Greetings from Sandwich, New Hampshire

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    Wallace Genealogy

        Greetings! If anyone is connected to the following or has more info, please let me know. Also, there are some great pension and local history records transcribed below! Regards,    Ward Hamilton            

Thank you Ward for sharing this with us.

First Generation
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1. William Weymouth WALLACE. Born abt 1752 in Greenland, Rockingham, New Hampshire. William Weymouth  died in Sandwich, Carroll, New Hampshire abt 1842, he was 90. Buried in Beede Cemetery, Sandwich, New Hampshire.

"Weymouth Wallace, father of Samuel who settled on Wallace Hill, was one of the early settlers of Sandwich. He was a Scotchman, who came to the colonies before the Revolution, settled in Londonderry and entered the army from Epsom where he was working. He fought and was wounded at the battle of Bunker Hill as a private in Capt. Dearborn's company. After the War, he came to Sandwich and settled near Squam Lake, on the farm where Samuel was born. He received a pension for his military service from New Hampshire from 1776 to 1783, and thereafter, from the United States until his death." [Note: This passage, drafted in the early twentieth century is not entirely accurate, in that Weymouth Wallace was born in New Hampshire, not Scotland, as implied]

Sixteenth Annual Excursion, p 33, courtesy of the Sandwich Historical Society

Weymouth Wallace b. 1752 Scotland d. ca 1842 New Hampshire m. _____ Doe Private NH PNSR (pension # S43240) DAR Patriot Index

1790 Federal Census: Listing found under "Wm W Wallis" 1-2-5-0-0 Epsom, Rockingham, New Hampshire

Weymouth Wallace is listed in the Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Vol. 6, as being buried in lot 31, Beede Cemetery, Sandwich, New Hampshire. He is also found on lists of Revolutionary War pensioners in 1813 and 1818.



Military: 13456 New Hampshire: Weymouth Wallace of Sandwich in the state of New Hampshire who was a private in the company commanded by Captain Morrell of the regiment commanded by Colonel Stark in the New Hampshire line, for the term of one year from May, 1776, to May 1777. Ascribed to the roll of New Hampshire at the rate of eight dollars per month, to commence on the 25th day of April 1808. Certificate of Pension issued the 24th day of July 1809 and sent to William Badger, Esq., Gilmanton, NH. Returned to the roll on 18th day of March 1829 and notification sent to Hon. D. Barker, justice, at Rochester N. Hampshire. Pension commencing on the 7th of February 1829. Amount due on the 4th of September 1829... $55.34.

Source: NARA, Revolutionary Claim Acts of March 18, 1818, and May 1, 1820

Military: Revolutionary War Pension Records

WALLIS, Weymouth... His name appears on a list of invalid pensioners returned by the Circuit Court for the District of New Hampshire, submitted to the House of Representatives by the Secretary of War on December 14, 1792. Rank: Private Regiment: Col. Stark Disability: Wounded in the wrist 17th June, 1775, at the Battle of Bunker Hill Date of Commencement: May 28, 1792 Monthly Allowance: $2.22 Arrears Due: $40.

Source: NARA, American State Papers, class 9, page 58


WALLIS, Weymouth... His name appears on a list of claimants to be placed on the pension list returned by the District of New Hampshire, submitted to the House of Representatives by the Secretary of War on April 25, 1794. Rank: Private Regt: Col. Starke's Disability: Wounded in the wrist by a shot from the enemy, and considerably injured When and Where Disabled: June 17, 1775, Bunker's Hill Residence: Epsom Monthly allowance: $2.22 Arrears due: $40.

Source: NARA, American State Papers, class 9, page 108


WALLACE, Weymouth... His name appears on a list of applicants for invalid pension returned by the District Court of the District of New Hampshire submitted to the House of Representatives by the Secretary of War on December 31, 1794. Rank: Private Regt: Colonel Stark's Disability: Wounded in the right arm When and where disabled: June 17, 1775, Bunker's Hill Residence: Epsom To what pension entitled: One-half Remarks: Militia.

Source: NARA, American State Papers, class 9, page 139

Military: Court document filed in Strafford County, New Hampshire: On the 25th day of April A.D. 1818 before me the subscriber one of the judges of the Court of Common Pleas for said County personally appears Weymouth Wallace aged sixty seven years resident in the Town of Sandwich county and state aforesaid who being by me first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress entitles an [unreadable] to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the Revolutionary War. That he the said Weymouth Wallace in May 1775 enlisted in the Town of Epsom in said state for eight months and entered the aforesaid service in the company commanded by Captain Henry Dearborn and regiment commanded by Col John Stark, New Hampshire line he continued to serve until June following when in the battle of Bunker Hill he was wounded and so much disabled that he did no more duty during said enlistment that sometime about the month of January 1776 he enlisted at Winter Hill for one year in the company, regiment and line of aforesaid that he continued to serve in said service of the United States in said War on the continental establishment from January 1776 until the last of December following or first of January 1777 when he was dismissed from service at Ticonderoga in the state of New York that he had no written discharge that he was in the Battle of Bunker hill where he was wounded in consequence of which wound he has since drawn a small pension from said United States and that he is in reduced circumstances and stands in need of the assistance of his country for support. Sworn to and declared before me on the day and year aforesaid. signed William Badger I, William Badger, Judge as aforesaid, do certify that it appears to my satisfaction that the said Weymouth Wallace did serve in the revolutionary war as stated in the preceding declaration against the common enemy for the term of nine months on the Continental establishment and that he is in reduced circumstances and stands in need of the assistance of his country for support and I now transmit the proceedings and testimony taken and had before me to the Secretary of the Department of War pursuant to the directions of the aforementioned act of congress. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and have caused the seal of said court to be affixed to the same this first day of September 1818. signed William Badger Attest: Dan'l Waldrow clerk of the court of common pleas for said county  of Strafford

Source: NARA, Selected Records from Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land-Warrant Application Files, Microcopy No. 805, Roll 834

Military: To the Justices of the Court of Common Pleas now sitting at Moultonborough within and for the County of Strafford and State of New Hampshire, on the 14th day of July 1820. Weymouth Wallace aged 69 years, resident in Sandwich in said County, comes into court and in pursuance of an act of Congress passed on the 1st day of May, 1820, brings with him, and in his proper person exhibits to said Court a Schedule by him subscribed, containing his whole estate and income-his necessary clothing and bedding excepted-as follows:

Estate... 75 acres of poor, hard land with the buildings thereon standing
Livestock... 2 cows, 1- 3 yr old heifer, 1- 2 yr old heifer, 1 ox, 1 - yr old stein, 1/2 of an old mare, 4 sheep, 1 lamb, 2 hogs, 1 small pig
Farming tools... 1 scythe, 1/2 of an old pair of wheels, 1/2 small wagon, 1 old plow, 7 harrow, some small chains, 1 pitch fork, 1 chest, 1 shovel
House goods... 2 old tables, 7 old kitchen chairs, 1 shovel, pair tongs, 2 chests
I am indebted to sundry persons in all the sum of one hundred forty four dollars and ninety three cents. signed by the mark "X" of Weymouth Wallace and witnessed by Dan'l Hart and Geo Fellarston
And the said Weymouth Wallace doth here in Court further declare on oath that he served in the revolutionary war as follows, viz.: nine months in Capt Henry Dearborn's (since Secretary at War) company and was wounded in the Battle of Bunker Hill in year 1775 - one year in the regiment commanded by Col. John Stark and company commanded by Amos Morrill, in November or December 1776 and ending 1777.

That the date of his original declaration in order to obtain a pension is April 25, 181, and the number of his pension certificate is 13,456:-That his occupation is that of a farmer and has not sufficient ability to pursue it. That the number and names of his family residing with him, and their ages and capacities to contribute to their support, are as follows, viz.:
has one daughter named Sally Wallace aged twenty-nine years, has one granddaughter named Lovina Mooney aged 21 years, 1 grandson aged 8 years in common health but without any property.
The aforesaid schedule and oath and the above declaration duly subscribed and sworn by the said Weymouth Wallace having been by him exhibited in person, and presented to the court, and the same being seen and considered, it is the opinion of said court that the value of the property contained in said schedule is two hundred, seventy-nine dollars and fifty cents, which propert is subject to said Wallace's debt.
Daniel M. Durrell, Esquire, Chief Justice, and Valentine Smith and Samuel Quarles, Associate Justices of said Court. Attest, A. Peirce, Clerk. July 14, 1820.

Source: NARA, Selected Records from Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land-Warrant Application Files, Microcopy No. 805, Roll 834

Military: On February 7, 1829, Weymouth Wallace again petitoned the Strafford County Court to assist him in application to Congress to continue his pension. Within this document, Wallace states that he is seventy-seven years old, that he enlisted in May 1775 under Capt Amos Morrill's company, Col Stark's Regt, that he was discharged in December 1777 from Lower Canada, that hew "was wounded in the Battle of Bunker Hill by a ball which passed through his arm, that he now receives a pension of forty-eight dollars as an invalid pensioner." He itemizes his estate as consisting of 150 acres of land subject to two mortgages which total three hundred, seventy-two dollars, 2 cows, 1 horse, 1 pig, 5 sheep, 20 bushels corn, 100 lb pork, 1 basket of grain, beans, and peas, $1.50, 1 pair wheels, 1 chain, 1 old sleigh and a harness. "I further say that my occupation is that of a farmer that I am so infirm that I cannot perform any labors and that my family consists of a granddaughter who lives with me having no property. signed by the mark "X" of Weymouth Wallace. attested to by A. Peirce, Clerk

Source: NARA, Selected Records from Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land-Warrant Application Files, Microcopy No. 805, Roll 834

William Weymouth married Alice DOE.

They had the following children:
i. Simeon. Born abt 1769 in Epsom, New Hampshire.

ii. Jane Moses. Born abt 1769 in Epsom, New Hampshire.

iii. Nanny. Born abt 1770 in Epsom, New Hampshire.

2 iv. Samuel (~1785-1859)

v. Sally. Born abt 1789 in New Hampshire.



Second Generation
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2. Samuel WALLACE Senior. Born abt 1785 in Epsom, New Hampshire. Samuel died in Holderness, New Hampshire on 25 Sep 1859, he was 74.

Samuel and Nancy Wallace are enumerated on 19 Jul 1850 in Sandwich, Carroll, New Hampshire. Samuel values his real estate at $1200. Interestingly, there are Wallace families listed immediately before and after him (Joseph and Andrew). They are probably also his sons.

"The first of the Wallace family to settle in the Notch was Samuel, who acquired a farm of about 400 acres, and built a good set of buildings, consisting of a house with arched shed for wood and two barns. Pasturage was good, and the farm always had a large stock. On the farm is the lonely grave of his eleven-year-old daughter Elizabeth, who died of scarlet fever. Here also lived Asahel Wallace, who is said to have remained until after his marriage to Caroline Tappan when they moved over the Sandwich line into Thornton, there buying a farm from his older brother George, who moved to Mad River. Probably then was about the time the farm on Wallace Hill was abandoned, for the County Map shows no occupant in 1860.

While Asahel and Caroline Wallace were living in Thornton, there were born to them four children. In December of 1866 or 1867, Asahel Wallace bought from John Beede the place on the Intervale, and moved his family down on snow. The household goods, or enough to supply the family overnight, were packed on a sled, 25 head of cattle ran on ahead, horses followed loose, and mother with four children, one of them (Marcellus) a babe in her arms, came in a sleigh. After moving back to Sandwich, seven more children were born.

Caroline (Tappan) Wallace, mother of these eleven children, found time for much outside work. She became intensely interested in the temperance movement which was then gaining momentum, and was elected president of the county organization, and traveled much about the state lecturing for the cause. At the end of her term of office she was sent as a delegate to the National Convention held at St. Louis, Missouri. She is remembered as a ready speaker and able writer, who spent her last years at Concord."

Sixteenth Annual Excursion, pp 32-3, courtesy of Sandwich Historical Society

Samuel married Nancy DUQUOINE, daughter of Andrew DUQUOINE. Born abt 1790 in New Durham, New Hampshire. Nancy died in Holderness, New Hampshire in Jan 1859, she was 69.

They had the following children:
3 i. Samuel (1823-1867)

ii. Ira. Born abt 1819 in New Hampshire. Occupation: Laborer.

iii. Nancy. Born abt 1823 in New Hampshire.

iv. Azub. Born abt 1826 in New Hampshire. Occupation: Farmer.

v. James. Born abt 1828 in New Hampshire. Occupation: Farmer.

vi. Abigail. Born abt 1839 in New Hampshire.

4 vii. Asahel Adams (1825-1896)

viii. Elizabeth. Buried in Wallace Hill family farm, Sandwich, New Hampshire.

Died young, eleven, of scarlet fever.


ix. George.



Third Generation
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3. Samuel WALLACE Junior. Born on 6 Jul 1823 in Sandwich, Carroll, New Hampshire. Samuel died in Holderness, New Hampshire on 11 Jun 1867, he was 43. Occupation: Laborer (1850 Fed Census: NH). Occupation: Farmer (1860 Fed Census: NH). Occupation: "..was a sailor in early life." (Toppan-Tappan Genealogy, p 62).

Samuel and Lucy Wallace are enumerated on 19 Jun 1860 in Holderness, Grafton, New Hampshire. Samuel listed his real estate as being worth $2800 and his personal estate worth $1000.

On 11 Apr 1858 when Samuel was 34, he married Lucy March TAPPAN, daughter of Jonathan TAPPAN (16 Mar 1800-14 Mar 1880) & Dorothy Beede HEARD (5 Jan 1803-28 Oct 1880), in Sandwich, New Hampshire. Born on 27 Oct 1832 in Moultonboro, New Hampshire. Lucy March died in Sandwich, New Hampshire on 15 Nov 1896, she was 64.

They had the following children:
i. Freeman Leslie (1859-1921)
ii. Flora Eda (1862-1931)
iii. Flora (1861-1861)
iv. Ira Tuttle (1864-)

4. Asahel Adams WALLACE. Born on 16 May 1825 in Sandwich, Carroll, New Hampshire. Asahel Adams died in Sandwich, Carroll, New Hampshire on 24 Mar 1896, he was 70.

On 10 Mar 1859 when Asahel Adams was 33, he married Caroline Isabelle TAPPAN, daughter of Jonathan TAPPAN (16 Mar 1800-14 Mar 1880) & Dorothy Beede HEARD (5 Jan 1803-28 Oct 1880), in Sandwich, Carroll, New Hampshire. Born on 31 Oct 1835 in Sandwich, Carroll, New Hampshire. Caroline Isabelle died in probably Concord, New Hampshire, where she was living at 27 South State Street (1915). aft 1915, she was 79.

They had the following children:
i.   Charles L.
ii.  Christopher T.
iii. Emma L.
iv. Marcellus C.
v.  Marjorie V.
vi. Dolly Caroline
vii.Mary Huntress
viii.Asahel Horace
ix. Frederick William
x.  Alonzo March
xi.
Almira Rice

 

 

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