EARLY CATHOLIC FAMILIES IN PATERSON
Circa 1830
Men and Women who Assisted
in Establishing the Church in This City

Taken from
"History of the Catholic Church in Paterson, N.J.,"
by Charles A. Shriner
Press Printing and Publishing, 1890

"A glance at the families who constituted the Catholic church in the times of Father O’DONOGHUE and his predecessors, a glance through the memories of some of the old Catholics of the of the present day at the Catholic church of Paterson in 1830 and thereabouts, will undoubtedly be of interest to a great many.

"The following list is not complete, but it is a complete as it could be made from the materials at hand, the scanty records and the recollections of old citizens, more or less identified with the progress of the church work in this city:"
Charles A Shriner, "A History of the Catholic Church in Paterson, N.J.

ABBOTT, Thomas,
a weaver, for some time kept a grocery in Main Street. He has two sons still living in this city. Thomas, an overseer in the mills of R. & H. Adams, and Michael, a machinist.

AGNEW, Patrick,
was among the earliest and most liberal of the Catholic settlers in Paterson. For a number of years, he kept a grocery store in Cross Street. At the time of his death, he was a lay judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Passaic County. His son, John, who is still in business in this city, was a lieutenant of the Montgomery Rifles and an alderman from the old South Ward. His son, Thomas, is in business in San Francisco, and his daughter, Margaret, is the wife of the Hon. Charles H. O’NEILL, of Jersey City.

BANNIGAN, Peter and Michael,
were two brothers. Peter was a trustee of the old church in Mill Street and also of the Oliver Street church; he resided in Ward Street; he was the father of Mrs. Robert HAMIL. Michael lived in Cross Street, near White’s alley; he subsequently erected the brick building at No. 19 Marshall Street, and there he died.

BARRETT, Michael,
was a travelling agent for several New York firms. He died a few years ago, leaving two daughters and several grandchildren.

BINSSE, Dr. Donation,
practiced medicine in this city. He was born and educated in France, his parents being people of moderate means. He was very fond of hunting, and the picture he presented as he returned from his favorite sport with his corduroy suit, his trousers tucked in his knee-high boots, with a large string of quail or rabbits dangling at his side, is still vivid in the memory of Patersonians. He resided on the corner of Hotel and Market Streets and subsequently in the old bank building in Main Street. He left Paterson, but his remains were returned to this city for interment. His two sons are still living but not in Paterson.

BLAKE, Thomas,
was a butcher and lived in Broadway; he had four sons, all of whom are dead, and one daughter, the wife of Joseph SMITH; she died a few years ago. There are no relatives living in Paterson

BOYLAN, William,
lived for a number of years in Market Street. He came here in 1827. There are no descendants of his living in Paterson at present.

BRADLEYS, Three Sisters,
kept a boarding house for some years on Market Street, near Mill. Father O’DONOGHUE boarded with them, as did several other priests; they left Paterson about 1832.

BROWN, John P.,
was one of the trustees of the Oliver Street church when it was building. He was in partnership with Joseph WARREN in the leather business in lower Main Street and married a daughter of Mr. Warren. His sons, John and Joseph, still carry on the leather business at their father’s old stand; there are several daughters still living in upper Broadway.

BURKE, Edward,
kept a store on the corner of Oliver and Mill Streets. He subsequently removed to New Orleans and has no descendants living in Paterson.

BURKE, John,
lived in Passaic Street; he had two sons, John, a machinist, and Richard, a blacksmith; they are both dead; John had three daughters, some of whose descendants still live in this city.

BURKE, Thomas,
was a cotton spinner and worked at his trade for a number of years; subsequently he kept a tavern. He was a brother of John BURKE, mentioned above. He built a house adjoining the Catholic church in Mill Street. The house burned down some years after it was erected, and his wife perished in the flames. He had two sons and a daughter; John was a constable and died some years ago; James died in the South. His wife is still living in this city.

BURNS, John, a bachelor, resided in Paterson only a few years when he died. He was employed in Godwin & Clark’s machine shop, where he was caught in a lathe on which he was working. He died of lockjaw which set in as consequence of the injuries he received.

BUTLER, Patrick, was a cotton spinner. By frugality and good judgement, he accumulated a handsome fortune on which he lived at his ease for a number of years and left much of it to his heirs. He built a house next to that of Thomas BURKE in Market Street. He was the father of Mrs. Stephen WALL, Mrs. Dr. QUIN, Richard H. BUTLER, Nancy BUTLER, and Louise Jane BUTLER, who are still residents of this or New York city.

CALLAHAN, John,
lived in Prospect Street. He looked after the water gates of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures for a number of years previous to the appointment of Mr. CHAPMAN. Subsequently, he went to the western part of New York State, where he purchased a farm and where he died a short time ago.

CARDLE, John,
worked one loom in his dwelling in Marshall Street. None of his descendants reside here at present.

CARR, James,
was a weaver and lived in Market Street with his brother-in-law, Patrick QUIN. He was a widower. His son, John, who was a blacksmith, removed to New York with Patrick Quin.

CARROLL, John,
for a number of years taught school in Prospect Street. His son, Simon, was traveling salesman for several New York and western firms and married a daughter of Michael BARRETT. His oldest daughter, Mary, married Christopher MCKIERNAN; Ellen married James MACKAL, and Ann never married. The only descendant of this early settler living at present is Mary MACKAL. The widow of John Carroll died in St. Joseph’s Hospital several years ago.

CARROLL, Philip,
kept a hotel on Market Street, just west of Cross Street. His son, after his father’s death, removed to New York, and his widow, a woman well known for her many charitable acts, married Andrew LYNCH; her four daughters married merchants of New York city; she had no children by Lynch.

CASSADY, Michael,
was a weaver who came here in 1827 and lived on Marshall Street. None of his descendants live in Paterson at present.

CHAPMAN, Philip,
died a few years ago at the age of eighty years. He was the tender of the water gates of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures at the Falls, an occupation in which his sons succeed him; he has a number of descendants still residing here.

CHEW, Richard,
was here in 1827 and lived on Ellison Street. None of his descendants live in Paterson at present.

COLIN, Felix,
was here in 1827 and was a weaver, having two looms in his dwelling on Broadway. None of his descendants live in Paterson at present.

COLON, John,
was a laborer, who came here in 1827. He kept a boarding house in Main Street for some time. None of his descendants reside in Paterson at present.

CONNOLLY, Michael,
was the sexton of the church on the corner of Market and Mill Streets. He kept a store on Market Street and his widow and his son, John, live within one door of where the store was. His wife was a daughter of Michael GILLESPIE.

CONROY, Owen,
lived on Mill Street, coming here in 1829. None of his descendants live here at present.

CONVERY, Hugh,
was a weaver, having two looms in his residence of Broadway; he came here previous to 1829. His family subsequently left Paterson.

CONWAY, Patrick,
was here in 1827 and lived on Main Street; he was a tanner and currier. After his death, his family all left Paterson.

CONWELL, James,
was a distant relative of the late Rt. Rev. Bishop CONWELL, of Philadelphia. He was a cotton mill operative and resided in Jersey Street. A number of his descendants still live in this city.

CORRIGAN, Patrick,
who still resides in Mechanic Street with his child, was employed in the cotton mill for a number of years.

COUGHLIN, Patrick,
lived for a number of years in Van Houten Street. He kept a livery stable and ran a line of stage coaches between Paterson and Hoboken. When the Paterson & Hudson River railroad was built to Bergen Hill, he brought the passengers to and from Jersey City. When the road was completed to the water’s edge in Jersey City, he removed to New York where he kept a hotel in Cortlandt Street known as the Paterson House. He was also agent for the railroad company and sold their tickets in an office in the same building in which he died. None of his descendants live in Paterson. He had two brothers, John and Richard. The former was a shoemaker and carried on his business in Ellison Street; none of his descendants live in Paterson. Richard, who is still living, came to Paterson when he was a very young man. He was one of the first conductors on the Paterson & Hudson River railroad and served faithfully in this capacity for over thirty-five years when he resigned and became the trusted messenger of the First National Bank of Paterson. Unfortunately, he met with a severe accident some years ago in a ferry-boat collision, which compelled him to cease his services as messenger for some time.

CRAVEN, George,
was a weaver, who came here in 1827; he resided in the over-the-river section of Paterson, a place which at that time was called New Manchester. None of his descendants live here at present.

CROWLEY, Timothy,
was a weaver and lived in West Street. He came here in 1827, but none of his descendants live here at present.

CUNNINGHAM, John,
kept a grocery in Passaic Street. He was a brother-in-law of Patrick QUIN, they having married two sisters. None of Mr. Cunningham’s family are now living in Paterson.

CURRAN, Edward and Peter,
were brothers. Edward lived in Prospect Street; of his four children, Patrick is still living, John, James, and Ellen being dead. Peter removed to Michigan, where he lived on a farm near Detroit. When he died, his widow returned to Paterson and became the second wife of Patrick ROONEY; she survived him but died a few years ago and was buried from the present St. John’s Church.

DALY, William,
was a reedmaker; he came here in 1827 and lived in Main Street. None of his family remain in Paterson.

DELANEY, Michael,
came here previous to 1827; he lived in Oliver Street; all his family have left Paterson.

DEMPSEY, Thomas,
came here in 1827 and lived in Market Street. His family are all dead.

DEVLIN, Arthur,
was a school teacher and resided in Prospect Street. He removed to Rhode Island, where his sons still reside.

DIMOND, James,
was a weaver, who operated five looms in his residence in West Street. He had three sons and one daughter; one of his sons, James DIMOND, Justice of the Peace, still resides in Paterson.

DIPLEY, John,
was here in 1827 and lived in Main Street. All of his family have left Paterson

DONOVAN, Daniel,
lived on the corner of Oliver and Marshall Streets and for a long number of years worked for the late Michael MORRIS. He died in 1851; a number of his descendants still live in this city.

DONNELLY, John,
came here previous to 1827. He lived in Main Street. His family are all dead.

DORIS, James,
was a blacksmith and farrier, who had a shop on Market Street, near Mill. He was a lieutenant in the Irish Greens. His oldest daughter married John JORDAN, a police officer at present. His youngest daughter married John O’BRIEN, who served as an assemblyman from the Second District.

DOUGHERTY, James, Hugh, Robert, and William.
James, the oldest, came here about the year 1826. He owned a double house on Market Street, near Cross, were he lived and operated eight looms and where he died. He had two sons, both of whom are dead, and one daughter, who died in St. Joseph’s Hospital a few months ago. Hugh, the second in age, came here with James. He was a school teacher and first taught school in the double house belonging to Dennis MCKIERNAN, in White’s alley; subsequently, he taught in his own house on Cross Street, opposite the Methodist church; the school room was on the second floor, rear, the front of the building being occupied as a store and dwelling. He had sixty pupils, among them being Morgan SWEENEY, Robert SWEENEY, James DUNN, Thomas FARNON, and Christopher MCKIERNAN. He was a bachelor, and at his death bequeathed all his property to the church of St. John the Baptist. Robert was also in the basement of the Oliver Street church. Subsequently, he went to New York, where he kept a livery stable for some time. Then he returned to Paterson, but shortly afterwards went to Sussex County, near Brooklyn Lake, where he remained until a short time before he died. William resided in Passaic Street where he died a few years ago. He left two sons, Hugh and John, both machinists and several daughters, all of whom still reside in Paterson.

DOUGHERTY, George,
lived on Oliver Street, where he had two looms; he removed from Paterson a number of years ago.

DOWLING, James,
was here previous to 1827; he was a weaver and operated four looms in his residence in Marshall Street. His family have all left Paterson.

DUFFY, Charles,
was a weaver, who came here previous to 1827 and lived in Main Street. He removed from Paterson about 1833.

DUFFY, Patrick,
was a weaver. He came here in 1829 and lived in Prospect Street. None of his descendants live here now.

DUNN, Edward,
worked in Rogers locomotive works and lived in Mill Street to the time of his death. His widow and other members of his family still reside in this city.

DUNN, ________,
the father of James DUNN, came here about the year 1826. His son, who is still living, has been Assistant U.S. Collector, alderman, and city treasurer. His oldest daughter married John O’BRIEN, the father of the late ex-assemblyman. The younger daughter married John KINSILLA. Both the daughters are dead; they were gifted with fine voices and for a number of years sang in the choir of St. John’s church. A daughter of Mrs. Kinsilla is the wife of James BERGIN, the contractor.

DUNN, John,
came to Paterson about 1825 while the Morris canal was being built. He was a bachelor and boarded with his brother-in-law, Patrick KELLY, on Oliver Street. He was employed in the Rogers locomotive works for a number of years. He died in this city.

EAGAN, Peter,
was a butcher and worked for Thomas CLARK. He was here in 1829 and lived in Washington Street. He left Paterson about 1835.

FAGAN, John,
was a weaver who had one loom which he operated in his dwelling in Broadway. He was here in 1829.

FANNING, James,
was employed in the cotton mill. He lived in Cross Street and subsequently in Market Street. He was a trustee of the Oliver Street church and during the time Fathers DUFFY and O’REILLY were here, a Sunday school teacher; for a number of years he was superintendent of the Sunday school with Michael MORRIS as assistant. His only daughter married Thomas DALEY, a boilermaker, who left Paterson some years ago.

FARNON, John,
resided for many years in Prospect Street and was the father of John and Thomas FARNON, of this city, and Peter FARNON, of Philadelphia. He and his two brothers were machinists. In 1850, John went to Mexico where he died in 1863. His oldest son, John, was a teacher in the Oliver Street school during the pastorate of Father O’REILLY. His sister, Ann, died here a few years ago, leaving all her property to St. John’s church; another sister, Mrs. MCGEE, died in Mexico.

FAULLY, Dennis,
was here in 1829 and lived in Washington Street. He had a family of seven children, all of whom left Paterson many years ago.

FINNEGAN, Francis,
lived in Main Street, near Slater. He subsequently removed to Rhode Island and none of his descendants live in Paterson.

FITZPATRICK, Michael,
was here in 1829 and lived in Prospect street

FORTUNE, James,
was a wool spinner for a number of years in Morrow’s mills, about two miles from Paterson. He died about 1870 at his residence on the corner of Clark and Ward Streets, leaving two sons and four daughters, all still living in Paterson. His sons are William and James M.; his daughters are Mrs. William J. BUCKLEY, Mrs. John REILLY, Miss Kitty and Miss Maggie.

FULTON, Thomas,
was the father of Mrs. Patrick AGNEW. He has other descendants still living in this city.

GALLAGHER, James,
was here in 1829; he was a weaver who operated three looms in the over-the-river district, which was then called New Manchester.

GARNANDI, Antonio,
was a marble cutter who lived in Prospect Street in 1829.

GARNET, Patrick,
was here in 1827 and kept a boarding house in Marshall Street

GARRAGHAN, Patrick,
was a weaver; he was here in 1829 and lived in Marshall Street

GARRET, Patrick,
was a contractor on the Morris canal and the Paterson & Hudson River railroad. He lived in Cross Street and has descendants living in Jersey City.

GILLAND, Philip,
was here in 1827; he was a weaver who had two looms in his dwelling in Prospect Street.

GILLESPIE, James,
was a son of Michael GILLESPIE; he was a trustee of the Oliver Street church in Father O’REILLY’s time. He was one of the founders of the Machinists Association and a partner in that concern up to the time of his death. His son, John, is in business in Market Street and his daughter is a Sister of Charity.

GILLESPIE, Michael,
resided for some years on Market Street, near Prince, and it was in his house that the first mass was celebrated by Father LARISSY. He subsequently removed to Belleville, where Fathers LANGTON and BULGER repeatedly said mass. He afterwards moved back to Paterson and took up his residence in Market Street, near Cross, where several of his descendants still reside. He was employed in the foundry of Godwin & Clark. At that time the Catholics had no cemetery in Paterson but Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie, rather than see the bodies of one of their children buried in unconsecrated ground, journeyed to New York with the remains, where they were interred in a Catholic cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie were the parents of nine children, of whom one still survives, Mrs. CONNOLLY, who lives with the Gillespies in Market Street.

GLOVER, Elias,
was a machinist; he was here in 1829 and lived in Van Houten Street

GLOVER, Peter,
was a machinist; he was here in 1829 and lived in Passaic Street. He has descendants living in the Totowa district of Paterson

GORMAN, John,
lived in Cross Street in 1829.

GRACE, Patrick,
was a weaver; he was here in 1829 and lived in Marshall Street

GRANT, Bernard,
was a burr-stone cutter who lived in West Street in 1829.

GRIFFITH, Andrew and Michael,
two brothers, lived on the corner of Cross and Van Houten Streets, opposite Colonel KERR’s residence. Michael died unmarried, but Andrew, who was a trustee of the Oliver Street church when it was in course of erection, had numerous descendants. His children were:--Mary, wife of Hugh BRADY and mother of Mrs. Michael A. HAROLD, who still resides with her daughter in Marshall Street; George, a leading tailor, Captain of the City Blues and Alderman of the Sixth Ward, whose widow is still alive; Margaret, wife of James SHORROCK, who died some years ago; Sarah, Michael and Andrew, who died unmarried, and Elizabeth and Augustine, who still live in Paterson.

GUIRREL, Patrick,
was here in 1827 and lived on Cross Street and subsequently in Oliver Street. He was for over thirty years a timekeeper in the foundry of Rogers locomotive works. He has several descendants living in Paterson.

HAGENS, John,
was here in 1829; he was a weaver and lived in West Street

HAGGERTY, John,
who still lives with his wife and child on Market Street, near Beech, was in his earlier years employed in the foundry of Godwin and Clark. For many years he was a Sunday school teacher in the Oliver Street church.

HAMIL, the father of James and Robert HAMIL,
was among the early settlers in Paterson. He is dead now as are also his three sons, but the work they did still remains and is too well known to need further reference in this volume.

HAWKINS, James,
was a machinist, who resided in Marshall Street, near Slater. He was a Sunday school teacher in the Oliver Street church during Father O’REILLY’s time and during a part of Father QUINN’s time. He removed with his family to California, where he died.

HEFFERMAN, Morris,
was here in 1829 and lived in Passaic Street. For many years he was in the employ of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures. He has several descendants living in Paterson.

HENRY, John,
was here in 1829 and lived in Oliver Street. He has several descendants living in Paterson, among them being Mrs. Henry MCCLORY.

HENRY, Peter,
was here in 1829 and lived in Marshall Street

HIGGINS, Edward,
was here in 1829 and lived in Main Street

HUGHES, Charles,
kept a grocery on the corner of Ellison and Prospect Streets. He removed to Lodi, in Bergen County, where he died, leaving several descendants.

HUGHES,
some of whose descendants still reside in Paterson, in his earlier years resided in Van Houten Street and was employed in the cotton mill.

KANE, James,
was here in 1829 and lived in Passaic Street.

KEAR, Colonel John,
was one of the most prominent figures in early Paterson. For some time, he kept a grocery on the southwest corner of Cross and Van Houten Streets, but his principal occupation was that of a contractor. As such, he constructed portions of the raceways and roads for the Society for Establishing of Useful Manufactures. He also built a number of houses for himself. He had two daughters and one son who subsequently left Paterson and took up their residence in New York city. He was colonel of the military of Paterson and was buried with military pomp, his house bedecked with the trappings of mourning and the empty cavalry boots hanging at its sides, following the coffin to the grave. A deed given him by the East Jersey Proprietors for the Catholic burying ground in Paterson is at present in the possession of Mr. William NELSON, of this city.

KEEGAN, Roderick,
lived in Market Street and subsequently in Mill Street. For some time, he was employed at the Morris canal while it was being constructed and at the time of his death, about 1856, he was employed in the foundry of the Rogers locomotive works.

KEENAN, James,
lived in Main Street and subsequently in Slater Street, where he died. Of all his family, there are but two living, John and Ann, who still live in Paterson.

KELLIHAN, Patrick,
was here in 1829 and lived in Prospect Street.

KELLY, Hugh,
was here in 1827 and lived in Prospect Street

KELLY, John,
was here in 1829 and lived in Market Street.

KELLY, John,
was a soap and candle manufacturer and lived in Van Houten Street, between Main and Prospect Streets; he subsequently removed to New York where his descendants still live.

KELLY, Patrick,
was a constable, who subsequently removed to New York, where he died. His daughter was the first wife of Matthew NEALON, of this city.

KELLY, Patrick,
lived in Oliver Street and owned a house and lot where the Brothers’ house now stands. Mr. Christopher MCKIERNAN tells the following incident, illustrating as well the character of Mr. Kelly as throwing light on the life among the Catholics in the early days of Paterson:---"Mr. Kelly owned a horse and cart and was ever ready to help any person in need. Many a time was his horse used for funerals. The Methodists had a hearse which the Catholics were in the habit of borrowing. On the death of a poor person, Kelly would put wagon harness on his horse and go to the Methodist church and hire the hearse, for which he paid fifty cents. If this stipend was subsequently not returned to Mr. Kelly, he never mentioned it. One day, Mr. Kelly had a funeral on hand. His horse was sick and could not be taken out of the stall. I was carting sand from the sandbank now known as Colt’s Hill; in those days it extended to where the curb of Main Street now is. Kelly came to me and I gave him use of my horse. I put the wagon harness on my animal and got the hearse. This was a great relief to Mr. Kelly, but it was the first and last time that I ever officiated as undertaker." Mr. Kelly had two sons who died in San Francisco; his daughter, Mr. William CARROLL, still lives in Main Street, nearly opposite Green.

KIELEY (KEILEY*), James D.,
was one of the first trustees of the Oliver Street church. He taught a private school for some years in Passaic Street and was the architect of the present St. John’s church. He subsequently removed to (Petersburgh*) Virginia where his son, A.M. KIELEY (KEILEY*), became prominent as a lawyer and politician and was elected Mayor of Richmond. (*Handwritten notations in the book- they have been included as they may be of significance to researchers).

KILLFOIL, Richard,
was here in 1829 and lived in Mill Street.

KINNEY, Cornelius,
lived in Market Street in 1829. After his death, his descendants removed to Brooklyn.

KINNEY, Daniel,
was here in 1827; he was a weaver and had two looms in his dwelling in Van Houten Street. His son and two daughters removed to Williamsburgh a few years ago.

LOCHLIN, David,
was here in 1827 and lived over the river.

LOCHLIN, Edward,
was here in 1827; he was a weaver and had three looms in his dwelling in Marshall Street.

LOCHLIN, Thomas,
was here in 1829; he was a weaver and had three looms in his dwelling in Marshall Street.

LOLLER, Edward,
was here in 1829 and lived in Marshall Street.

LYNCH, Bernard,
the father of Andrew, Bernard, Thomas, James, Mary, and Nancy, all of whom were prominent in church affairs, and his wife lie buried in the old Presbyterian Cemetery on Market Street, near Vine, where the tombstones of several of the family still remain. Bernard Lynch, his wife, and children are all dead, but their descendants still reside in Paterson. The second wife of Andrew, the oldest son, who was one of the first trustees of the Oliver Street church, still resides in Market Street, near Cross, with his two sons, James and Bernard. Thomas left Paterson and took up his residence in New York city, were he died.

MAGENNIS, Arthur,
came to Paterson from Matteawan, NY about 1825 or 1830 and was the father of the late Comptroller of the City of Paterson. He kept a store here for some time and subsequently was employed in his son’s cotton mill, the old Franklin mill on Mill Street, opposite Ellison.

MAGINNIS, James,
was here in 1829, living on Passaic Street

MAGLONE, Loughlin,
was here in 1829, living in White’s alley.

MAKIN, Joseph,
was here in 1827; he was a weaver and had two looms in his dwelling over the river. He removed to New York state about 1835.

MALLON, John,
was a laborer on the Morris canal. His children are John, for many years representing the Eighth Ward in the Board of Aldermen and at present Senator from Passaic County; Felix, of Jersey City; Mrs. ROE, the wife of a police officer; Mrs. Michael CAMPBELL, the wife of the ex-Alderman from the Fifth Ward, and Mrs. Patrick FITZPATRICK.

MALONE, James,
was here in 1827; he was a weaver and lived in Ellison Street; he left a number of descendants here.

MARSHALL, William,
was here in 1827 and lived in Prospect Street up to the time of his death. His descendants here consist of three sons and a number of grandchildren.

MARTEN, Thomas,
was here in 1829; he was a weaver and had six looms in his dwelling in West Street.

MARTIN, Thomas,
was here in 1827; he lived in Main Street; he was a weaver and had six looms. After his death, his descendants all left Paterson

MARVIN, Luke,
was here in 1827; he was a weaver and had five looms in his dwelling on River Street. He went west about 1833.

MATTHEWS, James,
was here in 1829; living in Marshall Street.

MCALEER, Edward,
was a captain of the Montgomery Guards of Newark. He was a blacksmith and lived in Cross Street in 1827. He died in Newark and his descendants still live there.

MCARDLE, John,
lived in Van Houten Street in 1829. He has one son, John, still living here.

MCEVOY, James,
lived in John Street in 1827. He taught Sunday school in the Mill Street church and also in the Oliver Street church for many years. He left a number of descendants in Paterson, one son, Edward, a machinist, living in Main Street at present.

MCCARTHY, Daniel,
was here in 1827, living in Prospect Street

MCCARTHY, Daniel,
lived in Prospect Street in 1827. He went west about 1832.

MCCARTHY, John,
was one of the first butchers in Paterson, coming here about 1825. About 1842 he removed to New York where he died.

MCCLORY, George,
was a weaver and in 1827 lived in Cross Street. He was the father of Henry, a machinist in the Watson Machine Company’s works, and of Daniel, a member of the police force. His daughter married Thomas MCINERNEY, and her son is also on the police force. The grandchildren of the deceased are very numerous in Paterson.

MCCLORY, James,
lived in John Street in 1827. His sons, John and Andrew, left Paterson after his death, twenty-nine years ago. The former was a tailor and the latter a portrait painter.

MCCOLLOM, Three Brothers,
were employed as cotton spinners. A number of their descendants still reside in New York.

MCCOUBREY, John,
was a weaver and lived in Marshall Street in 1827. A number of his grandchildren still reside here.

MCCRANDLESS, James,
lived on Van Houten Street in 1829.

MCCRANNALS, Patrick,
lived in John Street in 1829.

MCCROSSEN, Daniel,
lived in Prospect Street and had a portion of the original contract for the construction of the Morris canal. He has a number of descendants residing in Paterson. His widow married William BACON.

MCDONALD, James,
lived in Broadway in 1827.

MCDONALD, Michael,
was here in 1827, living in Passaic Street. His son, William, and his daughter, Mrs. VAN DERBECK, still live here. His son, a blacksmith, served three years as a cavalryman in the late war.

MCDONOUGH, Francis,
lived in Van Houten Street in 1829. Some of his descendants live in Newark.

MCELHATTAN, Francis,
was a linen dresser and lived in Prospect Street in 1829. His descendants moved to New York after the death of Mr. and Mrs. McElhattan.

MCFARLAND, Michael,
was here in 1827 and lived in Main Street. He subsequently removed to Passaic Street, where he died. His descendants lived in Newark, Jersey City, and New York.

MCGEE, Charles,
was here in 1827; he was a weaver and had one loom which he operated in his dwelling in Marshall Street

MCGINNIS, James,
was here in 1827, living in Passaic Street

MCGIVERN, Thomas,
and his brother were employed in the Phoenix mill. They both died here, but none of their descendants are at present residents of Paterson.

MCGOWAN, John,
was a weaver and lived in Market Street in 1827. After his death, his family removed to New York, where his descendants now reside.

MCGRAW, James,
was a mason and worked on the Oliver Street church. His descendants now live in Jersey City and New York.

MCGROGAN, Thomas,
was a machinist who died in Paterson, but whose descendants have since left for other parts of the country.

MCGUIRE, Patrick,
was here in 1827, living in Prospect Street. His two sons, Patrick and John, went to Florida after the death of their father.

MCHOLLAND, Patrick,
was here in 1827, living in Marshall Street

MCKENNA, Arthur and Hugh,
both died in Paterson. Arthur had no children. Hugh had three children, of whom one became a Christian Brother; the other is Andrew MCKENNA, an ex-Alderman.

MCKENNA, Patrick and James,
were two brothers who lived on Prospect Street in 1827.

MCKEOWN, Edward,
was a cotton spinner; he was a Sunday school teacher for many years and Superintendent of the Sunday school in the Oliver Street church during Father O’REILLY’s time. He and his family went to Mexico, where he died; none of his descendants live in Paterson at present.

MCKEOWN, George,
was a teamster on the Paterson and Hudson River railroad. He died in Paterson, and his son and daughter still reside here.

MCKIERNAN, Dennis,
who was no relation to John and Cornelius MCKIERNAN, came to Paterson in 1818. He was a weaver and built a house and weaveshop on Cross Street where he had twelve looms. In this house, which is now known as the Hotel de Normandie, he lived for many years. He also built a house on the corner of Cross Street and White’s Alley and two in the alley. His business was that of grocer, but he also kept three teams of horses. These he used to work on a farm he had a short distance above Haledon and to cart cotton and other goods to and from the landing at Acquackanonk, now Passaic. At times, he made contracts with the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures, such as digging and raceways, &c. He was elected roadmaster in 1829, 1830, and 1831. He was a member of the Irish Greens and received his commission as captain of Militia from the Governor of New Jersey in 1832. He was a trustee of the old church in Mill Street. He died in May, 1861, in his seventy-first year, leaving a widow, five sons and three daughters. His oldest son, Dennis, was a trustee in the Oliver Street church during the pastorate of Father O’REILLY; he is now living in New York with a large family of children and grandchildren. Christopher served six years in the Board of Aldermen. Major James MCKIERNAN served in the navy during the late war under Captain WARD on the Freeborn; he died abut five years ago, leaving three children. Captain John MCKIERNAN is a member of the firm of Doremus & McKiernan and Lieutenant Samuel G. MCKIERNAN is a member of the firm of McKiernan & Bergin. Dennis MCKIERNAN’s widow died ten years ago. His daughter Margaret died eleven years ago, and Rose Ann died three years ago. The only daughter now living is Mary Ann. At the time, Father O’DONOGHUE commenced to collect money for the Oliver Street church, Patrick GARRETT, Patrick KELLY, John O’BRIEN, Roderick KEEGAN, and others collected between Paterson and Little Falls and between Paterson and Newark; Dennis McKiernan, taking of one of his horses, brought the priest along the line of the canal as far as Dover, collecting. They were gone several days.

MCKIERNAN, John and Cornelius,
were brothers. John was never married and by occupation was a peddler. He kept a grocery and built several houses in Prospect Street. He died in 1828 and left his property to his brother, Cornelius, who came to Paterson from Poughkeepsie. He kept a store and a boarding house, a place where the poor were always welcome to a night’s lodging and a meal. He died a number of years ago; his wife and son Cornelius, are also dead. Another son and two daughters and several grandchildren are still living in Paterson.

MCKIERNAN, Terence,
a brother of Dennis, came here in 1827. He worked for Dennis at weaving until the Paterson & Hudson River railroad was built; finding that at handloom weaving he was unable to cope with the powerloom, he went to work as brakeman on the railroad and was engaged at this up to the time of his death. His daughter, Mary, is still living, but the rest of his immediate family are dead.

MCKINNEY, Arthur,
lived in Van Houten Street in 1829.

MCLEAN, Thomas,
was a cotton weaver, residing in Elm Street. While in New York one day transacting some business, he died suddenly. His remains were brought to this city for interment. He leaves two daughters, one unmarried, the other Mrs. Hugh ROONEY.

MCLEAVEY, Robert,
was a flax spinner and lived in Cross Street in 1829.

MCNALLY, James,
kept a hotel for some years which was made famous by the fact that General LAFAYETTE stopped there in 1825. The hotel was on Market, Hotel, and Union Streets; it was subsequently turned into a machine shop, occupied by what was formerly the Oldham Works. In 1848, it was destroyed by fire. McNally died in Paterson, but left no children.

MCNAMEE, Robert,
was a cotton spinner who resided on the corner of Broadway and Mulberry Street. His son, Bernard, subsequently occupied the same building, and it was there that Father LANGDILL celebrated mass. Both McNamees were cotton spinners and died in Paterson, the son about 1875.

MCNULTY, Dennis,
lived in Market Street in 1829.

MCREYNOLDS, James,
was here in 1827, living in Van Houten street

MILLIGAN, Michael,
was here in 1829, living in Marshall Street

MOONEY, Terrence,
was a shuttle maker and resided on Main Street, near Slater. He had a shop in Jersey Street and did a large business, employing three of his sons and a number of other men. He was an intimate friend of Father O’REILLY and spent many of his evenings with him. He removed with his family to Troy, N.Y. where de died. His children then moved to Florida, where they died, but where some of their children are still living.

MORGAN, Daniel,
was a laborer who came to Paterson in 1826. When a short time afterwards work was to begin on the Catholic church in Oliver Street, he and a number of other laborers were sent to the site. Before they began to dig the superintendent said to him:--"Then you dig the first shovelful of dirt," and Mr. Morgan did so. He died a few years ago at No. 77 Jersey Street. He was the grandfather of Mrs. Dr. O’GRADY. His only daughter is Mrs. Thomas MORGAN whose husband is in the grocery business in Main Street.

MORGAN, Edward,
was here in 1829; he was a weaver and had five looms in his dwelling in West Street. He has one son and several grandchildren living in Williamsburgh, NY.

MORGAN, Patrick,
was a brother-in-law of John CARROLL and father-in-law of Thomas FLETCHER. Several of his descendants live in Paterson.

MORGAN, Thomas,
was here in 1827, living on Main Street. He died a few years ago. His son, Thomas, has a grocery on Main Street.

MORRIS, Michael,
came to Paterson from Godwinville and was at first employed as a cotton weaver, but subsequently devoted his attention to dealing in waste. He was well known to nearly every Catholic in Paterson and vicinity, and his death, which occurred some years ago, was lamented by all. He has two sons living, Michael J. MORRIS and the Rev. John P. MORRIS. He only daughter died, leaving one child.

MULHOLLAND, Arthur,
lived in Marshall Street for many years and his descendants still live in Paterson.

MULHOLLAND, Charles,
a cotton weaver, resided on the corner of Prospect Street and White’s alley. He died in Paterson, and his children removed to other places.

MULHOLLAND, James,
another of the pioneers of the Catholic church in his city, died some years ago after a long and active life. His descendants still reside in Paterson.

MULLEN, Peter,
was here in 1829, living in Ellison Street.

MURTAGH, Michael,
was the first superintendent of the Paterson level of the Morris canal. His son, Bernard, died while a member of the Board of Aldermen, but his other son, John, is in business in this city and has respesented the Eighth Ward in both the Board of Freeholders and Board of Aldermen.

MURPHY, Patrick,
resided on the corner of Pine and Grand Streets and was in the employ of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures. His children still live in Paterson.

MURPHY, Thomas T.,
was a weaver and had three looms. He has several descendants still living here. He died a few years ago at the age of 92. He was well educated, especially in the doctrines of the Catholic church and was every ready to defend it which he was required to do very frequently in those early days. His son, James, and a number of grandchildren still reside in this city.

NUGENT, James,
was here in 1827, living in Oliver Street.

O’BRIEN, John,
was a cotton spinner and lived in Market Street. He taught Sunday school in the Oliver Street church before it was enlarged and for some time was superintendent of the school. He subsequently went to Mexico with Edward MCKEON; he lived there a number of years, and his remains rest there. His daughter, Mrs. WARREN, died here four years ago in Pearl Street and was buried from St. Joseph’s church. O’Brien has several descendants living in Newark.

O’DONNELL, William,
was here in 1827, living in Marshall Street. He and his family subsequently removed to Pittsburgh.

O’NEILL, Charles,
came to Paterson in October, 1828, and went to work in Prospect Street as a shoemaker. Assiduous attention to his business impaired his health and his physician advised him either to take a sea voyage or obtain some employment in which he could have outdoor exercise. Mr. O’Neill went into the lumber business to which he subsequently added coal and building material. He has always been prominently connected with Catholic church matters in Paterson and was one of the first trustees of the Oliver Street church. Although ninety years of age, he still enjoys health and vigor. His oldest son, Patrick, who was a carpenter, settled in the South. John, who was also a carpenter, carried on business in this city, employing a number of men. He was an alderman and city treasurer for a number of years. During part of the time Fathers QUIN and SENEZ were here, he played the organ in the church and for a number of years rang the chimes, never receiving or expecting any pay for his services. For a number of years he was superintendent of Sunday school. Charles Henry was Captain of the Montgomery Rifles; he was an excellent officer, a good drill-master and stout disciplinarian. He subsequently removed to Jersey City, in which place he is in business; he was three times elected Mayor of Jersey City. Thomas E. is the youngest son and assists his father in his business. His daughter, Susan, is the wife of John AGNEW; another daughter is Mrs. Catherine SHARKEY, and a third is Mrs. Dr. KANE. Another daughter, Theresa, has taken the veil and is in the convent at Madison. Ellen and Esther still reside with their parents in Mill Street.

O’NEILL, Bernard and John,
were brothers of Charles. John established the shoe business conducted by his sons in Main Street. He and his wife are dead, leaving three sons and three daughters. Barney married a daughter of James WADE; he was an insurance agent, a justice of the peace, and a lay judge of the Court of Common Pleas of this county. Three daughters and two sons still survive him.

O’NEILL, Edward,
of another family from the foregoing, was employed in the Phoenix Mill and has several descendants living in Paterson

O’NEILL, Patrick and Charles,
two brothers, no relation to the foregoing, were employed in a nail factory which stood where the Gun mill now stands. They resided in Prospect Street and none of their descendants at the present day live in Paterson.

O’REILLY, Edward,
kept a dry goods store, and subsequently removed to New York City, where he married and where he is still in business.

PLUNKETT, Patrick D.,
was the father of James, Joseph, and Edward. He worked in a machine shop. He and his wife died in Paterson after which the family left here. James, the oldest son, carried on a machine shop in Mill Street, being the senior partner of the firm of Plunkett & Thompson. Joseph owned a cotton mill. Edward was a machinist and worked for his brother. John, a brother of Patrick D., lived in Cross Street in 1827. He was a shoemaker and employed four men. None of his descendants live in Paterson.

POWERS, James,
for some years kept a store in Cross Street, opposite Elm, and erected the brick building situated just below the office of the late Dr. QUIN. His only surviving son is ex-Alderman John POWERS. His daughter, Margaret, became a Sister of Charity and adopted the name of Sister Regina. She died while at St. Agnes’ Institute in this city and her remains rest in Paterson. Another daughter of Mr. Powers is Julia, the wife of William MCNAIR, the baker.

QUIN, Dennis,
was here in 1827 and lived in Ellison Street. He was a tailor and was married but had no children. He and his wife died here.

QUIN, John,
was the father-in-law of Dennis MCKIERNAN and lived in Cross Street. He was a weaver by occupation and for some time kept books for his son-in-law. He came to Paterson in 1818, and his wife died in 1822. She was buried in the Presbyterian cemetery as were many Catholics in those days. He was thoroughly versed in the history and doctrines of the Catholic Church and was very found of discussing them with persons of other faith. He died in 1842, at the age of 84, being able to attend to his business until three days before his death. He was very intimate with Father O’REILLY, from whom he received the sacrament of Holy Eucharist on the morning on which he was taken sick.

QUIN, Patrick,
lived in Market Street, near Mill, in 1824, where he had a grocery. He was a contractor and also a farmer. He had a large farm on the Wesel Road, embracing what is now Cedar Lawn Cemetery. He was a trustee of the first church and also of the Oliver Street church. He subsequently removed to New York with his family, Dennis MCKIERNAN accompanying him to assist with his contracts and returning home every Saturday evening. He lived for many years on the corner of Sixth Avenue and Twelfth Street. He had two sons and one daughter. The oldest son, James, was a locksmith and brass moulder and was superintendent for Hall & Co., in Pitt Street, New York; Dennis MCKIERNAN, Jr., served his apprenticeship under James. James lived in a tavern in Market Street, a couple of doors west of Cross Street; the tavern was kept by Philip CARROLL’s widow. He returned to Paterson by orders of his physician in order to regain his failing health; his mother subsequently followed him here in order to take care of him; she assisted in this by her old friends, Mrs. CARROLL, Mrs. BOYLE, Mrs. CONNOLLY, Mrs. MCKIERNAN, and others, who lived near by in Market and Cross Streets. Nursing and medicine were of no avail, and he died and was buried here. Daniel, the second oldest, worked on the farm on the Wesel Road and assisted his father in New York, he having left Paterson about two years before his marriage. In 1836, while living in New York, Quin exchanged his Paterson property for several thousand acres of land in Ohio, whither in 1841 he removed with his wife, children, and grandchildren. They are all dead now with the exception of some of the grandchildren.

RAFFERTY, John and Peter,
were weavers and lived in Mill Street in 1829. Their descendants live in Newark.

RAFFERTY, Peter and Philip,
were two brothers. Peter removed to California, returned to Paterson for some time, but again turned his face to the Pacific coast; he is now a resident of San Francisco. He was married in San Francisco to Miss Susan RUSSELL, a niece of Charles O’NEILL. Philip was for many years trustee of the Oliver Street church. He was the junior member of the firm of Todd & Rafferty and died in this city. He was very prominent in politics and twice the democratic candidate for congress from the fifth congressional district. His first wife was a daughter of Joseph WARREN and his second a daughter of Hugh BRADY.

RILEY, Hugh,
kept a grocery on the corner of Cross and Market Streets. He and all his family died in Paterson.

RILEY, William,
was a weaver and lived in Cross Street in 1829. After his death, all his family left Paterson.

RITCHEY, Michael,
was a weaver and lived in Prospect Street in 1829. In 1838, he and his whole family removed to Pittsburgh.

ROONEY, Patrick,
had four sons, Bernard, John, Hugh, and Patrick. Hugh died about three years ago. The other three sons are living in St. Joseph’s parish in this city. The oldest son, Bernard, lived in Market Street in 1829.

ROSSITER, Martin,
whose tragic death by being carried over the Falls in the freshet of 1882 was deplored by all, was for many years a farmer and in the employ of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures. His son, Richard, is still in the employ of that corporation; another son is a priest, belonging to the order of Passionists, and a daughter is a sister of the Sacred Heart. Paul and George, two sons, are employed in New York.

RUGGY, Patrick,
came to Paterson in 1829. None of his descendants live in Paterson at present.

RUSSELL, Thomas,
was here in 1829, living in Passaic Street. He has a number of descendants living in Newark.

RYAN, Patrick,
lived here for many years and up to the time of his death in Jersey Street, where he accumulated some property. His widow died a number of years after his death. He was a watchman in James SHEPHARD’s bleachery in Market Street for thirty years. He has one son living in this city, ex-Alderman RYAN. The rest of his family are living in San Francisco.

SCULLEN, John,
lived in Oliver Street in 1829.

SCULLEN, John,
lived in Market Street in 1829. Some of his descendants are still here.

SEIN, Michael,
a German, lived in Marshall Street in 1829. He was killed by a gun in firing a salute on the Fourth of July, 1836. Some of his descendants still live here.

SHERVEN, Henry,
was a weaver and had two looms. He lived in Oliver Street in 1829. Some of his descendants are still living here.

SHERVEN, Patrick,
was a weaver and had two looms. He lived in Marshall street in 1829.

SHEYS, Bryant,
was one of the first Catholics who settled in Paterson He taught school on Market Street, near Wesel bridge. Among his scholars was Henry P. SIMMONS, of Passaic, formerly lay judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Passaic County. The building was partly used as a school and partly as the residence of the teacher. The rising generations of those days referred to it as "The Bellows" from the fact that the wind blew in at the many crevices in the building. Mr. Sheys had a son, James B., who studied law in New York, and a daughter, Harriet. He subsequently owned the property adjoining the Oliver Street church and sold it to Mr. MCGINLEY, from whom the church obtained it. Mr. William NELSON, in his "History of the Schools of Passaic County," says concerning Mr. Sheys:--"Bryant Sheys next wielded the rod at Wesel. He was an Irishman who retained a rich brogue to the last. He was a political exile, it is said, and came to America about a century ago, settling at Taunton, Mass., where he taught school during the revolution. Of the incidents of the times that tried men’s souls, he was very fond of talking, especially when his tongue was loosened (and it was ever quite limber) by a glass or two. He used to say he ‘always liked the Baptists because he never knew a Baptist who was a Tory during the revolution.’ He came to Paterson previous to 1800 and kept a tavern in Oliver Street, adjoining St. John’s Roman Catholic church, and being somewhat of an antiquarian, accumulated a valuable collection of local curiosities."

SHIELDS, Christopher and Patrick,
were two brothers. Christopher built a house in Hotel Street, near Smith, and was in the grocery business until he joined his brother in the dry good business on the corner of Main Street and Broadway. They removed from Paterson and have no descendants here.

SLEAVIN, John,
kept a grocery and bowling alley on the corner of Ellison and Prospect Streets. He died in Paterson, but none of his descendants live here in the present day.

SMITH, James,
was a weaver and lived in White’s alley in 1829. His grandson, James, a machinist, and a number of great-grandchildren still reside in this city.

SMITH, Terence,
was a tanner and lived in Fair Street in 1829.

SULLIVAN, William,
lived in Prospect Street in 1829.

SWEENEY, _______,
the father of Morgan and Robert, lived in Hamburgh Avenue for a number of years. He died a number of years ago. His daughter is a Sister of Charity.

TAGGART, Peter,
was for a number of years a peddler of dry goods. Subsequently in partnership with Philip RAFFERTY, he went extensively into the grocery business, having a large grocery on the corner of Main and Market Streets and another over the river. Taggart erected the building which now serves as a portion of St. Joseph’s Hospital; he subsequently sold the property to A.A. FONDA. His widow, a daughter of Joseph WARREN, died some years ago, and his daughter is still living in Paterson, the wife of William S. KINCH.

THOMSON, Thomas,
was a weaver who had two looms; lived in Fair Street in 1829.

TILBY, Dr. John,
practiced medicine in Paterson and resided in Cross Street, near Market. He died in this city, but his two sons and one daughter removed to other places.

TRACY, Thomas,
lived in Oliver Street in 1827.

TRANEY, Patrick,
lived in Van Houten Street in 1829.

TREADWAY, James,
lived in Cross Street in 1829.

TROY, John,
a weaver, lived in Mill Street in 1827.

VELASQUEZ (VASQUEZ?*), Joaquin I.,
a Spaniard, owned the Phoenix mill and afterwards formed a partnership with John TRAVERS and embarked in the manufacture of cotton. He sold out shortly afterwards and left Paterson. He was one of the most liberal Catholics of his day, and it was principally due to his generosity that the first Catholic church was erected in Paterson. One day he said to his men:-- "If you will go among your friends and collect five hundred dollars, I will add five hundred; Mr. COLT will give the land and we shall soon have a church of our own in which to worship God." This proposition was received with joy by the thirteen Catholic men at that time in Paterson, for that was the number that built the first church here. The money was soon raised. (*Handwritten notations in the book- they have been included as they may be of significance to researchers).

WADE, James,
a cotton spinner, according to the most reliable accounts, enjoyed the distinction of having been the first Catholic Sunday school teacher in Paterson, having a class in the old church building on Mill and Market Streets. He lived at the corner of Cross and Ellison Streets. His daughters are Mrs. B. O’NEILL, of this city; Mrs. SEE, of Totowa, and Mrs. COUGHLIN, of Hoboken. He has also other relatives living in New York.

WARD, Peter and James,
were brothers. Peter owned the property on the southeast corner of Ellison and Cross Streets, which has since been torn down. He had a weavershop fronting on Ellison Street; he had fifteen looms. He went to Rochester, NY, where he engaged extensively in the flour business. He was married after his removal to Rochester. James was a butcher and had his store on the southwest corner of Ellison and Cross Streets, opposite his brother’s place. He married a sister of Mrs. Thomas MCLEAN and Mrs. Arthur MCKENNA. Ward and his wife are both dead and left no children.

WARREN, Joseph,
in partnership with BROWN, conducted a tannery and leather store in lower Main--then Parke--Street, almost opposite Bank Street. Mr. Warren’s grandson still resides there. Brown boarded with Warren and subsequently married his daughter, after which the family removed to Division Street. Mr. Warren was one of the trustees of the Oliver Street church when it was building.

WARREN, Richard,
a brother of Joseph, was a currier; he lived in Fair Street in 1827 and is still a resident of this city, as are a number of his descendants.

WARREN, Richard,
was a cousin of Joseph and a currier; he lived in Broadway in 1827. He was the father of John J. WARREN, at present lay judge of the Court of Common Pleas and Secretary of the Board of Health. Other descendants also live in Paterson.

WELCH, James,
lived in Prospect Street in 1827.

WHITE, Michael,
was a weaver; he had one loom and lived in Marshall Street in 1827.

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