Greenwich Tea Burning Chapter, NSDAR, Bridgeton, New Jersey

  Chapter History

The Greenwich Tea Burning Chapter was organized July 12, 1904. It was named for a revolutionary episode.
The Organizing Regent was Caroline Lawrence Tomlinson (Mrs. Joseph). She served in that capacity from 1904-1913.
Mrs. Caroline Lawrence Tomlinson
Origin of the Name: "Greenwich Tea Burning"
To placate the indignant colonists, England at last took her obnoxious tax off everything but tea.

Shortly after the occurrence of "The Boston Tea Party," the East India Company sent a brig, bound for Philadelphia, up the Cohansey River and discharged a quantity of tea at Greenwich. This was deposited in the cellar of a house, standing in front of the Market Ground.

On the evening of December 22, 1774, a party of young men from the vicinity of Greenwich, disguised as Indians, took the tea from the cellar. The tea was carried across Market Lane, directly opposite its storage place and burned on a slight knoll. This spot is west of the site of the Tea Burning monument plot, which is part of the acre used as the market ground of colonial days.

Bridgeton's Liberty Bell
The bell was cast in 1763, and placed in the court house, and, until taken down to send to the Sesquicentennial, was in the tower of the high school and used daily. On its return, it was put back in the tower of the high school and is again used daily.
A photograph of Bridgeton's Liberty Bell. The bell proclaimed America's independence from the belfry of the court house, Bridgeton, upon the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.
The bell proclaimed America's independence from the belfry of the court house, Bridgeton, upon the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.

The above information and photographs from: "State History of the New Jersey Daughters of the American Revolution," 1929; compiled by Grace Louise Cadmus and assisted by E. Jane Peer.

Greenwich Tea Burning Chapter | Bridgeton, New Jersey
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