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Nebraska STATE GAZETTEER

Business Directory and Farmers List 
for 1890-1891

Omaha:
J. M. Wolfe & Co., Publisher, 509-510 Paxton Block 1890
Entered according to Act of Congress in the year of 1890,
by M. M. Wolfe & Co, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

Sherman County Business List

Ashton - Austin - Divide - Hazard  - Hayestown - Litchfield - Loup City - McAlpine - Paris - Rockville - Verdurette

Ashton is on Oak creek, in the eastern part of Sherman county, and on the Arcadia branch of the B.& M. R.R., 13 miles from Loup City, the county seat. The settlers were principally Polish immigrants, and the population now numbers about 200. The railroad was complete to this point in November, 1887, from which time the town dates its existence. The adjoining country is devoted principally to agriculture and stock raising. The shipments for the past year were 300,000 bushels of corn and 70 car loads of live stock. There are here a grain elevator, a feed mill, a bank, a hotel, agricultural implement repositories, lumber yards and other business enterprises and industries.
Austin, a postoffice in the eastern part of Sherman county, six miles south of Loup City, the seat of justice.

Divide, a postoffice in the western part of Sherman county, eight miles from Loup City, the seat of justice.
Hazard, a postoffice and a station on the Nebraska division of the B.& M. R.R., in the southwestern part of Sherman county, 18 miles from Loup City, the county seat, and 10 miles from Ravenna. Population, 45.

Hayestown, a postoffice in the extreme southeastern part of Sherman county, 20 miles south of Loup City.


Litchfield is in the western part of Sherman county, in the Muddy Creek valley, 18 miles from Loup City, and 47 miles northwest from Grand Island, on the branch of the B.& M. R.R., from Nebraska City to Newcastle, Wyoming. The place has a population of 300 who are manifesting considerable enterprise, which is evidenced by roller mills, elevator, two banks, etc. There are also two churches -- Methodist and Presbyterian -- a G.A.R. post and a lodge of A.O.U.W. The local newspaper is the Litchfield Moniter, E.R. Bradley, publisher.


Loup City, the county seat of Sherman county is located in the north-central part of the county and has a population of 677. It is on the Arcadia branch of the B.&M. R.R., and is the terminus of a spur of the G.I. & O. branch of the U.P.Ry. The town has a good water works system, which cost $10,000, and a $70,000 roller flour mill, with a capacity of 125 barrels per day. A grand enterprise for the development of manufactures is a canal two and a half miles in length from the Middle Loup river to the town, have a fall of 56 feet and furnishing a splendid volume of water power. There are some fine brick business blocks here a and large grain elevator, besides other valuable improvements made within a short time. There are two banks, two lumber yards and three newspapers -- the Northwestern, Sherman County Times and Sherman County Alliance.
McAlpine, a flag station on the B.& M. R.R., seven miles east of Arcadia.

Paris, a postoffice in the southern part of Sherman county, eight miles due east of Hazard.

Rockville, a station on the Loup City branch of the U.P. Ry., in the southeastern part of Sherman county, 13 miles from Loup City, the county seat. Population, 100. The churches are Methodist, Episcopal and Congregational.
Verdurette, a postoffice in the south-central part of Sherman county, eight miles south of Loup City, the county seat.

Sherman County Home Page

This page last modified onThursday, 21-Aug-2003 10:20:35 MDT .