intention of making her future home with her son, but she did not like the big city, so she returned to this city.
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J.A. Rans, who for several months had charge of the Thurston hotel and who left here last July in hope of improving his health, was in the city last Wednesday and Thursday. Since leaving here he has spent most of his time in Battle Creek, Michigan. His wife and daughter have been in Fremont, and all went from the last named city Saturday to Grand Junction, Colorado, where Mr. Rans expects to engage in some kind of business. He is looking in better health than when leaving in July.
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Mrs. Kehoe started for Gwelph, Canada, Saturday, in response to a telegram apprising her of the serious illness of her father. [Platte Center.]
The Columbus Journal, December 9, 1903
Will Brewer is confined to the hospital where he underwent an operation one day last week.
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The Albion Argus says that Josie Cave went to Columbus last Thursday to visit with her grandma, Rose Prickett.
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Wm. Bucher is putting in an acetylene gas plant for lighting his place of business. We understand several merchants are contemplating doing the same.
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Snyder & Kennedy, proprietors of the new tombstone works, delivered a fine monument Friday in Osceola, to be placed over the grave of Henry Burns, father of G.O. Burns of this city.
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Leo Schonlau came up Saturday from Omaha to visit with his sister Mrs. Al. Butler for two weeks. Leo is now working in the office of the general superintendent of the Union Pacific.
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The Bellwood Gazette says it is rumored that the B.& M. will build a new bridge across the Loup rivinloln, the state commander, was present at the meeting Friday. The installation of officers of both the Sir Knights and ladies will probably take place toegther on January 8. is winter.
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O.C. Shannon left Sunday for Canon City, Colorado, where he goes to return with Mrs. Shannon, who is badly afflicted with rheumatism.
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A.W. Lanfier, a former Columbusite, arrived here Saturday and expects to engage again in the paper hanging and painting business. He has been in South Dakota since leaving here.
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Chris Hagemann of Fremont came up Monday to take charge of Bushman's billiard hall. He is a brother of Ed. H. Hagemann who has been employed at the Thurston a number of years.
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A.A. Millikan, an auctioneer with years of experience, has located in Columbus. He comes from Washington state. Any one who contemplates having a sale will do well to call on or address him before making other arrangements.
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Mr. and Mrs. H.H. High took their infant child, a girl one year old, to Omaha Saturday where an operation was performed upon the eyes of the child by Dr. Gifford. Physicians here advised the operation in order to save the baby's sight.
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Creston Statesman: Mrs. E.P. Westcott, Mrs. A.W. Clark, Mr. J.E. Nichol and daughter Goldie were up from Columbus Sunday, to attend the funeral of Grandma Lewis....Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Clark are up from Columbus this week visiting with relatives.
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Al. Williams and family of Wayne county, stopped over night with the family of R.E. Jones one night last week, on their way to Los Angeles, California, where they will spend the winter. The Williams family formerly lived south of Cornlea and were well known in this county. They moved to Wayne three years ago.
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Si Rapp, who for six years has been away from Columbus, living in Omaha and other towns, arrived here a few days ago for a visit of one week with friends. Mr. Rapp will go to South Dakota to take charge of an eating house on the B.& M. Mrs. Rapp is also here visiting relatives. Mr. Rapp was a former Union Pacific employe here.
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The home of Sam Kavich was quarantined Friday morning for diphtheria, three children being afflicted with the disease. A physician was not called before Thursday evening although the children had been ailing a few days before. On Friday, the youngest child succumbed to the disease, mention of whose death we have elsewhere in this issue of The Journal.
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Mark G. Perkins of Omaha, who will enter into partnership January 1, with Messrs. Howard & Swain in the publication of the Telegram, is in the city today making the acquaintance of business men in the city. Mr. Perkins expects to begin active work here the first of the year, but his family will not move until later. In company of Judge Howard this office acknowledges a pleasant call from Mr. Perkins this morning.
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Lindsay Post: The horse which Miss Juleson was riding to her school eight miles west of Newman Grove last Monday morning slipped and threw her to the ground injuring her skull. A farmer working in the field saw the accident and hurried to her assistance and took her home unconscious. Dr. Monk and Dr. Walker were called who trepanned the skull and removed two spicula of bone from her brain and the girl immediately regained consciousness. At last report she was doing nicely.
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Last Tuesday afternoon H. McLean and W.P. Graves chased a rabbit under a pile of ties in the B.& M. switch yards, and while poking among the ties with a stick for the animal discovered a bundle containing a one-half pint bottle of nitroglycerine, sixteen fuses, two of which were primed with percussion caps, two candles and a ball of beeswax. Chief of Police Hagel was immediately notified and the articles taken possession of by him. The owner of the bundle has not been discovered, but it is evident that the articles are the property of safe burglars.
The Columbus Journal, December 16, 1903
Mrs. H.J. Hudson has rented her residence on Fourteenth street to E.F. Younkin.
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Albert Dobmeyer of Ft. Dodge, Iowa, has arrived here to make his home with his uncle, G. Frischholz, and attend school in the city.
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Frank McTaggert passed through town last Tuesday on his way from Washington state to Omaha. He will spend his holiday vacation with his parents here.
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Henry Wilken, who has been taking treatment at Baily's sanitarium at Lincoln, returned home Friday very much improved in health. He and his mother will make their home with Mr. Rabler, a relative at Leigh, Nebr.
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The children of Sam Kavich who have been suffering with diphtheria, are improving as well as could be expected, considering that they had the disease in a very vicious form. Five children are now afflicted, one dying a few days ago, and one not yet taking the disease.
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Miss Lida McMahon, matron at the Geneva school for girls is expected home the 26th for a short vacation. Mark McMahon will return next Saturday from Chicago where he is attending dental college, and will be at home three weeks.
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John W. Byrnes, through his attorney B.P. Duffy, has been informed that he will receive $1,121 from an estate left by a brother-in-law in Melbourne, Australia. Mr. Duffy has been working three years on the case and has now the satisfaction of winning his suit.
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Will Cain, son of Thomas Cain, who resides near Genoa, was brought to St. Mary's hospital one day last week. He is suffering with diabetes, but is now much better than when he was brought here by his mother. Mr. Cain is a former school teacher in the county and his many friends hope for his speedy recovery.
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Louis Stracke, a former Columbus resident in the 70s, proprietor at one time of the old Central hotel, now of Stuart, this state, was in the city last week accompanied by his wife who is receiving treatment at St. Mary's hospital. Louie says he almost lost his bearings upon his arrival here, so many changes having taken place in the building line since he left years ago. He has grayer grown, yet he looks in splendid health.
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The Macabee lodge has elected the following named gentlemen to fill the offices in their lodge the coming year: Ed. Hagemann, commander; Fred Naylor, lieutenant commander; Henry Heineman, record keeper; H.J. Miles, sergeant; George Swartsley, chaplain; Wm. Bodinson, master at arms; Eugene Clark, sentinel, and Homer Tiffany, ticket keeper.
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The ladies Macabee lodge held their annual election of officers last Friday evening, resulting in the following being chosen for positions: Commander, Mrs. Cora Boyd; lieutenant commander, Mrs. Jennie Hgael; chaplain, Mrs. Carrie Slater; mistress at arms, Mrs. Kuntzelman; ticket, Mrs. Belle Scofield; sentinel, Mrs. Worden; sergeant, Mrs. Ella Scott; finance, Mrs. Cassin; record keeper, Miss Maud Woosley; organist, Mrs. Farrand; past commander, Mrs. Dowell. Miss Ella Lark of Lincoln, the state commander, was present at the meeting Friday. The installation of officers of both the Sir Knights and ladies will probably take place together on January 8.
The Columbus Journal, December 23, 1903
Jay Smith, who has been working in western Nebraska several months, returned home last week.
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Mrs. E.D. Fitzpatrick will spend the Christmas vacation with her daughter, Sister Edwarda, in Omaha.
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Dr. Hoard of Lincoln, medical examiner for the B.& M. railway company, was in town Friday to visit Ed. Kohler and Wilbur Jessup who are both confined to their homes on account of injuries received while on the road.
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A change was made a few days ago among the operators at the Union Pacific depot here. T.W. Oleson is now night operator and H.E. Snyder of Central City day man. B. Barshinger, the former night operator, goes to Beatrice to take a position as cashier.
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Mrs. Elizabeth Erb is lying seriously ill at her home in the east part of town.
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James Salmon of Omaha is visiting his many relatives in and around Columbus and expects to remain a few weeks longer.
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Ed. Gluck returned home Saturday from Culver, Indiana, where he is in attendance at a military school. He will spend the holidays with relatives.
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Lawrence McTaggart writes home from Yokohama, Japan, that he expects to spend Christmas in Honolulu, and that the ship is headed toward home.
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Mr. and Mrs. Robert McPherson of Haigler, Nebraska, have gone to California for the benefit of Mr. McPherson's health. Mrs. McPherson, it will be remembered, visited here a few weeks ago with her brother and sister, W.A. McAllister and Mrs. W.N. Hensley.
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Mr. Knutson, who resides on the old Barnum farm south of town, has been hauling a great amount of corn to town during this and last week. When he has finished shelling and hauling, he expects to have marketed over 6,000 bushels. Mr. Knutson will leave about March 1 for Kearney.
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Joseph Henggeler of Shell creek, telephoned in today that he was packing his summer supply of ice. He will put about thirty-five tons into his house. He says he takes it from Shell creek and that it is about one foot thick and of excellent quality.
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While driving to Duncan Saturday, Mrs. Lewis Jones, living southwest of town, received slight injuries in a run-away. The horse she was driving became unmanageable, ran into a barb wire fence, cutting himself in a frightful manner and demolishing the buggy.
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Wm. F. Rhodehorst, living about four miles north of town, lost his large barn by fire Friday afternoon. The cause of the fire is entirely a mystery. Mr. Rhodehorst was away from home, and his wife and two young children were in the house alone. About 2 o'clock Mrs. Rhodehorst heard the crackling sound and soon discovered that the barn was all ablaze. Three horses valued at about $300, five sets of harness, 800 bushels of oats, 400 bushels of corn and many articles stored away in the barn, were totally consumed. About 500 bushels of grain was saved by cutting through the side of the barn, through which the grain could be shoveled. The barn was 26x40 feet with a large hay mow and shed addition.
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Ben Rochon, whose genial countenance was familiar to Columbusites away back in the 70s, as he was a resident here then, was over from Bellwood Friday taking in the sights. He has recently returned from a trip to Alberta, Canada, and as soon as he can adjust his business he expects to return there and make that his future home, as he is well pleased with that country.
The Columbus Journal, December 30, 1903
George Stevenson, from Hastings, was in town over Monday, to look after his opera house interests in this city.
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Mr. and Mrs. Richard Ramey returned Wednesday from St. Louis where they went for the beneift of Mr. Ramey's health.
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Frank Dischner of O'Neill came down Thursday to spend Christmas at home. He is now engaged in the land business there and is doing well.
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Miss Anna Gass has accepted a position as type writer in Hulst & Adams' store.
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Peter Duffy, now of El Reno, Oklahoma, is visiting relatives and friends in the city during the holidays. Peter is state inspector for a fire insurance company, with headquarters at El Reno.
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Thurston Simmons an old time Columbus boy, arrived here Friday from Homer, Michigan, where he has been the past three years and will be the guest of his uncle, Mr. Sparhawk, until Thursday where he will go to Omaha to attend a business college.
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John R. Fox is having erected a building on Twelfth street west of Rickly's restaurant, to be used for a barber shop. Messrs. Brown and Ward, barbers, will unite with Mr. Fox in the purchase of the fixtures, and they expect to be ready for business in the new location within two months.
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A correspondent of the Cedar Rapids Outlook writing from Primrose makes this mention: "F.K. Strother, of Columbus, Nebr., has decided to locate in Primrose and engage in the real estate business. He is a business man of experience and will be a valuable addition to our town. He will office in the building with Mr. Dewey."
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Prof. H.J. Huff, the teacher of short hand in the Business college has resigned his position here and will represent the Remington type writer firm in the southeast portion of this state. Prof. Huff made many friends during the few months that he was here and his friends will watch for his success in other fields.
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Pat, son of Patrick Lyons, fell from his horse about 1 o'clock today, Tuesday, and as we go to press is lying in a critical condition. The boy is about 12 years old. He was riding horseback and in turning a corner near F.T. Walker's residence, the horse stumbled, throwing the boy to the ground and breaking his skull. Dr. ___s was called, but no hope ________ for his recovery.
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