Platte Co., NE - 1904 News (Jan-Apr) NEGenWeb Project
PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
News From 100 Years Ago
(Jan., 1904 - April, 1904)


The Columbus Weekly Telegram, January 8, 1904
Secretary Brugger, of the board of education, appeared before the board of supervisors Wednesday afternoon to suggest that official action be taken toward the proper education of Mary Benson, a little Columbus girl whom he said to be growing up in illiteracy owing to the criminal negligence of the child's mother. Mary Benson is the Americanized name of the eight-year-old daughter of a Polish woman who lives in a cottage down near the river. For the past three years her name has appeared regulary upon the reports of Truant Officer Schmocker, and this lead to an investigation of her case. The mother promised faithfully to send the girl to the public or the Catholic parochial school, and repeatedly broke the promise, then the educational board decided to take a hand in the matter. For several weeks Secretary Brugger has been in correspondence with the state home for the friendless, at Lincoln. The officials there say they cannot receive the girl without consent of her mother, accompanied by a fee of two dollars a month, which the county must pay. Those posted in the matter say the county is under legal obligation to look after the child, and the county board has authorized Supervisor Held to take such course as he may deem advisable.
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Miss Ethel Hurd has arrived from Omaha to become operator in the local office of the Postal Telegraph company. The company has already opened its line for general business, having established a temporary office in the First National bank building.
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Walter Duvall, a transient resident of Columbus, was arrested by Officers Nelson and Meehan Monday morning upon an information from Schuyler charging him with stealing a revolver, belt and cartidges belonging to Deputy Sheriff VanHousen, of Colfax county. The stolen articles were found in Walter's possession, but he claims he bought them from a man at Schuyler. He was taken to Schuyler in the afternoon to face the charge filed against him.
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Miss Laura Miner has obtained a position in a restaurant at Council Bluffs.
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Mrs. Mary Bremer returned Saturday evening from Portland, Oregon, where she has been several weeks visiting her daughter, Mrs. C.D. Rakestraw.
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Mrs. Sumption, who has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. W.H. Benham, expects to leave the first of next week for Denver.
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People looked at them and said: "There is the long and short of it" when they saw Henry Lubker and a tall, handsome man going down [the] street together conversing like a pair of brothers, as indeed they were. It is needless to say who was the short of it. The long was represented by Mr. Fred Lubker, who is here for a brief visit at Henry's home. He is located in South Dakota, where he is engaged as a contractor. If the women of Dakota are handsome in keeping with the appearance of Lubker's tall brother, Dakota would be a delightful place for any white man to take up his abode.
The Columbus Journal, January 13, 1904
C.J. Scott & Son have started the erection of a residence for Ernest Scott on Eighteenth street. Ernest has sold his residence now occupied by himself to his father C.J. Scott.
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Miss Gertrude Whitmoyer leaves this Wednesday for Park City, Utah, where she has been engaged to teach music and art in the public schools. Park City is about thirty-five miles from Salt Lake City.
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Jake Mauer and family and William Mauer, all of Madison county, were in Columbus Wednesday on their way to Pasadena, Calif., where they expect to make their future home. The two gentlemen are old settlers of Madison county and in the early days did their trading in Columbus.
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We are in receipt of an interesting letter from E.J. Couch, formerly a resident in the northwest portion of the county, who moved to Gross, Boyd county, a few years ago. Mr. Couch seems to be well pleased with his location. He has 1,000 acres of land, 700 of which are under cultivation.
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J.J. Sullivan of Genoa has moved to Columbus. He was a resident here several years ago.
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William Bloedorn of Platte Center was in town Monday on his way to Crowley, Louisiana, where he will spend several months. His son Charlie has a farm there and Mr. Bloedorn will look after it while in the south.
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Mrs. Homer Robinson entertained about fifteen ladies Tuesday afternoon to a Kensington, in honor of Mrs. Pearl Petermichael of Valparaiso, who has been visiting Columbus friends. Mrs. Petermichael will be remembered here as Miss Pearl Mosgrove. She left Friday for her home.
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John McPherson and his two sons Lawrence and Kenneth of Haigler, Nebraska, visited in the city from Friday to Sunday on their way home from Omaha. Mr. McPherson is a nephew of Mrs. W.N. Hensley and W.A. McAllister and is well known to many people here. He is a successful merchant in his home town.
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A.M. Covert is expected home this week from Shenandoah, Iowa, where he has been with his sister Mrs. Snow. Since leaving here four months ago Mr. Covert has been taking massage and electrical treatment for the injuries he received by the accident in the Union Pacific yards here about a year ago, and he writes home that he is improving in health.
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Archie Griffin, of Denver, a former Columbus boy, visited friends here last week. He is the son of J.A. Griffin, for many years employed in Friedhof's store and later associated with A.M. Gray in the shoe and clothing business, and is now a resident of Denver. Archie came to Columbus Friday from St. Edward where he visited his aunt, Mrs. D.N. Jennings.
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H.H. Wolken and family left for Columbus Monday where they will make their future home. Mr. Wolken is a carpenter by trade and will no doubt find more work in his line in a larger Place. We hope that Mr. Wolken and family will prosper in their new home.--Humphrey Democrat.
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C.A. Church has been operating a saw mill the past few weeks, having the camp located in the Olcott Bros. grove south of Columbus. Farmers in the neighborhood have been hauling logs to be sawed up, and say that the lumber is much more satisfactory than that purchased in town. The camp presents quite a business aspect; farmers hauling trees for miles around to be made up for building and fuel purposes.
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Ed. Smith, formerly of Hillsdale, Michigan, who years ago frequently visited with the North family, is in the city. He has disposed of his hotel interests in South Dakota, and bought a large tract of land in Colorado, to which he will give his attention in the near future. A daughter of Mr. Smith will make her home here with Mr. and Mrs. J.E. North and attend school.
The Columbus Journal, January 20, 1904
Hubert Burruss was called to Silver Creek Monday by the serious sickness of his mother, who has been at death's door for several weeks.
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August Schutte, on Shell creek, fifteen miles northeast of Columbus, is making arrangements to build a large addition to his residence.
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Charles Kuntzelman of Cornlea, son of M. Kuntzelman, was operated upon for appendicitis Monday morning at the hospital.
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We learn from the Monroe Republican that D.W. Ziegler has gone to Lincoln where he will enter the employ of an old line insurance company as solicitor.
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Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hudson went to Nebraska City Saturday, called by the sickness of one of the Loeb children who is afflicted with typhoid fever.
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Arnold Oehlrich has contracted with C.J. Scott & Son to put in a plate glass front in the store building on Thirteenth street, now occupied by W.E. Dunning as a dry goods store. The new front will be similar to that of the Dack drug store. Work will begin on the improvement about the 1st of next month.
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Mrs. A.J. Arnold of National City, Calif., arrived here Saturday night, called by the sickness of her son, Dr. H.J. Arnold. The doctor has been very sick for several days but is now much improved and expects to be around as usual in a few days. Mrs. Arnold will remain for a while to visit her relatives, having not been here since she left, ten years ago.
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Walter Scott was in Cedar Rapids Friday on business, and was so pleased with the town that he may decide to move his family there in the near future and go into the contracting business. Cedar Rapids had a big fire recently, destroying four store buidlings, and Mr. Scott has good prospect of rebuilding some of these. He was enthusiastic in praise of the town and believes there is a splendid future ahead for the place, which has a perfect water system and many city advantages.
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The old settlers remember Richard Heitzman, a former resident here, and will read with interest the following from the David City Press: "Richard Heitzman and wife celebrated their 16th wedding anniversary last Sunday week. That they have lived happily is plainly evident from the fact that Mr. Heitzman weighs 290 pounds of good avoirdupois--16 ounces to the pound, while Mrs. H. makes the scales groan at 230 pounds. The Press wishes them many happy returns."
The Columbus Journal, January 27, 1904
Miss Rosie Miller spent a part of the day with Plessie Drinnin, Sunday. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Miller, will move the first of March to the Guy C. Barnum farm across the Loup which Mr. M. bought last summer, while Miss Rose will remain on the Joe Bucher farm where they now reside and keep house for two of her brothers who will remain for another year, until their lease expires.
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Mrs. Howard Clark was quite sick last week. ... H.E. Babcock was sick at home part of last week. ... Little Robert Strother was seriously ill last week. ... Mrs. W.A. McAllister was ailing last week with quinsy. ... The little daughter of Charles Mills was sick last week. ... Mrs. Paul Rodack, living in the southeast part of town, is very sick. ... Miss Nellie and Frank Baker went to Genoa Wednesday, called by the serious illness of their niece, Mrs. Hoke. ... R.S. Dickinson is confined to his room by sickness. ... Henry Ragatz was unable to be at work Monday on account of sickness.
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Charles Mills has moved his family into his new residence in the northwest part of town. ... Mrs. Anna McLean purchased last week the residence of Harriet Reed in the west part of town. The latter is a resident of California. ... Otto Kumer has rented his farm near Silver Creek and expects to move to Columbus about March 1, and will buy or build a residence here and make his home in the city principally on account of the school privileges. ... George Winslow will return this week to Columbus from Holt county, and expects to engage in business in this city. His mother, Mrs. Winslow, will also probably return with him and make this her home. ... Ralph Boyd went to Norfolk Monday where he has accepted a position in a hardware store. ... Henry Lubker has traded his residence on Fouteenth street to Adolf Korte for an eighty-acre farm in Colfax county. Mr. Lubker expects to remain in Columbus. ... David Thomas of the Postville neighborhood was in town Saturday. Mr. Thomas has rented his farm there for the coming year and may come to Columbus to reside. He purchased a few months ago the farm of Mr. Sparhawk south of the river.
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E.S. Newlon is home from Madison where he has been engaged in a store since before Christmas.
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Mr. and Mrs. George Fauble left last week for Kingfisher, Oklahoma, where they will remain until about April visiting the family of Henry Fauble.
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Miss Anna Goetz, who has made the acquintance of many people here through her work as dressmaker, has accepted a like position in a store at St. Edward.
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Louie Schonlau, a former Columbus boy, was in the city over Sunday. He is now representing a large clothing house of Milwaukee as traveling salesman and likes his new work very much.
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The Fullerton News-Journal says that Dan Lord of Denver, is looking after his ranch near Fullerton. Dan is known to many of the old settlers around Columbus, as he formerly lived here.
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S.S. Rickly, who for the past five or six years has successfully managed the Vienna Restaurant on Twelfth street, disposed of his interest in same to Percy L. Knight of Shelby and James W. Corbett, the latter for some time having been connected with the Home restaurant, the new proprietors taking charge at noon today, Tuesday. Mr. Rickly will probably remain in Columbus until spring when he and family will remove to either Wyoming or Colorado.
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The Catholic Knights recently installed the following officers: President, Lawrence L. Wernert; vice president, Joseph Herod; financial secretary, G. Frischholz; corresponding secretary, J. Gray; treasurer, Henry Abts; sentinel, Frank Tunis; sergeant at arms, Martin Speicher; trustee, Joseph Henggeler. At the installation meeting Rev. Father Theobold delivered an address on Catholic Knightism.
The Columbus Journal, February 3, 1904
Mrs. Frank Gerhard is quite sick. ... Mrs. Fred Scofield has been a sufferer with the grip the past week. ... Mrs. Leo Borowiak is quite sick. ... Mrs. Anna Lehmann is quite sick with la grippe. ... Miss Bertha Stauffer has been confined to the house by sickness the past week. ... Clerk of the District Court Gruenther has been confined to his home in Platte Center the past few days on account of sickness.
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Jerry Scully of Oklahoma City, a cousin of F.T. Walker, arrived last week on a visit to relatives here and at Humphrey.
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Forrest Butler returned a few days ago from visiting his sisters Mrs. George Mentzer at Blue Springs and Mrs. Nelson at Lincoln. The Mentzer family live on a farm near Blue Springs and are doing well.
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Walter Scott has sold his residence property where he is now residing on Eighteenth and Murray street to Mrs. J.D. Brewer, who will move into the house this week. Mr. Scott has not yet decided where he will move to.
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Ernest Dussell and son Francis went to Omaha Saturday, and while there visited with David Orr who is known to many of our readers. The latter is on his way to Old Mexico where he will work at the plumbing trade.
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John Cornils, who for the past few months has been filling a position as pharmacist in a drug store at North Platte, arrived in the city one day last week and will visit a short time with the family of his uncle, Arnold Oehlrich.
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Samuel Galley, one of the pioneer business men of Creighton, Saturday disposed of his stock of general merchandise to S.J.G. Irwin. Mr. Galley has been in active business there for the last twenty-four years, and is a brother of J.H. Galley of this city. Mr. Irwin is a nephew of Mr. Galley and well known in Columbus. He is a son-in-law of G.W. Elston of this place.
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F.T. Walker, about two weeks ago purchased from George Contor his 240 acre farm in Loup township, paying about $22.50 per acre for the place. Last Wednesday Mr. Walker sold the farm for $27 an acre to John Zonka of Benton. If this was an indication of the general rise in real estate, Platte county would need no canal power to give a boom to the community.
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H.B. Musser will leave in March for Sherman county where he will take charge of the 1,800-acre rnach of the Stenger Brothers. Mr. Musser and his family have been active members of church and social gatherings and the city will lose good citizens in their departure.
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While Peter Dischner of Duncan was driving around the corner near Asche's store last Saturday afternoon, one of his horses was taken with a fit and died in less than ten minutes. Mr. Dischner was compelled to borrow a horse to get home with.
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Mrs. N.D. WIlson was called Sunday to David City by the serious illness of her sister, Miss Lucy Smith. Her brothers, E.W. of Silver Creek, and G.E. of Rockdale, Wyoming, both passed through here Monday to the bedside of their sister.
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S.E. Baker received word that his broterh J.F. Baker of Custer county lost his left hand last Thursday in an accident with a corn sheller.
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C.A. Newman has severed his connection with the Ragatz & Co. grocery establishment and we understand will give his entire attention to his farm east of town. Jesse Newman, who has had charge of his father's farm contemplates going to Rochester, New York, to join his uncle, Frank Brindley. Frank Schram has taken Mr. Newman's place in the Ragatz store as bookkeeper.
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Mrs. J.C. Schafer and children arrived from Columbus Tuesday morning, and the family are now getting settled in the Neely house near the mill. Mr. Schafer has charge of the Standard Oil wagon at this place.--Humphrey Democrat.
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George Winslow moved his family to Columbus from his farm in Holt county last week, and is occupying the Ernest Scott residence in the north part of town. Mr. Winslow's mother also returned with the family, and will make this city her home. George has purchased the livery barn north of the Clother hotel from Frank Hungerford, and took possession of the property Monday. The business men of the city will welcome Mr. Winslow and know from past acquaintance that he is competent to conduct an up-to-date livery and will be a help to the enterprise of the town.
The Columbus Journal, February 10, 1904
P.J. Gruenther of Cheyenne is here, called by the sickness of his brother C.M. Gruenther. ... Mrs. John McMahon was taken suddenly sick Friday evening, but was much better on Saturday. ... Mrs. W.N. Hensley and daughter, Miss Metta, have both been quite sick the past week. Miss Metta has been unable to teach her school. ... Chris Gruenther was brought down from his home in Platte Center Wednesday, to the hospital in this city, where he will receive special care from his physicians.
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W.E. Dunning, who purchased the Beecroft stock of dry goods a few weeks ago sold the same last week to L. Krasne & Son of Fullerton who moved the entire lot to that town.
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Mrs. Charles Jens has returned home to Humphrey and took with her the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jessup, Mildred Louise, whose mother died last month. The older child, Helen, will live with her grandmother, Mrs. Schram.
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Jesse Holmes of Gower, Missouri, was here last week, the guest of Dr. Vallier. Mr. Holmes is a retired farmer and contemplates making his home in Columbus.
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The following is from the Albion News: "Mr. Schupbach, of Columbus, was an Albion visitor last Monday. He owned one of the first lumber yards in Albion. Their first stock of goods was hauled on wagons from Columbus, as the railroad had not yet been built."
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George Henggler, who lives ten miles northeast of town on Shell creek, finished filling his new ice house last Saturday. He is fortunate in having a spring on his farm and has made a pond from which he gets his ice, which he says is of excellent quality this year and sixteen inches thick. He put up about twenty-five tons which will be enough to do him until next winter.
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The carpenters and lumber dealers say that the greater part of the building improvements this spring will be done in the country. A number of farmers are figuring on new homes; among them are Rudolf Korte living about ten miles north of town and Henry Hake about eight miles north. The former will put up a house costing in the neighborhood of $1,600 and the latter a residence valued at about $1,000.
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L.W. Snow has leased the Arnold Oehlrich store building on Thirteenth street which he will occupy with his book and stationery store about March 1. The building is being repaired and when ready for occupancy will be a first-class store building. Mr. Snow moves from his present location just west of Pollock's in order to have more store room.
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The home of Charles Powell, colored, living int he northwest part of town, was searched last Wednesday for lumber, James Pearsall suspecting members of the family of stealing from him. The lumber was not found, but a new fur lap robe identified as one lost by THomas Boyd was found. The family claimed that the robe had been found by one of the boys on the street.
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James Church and Frank Mackey were put under arrest Sunday on complaint of County Attorney Latham who alleges that Luluia Gollisoth, a girl not yet fifteen years of age, was held in custody by the defendants for three days and nights in the Grand Pacific hotel. The girl is making her home with her sister, Mrs. S. Grover, who, having missed her, made investigation which brought out the above information. The hearing in justice court comes off this Tuesday afternoon before Judge Curtis.
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On Thursday afternoon Arthur McGann started back to his home in boyhood days at Ohio, Bureau county, Ill. [District 44 and Vicinity.]
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Henry Engel boarded a train Saturday evening for Central City, near which place he visited over Sunday with his brother George and family. [District 44 and Vicinity.]
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A.J. Mason, an old-time Platte county boy, was in town Friday. He is located at Carroll, Wayne county, near which place he has a school. He says that Bob Evans, Dan Maher and all the other people from here who live in that vicinity are well and prosperous. Dan is marshal of the village of Carroll. [Platte Center.]
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Miss Florence Jennings, daughter of A.M. Jennings, a former Columbus citizen and now living in Fitzgerald, Ga., was in the city from Saturday until Monday on her way to St. Edward. Miss Florence has been living for some time with an aunt at Ravenna, Nebraska. While in Columbus she was the guest of the Fitzpatrick family.
The Columbus Journal, February 17, 1904
Hiram Rice of Albion left one day last week for Los Angeles, California, to visit his mother who is ill. The Rice family formerly resided in this city.
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W.A. Gale sold his 160 acre farm near Woodville last week to J.W. Currier for $6,000. Mr. Gale leaves in March for California there to make a new home for his family.
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Frank Clark has purchased from Dave Mowery, his interest in the second-hand store formerly owned by John Eusden, and will now conduct the business for himself. The transfer was made on the 6th of February.
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A. Haight has purchased from Mrs. Young of San Diego, California, formerly of Columbus, the residence property on west Thirteenth street, now occupied by L.J. Lee. Mr. Haight will improve the place by adding all modern conveniences and making it a desirable home to rent.
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Prof. Funk was called to Wichita, Kansas, today, Tuesday, by the serious illness of his mother.
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John Byrnes, through his attorney, B.P. Duffy, received a few days ago, a draft for $672, a portion of a $1,100 share of an estate in Australia, which will come to Mr. Byrnes. The estate was that of a brother of Mr. Byrnes' first wife, and as she and her two children are both dead, Mr. Byrnes received this share of the estate.
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David Thomas of Postville, who has been one of the prominent farmers of the county for many years, was in town Monday. Mr. Thomas has rented his farm near Postville and also the Sparhawk place he purchased a few months ago, and expects to purchase a home in Columbus and move here in March.
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Ben Walters, who left Columbus about two years ago and has made Grand Island his home since that time, has returned to this city with his family composed of wife and daughter and will make this their abiding place once again. The C.B. Tomlin property corner of North and Fifteenth streets is being renovated for their occupancy.
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Nick Adamy has purchased 160 acres of pasture land lying just north of Mrs. E.J. Young's farm, which is part of the M.H. White dairy farm. The land which lies alongside a slough and has no improvements, was sold for $47.50 an acre. Mr. Adamy will fence the place in for pasture for the present, but contemplates at some future time to build a residence thereon and move his family from his present home ten miles north of town.
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Mrs. F.W. Clifford of Denver was the guest Saturday of her cousin, Mrs. Jennie Walker, on her return home from Omaha.
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Mrs. Frank Beaton of Omaha came up Saturday to visit a week with her mother, Mrs. Condon. She was accompanied by her son Harold.
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Mrs. O.T. Roen left Friday for Los Angeles, California, where she will visit her brother Charles George. Mrs. Roen goes west hoping to regain her health, and expects to remain three months.
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Mr. and Mrs. H.F. Mielenz, who have, since leaving here last fall been living in Humphrey and Stanton, were visiting friends Friday. Mrs. Mielenz and children went to Albion Friday and Mr. Mielenz left for Chicago where he expects to find employment.
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Eber Smith, brother of A.J. Smith, has purchased the residence property just west of the Columbia brewery, from John F. Schroeder, one of the old settlers of this county, a retired farmer from Creston township. Besides the house and two lots, Mr. Smith also purchased about one block of land south and expects to make the place his home, and may engage in farming on a small scale. Mr. Schroeder left Wednesday for Baltimore to visit an uncle, but will return soon and then arrange for an European trip. The couple expect to finally make their home in Ohio.
The Columbus Journal, February 24, 1904
Lee Gray and Mr. McTheters, a cousin, who had been here five weeks, started last Tuesday for Oklahoma City to visit relatives. They stopped in Hamilton county to visit Mr. Gray's parents on the way down.
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A son of Mr. and Mrs. James Jenkinson, about four years old, is sick with scarlet fever. The family is quarantined.
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Axel Anderson made a business trip to Columbus Saturday for the purpose of renting a house. Mr. Anderson expects to move his family to Columbus soon.--St. Edward Advance.
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Georgie Kummer, grand son of Wm. T. Allen, left Monday for Topeka, Kansas, where he joins his mother, Mrs. Miller, and will have a position as messenger boy with the Rock Island Railway company.
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Mrs. Thomas Wilson returned last Thursday from Los Angeles, California, where she went with her daughter, Miss Sadie, several months ago. The climate did not agree with Mrs. Wilson so she returns to Columbus to reside. Miss Sadie will remain in Los Angeles.
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C.L. Easton sold his residence property just west of the Second ward school house last Wednesday to J.E. Kaufmann, the consideration being $1,200. Mr. Easton does not give possession until next May. Mr. Kaufmann will repair the building and make improvements on the place.
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Recruiting officers have been here several days and secured two Columbus boys for the U.S. army. They are Frank Kotlar and Clarence Rollin, who left Tuesday of last week for Ft. Crook, near Omaha. They enlist for three years service. Both boys have been sergeants in Company K of the militia, and will no doubt make good soldiers.
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Mrs. Harry Kemp and two children of Salt Lake City were in town Thursday on their way home from a visit to relatives in St. Edward. Mrs. Kemp will be remembered as Miss Myrtle Wright, a school teacher in this county about twelve years ago, and Mr. Kemp was a printer in Columbus thirteen years ago, but after leaving here became a Methodist minister.
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Tom Boyd will be laid up for several weeks with a bruised leg. While getting into a buggy at his home at 11:30 o'clock Thursday night, the horse started suddenly and Mr. Boyd had his right leg caught in the spokes of the wheel. It was at first thought that the limb was broken but proved to be a badly bruised member. He had been called at that late hour to the home of his father, where Mrs. Ralph Boyd died during the night.
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Thomas Adams, who has retired from the firm of Hulst & Adams, last Saturday purchased the twenty-acre farm property one mile northwest of town from Mrs. M.C. Bauer, and expects to move to the place about May 1. F.H. Rusche will move his family to his town residence and will build a cottage on the same lots with his house which Mrs. Bauer and her sister, Miss Becker, will occupy. The farm which Mr. Adams has just purchased is well improved, having a large residence and stables, all with modern conveniences. The consideration in the purchase was $5,000.
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W.F. Jessup sustained injuries from a fall last Wednesday morning that will be the cause of his remaining at home a number of weeks. He is brakeman on B.& M. freight, and when at Pleasantdale as he was about to set a brake, the train suddenly slacked speed and he slipped from the car to the track striking the rail with the left side of his face, spraining the left wrist, bruising his right shoulder and receiving internal injuries. He was brought to Columbus and is now at the home of Jacob Schram, where he is doing as well as could be expected. Mr. Jessup has been exceedingly unfortunate this winter. A few months ago he sustained injuries while at work, from which he was confined to the house, and before he returned to work his wife was taken seriously ill and after several weeks, died. Now soon after he returns to work, Mr. Jessup is again laid off by an accident.
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Carl Evert, jr., was over in Polk county last week to visit his sister. ... Frank Adams will move to Creston; Henry Lefflen will move on the Frank Adams farm. ... There will be music in the air now. Frank and Henry Z. Luschinger each have a new violin. ... Henry Hake and Henry Luschen are each hauling material to build an addition to their houses. ... Joseph and Ernest Schacher returned last week from Gruetli where they went to visit their uncler, Galip Kummer. ... O.W. Clark has moved to the F.F. Clark farm just vacated by the latter. J.T. Mahlan moved on the O.W. Clark farm. ... Mrs. Henry G. Luschen has been at Creston the last week visiting her daughter, Mrs. Otto Loseke. Of course grandma had to go and see the baby. [Rural Route No. 1]
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A young man named John Uda, who has been engaged in farm work in this vicinity the past season, is confined to his bed at the home of John Riley, southeast of town, with a bad case of blood poison, the result of a bruise on one of his knees. As he is without means Supervisor Clother sent him to the hospital at Columbus, where he will be cared for at the county's expense. [Platte Center.]
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Joyce Hall of David City was the guest of his brother, Will Hall, from Friday to Monday. ... Miss Anna Becker has returned from Morrison, Illinois, where she visited six weeks with her sister, Mrs. Prof. Weaver. ... Miss Louise Schmocker visited her parents Mr. and Mrs. John Schmocker over Monday night, on her return to Norfolk from Omaha. Miss Louise is engaged as a telegraph operator in the Western Union office at Norfolk.
The Columbus Journal, March 2, 1904
Mrs. O.C. Pennington left Saturday for Stanton and Mr. Pennington followed the next day. They expect to reside on a farm near that place.
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A.M. Covert is against employed as one of the night men at the U.P. round house. He has not altogether recovered his health but is gaining steadily.
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Mrs. Robert Lewis, living in the northwest part of the city, is confined to her bed from a stroke of paralysis which she suffered Monday of last week.
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Bert Stillman leaves this week for California to visit his mother and sister about two months. Frank Kersenbrock takes his place at the Dack pharmacy during his absence.
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Henry Sturgeon has leased the Kipple farm north of town, better known as the Butler place, and will begin spring work there soon. Mrs. Sturgeon will move from the city and keep house for her son.
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H.B. Musser loaded his cars last week and has gone to Sherman county where he takes charge of the Stenger ranch. Mrs. Musser will remain a few days until the home there has been prepared for occupancy.
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W.N. Hensley returned last Wednesday from St. Louis where he has been looking after the manufacture of his invention, the car coupler. Mr. Hensley has had several mishaps in gettng the invention completed but now expects to have one ready for use in a short time.
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Fred Scofield and Ralph Swartsley have rented the Louis Zinnecker farm adjoining the city on the east, and are moving their stock and goods this week from the dairy farm of H.J. Alexander north of town. The dairy will be established at the farm east of town. Mr. Alexander has not yet rented his place.
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Mrs. John Rybah living in the south part of town, is reported seriously sick.
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Fred Seipp leaves today, Wednesday, for Tacoma, Washington, where he expects to find employment.
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Miss Alma Vallean of Genoa came down Monday to enter Mrs. Hagel's dress-making rooms as seamstress.
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Henry Wilken has again moved to town from the farm and is getting settled in the home on Olive and Sixteenth streets. ... A.L. Davies moved Monday from the Speice farm northwest of town to this city, where his children can procure better educational advantages. ... Otto Kummer moved his family in from his farm near Silver Creek last week, and will occupy the residence of Mrs. Mary Cramer on Ninth Street. ... Jesse Holmes of Gower, Missouri, has moved his family to this city and is living in rooms in the Barber block. Mr. Holmes may conclude to make Columbus his future home.
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Charles Jens came down from Humphrey Friday on his way to Chicago, where he goes to purchase goods. Mrs. Jens and children accompanied him to Columbus to visit their relatives here.
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John Schmocker received word from his daughter, Miss Louise, that she will be transferred by the telegraph company with which she is engaged from Norfolk to Ottawa, Kansas, this or next week.
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L. Cohen will start a dry goods store in Genoa within the next week. He will put in his stock as soon as the building he has rented is ready for occupancy. He expects to continue his residence in Columbus.
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W.H. Randall has rented his farm northwest of town to E.W. Smith from near Osceola who will move here this spring and conduct a breeding farm. Mr. Smith is a relative by marriage of Lutte North.
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Samuel Richards, of North Platte, was in the city Thursday and leased the Gottschalk store building on Eleventh street. As soon as the building has been repaired, he will put in a stock of general merchandise.
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John F. Schroeder and wife left here Thursday for Maryland where they expect to make their home, at least for the present. The residence he sold to Eber Smith is being repaired and the new owners will move to the place this week. ... Mr. and Mrs. A.G. Schlauder will leave next Saturday for Roswell, New Mexico, where they expect to make their home. Mr. Schlauder has been a commercial traveling man and has made Columbus his headquarters for the past six weeks. ... Henry Freese, Henry Roelle and Albert Goebel, together with their families, all left today, Tuesday, for Pleasanton, Buffalo county, where they expect to reside. Messrs. Freese and Roelle have purchased farms and Mr. Goebel will rent a place.
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The Silver Creek Sand informs us that John Wurdeman of Platte county, who owns a half section of land northeast of Clarks, was in that town Thursday. He brought Julius Wagner and George Klanke along with him to build a house, barn, etc., on the place. Herman Leuschen of Boheet, Platte county, will live on the farm as soon as the buildings are completed.
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Miss Maggie Schilz left Monday of last week for Lafayette, Indiana, where she will join the Franciscan order of Sisters. For about two years she will take religious instruction and prepare herself for teaching shorthand and typewriting. Sister Josepha, who was at the head of the school here several years, is now stationed in Lafayette and is at the head of all the Franciscan Sisters' orders of the United States. Miss Schilz not only has the character to become a sister in high standing in her order, but has had the practical experience of several years work in public offices and will make an instructor in her chosen work worthy to teach in any school.
The Columbus Journal, March 9, 1904
Frank Adams has moved from north of town to near Creston.
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Miss Griffeth has arrived from St. Joseph to engage in the millinery store of Mrs. Jay.
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Jasper Nichols came down from Randolph Thursday to visit his wife and baby for awhile.
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Mrs. Kargus sold her farm of 263 acres in Loup township to Peter Stec last week for $26 an acre.
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Johnny Glynn, engineer on the Union Pacific, and an old-time Columbus boy, visited with relatives here Sunday.
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Miss Vina Nash, one of the business college graduates, has secured a position in a bank at Monroe, her home town.
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Mrs. W.S. Jay returned the first of the week from Erie, Colorado, where she was called from Lincoln by the serious illness of her sister, Mrs. Butcher.
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Mr. and Mrs. Shell Clark of St. Edward came down Wednesday to consult physicians in regard to Mrs. Clark's health. She is a grandchild of Mrs. H.J. Hudson.
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The Kenutzen family moved Friday to their newly purchased farm near Kearney. Mr. Miller, who has been farming northeast of Columbus, moved to the farm just vacated by Mr. Kenutzen, the old Barnum place south of town.
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Fred Stenger left Saturday last for National City, California, where he will make a visit of two weeks to his mother, Mrs. Caroline Stenger, and his sister, Mrs. DeFord. Ernest Stenger, who resides in North Platte, will make the trip with him.
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Fay, the young daughter of Fred Scofield, is quite seriously ill. ... Chris Hageman has been laid up the past few days with rheumatism and grip. ... Miss Stribbling was unable to attend to her work in the Gray millinery department on account of sickness, Saturday and Monday. ... E.C. Halm who has been seriously ill since last Tuesday, has steadily improved since Friday and is now thought to be on the road to recovery. ... C.A. Beardsley, who has been confined to his home the past six weeks by sickness, was able to visit his place of business one day last week, the first time since taken ill. ... D. McDuffee, who fell ten feet while at work at the B.& M. round house several weeks ago, is again around town, but will be unable to go to work for at least two weeks. His worst injuries were to his back. ... Prof. Clevenger returned to his school duties Friday after several days illness. His studies in the High school were taught by Rev. Halsey. Miss Graham was also ill part of last week, and Miss Rorer taught in her place. ... Judge J.G. Reeder underwent an operation at the hospital Monday, Dr. Evans having charge of the surgical work. The patient is doing as well as could be expected, but his physicians say he will be compelled to remain in the hospital about three weeks.
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John Burrell came up Monday night from the Lincoln penitentiary and is at home on parole for a visit.
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The Pearl Bonesteel land six miles northeast of town was sold last week to Koch Bros., of Creston. The farm consists of 120 acres with no improvements to speak of, the consideration being $7,200.
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Mrs. Gilmore and daughter Neta and son Shimer, left Columbus Monday for Battle Creek, Michigan, where they expect to make their future home. The Gilmore family had been guests of friends here several days before departing for the east.
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Miss Bessie Marks, who has been employed as stenographer for Becher, Hockenberger & Chambers for several months past, left Monday for Lincoln where she has secured a position in the Lincoln telephone office. Miss Daisy Cash takes the place vacated by Miss Marks here.
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Louis Maier and John Kotlar have dissolved their partnership business in the blacksmith and wagon shop on Tenth street, Mr. Maier purchasing the interest of Mr. Kotlar, and took possession March 1. Mr. Kotlar will look after his farming interests north of town but will continue to work at intervals in the shop.
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Marc G. Perkins has rented the residence property from A. Haight, now occupied by L.J. Lee; the first named will occupy it about May 1. Mr. Lee expects to move his family to Omaha soon, and the house will be remodeled and furnished with modern improvements before Mr. Perkins takes possession.
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The Columbus Cream company has purchased the dairy business from O.D. Butler & Son. The Butlers will keep the herd of cows and sell the milk to the Cream company. There is almost a larger demand for milk and cream than the Columbus dealers can supply, and farmers could secure a good income by making more of the dairy department on their farms.
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Mrs. Coffey and family came down from near Monroe where they have been living several years, and moved their household goods Friday to their farm eight miles southeast of town, recently purchased by John Coffey. The place is known as the Clem Watkins farm. On account of the Platte bridge being out, they were compelled to ship their goods by train from Columbus to Bellwood.
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Platte county land selling for $80 an acre has come to be a very common thing, observes the Humphrey Democrat. Last week Nick Fehringer sold his quarter section near Tarnov to John F. Tworek for $12,960 or $81 per acre. About four years ago Mr. Fehringer bought the land for $34 per acre and in those few years the land has more than doubled in price. Eighty-one dollars per acre is the highest price yet paid for Platte county soil.
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Last week's dailies gave extensive space to an article in regard to a canal scheme advanced by Kansas City parties. They contemplate connecting the states of North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma with the Gulf of Mexico by a navigable canal. They would have the government build the canal and believe the scheme would be valuable for power purposes as well as for shipping grain. The proposed route would run some where west of Columbus, so that we may yet have the benefit of a great canal.
The Columbus Journal, March 16, 1904
Mrs. H.E. Babcock was very sick last week, but is now improving. ... Mrs. Carl Reinke is slowly recovering from a siege of sickness lasting several weeks. ... Hubert Burruss was confined to the house last week by sickness, and will be unable to resume work for a few days longer.
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Mrs. James Kirkpatrick returned home to Grand Island Friday after a week's visit with her son J.F. Kirkpatrick of this city.
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Editor Johannes will build an addition to his residence in the east part of town, to the value of about $1,000. Wm. Roth has the contract.
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The rooms on Thirteenth street recently vacated by L.W. Snow are being fitted up by Sowerwine & Stanley who will conduct an up-to-date pool room.
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Miss Leafy Gray went to Lincoln Friday where she will be engaged in a wholesale millinery store a few weeks before accepting a position as trimmer.
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Miss Florence Snyder began work in the Independent Telephone office Monday as one of the day operators and Miss Dollie Snyder is in the same employment as night operator.
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Judge J.M. Curtis purchased Monday the Carlson residence property on Sixteenth street, two blocks west of the Third ward school. He will occupy the premises in about three weeks.
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F.A. Matson of Madison has sold his implement store to a company of investors. Mr. Matson will be in charge of the stock for a short time at least. His Columbus friends would be glad to have him become a resident of this city where many of his relatives reside.
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Mrs. Walter Butler came down from Belgrade Saturday to spend two weeks with her mother, Mrs. Carl Reinke, who has been ill for several weeks.
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Sheriff C.J. Carrig took Mike Mostek to the penitentiary at Lincoln Friday. Mostek was sentenced to three and a half years imprisonment during the recent term of court.
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The old Harragraffen blacksmith shop, lately purchased by Frank Adams, is being remodeled this week by F.E. Davis and Stark Inghram. Back of a window casing they found moulds for coining counterfeit dollars.--Creston Statesman.
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Henry McCarville, living on the D.C. Kavanaugh farm eight miles north of Columbus and one-half mile west of the Buss separator station, will have a public sale of his household goods and stock next Friday, March 18. Mr. McCarville expects to move to this city after leaving the farm.
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The Central City Nonpareil states that B.J. Hilsabeck who has been manager of a lumber yard in that city, has purchased a yard at Franklin, Nebraska, and will move to his new home in April. Mr. Hilsabeck was formerly supeintendent of schools in Platte Center ad his wife is a daughter of Wm. Bloedorn of that town.
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Mrs. J.G. Engel and two of her children living near Clarks, visited their many relatives in and around Columbus, returning home Sunday. Mrs. Engel is a daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Erb. The Engel family are well pleased with their new home and say the country around them is being well improved and increasing fast in value. The Grover family who formerly lived near Richland, moving to a farm four miles from the Engel place about three years ago, value their land today at $45 an acre, and they paid only $3 an acre for the farm when they moved to it. Last year Mr. Engel raised corn that yielded 40 bushels to the acre.
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M. Rothleitner has sold his residence north of the Third ward school, and moved his family last week to the Sturgeon residence east of the same school. Walter Scott purchased the Rothleitner residence, but has not yet decided when he will occupy the place. Mrs. Sturgeon has moved four miles north of town, where her son Henry will take charge of the Kipple farm.
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S. Richards of North Platte is putting in a stock of general merchandise in the Gottschalk building on Eleventh street, and expects to be ready for opening day Friday of this week. Mr. Richards will not spend all of his time in Columbus, as he has a store also in North Platte where his family reside, but his father-in-law, L. London, who has been a resident of Columbus for some time and who has an interest in the business, will take charge of the store here.
The Columbus Journal, March 23, 1904
F. Adolph Gores will leave this Wednesday morning for St. Louis where he will work on the World's Fair ground as one of the painters.
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Mrs. G. M. Loseke expects to go to St. Louis about April 1, and Jasper Nichols will move his family to her residence north of the High school.
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Basil Geitzen returned home last Tuesday from Marquette, near where he has been engaged on a ranch all winter. He expects to remain for the present at least.
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Mrs. Tena Hoppen underwent a critical operation at the hospital Tuesday of last week, but is now improving. Mrs. Emma Chapple, of Omaha, her sister, was sent for and will remain a short time.
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Dr. Van Es of Fargo, North Dakota, was a Columbus visitor Saturday and Sunday. The doctor will be remembered by many Columbus people, he having been a veterinary surgeon here for two years, leaving Columbus ten years ago.
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Paul Duffy writes from Pittsburg, Kansas, that he has a good paying position there and evidently likes his work.
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Fred Novel left Saturday for St. Louis where he goes to work on the World's Fair grounds at the carpenter trade.
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E.A. Studley, for many years living near Platte Center, has moved his family to the Babcock farm three miles west of Columbus.
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Miss Louise Kays, well known to many Columbus people, is lying very sick at her home in Clarks, having contracted tuberculosis. She is reported to be near death's door, and her sister, Mrs. George Spear of Norfolk, is with her at her home.
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We made mention of Fred Stenger leaving for California for a visit to his mother. Mr. Stenger did start for the west and got as far as North Platte where he was to meet his brother Ernest, who planned to accompany him, but as the latter had urgent business to detain him several weeks, the trip to the coast was temporarily abandoned.
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Bob Gentleman's livery barn at Platte Center burned about 1 o'clock Friday morning. Sixteen horses were destroyed, together with hay, grain and all the harness. The buggies were saved. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Mr. Gentleman was in Norfolk on business at the time. The loss is considered at $4,000, with $1,515 insurance.
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C.K. Davies returned from Kearney where he purchased a farm containing 160 acres of choice land which lies in the city limits of that place. The Davies family expects to move next week to their new home and their many friends here will very much regret their departure. Mr. Davies expects to engage in the fine stock business and will no doubt make a success in his new location. His principal reasons for leaving Columbus is to secure a larger farm than he has had here and also to be nearer good schools.
The Columbus Journal, March 30, 1904
W.C. Ernst and wife left for Rockville, Nebraska, on Monday, where they will make their future home. ... C.K. Davies left Monday with one car of stock and a car of household goods for Kearney, where he will make his future home. ... Mr. and Mrs. E.S. Newlon expect to move next week to Omaha where Mr. Newlon has accepted a position. ... Arthur Pohl of Columbus, who is now at work in the store of Diers Bros. & Co., will move his family into the building west of Henry Fox's place, recently vacated by H.H. Wolken and family, says the Humphrey Leader.
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J.E. Kaufmann is building an addition to his residence in the way of a bathroom and sewing room.
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George Willard of St. Edward was here last week and purchased the farm south of town known as the Sturgeon place, and of late years owned by Mr. Key. Mr. Willard purchased the lands as an investment.
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J.B. Gietzen has sold his residence in Highland Park addition to David Thomas, from near Platte Center, who will move his family here April 8. The consideration was $2,000. The Gietzens will reside with Fred Roberts and family until May 1, when they will move to the Thomas Adams residence. Mr. Gietzen expects to build a home during the summer on his lots just north of Mrs. R.H. Henry's residence.
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Roy Paschal, son of Joseph Paschal, a former newspaper man of Columbus, has been visiting old time friends in the city the past week, and will leave in a few days for Lincoln to attend business college. Roy says the family is on a farm, forty miles from a railroad, their postoffice being Redmount, Oklahoma. Roy is the guest of Chester Ernst while in the city. Since leaving Columbus, another son has come to bless the home of the Paschals.
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Mr. and Mrs. Lee Beaty and son Guy, of Cedar Rapids, visited relatives here Thursday. They came overland to Wattsville, where they have been staying a few days with former neighbors.
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Mr. and Mrs. C.B. Smith and son Leo of Browns Valley, Minn., were in the city a few days visiting Mrs. Smith's relatives the Rickly and Matthews families. Mrs. Smith will be remembered here as Miss Enor CLother. They were on their return from a three months' trip to New Orleans, California and other places of interest, and left here Monday, going to Albion to spend one day with friends. Mr. Smith is a banker in his home town.
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G.W. Johnson, a building contractcor of Lincoln, has purchased the Morrissey building on Eleventh street, vacated a few months ago by Henry Herchenhan, and began Thursday to make substantial repairs on the same. He will add a second story to the building, put in an entire new front with a stairway on the east side leading to the second floor and a large opening on the west side for the first story rooms. The interior will be put in first-class shape for store room purposes. Mr. Johnson has had several offers to rent the place, and will rush the work as rapidly as possible.
The Columbus Journal, April 6, 1904
Mrs. John Klug, living near Benton is very ill with typhoid fever. ... E.C. Holm who has been seriously ill the last five weeks, was taken with a relapse Sunday. ... Fred Engle, the eight year old son of John Engle, near Duncan, is seriously ill with appendicitis.
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Miss Frances Maynard of Schuyler, came Thursday to work in The Journal office and will occupy a seat at the type setting machine.
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August Wagner went to Madison last Saturday to draw up papers for his sister, Mrs. C.E. Ewing, who has recently purchased a residence and two lots there.
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Mrs. John Kohl of Clarks was brought to the Columbus hospital Wednesday for treatment. The Kohl family, about ten years ago, lived ont he Oehlrich ranch east of town.
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Mrs. Kimbrough of North Bend, mother of E.H. Kimbrough, returned Friday to North Bend after spending several days here with her daughter-in-law, who has been ill.
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John Huber with his family will move Wednesday to Wisner, where he has purchased a confectionery store. ... Mr. and Mrs. E.S. Newlon left Monday for Omaha where they expect to make their future home. Their many friends here will wish them abundant success.
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Mrs. Ruby Browne of Lincoln returned home Monday after a visit to her relatives, the Hensley family.
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Mr. and Mrs. T.W. Adams returned Tuesday from Dawagac, Mich. where they attended the golden wedding anniversary of Mr. Adams' parents Monday of last week.
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L.G. Patterson, for several years employed in printing offices in Columbus, was in town Sunday on his way to Seward where he will work the job department of the Blade.
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Miss Bertha Stauffer has resigned her position as cashier in the Gray dry goods store to take effect Saturday. She will remain at home until June, at which time the family will move to Washington, where they expect to make their future home.
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Wm. Robertson, of Norfolk, with his brother Dave of Madison, passed through here Saturday, bound for Omaha, where they met two other brothers on Easter Sunday, one being J.C.T. Robertson of Omaha, the other, Collin Robertson from Forreston, Illinois.
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L. Hecker, living on east Eleventh street, suffered a severe stroke of paralysis Monday morning at 10 o'clock. His left side is so crippled that he is unable to talk or walk. Mr. Hecker is about seventy-four years old and has a family of grown children.
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Rev. L.J. Baker a former Columbus residence, was in town Monday on his way to Utah, where he has been sent by the national board of the Baptist church as a missionary in Utah. The Bakers have for the past eight years been living in Kentucky and Ohio, and Mr. Baker leaves Sidney, Ohio, to accept work in the far west. Mrs. Baker, Guy and Miss Beryl, will remain in Sidney until June at which time Guy will graduate form the high school. They expect to visit Columbus friends on their way west.
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Geoffry Simpkins the sixteen year old son of a retired English naval officer whose home is in Oxford, England, has just secured work on Dr. Evan's farm north of Columbus. Young Simpkins came to America unaided and drifted into Columbus by chance.
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Sheriff Carrig returned Monday evening from Utica bringing with him Cal Smith whom he has wanted badly for some time on a charge of horse stealing. The sheriff went to Exeter expecting to find his man there, but only to learn that he was twenty-two miles further on, at Utica. Smith was located by means of a prominent marks on his face and neck, which the sheriff had mentioned in the description sent out over the state sometime ago. The description was accompanied by a offer of $60 reward for the arrest and conviction of Smith.
The Columbus Journal, April 13, 1904
Mrs. F.W. Farrand is suffering from a sprained ankle, sustained while alighting from her carriage Monday. ... John Toczek living five miles east of town was unfortunate in having one of his elbows dislocated Tuesday of last week.
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The Topeka (Kansas) State Journal has the following to say about a Columbus boy, grandson of W.T. Allen. "George Kummer is a new clerk in the employ of the office of W.J. Healy, freight auditor for the Santa Fe R.R."
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Mrs. Anna Parks left Monday for Ord where she expects to make her home in the future. Norman has returned from California and has a position at Ord as painter.
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Sam McFarland, who sold his interest in his saloon to his partner, James Nevels, a few weeks ago, will leave this week for Lexington where we understand he will engage in the saloon business.
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Mr. and Mrs. Huffman, Charles Doody and Wm. Riley all of Platte Center start overland this week for South Dakota, where they have taken homesteads near Pierce. Nearly thirty people from in and near the Center have filed on homesteads in the same neighborhood.
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Relatives of Mrs. J.H. Reed in Riverside, Calif., have written to friends here that on account of serious trouble with her eyes, Mrs. Reed was obliged to have one eye destroyed by physicians, to save the sight of the other. When Mr. and Mrs. Reed were in Columbus about a year ago, Mrs. Reed was suffering with eye trouble and was then much worried about the future.
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Henry Lubker has moved his family to the C.H. Davis residence, recently purchased by E.C. Halm. On account of the illness of Mr. Halm the family hae been unable to move to their newly acquired home, and the Lubkers were obliged to give possession of their home to Mr. Korte, who purchased it several months ago.
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George Truman living near Genoa has for thirty years sent monthly reports of the weather conditions to the Journal, which are read with interest by the subscribers. When he began keeping the records for the government, he was the only weather reporter in northern Nebraska. Now nearly every county in the state has its reporter.
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W.B. Hester, a Lincoln contractor, was in Columbus Saturday on his way to Lincoln. Mr. Hester is directing the work of re-building the Norfolk asylum, representing the Capital City Brick & Pipe Co. of Des Miones, Ia which company has the contract for the four buildings which are to be erected at Norfolk. He reports that the work is progressing nicely with sixty men employed. Mr. Hester is the contractor who built W.J. Bryan's home near Lincoln, and as a memento carries a fine gold watch inscribed, "W.J. Bryan to W.B. Hester, in Memory of Fairview."
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Louis Raney is home from Kansas City visiting his father, conductor C.S. Raney of the B.& M.
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I.W. Holmes and wife, who have been visiting Mrs. Homes' mother, Mrs. Stovecek, returned to Ravenna Thursday of last week. Mr. Holmes was formerly a fireman on the Columbus-Lincoln branch and is now employed in the yards at Ravenna.
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Sam Bond, the veteran brakeman on the branches out of this city, returned Tuesday from a sixty-days vacation and resumed his place on the Norfolk passenger Wednesday, and is now calling out the stations in his usually cheery manner and admonishing passengers not to forget their packages. His vacation was passed with friends and relatives in Wisconsin and he reports a very pleasant time.
The Columbus Journal, April 20, 1904
O.C. Breese is expected home from California this week, where he has been for several months past. He was expected to leave California about last Saturday.
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A sister of J.D. Stires, residing in Omaha, was thrown from a street car and suffered a broken hip. On Mr. Stires' return from Omaha last week she was improving.
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Invitations are out for the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. G.D. Phillips, parents of Walter Phillips. The festivities will take place May 3, at the home of their daughter in Blair.
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The rooming house of Miss Frances Labin just west of the Presbyterian church was quarantined yesterday for scarlet fever, Louis Rinehart one of the roomers being ill with that disease.
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Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Dawson of Kansas City arrived here Saturday on a visit to relatives. Mr. Dawson returned home Monday and his wife will remain one week to visit her sister, Mrs. George Scott.
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Fred Witchy, working on the farm of Wm Kuntzelman northwest of Columbus was taken sick last Saturday and today his malady was pronounced smallpox by the physicians. The house was quarentined this afternoon.
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Harry Dougherty, a former Columbus boy, visited friends here a few days, returning to his home in Omaha Sunday. Harry's father was an employe of the B.& M. and left Columbus about ten years ago. He is now manager of the Klondike hotel in Omaha.
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Mrs. C.S. Raney returned home Saturday from Galesbu[r]g, Ill. where she was called three weeks ago by the serious illness of her mother. Louis Raney, who accompanied her, returned home a week earlier. Mrs. Raney left her mother somewhat better but with little hope for recovery.
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Harry Lawrence visited his grandmother Mrs. Warner the first of last week. He has been away from Columbus since last May, working in the painting department of the B.& M. car shops at Alliance, and left there to take a position in a paint shop at Omaha, Ole Oleson formerly of Columbus, securing the place for him.
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Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Musson of San Francisco visited the family of C.C. Gray last week on their way to Chicago where they will visit relatives. Mrs. Musson is a sister of Mrs. Gray and will be remembered here as Miss Arabella Okey, at one time a pupil in Columbus. Mr. and Mrs. Musson were married last year. They left Wednesday on their way east.
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John Eusden, who has been living for several months past with his daughter, Mrs. Hoare, near Platte Center, was in Columbus last week looking after his business interests here.
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M.H. White, his wife and daughter Miss Effie arrived here Wednesday from Spokane, Washington, and expect to make Columbus their future home. The White family moved from Columbus fifteen years ago to Tacoma where they resided until one year ago, when they moved to Spokane. Since leaving here Mr. White has been engaged in his old trade, that of harness making. He returns to Columbus for the purpose of improving his farm, which lies directly north of town. He owns four hundred acres in the section north of Columbus, which has for several years been rented by H.J. Alexander, and will now either re-build the residence on the place and reside there, or will live in town and oversee the work. Hilton White may possibly return to Columbus within a few months to make his home with his parents. Mr. White tells us of many old time Columbus people in the west whom our readers are always anxious to hear about. George Wandall is in Tacoma, a solicitor for a commission house; Dr. Schlug is a leading physician in the same town and one of the health officers of that city. Mr. Sharp a brother-in-law of George Wandall and Eben Pierce known to many Columbus people are both in Tacoma. Dr. Thurston, dentist, Bert Osterhout formerly at the Thurston hotel here, Sigenthalar Bros., Dolan (of the Dolan & Smith drug store in Columbus), young Gerber from near Duncan, Dr. Runner, physician, and Dave Dowty are all in Spokane.
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Miss Emma Wake, who has been visiting her parents, went ot Seward today to visit her brother, Thomas Wake.
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John Deegan and daughter Miss Lillie leave this evening for Red Lodge, Montana where they will visit about one month.
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Mrs. Kate Bardwell and her two young sons expect to leave within a few days for st. Louis where Mr. Bardwell is in business.
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A.E. Matson left Monday for Humbolt where he will take charge of a hardware store recently purchased by his brother F.A. Matson of Madison.
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Arthur Gross, now a leading attorney of Omaha, was in Columbus on business Monday. Mr. Gross was at one time a Columbus young man, his father being int he grocery business here in the early days.
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T.K. Ottis and daughters, Miss Mary and Mrs. Condon, and Nora Condon, all of Humphrey, were in town yesterday between trains on their way to Memphis, Tenn., where they will visit two daughters of Mr. Ottis. They will remain two weeks.
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Miss Sara Perkinson of Platte Center was the guest Monday of Mrs. Jerry Carrig on her way south. She left Tuesday for Dickins, Texas, accompanied from Milford by her brother, Jos. Perkinson, and the two go across country to their homesteads in Oklahoma.
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The following named were examined for teachers' certificates at the office of County Superintendent Leavy last Saturday: Misses Marguerite Dineen, May Hughes, Pearl Kent, Anna Callahan, Kittie Gentleman and Rose Callahan.
The Columbus Journal, April 27, 1904
Mrs. T.W. Olsen went to Silver Creek yesterday to visit relatives. ... Mrs. Dr. Paul and son went to Custer county last Wednesday to visit relatives. ... Paul Krause of Albion visited his mother and sister in Columbus last Thursday. ... Lyman Crotts of Hutchinson, Kansas, visited his cousin, W.L. Chenwerth over Sunday. ... Ernest Hans and wife of Battle Creek are guests of Mrs. J.W. Wisenstine, Mrs. Hans sister. ... Mr[s?]. L. Gerrard returned last week from a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Roscoe Pound. ... Grandma Burdick of Harvard, arrived here Thursday on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. C.J. Scott.
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August Meyers left last evening for Stanton where he has accepted a position.
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Mrs. C.M. McGinnis of Brooking, S. Dak. was alled home last Tuesday by the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. Saffron.
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Mr. Stanley Maly expects to start within a few weeks for a three months trip through Europe. He will visit his native country, Bohemia.
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Mrs. Tharpp left Sunday for Casper, Wyoming, where he husband is engaged in cigar manufacturing. Mrs. Tharpp is remembered here as Miss Anna Nichols.
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S.E. Baker last week purchased the residence property of Chas. Pearsall just west of H. Elliott's residence. He and his family will occupy it within a few weeks.
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Agent Benham informs us that plans have been drawn for stock yards to be built at an early date, on the ground that is enclosed by the Union Pacific "Y" in the west part of town. The plans are being submitted to the various workmen.
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The young child of Garrett Hulst is with relatives in Lincoln, where its parents hope to keep it free from catching the epidemic of measles or scarlet fever which are so prevalent in Columbus. Mrs. Hulst will visit in Lincoln this week.
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Mrs. John Hoffman and daughters, Grace and Myrtle and Lucile, and sons, Arthur and John, left Friday for their future home in Sparta, Wis. The Hoffman family have been long time residents in this city and their friends regret their departure.
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Chas. Duffy is home for a visit to his father, B.P. Duffey. ... Miss Nora McMullen of Stromsburg is visiting her brother, F.D. McMullen. ... Misses Ethel and Maud Galley went to David City yesterday to visit relatives. ... Mrs. Fred Roberts returned Wednesday from one weeks visit to her sister in Omaha.
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Sam McFarland and his family departed yesterday for Lexington to make their future home.


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