Obituaries

Obituaries - 1895-1900

Date ????

HENRY OBERWETTER 1821-????
Obituary of HENRY OBERWETTER
Died at Gordon, Nebr.
Obituary - Henry Oberwetter
August Oberwetter received a telegram last Friday from his brother, Louis, living at Gordon , Nebr., announcing the death of his father, Henry Oberwetter, who, since the death of his wife about seven years ago, had made his home with his son Louis. Mr. Oberwetter was born in Prussia April 21, 1821. He, with his wife, came to this country in 1848 and located in this county in 1869. To them were born five children, of whom his sons Louis and August are the only ones now living. Mr. Oberwetter enlisted in the 36th Wisconsin volunteers, in the war of the rebellion. He was wounded, from which he lost an arm, and was discharged after a service of 18 months. Like all others who suffer from wounds in the service, he was made the recipient of a pension, and the writer hereof frequently in years past assisted him in making out his pension vouchers. His death adds one more name to the roll of those who voluntarily took upon themselves the burden of defending the flag and saving the union from disruption, and who have been finally mustered out. It is an honorable record and one that his children will always refer to with pride. He reached a ripe old age and his remains were brought here to be interred in the Panther Creek cemetery. 

Source: Dallas County, Iowa, News.

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Date ????

submitted by Nancy Troxel Schatz

JOHN D. STAUFFER DIES AT HIS HOME IN CALIF.
John D. Stauffer, one of Sheridan County's pioneers, died at his home at Pasadena, Calif., three weeks ago, after having been in bad health for several months. Mr. Stauffer was a Civil War Veteran who helped to found and build up this community. For many years, he was a County Commissioner of Sheridan County, and throughout his life, he was always a worker for worthwhile things. Jerry Stauffer of Gordon, went to California to attend the funeral, and he brought his mother back with him. She will spend the summer with relatives here and next fall, will return to her Pasadena home.

Source Unknown. Found among family possessions.

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1895

H. H. Jones was born in Ohio, April 12, 1841 and was married June 11, 1866, in Ohio to Miss Arminda Ford. His wife died in Indiana in 1882. Seven children resulted from this union, two of whom died in infancy. The other five, four sons and one daughter, reside in this locality. In 1884 he moved to Cherry county, Nebraska, locating near Lavacca, where he has since resided. Last December his mind became affected and he was taken to the hospital at Norfolk for treatment, where he died June 26th of parisia. He was a member of the Presbyterian church at Gordon and also of the I. O. O. F. The remains were brought to Gordon Thursday morning and funeral services were held in the Presbyterian church at 10 a.m. under the auspices of the I. O. O. F. The sermon was preached by Rev. I. C. Sloan of Alliance and was a most fitting tribute to the dead. The remains were buried in the Gordon cemetery. - [probably Gordon Journal, June 28th.]

Source: Valentine [NE] Republican, July 5, 1895.

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1898

CURRY, ALICE
"Gordon [NE] Journal," January 28, 1898
Mrs. Alice Curry departed this life at Valentine, Nebraska, Jan. 21, 1898, age 33 years. Deceased married John W. Curry at Gladstone, Illinois, in 1881. They soon removed to Iowa, where Mrs. Curry was baptized and united with the Presbyterian church in 1885. For eleven years Cherry county, Nebraska, has been their home, where they have made the acquaintance of a large number, their friends being counted by the score. Their hard and unceasing labor was just beginning to show compensating returns, a spendid new house having been occupied but a few weeks, and some of the best furnishings being still unopened. Mrs. Curry was taken serously ill Monday morning and died of heart failure Friday evening, after successfully rallying from an operation for cancer of the stomach and consumption of the bowels. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. A. S. Beck at Merriman, before a large gathering of sympathizing friends. The remains were interred in the Gordon cemetery Sunday morning. A husband, mother, two brothers and four sisters remain to mourn, all being in the east but the husband and one brother. An adopted son five years of age very keenly shares the husband's grief.

(Transcriber's note: The adopted son's name was Bryson, per the 1900 census)

[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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BOYCE, JOSEPH
"Gordon [NE] Journal," February 4, 1898
Died at his home, northwest of Gordon, Saturday morning, Jan. 29, 1898, at 2 o'clock, Joseph Boyce, aged 76 years. He died of Paralysis. The deceased leaves a wife, three sons and three daughters. The funeral was held from the Sod Church* at 11 a.m. Sunday, conducted by Rev. Harris.

(* This looks like "Sod Church" but the print is very faded.)

[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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MOSENA, ANDREW
"Gordon [NE] Journal," March 25, 1898
At the Gordon Hotel, Wednesday morning, March 23, 1898, of typhoid pneumonia, Andrew Mosena.
The deceased was born in Ohio, June 15, 1830. He moved to Burlington Iowa, where he was married. He afterwards moved to Dallas county, Iowa, where he resided for a number of years. Twelve years ago this month he came to Sheridan county, where he has resided continuously since. Ten years ago, his wife died and was buried in the Gordon Cemetery. He leaves six children to mourn his loss, four of whom were present at the funeral; Mrs. Geo. Fisher, Mrs. Fred Hills, John Mosena and an unmarried daughter, Ella Mosena. A married daughter resides in Iowa and son in Montana. The funeral was held from the Presbyterian church at 10 a.m. Thursday, conducted by Rev. David Oastler. The deceased was a man little known outside the business circles in Gordon, but was known as an honest, well meaning man and was held in high esteem by those who were his intimate firends. The community feels a tender sympathy for the sorrowing relatives.

[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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SPOTTED BIRD
"Gordon [NE] Journal," March 25, 1898
Gone to the Happy Hunting Grounds
Spotted Bird, a Sioux brave, died at Rushville last Sunday afternoon, of consumption. The demise of a friend or relative calls fourth the tenderest and most profuse emotions of the Sioux heart and the scene around the bier is most wierd to one not accustomed to such ceremonies. J. L. Harrison of the east side barber shop was a witness to the demonstrations in honor of Spotted Bird, last Sabbath afternoon and furnishes us this graphic description of the obsequies. There was present a large number of Indians from the reservation, about fifty of whom were to leave that night for New York, to join Buffalo Bills' wild west show. To all it was a solemn occasion. All the braves who were going away squatted in a circle and joined in chanting a funeral dirge. The huge war bonnet of the dead warrior, with its long streamers of eagle's feathers was brought forth and torn assunder and the pieces divided among the mourners, as souvenirs of the departed. Then the sorrowing squaw of the deceased brought fourth other souvenirs and bestowed them upon favored friends. She then chanted a wierd dirge and passed around the circle of mourners and laid her hands upon the head of each. After this cermoney was ended the mourners arose and went into the tepe to take their final leave of the departed, each one grasping the dead brave's hand as they passed by.

[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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RANDALL, TODD
"Gordon [NE] Journal," May 27, 1898
Todd Randall died at the Gordon Hospital last Friday, about 4 p.m., of cancer of the stomach.
The deceased was born in Missouri and was 68 years of age at the time of his death. He first saw the west in 1849, when he came to Fort Laramie as a government teamster. He has lived with the Indians in this country for almost 50 years. Forty-seven yers ago he married a Sioux maiden, who, with eight children still survives him. He was a character well known throughout all this section of the country. At one time he was engaged in the butcher business in Gordon. He leaves considerable property to his family, consisting mostly of cattle and horses. He made a will just before he died. The remains were taken to his home on Corn Creek, last Saturday, where they were buried last Sunday.

[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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SPRAGUE, FRANK
Hay Springs, Nebraska, April 28, 1899
Mr. Frank Sprague, a resident for fouteen years of this place, a worthy member of the Congregational church, in which he has always been identified as a tenor singer and leader of the choir, died Tuesday morning, after an illness of about two weeks. Rev. B. F. Diffenbacker and wife, Ellen Sprague and a brother of Mrs. Frank Sprague, came from the eastern part of the state to attend the funeral services which were held in the Congregational church, Wednedsay afternoon. Rev. Jones and Diffenbacker officiating, after which he was taken to the cemetery and the Modern Woodmen buried the remains in accordance with the ritual, he being a member of their order and carried a life insurance of $1000. Mr. Sprague was only forty-seven years old, yet he was unable to throw off the attack of lung fever. This loss to his devoted wife and three daughters seems to be almost intolerable, yet the community generally feel sad at losing such a worthy and estimable citizen.

[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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HOLMES, ADA
"Gordon [NE] Journal," April 28, 1899
After a painful illness of four weeks little Ada Holmes, the eleven-year old daughter of P. M. Holmes, passed away last Tuesday morning, after having been unconcious for eight days. She died from the effects of that terrible disease, spinal minengitis. The funeral was held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, from the Christian church, conducted by Rev. Wilkinson, and the body was laid to rest in the Gordon cemetery, beside that of her mother, who died last January. The father and two surviving children have the deepest sympathy of all in this their double affliction. Little Ada was loved by all who knew her. So kind and gentle in disposition and ladylike in her childish manner, she won friends whereever she went. She will be missed by playmates and friends, brother and sister, but most of all by a grief-stricken father to whom she was a solace and comfort in his hours of sadness.
[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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ROBERTSON, Infant Daughter
"Gordon [NE] Journal," April 28, 1899
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Pleasanton Robertson, aged seven months, died last Friday. The funeral was held at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, conducted by Rev. S. A. Beck.
[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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DIX, JANIE
"Gordon [NE] Journal," May 5, 1899
Died. Saturday morning, April 29, 1899, Janie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sol. Dix, after an illness of but three days, aged 8 years. The funeral was held from the Christian church in Gordon, conducted by Rev. Witkinson, and the body was buried in the Gordon cemetery.
[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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WASMUND, EDWARD F.
"Rushville [NE] Standard," August 11, 1899
The "Standard" is called upon this week to chronicle the sudden and altogether unexpected death of Edward F. Wasmund, son of our county treasurer. The death occurred Monday morning between 9 and 10 o'clock, from an injury received on the night before at about 6. Ed. had gone down to the ranch of Dan Hill, where he intended to work through haying and Sunday evening he was asked to assist in topping out a stack of hay. After this was finished he climbed down on the stacker until he had reached the last crosspiece. He then turned his face towards the stacker and after throwing the pitch-fork out back of him, leaped backwards towards the ground. In being thrown, the pitch-fork struck in the ground with the handle up, so that Ed. chanced to fall directly over it, the handle entering the rectum for a distance of probably 8 inches. He fell to the ground and fainted, and was then carried to the house about a mile distant. An attempt was made to telephone for a doctor, but the wire was found to be down, and so a messenger was dispatched to Rushville, reaching here between 9 and 10 o'clock at night. Dr. Davis and Treasurer Wasmund and wife immediately started for the scene, reaching the bedside of the wounded young man about 2 o'clock Monday morning. He was by this time very weak. After an examination the Dr. pronounced the case fatal, but thought that perhaps Ed. might live ling enough to reach Rushville. They started, but within about 2 miles of town, the weak form, already exhausted by pain and loss of blood, breathed his last and the constitution so rugged a few hours before was wrapped in death. He suffered the gratest pain in his right shoulder, probalby caused by his falling upon it, while the worse wound was so great as to almost kill sensation. He was conscious up to his death, after recovering from the first fainting spell. The funeral srvices were conducted by Rev. A. F. Cumbow and Mrs. Mendenhall, on Tuesday at 4 o'clock p.m., and the remains interred in Fairview cemetery, a large crowd attending. Singing was ably rendered by the choir. With the exception of two infants, this is the first death in this family, and coming so suddenly, fills the home with deep bereavement. We see again the sudden and destructive appearnce of the unexpected. Ed. was an industrious, moral and healthy young man and it seems almost incredible to note his quick demise. But however careful persons may be, they are never proof against accidents. The "Standard" joins the relatives and friends of the deceased in paying its respects, and extends to them its deepest sympathy.
[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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LOVEKIN, MRS. GEORGE
"Rushville [NE] Standard," August 18, 1899
Died - at her home in Rushville, at the 2:30 a.m. on Thursday, August 24, of sciatic rheumatism, Mrs. Geo. Lovekin. She departed this life at the prime age of 36, after a lingering illness of about a year. The disease had shown signs even before, but did not render her helpless unless until last summer. Great suffering is caused by this dreadful affliction and it seemed to increase its force in this case. Long and patiently she has born the pains that strive to overshadow the mind and steep it in disconsolation, but the silver cord of life has at last been stretched to the utmost limit and broken. Better far, no doubt, that the change for peacefuil rest has been made. Mrs. Lovekin had all the treatment possible for the case, but yet she continued to grow weaker until the inevitable came unconsciously to her. She had gone to sleep and was apparently at rest until death, with the exception of a little heavier breathing just before the end. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Cumbow, under the auspices of the order of the M. W. of A., this morning, at 10 o'clock, and the remains interred in Fairview cemetery. The departed leaves a husband and son to miss her presence and mourn their loss. In their hours of trial the bereaved have the sympathy of their many friends in this community.
[transcribed by Kaylynn]

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1900

MARTIN ELLARD
[Gordon Journal, Gordon, Sheridan County, Nebraska, Friday, Sept. 21-28-Oct. 12, 1900 NUM 20-21-50]
Martin Ellard (1839-1900)
Died - Monday afternoon, September 24, 1900, Martin ELLARD, who had been working on the section for some time past, went to his work, feeling as well as usual. He was shoveling cinders near the roundhouse and had lifted but a few shovels full, when he fell forward dead, a victim of heart failure. Martin Ellard was born Nov. 11, 1839 in Queens County, Ireland. He came to America when but ten years of age, with his widowed mother, and lived in the city of Buffalo, N.Y. for about 20 years, afterwards moving to Green county, Wisconsin. He was married September 29, 1870 in the city of Buffalo, to Miss Eunice Woodin. Seven children were born to them, four sons and three daughters*, three sons and two daughters surviving him, viz: Herbert, who is a soldier in the regular army and now stationed in San Francisco; Fred, who lives at Alliance; Willie who lives in Gordon; Mrs. Katie Beadz, who also lives in Gordon, and Mrs. Musa Brown who lives in Alliance. He enlisted in Co. G. 118th regiment, York state volunteers, an dserved his country faithfully until the close of the war. He came to Nebraska sixteen years ago and to Sheridan county twelve years ago, where he filed on a homestead and continued to reside until about a year ago. His wife died four years ago last April. The funeral was held yesterday morning at ten o'clock from the residence of Kate Beadz, condeucted by Rev. J.A. Scamahorn, and the remains were laid to rest in the Gordon Cemetery.

* Harriett White (formerly Beadz) was the daughter who predeceased Martin Ellard)

Submitted by Melody

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