Place Names and Places
A - H

ALDERSHOT
This settlement is located about two miles north of Kentville. It was probably named after Aldershot Camp which was established about thirty-five miles south-west of London, England in 1855.

Soon after 1812 a number of Negro families from the United States came to Nova Scotia and settled in the Pine Woods and Gibson’s Woods area. Soon after Confederation a central place for militia drill was established on the Aylesford plain near the Annapolis county line and it was called Aldershot. In 1904 the Dominion government purchased land for a new Camp Aldershot in the Pine Woods.

School classes were held for six months in 1870. In 1906 $700 was voted for a new school in Pine Woods. In 1944 a rented building in Yoho section of Aldershot was replaced by a new school built on Meadow Road. Aldershot Elementary School was built in 1962. Inhabitants of the village have been employed in the military camp or in the town of Kentville.

Population of Aldershot in 1956 was 1406.

 

ALTON
This rural area is about two miles south of Kentville on Mill Brook in central Nova Scotia. It may have been named after a town in Hampshire, England. An early name was Beech Hill, and in 1872 the school section was known by both names. William Wall was one of the Horton township proprietors who drew title to lots of land in this area. Settlement probably began in the early 19th century.

A school house was built at Beech Hill about 1866.

A postal way office was opened in 1863.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was North Alton, 274, South Alton, 202.

 

ARLINGTON

This rural area is located west of Upper Pereau and near the head of Ross Creek approximately four miles south of Bennett Bay in central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after Arlington, Mass., or Arlington, Virginia, U.S.A. The land was part of Cornwallis township which was established in 1761.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was 110.

 

AUBURN
This settlement is located about three miles west of Aylesford in west-central Nova Scotia. It was probably named for a village in Westmeath, England. Two of the early grantees in this area were Walter Wilkins, one thousand acres on October 20, 1770, and James Marden, five thousand acres on September 10, 1783.Bowser’s farm was a resting place on the Windsor to Annapolis route in 1794.

St. Mary’s Anglican Church was built in 1790. In 1799 and 1833 school-houses were built near the Church. The last school was later sold to the school section and was used as a common school in 1891. West King’s District High School was opened on October 5, 1956.

Farming is the main industry.

Population in 1956 was 383.

 

AVONPORT
This settlement is located near the mouth of the Gaspereaux River in central Nova Scotia. So named on account of its location, it was at one time included in Lower Horton. Then it was known as Horton Point until February, 1864, when it was changed to Avonport. James Fillis from Halifax was one of the earliest settlers acquiring a grant of land between Horton River and Blue Beach. He built a house and planted an orchard. The Reid family from Scotland were also early settlers. A Union Church was built here in 1864. Avonport Baptist Church was possibly built about 1909-1910. In 1925 an old building near the Church was remodelled for school purposes. The new L.E. Shaw Memorial School was completed in 1956.

A postal way office was established with W.F. Newcomb as postmaster on June 1, 1972.

A covered bridge was built across the Horton River in 1869. It was torn down in January, 1952, and a bailey bridge was put in use until a new bridge could be completed in 1961.

A railway station was built in 1870. A lighthouse was completed at Horton Bluff in 1851.

Farming and the manufacture of clay products have been the main industries. Robert Shaw built a clay brick and tile manufacturing plant here in 1883.

Population in 1956 was Avonport 253, Avonport Station, 210.

 

AVONPORT STATION
See AVONPORT

 

AYLESFORD
This village is located about five miles west of Berwick near the sources of the Annapolis River near the Fundy shore of Nova Scotia. Aylesford bog was called Kobetek by the Indians meaning "a beaver’s home, from a little beaver shaped island." The English name was possibly given in honor of the fourth Earl of Aylesford who was Lord of the Bedchamber to George III until 1783. On October 6, 1786, by order of the Executive Council the part of Wilmot which lay in Kings County was called Aylesford. The south-eastern boundary was cut out in 1823 and the Western boundary of the County from Aylesford township to Lunenburg County line was cut out in 1824.

Settlement probably began in this area soon after Wilmot township was laid out in 1764. It was greatly extended by Loyalist immigration. By 1802, there were forty-two families in the township. On September 15, 1787, James Morden made an indenture with John West, a resident of Aylesford Mountain (in the township of Aylesford, lately called Wilmot Mountain in the township of Wilmot) for 130 acres of land on Aylesford Mountain. Lower Aylesford remained almost unsettled until 1835 when the government began selling land there.

Baptist meeting houses were opened at Upper Aylesford on December 14, 1873, and at Lower Aylesford in 1877. St. Lawrence Roman Catholic Church was built shortly before 1854. The Roman Catholic congregation moved and renovated a store for church services opening the building in June, 1942. The new St. Monica’s Church was built in 1956. The Aylesford United Church was built in 1956. The Aylesford United Church was built in 1831 as the East Chapel. It was moved and renovated in 1917.

Two school-houses had been built in the Township by May, 1814. A new school was erected at Aylesford Mountain in 1878, and at Aylesford in 1895. On October, 1965, the new St. Mary’s Elementary School was opened.

A postal way office was established in 1836 and a post office in 1853. A way office was opened at Aylesford West from 1859 to 1860. James D. Van Buskirk was postmaster at Aylesford in 1854.

The Aylesford Union was published by Rev. John B. Morgan of the Ayelsford Baptist Church in 1897-99. The first year it was printed at the Register office, the second year at the Middleton Outlook office.

Fruit growing along with other forms of agriculture is the main industry. In September, 1964, the Scotian Gold fruit processing plant, after about forty years of production was scheduled to be abandoned and sold.

Population in 1956 was: Aylesford, 738, Aylesford East, 96, Aylesford Mountain, 63.

 

AYLESFORD EAST

See AYLESFORD

 

AYLESFORD MOUNTAIN
See AYLESFORD

 

BASE LINE ROAD
This settlement is located near Canady Creek and about three miles south of the mouth of Minas Channel in west central Nova Scotia. It takes its name from its situation on what was probably the base line for the township lots along the shore. W. Thomas, E. Harris, E. McDaniel, J. Bryden, J. Carr and J. Knowlan, were the settlers here in the late 19th century.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

 

BAXTER’S HARBOUR
This rural area is located on the south side of the Minas Channel in central Nova Scotia. It was names for Dr. William Baxter or his son, John B. Baxter, who were early settlers in the early 19th century. Possibly the harbour was frequented by fisherman in 1780 or earlier. Dr. Baxter bought land on the north mountain from David Eaton about 1803.

Jonathan Margeson was a schoolmaster here in 1834. A school-house was built in 1869. A new school was built in 1906 but it burned down and was replaced with a new building in 1939. A way office was established October 1, 1873 with John Baxter as postmaster.

Fishing and limited farming are the main occupations.

Population in 1956 was 112.

 

BERWICK
This town is located near the head of the Annapolis River in West Central Nova Scotia. This district was early known as Pleasant Valley, the village site being called Congdon Settlement, Curry (Curries) Corner, and Davisons Corner, after various settlers. In October, 1851, a meeting of the inhabitants was called and the name "Berwick" chosen after the English seaport town on the Tweed River.

The land was granted to the proprietors of Cornwallis Township about 1760 but settlement began at the site of Berwick about April, 1810, when Benjamin Congdon moved here and built a small house. About the same time, Enoch Congdon and David Shaw from Phinney Mountain, Annapolis County, moved here. William Davison arrived about 1835, and the place then became known as "Davisons Corner." By 1835 there were three houses on the site. The town incorporated in 1923.

In 1828 the Pleasant Valley Baptist Meeting House was built and was the home of the Second Cornwallis Baptist congregation until a new Church was built in Berwick in 1857-58. The foundation stone of the Methodist Church was laid May 25, 1857, and the church was opened January 31, 1858. It was burned in November 1938, and the new Church was dedicated on February 25, 1940. The Methodist Camp Meeting grounds, incorporated in 1885, are now the property of the United Church of Canada. The Anglican Christ Church was built in Grafton about 1854 and was moved to Berwick in 1876. The Parish hall in use by June, 1959, was dedicated in September, 1959. St. Anthony's Roman Catholic Church was built in 1956, opened and blessed on November 25, 1956.

A log school-house was probably erected before 1830. Another school with the second floor used as a temperance hall was built in 1850. Soon after this, Miss Fields opened a boarding school for girls. It closed after a year but reopened in 1858 in Wolfville as the beginning of the Acadia Seminary. A new public school was completed in 1874. In April, 1882, three schools near Berwick were burned down. New schools were built at South Berwick and Windermere in 1883. A new school was built at Berwick in 1935. In January, 1959, the new Berwick Junior-Senior High School was completed for use.

A postal way office was established in 1856, and it became a Post Office in 1858 with J.M. Parker as Postmaster. A way office was established at Berwick Station in 1873. Construction of West Kings Memorial Hospital was begun on May 2, 1966. A fire station was begun in December, 1965.

The Star was begun in Berwick by James A. Halliday in 1866. It was moved to Kentville, 1863-73, 1873-79, then to Wolfville where it was published until about 1881.

The Farm Journal was published by A. J. Pineo in Pictou but dated in Berwick in 1888. When it was discontinued, he began the Berwick News in Pictou about 1889. This paper was purchased by John E. Woodworth in 1891, and the name was changed to Berwick Register. This was still being published in 1966. The Co-operative News was published about 1916-17.

The Windsor and Annapolis (later D.A.R.) Railroad was completed in 1869.

Berwick Bakery was begun by Arthur E. Bezanson in 1924. Hayden Furniture Ltd., furniture repairers and manufacturers, began about 1949. H.D. Larsen, meat packers began operations in 1947. Other basic industries include stores, garages, etc.

Population of Berwick in 1961 was 1282, of South Berwick in 1956, was 378, and of South West in 1956 was 101.

 

BILLTOWN
This rural area is located north-north-west of Kentville and about six miles south of Halls Harbour in central Nova Scotia. It was named after the Bill family which settled here about 1770. By 1790 there were about ten houses in the settlement.

A Baptist Church was built in 1835. It was burned in 1871 and rebuilt in 1872. A new Baptist Church was dedicated October 18, 1903.

Elisha Beckwith was teacher in the upper part of the village and James Carmichael was teacher in the lower section from December, 1828 to June , 1829. A school-house was built by 1888.

A postal way office was in operation here from 1855 to 1863.

Farming is the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was 97.

 

BISHOPVILLE
This settlement is located on the Half-way River in Central Nova Scotia. It is named for early settlers. An early name was Halfway River. Joseph Hacket and Silvanus Higgins were original proprietors of land in this area.

The United Baptist Church was dedicated on January 4, 1903.

James Fox was schoolmaster at Bishop Hill, Horton in 1836.

A new school-house was built in 1875.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

 

BLACK ROCK
This rural area is located near Canada Creek on the south side of Minas Channel in west-central Nova Scotia. It was so named for a prominent natural feature. In the summer of 1800 the Kennedy, Gilbert and Bentley families moved here and took up residence. In 1827, "the industrious settlers who are now making grate improvements" petitioned the Nova Scotia Assembly for money to build a wharf.

A Baptist meeting house was dedicated on February 7, 1864.

William Nesbit and Thomas W. Pearson were schoolmasters here during the June to December, 1828, school term. A school was built at East Black Rock in 1848.

A lighthouse was erected in 1848.

In the mid 19th century considerable shipbuilding and shipping of wood and potatoes was carried on. More recently fishing and farming have become staple industries.

Population in 1956 was 112.

 

BLOMIDON
This settlement is located on the west side of Minas Basin in central Nova Scotia. It was called by the Indians, Owbogegechk meaning "abounding with Owbok or dogwood." Champlain called the cape Cape Poutrincourt after his friend who succeeded in scaling the cliffs during an exploratory voyage. It was also called Cape Porcupine. The French Acadian settlers called it cap Baptiste, a name probably derived from a Norman word, Baptisterie, and meaning the place where sailors get baptized by wild waves. The common term for Cape Porcupine was Blowmedown, "from the gusts which blow from it when the wind is west and south-west," and the contracted form of this, Blomindon, came to be used officially. When settlement began here by New England Planters, probably in the late 18th century, the name of the cape was adopted by the village.

Fishing and farming are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was: Blomidon 55, Lower Blomidon, 79.

 

BROOKLYN
This settlement is located on the Cornwallis River about four miles west of Kentville in central Nova Scotia. It may have been named after Brooklyn, New York, or possibly because of natural features. A lyn is a waterfall hence "Brooklyn" would be a waterfall on a brook. The site was part of Cornwallis township which was granted to New England immigrants in 1759 and 1761.

A school-house was built here in 1865.

Farming is the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was Brooklyn Corner, 59, Brooklyn Street, 85, West Brooklyn, 119.

 

BROOKLYN STREET
See BROOKLYN

 

BUCKLEY'S CORNER
This settlement is located just north of Grafton about five miles south of the mouth of Minas Channel in west-central Nova Scotia. It was probably named for the Buckley family whose store and way-office were prominent here in the late 19th century. This corner formed the south-west part of a rectangle known as Union Square at one time.

A school-house was built at Buckley in 1867.

A postal way office known as both Union Square and Buckley's was established in 1855.

Farming and fishing are the main industries.

 

BURLINGTON
This rural area is located two miles south of the mouth of Minas Channel in west-central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after Lord Burlington. The village site was part of Cornwallis township which was granted to New England emigrants in 1759 and 1761.

By 1922 the village contained a Methodist and a Baptist Church and a Post Office. The Baptist church was probably built in the 1860's or 1870's and the Methodist church in the 1890's or early 1900's.

A new school was built about 1885. A postal way office was established on August 1, 1870 with Charles Hall as office keeper.

A new community hall was opened in November, 1956.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was 83.

 

CAMBRIDGE
This settlement is located on the Upper Cornwallis River in central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after Cambridge, England, home of Cambridge University. In 1759 and 1761 the land became part of the Cornwallis township. In 1794 Marshalls farm kept by Mr. Stedman was a prominent estate on the Windsor to Annapolis road.

A Baptist meeting house was opened here on April 9, 1865. A Baptist Church was dedicated on November 8, 1874.

A school-house was built in 1867. It was destroyed by fire and replaced by a new school in 1886. The nineteen room Central Kings Rural High School was completed in November, 1952. In June , 1961, construction began on the Cambridge District Consolidated Elementary School. It was opened on January 30, 1962. Central Kings Senior High School was built in 1962.

A postal way office was opened at Cambridge Station on August 1st, 1872, with John C. Neily as postmaster.

Farming is the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was: Cambridge 586, Cambridge Station, 79.

 

CANADA CREEK
This rural area is located on the south side of Minas Channel in west-central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after Mayor William Canada [Canady, Cannady, Kennedy] one of the first Cornwallis township grantees who took up land here. The variation "Canady Creek" is also used. Settlement probably began in this area soon after 1800.

A postal way office was established in 1864.

Fishing and farming are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was 55.

 

CANARD

This rural area is located about three miles south of Canning and along the Canard River on the west side of the Minas Basin in Central Nova Scotia. The Indian name was Apcheechkumochwakade, meaning "a place abounding in little ducks." "Canard" is the French word for "duck". There was an Acadian French settlement at Riviere aux Canards by the beginning of the 18th century. In 1760 settlers from New England arrived. Hezekiah Cogswell was one of the original grantees at Upper Canard in 1761. Ezekiel Huntington was a grantee in the Canard area and some of the grantees at Lower Canard were: Isaac Bigelow, Senior and Junior, Jabez West, John Lowdon, Samuel Morris, and Nathaniel Bliss. Davis Eaton came to Cornwallis about 1761 and built his house on Canard Street near Hamilton's corner. This corner was long known a Jaw Bone Corner or the Whalebone because of a gate here with posts made from a whale's jaw bone. Later it became Hamilton's Corner possibly in honor of an early settler.

In 1786 a new light congregationalist meeting house was built at Jaw Bone Corner. It was also used for school purposes at times. The last service was held in it in 1824. A church building was erected at Upper Canard in 1807-09. It stood until 1873 and was replaced by a new church which burned down in 1909. A new church was constructed soon afterwards. The Canard United Church was built by the Presbyterians about 1858. A Campbellite meeting house was built about mid-19th century.

There was a one-room brick school-house standing at Lower Canard in 1807. A school-house was built at Lower Canard in 1866, and at Upper Canard, the school was enlarged in 1876.

A postal way office was established in September, 1849.

A new Temperance hall was opened in September, 1849.

The Wellington Dyke, one of the largest in the area, was begun in 1809, abandoned until 1817, and completed in 1824.

Agriculture in various forms constitute the main industry.

Population in 1956 was: Lower Canard, 93, Upper Canard 171.

 

CANNING
This large village is located on the Habitant River in central Nova Scotia. Early names were: Apple Tree landing and Habitant Corner. About 1830 the name was changed in honour of George Canning, the British Prime Minister, whose son, Viscount Charles John Canning was a Governor-General of India.

Settlement increased with the arrival of Loyalists after the American Revolution. A man named Stewart (or Steward) is said to have been the first to settle in the area. By 1830 the chief householders were: Benjamin Donaldson, John Wells, John Sheffield, and William Woodworth. Between 1839 and 1853, fourteen houses were erected, seven stores opened, and a hotel was built. About 1849 a cutlery factory was opened. On July 15, 1866, the entire business section for about one-half mile was burned out. The village was largely rebuilt by 1868, but another bad fire destroyed much of the new construction in that year. Another fire on June 23, 1912, destroyed about ten stores before it was stopped.

A Methodist Church was erected about 1854 and dedicated on May 25, 1856, but this Church burned down on February 8, 1908. The new Church which became Trinity United Church was opened February 13, 1910. A Baptist meeting house was erected about 1857. In the 1870's there was a Free Baptist Church at one end of the village. St. Michael's Anglican Church was consecrated on August 25, 1906.

There was a school-house here about 1830. Perry Borden was a teacher here for the December 1829 to June 1830 term. A new school was built in 1876 but was burned down on June 17, 1886. A new building was erected immediately to replace it. In 1918 this school was damaged by fire but was repaired. Glooscap School was built in 1964. A postal way office was established in 1846 with Elias Burbidge as Postmaster. This became a post office in 1857. The building in which it was housed was destroyed in the June 23, 1912 fire but a new building put into use which served until the new Federal Post Office was completed and put into operation in August. 1959.

The Kings County Gazette was published by H. B. Borden in 1864-65 then by Major Theakson in 1865-66. The Canning Gazette was edited by Alexander M. Liddell in 1888 but in three months it amalgamated with the Western Chronicle.

Kent Foods Ltd. Plant was built in 1946. The United Fruit Company built a cold storage warehouse here in 1957. Fruit processing has been a major industry. In March, 1884, a local firm started a factory for the evaporated vegetable business. Potato growing was a major industry in 1910.

Population in 1956 was 619.

 

CENTREVILLE
This rural area is located near the sources of the Habitant and Canard rivers in central Nova Scotia. It was probably names because is was located about equidistant from the Minas Channel, the Cornwallis River and the west side of Minas Basin. The land was part of Cornwallis township of which grants were made in 1759 and 1761.

Prior to 1918 the Baptist congregation worshipped in the community hall. The Baptist church was dedicated in May, 1920. A Roman Catholic Church stood in the village in the late 19th century.

A school-house was built by 1874. A new school was built in 1920 and in 1951 an old hall was renovated for school purposes. A new Federal post office was completed on May 2, 1966.

The railway was completed through this village in 1890.

Agriculture and food processing are the main industries.

Acadia Foods Limited began operations here about 1954.

Population in 1956 was 437.

 

CHIPMAN BROOK
This rural area is located about three miles west of Halls Harbour on Minas Channel in central Nova Scotia. It was named after early settlers. The land became part of Cornwallis township in 1759 and 1761.

A school-house was built here before 1874. In 1909 and in 1916 new schools were built to replace buildings that had burned down.

A postal way office was established on January 1, 1872, with Thomas Murphy as postmaster.

Fishing and farming are the industries.

 

CHIPMANS CORNER
This rural area is located about six miles west of the mountain of the Cornwallis River in central Nova Scotia. It was named for the Chipman family who were early settlers in this area. Handley Chipman, Ezra Donner, Joseph Congdon, Samuel Starr and John Wood were grantees in this area in 1761.

A congregational Presbyterian meeting house was built here in 1767-68 and was taken down in 1874. Almost on the site of the church was the French Acadian Church of St. Joseph which stood during the first half of the 18th century.

A postal way office was established on April 1, 1871 with Samuel Chipman as office keeper.

Farming is the major industry.

Population in 1956 was 58.

 

CHURCH STREET
This rural area is located four miles west of the mouth of the Corwallis River in central Nova Scotia. It was so named from Church and Glebe lands on which St. John's Anglican Church was built.

Some of the grantees in this area in 1761 were: Peter Wickwire, Silas Woodworth, Hezekiah Morris, Francis Morris, Gilbert Jonathan Belcher, and Jermeiah Dier Rogers.

The frame of St. John's Anglican Church was raised in 1804. The Church was formally opened on December 25, 1810 and it was consecrated in 1826.

John McLean was the schoolmaster here in 1836.

A postal way office was established in 1855.

Farming is the main occupation.

Population in 1956 was 331.

 

COLDBROOK
This settlement is located on the Cornwallis river approximately five miles west of Kentville in central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after a place in Wales and was known as Cold Brook Station for a while after the railway was completed in 1869. The first settler in the village may have been Asa Davidson sometime between 1764 and 1782. In 1792 an English farm "now known as Colebrook," was a stopping place on the road between Windsor and Annapolis.

A school-house was built soon after 1866. It was replaced by a new building erected in about 1884-85, but this building burned down during the winter of 1903-04 and a new school was built soon after. Coldbrook Way Office was established on September 1, 1870 under the care of Henry Porter.

Fruit growing and processing are the main industries. Scotian Gold Cooperative engaged in the fruit processing business since 1912, opened a new plant at Coldbrook on September 22, 1964.

Population of Coldbrook Station in 1956 was 335.

 

CROSSBURN
[*note: in this book, Crossburn is listed as being in Annapolis County. I have included it here because it is listed as a current Kings County community.]

On the Annapolis-Kings county line just south of Mawhorgeck Lake in the south central part of Nova Scotia.

Superintendent J.W. Cross of the Davison Lumber Company had been born in Cassburn, Ontario. He substituted his name, Cross for Cass, to make Crossburn, and named the village. The settlement came into existence in 1905 as one of the chief lumber camps of the Davison Lumber Company.

In 1906 a school was built with Mrs. Bessie Fairn Mason as teacher, and in 1907-1909 a 300 book library was accumulated. In 1906 a Post Office was established.

The Springfield Railway was built from Hastings Junction to Crossburn in 1905. In 1921 this was dis-assembled, the rails shipped to British Columbia, and the remainder sold for scrap and other uses.

In 1921 the Davison Lumber Company shut down operations and moved out, leaving the village of Crossburn to revert to pre-1905 size.

 

DALE
This settlement is located at the south end of Lake Torment in the south-west corner of Kings County in central Nova Scotia. The name was probably prompted by a natural feature. John Gall received a one hundred acre grant in this area on January 21st, 1834, and Samuel Cowling received a two hundred acre grant on November 29, 1834.

Lumbering and limited farming are the industries.

 

DALHOUSIE
Dalhousie East and Dalhousie Road are parts of a settlement which extends into three counties along the road which was opened up by Governor Dalhousie for the settlement of disbanded soldiers from the war of 1812. The road and the military settlement was named for him, and approximately five miles of it runs through the south-west corner of Kings County. Land at Dalhousie East was granted in 100 acre lots to disbanded soldiers on October 26, 1821. At Dalhousie Road, John Gaul received one hundred acres in 1834, James Donellan received one hundred acres in 1852, Henry Matthews received two hundred acres in 1855 and Peter Veno received one hundred acres in 1857.

East Dalhousie Baptist Church was built in 1893.

John Loramore was teaching at Dalhousie Settlement in 1830. A new school was built at Dalhousie Settlement in 1891. A new School was built at Dalhousie on 1907.

A postal way office was established at Dalhousie East on July 1, 1872, with Melissa Starratt as postmistress.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

Population of Dalhousie East in 1956 was 203.

 

DALHOUSIE EAST
See DALHOUSIE

 

DALHOUSIE ROAD
See DALHOUSIE

 

DAVISON STREET
This settlement is located approximately six miles south of the mouth of the Cornwallis River in central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after Squire Davison who homesteaded here. The site of the village was part of Horton township grant which was erected in 1759 and 1761. Settlement probably began in the late 18th century.

John Reid was schoolmaster at "the Davison Settlement so called" in 1829. In 1910 a new school was built to replace one that had been burned two years previously.

Farming is the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was 94.

 

DELHAVEN
This settlement is located near the Look Off north of Canning and on the west side of the Minas basin in central Nova Scotia. The Indian name for Pereau was Upkowegun, meaning "spruce bark covered wigwam." The original name for the settlement was Middle Pereau. At a meeting of the inhabitants on March 10th, 1880, the name Delhaven was proposed by Holmes Davison and on April 10th, 1880, the bill was passed in the Nova Scotia Legislature authorizing the change.

The first European settlers were the French Acadians in the early 18th century. Settlement was begun here by New England Planters soon after Cornwallis township was granted to them in 1761.

A new school was built at "Middle Pereau" in 1883.

Fishing and farming are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was 82.

 

ETNA
This settlement is situated near the source of the Halfway River about three miles north of the Kings-Hants County line in central Nova Scotia. It was named after Mount Etna one of Sicily's volcanoes. An early name used in the 19th century was Greenfield. The land was part of Horton Township which was granted to New England settlers in 1759 and 1761.

A Baptist meeting house was built here in 1861. A school probably built in the early or middle 19th century received an addition in 1949.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

 

FACTORYDALE
This rural area is located about five miles north-west of Lake George in west central Nova Scotia. It was probably so named because of the carding mill and sash factory that stood there in the late 19th century. Elias Graves and Joesph Orpin were original grantees of the land in this area both in 1810.

A postal way office was established ion September, 1872, with Robert R. Ray as postmaster.

The basic industries are lumbering, farming and milling.

Population in 1956 was 73.

 

FOREST HILL
This rural area is located about four miles south of Wolfville in central Nova Scotia. The name is descriptive. The land was part of Horton Township which was set up in 1761.

In 1937 the Baptist church loaned a building which was fitted for school purposes.

Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was 112.

 

FOREST HOME
This settlement is located at the end of the south-east branch of Gaspereau Lake in central Nova Scotia. Its name is descriptive. The land was part of Horton Township and the proprietors on this were: Abraham Harding, Parker Peabody, Samuel Reid, Jr. and Silas Pick.

Lumbering is the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was 63.

 

GARLAND
This rural area is located about midway between Berwick and Harbourville in west central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after an early settler.

The industries are farming and lumbering.

 

GASPEREAU
This rural area is located on the Gaspereau River in central Nova Scotia. The Indian names for the Gaspereaux River were : "Magapekegechk" meaning "flowing over big stones" and "Segoonumaakade," "place of gaspereaux"." "Gaspereaux" is the French word for a type of fish plentiful here which were called "alewives" by the English. After the deportation of the Acadians in 1755 the land was settled by people from New England. Some of the earliest settlers were the Caldwell, Benjamin, Martin, and Pierce families. James Stewart was an original grantee in the area.

A meeting house was constructed about 1821. About 1853 it was moved and a Baptist Church was erected on the same spot. A new church was built in 1911-12 and dedicated October 6, 1912. A Catholic chapel was set on fire by an insane man in June, 1871.

Timothy Eaton was a schoolmaster at Gaspereau in 1812. The same year, Moses Stephens was employed to teach at East side of Gaspereau River. In 1814 a school-house had been provided. New school houses were built in 1867 and 1899. Gaspereau Valley Consolidated School was built in 1965.

Postal way offices were established here for short periods of time in 1842 and 1847. In 1852 the office became permanent.

Various forms of agriculture, especially fruit growing, constitute the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was 322.

 

GLENMONT
This settlement is located about four miles south of Baxter Harbour in central Nova Scotia. The early name was Baxters Harbour Mountain until it was officially changed in 1922. "Glenmont" was probably prompted by prominent natural features such as glen in the mountains. The land was part of Cornwallis township which was granted in 1761.

Lumbering is the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was 86.

 

GRAFTON
This rural area is located near the sources of the Cornwallis River in central Nova Scotia. It was probably named after the Duke of Grafton or perhaps after the Massachusetts town of that name. It was settled in 1821.

The Cornwallis Covenanter Church was built here about 1833-34. A Methodist Church was erected in 1838. The Anglican Christ Church of Berwick was originally built here in 1854, but was moved to Berwick in 1876. A Baptist Church was built in 1876 using material taken from the old Pleasant Valley Meeting House. It was dedicated on January 14, 1877.

A new school-house was built in 1919 to replace one that had burned down.

Fruit growing and other forms of agriculture are the main industries.

Population in 1956 was 197.

 

GRAND PRE
This settlement is located about half-way between the mouth of Gaspereau River and the mouth of the Cornwallis River in central Nova Scotia. The Lower Horton area was referred to by the Indians as Umtaban, meaning "an overflowing flood" because of the fact that the tides covered much of the lowlands for a part of each day before the dykes were built. Grand Pre is a name which was given by the French Acadian settlers and means, "Great Meadow."

Settlement may have begun in this area as early as 1680 when Pierre Melanson and Pierre Terriau moved here from Annapolis. About 1682 Claude and Antoine Landry, Etienne Hebert and Claude Boudrot, Jean Terriau, Martin Aucoin, Phillippe Pinet and Francois Lapierre moved here. In the spring of 1760 several shiploads of New England settlers arrived. This area became part of Horton township which was granted to the proprietors on May 29, 1761.

Probably the first church building in the area was the Acadian parish church of St. Charles which was built before 1707. A replica of this church was built as a memorial and was dedicated in August, 1922. A Presbyterian meeting house was built here probably in the late 1760's or early 1770's and was taken down soon after 1795. The Covenanter Church was begun in 1804 and completed in 1818. It was unused from 1894 until 1912 and eventually became the property of the United Church of Canada. The Chalmers Church a Non-Covenanter Presbyterian owned building was built about 1887-88 and was sold to the local school trustees in 1912. A Methodist Church was built about 1786. A new Church was opened in May 1821 but it burned down and was replaced by a new building which was dedicated in May , 1868. A new church hall for the Horton United Church at Grand Pre was opened December 2, 1928. A meeting house belonging to the United Church of Canada and located at North Grand Pre was possibly opened about 1861 as a Union Church.

John Cashen was teacher at "the Presbyterian Meeting House" September to December 1828. There was a school-house on Presbyterian ground here about 1835. A new public school was built in 1866. A school-house situated in Stewarts Woods was burned in 1872. A new school-house was erected in 1878. A school-house erected in 1913 was closed when the area was consolidated with Avonport and Horton District.

Farming has been the main industry. Acadia Dairy Company Limited was founded here prior to 1898.

Population in 1956 was 300.

 

GREENFIELD
See ETNA

 

GREENWICH
This village is located approximately three miles south-west of the mouth of the Cornwallis River in central Nova Scotia. An early name was Noggin Corner from a Noggin maker who had a shop here. About 1869 the Post office was called Port Williams Station but about 1905 the name was changed back to Greenwich, a name which possibly originated with Greenwich, England, and Greenwich, Conn.

The Bishop family were early settlers here, possibly receiving land as part of the Horton township grant in 1761. Jason Forsyth was another early settler, possibly building a house here as early as 1772.

A Free-Will Baptist meeting house was erected on the Bishop place sometime in the early or mid-19th century. A new Methodist church was built about 1910.

John Fox was schoolmaster here in 1838.

Prior to and including 1850, schools were held in various homes. A new school was built in 1879. In 1955 the Community Hall was modernized for school purposes. In October, 1959, the new eighteen-room Horton District High School was opened.

A Postal Way Office was established in 1857.

In 1868 the railway opened through to Windsor and by 1876 warehouses had begun to spring up along it for the handling of fruit and vegetable produce.

Agriculture is the basic industry.

Population in 1956 was 371.

 

GREENWOOD
This village is located south of the Annapolis River and about three miles east of the Kings-Annapolis County line. It was probably so named because of verdant forests found there by the first settlers. In the 19th century it was known as Greenwood Square, but later the name shortened. Greenwood and South Greenwood Village sites were both included in a grant made to Jabez Benedict and ten others on March 16, 1814. Settlement probably began soon after this date.

A Union meeting house was built at Greenwood Square about 1858. A new meeting house for Baptists and Methodists was dedicated on May 16, 1965.

A new district consolidated school was opened in September, 1961. A new fire station was opened on January 16, 1966.

Greenwood Air Base was built for the Royal Air Force in 1942 as an operational training unit. A school was opened on the base in September, 1951. A new nineteen room school was constructed on 1962. The Protestant Chapel was dedicated May 8, 1955. The base also has a Catholic Chapel. In June, 1964, Costello Park was opened containing permanent married quarters, two chapels, recreation areas and a school. This National Defence village had a population of 1500 in 1964-65.

Industries include fruit growing and dairying. Many of the inhabitants work at the base.

Population in 1956, not including the Canadian Forces Base, was 130.

 

HABITANT
This rural area is located on the north side of the Habitant River on the west side of the Minas Basin, in central Nova Scotia. The name is a French word meaning "inhabitant or resident". Some of the grantees of land here at the second township grant in 1761 were: James Mather, Peter Wickwire,jr., John Cocks, Elkanah Morton,Sr., Elisha Porter, Peter Pineo, John Best, Stephen Rogers, John Dean and George Smith.

A congregational-Baptist meeting house begun about 1819 was burned before it was completed but it was rebuilt in 1820 and completed in 1849. It was closed up and disposed of in 1889.

John Mills and James Henry Hopkins were schoolmasters in the settlement in 1828. A new school was constructed in 1875.

Farming is the basic industry. In 1958 Hillside Growers completed a plant for growing mushrooms and went into production.

Population in 1956 was 219.

 

HALL'S HARBOUR
This settlement is located on Hall's Harbour on the south side of Minas Channel in central Nova Scotia. It was named for Samuel Hall a native of the county who went to New England but returned to raid the new settlements in Kings County about 1779. While on the raid inland, he was cut off from his boats, at what became Hall's Harbour by the local militia and had to make his way overland to Annapolis and so back to New England. In 1826 two families settled here and a mill was built. A store was opened by Silvanus Whitney about 1830. A pier was erected about 1836.

Charles B. Cox was schoolmaster here during the last half of 1831. A new school was built at East Hall's Harbour in 1905.

A postal way office was established in 1855. A post office was established at East hall's Harbour Road in February, 1882.

In October, 1962, heavy seas destroyed the breakwater which was built in 1920.

Fishing and limited farming are the basic industries.

Population in 1956 was: Eat Hall's Harbour Road, 120, Hall's Harbour, 89.

 

HARBOURVILLE
This rural area is located on the south side of the mouth of Minas Channel in west-central Nova Scotia. An early name was Shingle Log Brook. Later it was named Givens Wharf after John Given. On March 13, 1860 the present name was chosen and is descriptive. Settlement probably began about 1829 by two families named Given and Hamilton. Seven buildings, including a hotel, were burned in August, 1870.

The Harbourville United Church was opened as a Methodist Church in 1860. A Baptist Church was built at Long Point in 1860, opened on February 10, 1861.

A school-house was built in 1861.

A postal way office was established at Givens Wharf in 1858. In 1863 the postal address became Harbourville.

The lighthouse which was probably built in the late 19th or early 20th century was torn down on May 18, 1961.

At one time the area was important as a shipping point for cord wood, potatoes and other things. More recently fishing has become a basic industry.

Population in 1956 was 165.

 

HARMONY
This settlement is located between the Annapolis and South Rivers in central Nova Scotia. It was probably named because of the natural beauty, peacefulness and serenity of the environment. This settlement of Harmony was part of a 4380 acre grant made to George Gracie, Thomas Ritchie and others on June 1, 1803. South Harmony was part of a grant made to five members of the Barclay family on May 1, 1797. T

The United Baptist Church was dedicated in 1918 and rededicated in May, 1960.

A postal way office was established on August 1, 1872, with Austin Spinney as postmaster.

Lumbering and milling have been the main industries.

Population in 1956 was: Harmony 54, Harmony Square, 64.

 

HARMONY SQUARE
See HARMONY

 

HIGHBURY
This settlement is located about two miles south-east of Kentville between the Cornwallis and Gaspereau Rivers. It was probably named after a suburb of London, England. The land was a part of the Horton township which was granted in 1761. Settlement probably began in the late 18th century.

A new school-house was constructed in 1951.

Farming is the basic industry, and fruit is the main product.

Population in 1956 was 296.

 

HILLATON
This settlement is located on Habitant Creek on the west side of Minas Basin. Early names for the settlement were: Washington Street and Saxon Street. "Hillaton" is probably a descriptive name referring to a town on a hill. Two of the Cornwallis township proprietors who received land in this area in 1761 were Stephen Herrenton and Seth Burg. [Harrington & Burgess].

Farming and lumbering are the major industries. On July 15, 1962, the new Canada Foods Limited processing plant went into production.

Population in 1956 was 123.

 

HORTONVILLE
This rural area is located west of the mouth of the Gaspereau River in central Nova Scotia. The Indian name for this area was "Umtaban" "an overflowing flood" referring to the tidal marsh which was reclaimed by the Acadians and English with the use of the dykes. The French name for the area was Grand Pre, "great meadow". The name "Horton" was probably given in honour of Horton Hall in Northhamtonshire, England, residence of George Montagu Dunk, Second Earl of Halifax who was president of the Board of Trade, 1748-61 and who aided the foundation of Halifax, N.S. Acadians began to move here from Port Royal in the 1680's. Following the deportation of 1755 New Englanders began to arrive in 1760. The first grant of Horton towship was made to Robert Dennison, Jonathan Harris, Joseph Otis, Amos Fuller and others on May 22, 1759. A new grant was made on May 29, 1761, when the first grant proved inadequate. In 1897 the name Horton Landing was by statute changed to Hortonville. Horton Landing was so named because it was the place where the New England Settlers landed in 1760 and laid out a town plot. The name still persists in the mid-20th century and is applied to an area north of Hortonville. On April 18, 1893, the rate payers of Horton Landing desired to change the name to Acacia, but the change was not made. Hortonville was so called because it was a village in Horton township. Lower Horton was an early name which included this area.

An Episcopal Church was erected at Town Plot, Horton Landing about 1770. It served until a new church was built in Church Street in 1810. A Presbyterian Church at Lower Horton was dedicated on January 4, 1891. A new Methodist Church at Lower Horton was dedicated in 1869.

By April 13, 1810, three school-houses had been built in the township. A fourth was built by December, 1812. Acacia Villa School was founded by Joseph R. Hea at Town Plot, Horton landing in 1852. In February 1873 an old Temperance Hall at Lower Horton which was being used for school purposes was destroyed by fire. A new school-house was completed at Horton Landing in 1877.

A postal way office was established at Lower Horton in 1842 which became a post office in 1850. J. Borden was postmaster in 1852. Horton Landing Postal Way Office was established on June 1, 1871, with Fred G. Curry as keeper. A lighthouse was built on Horton Bluff in 1851.

Farming is the major industry.

Population of Hortonville in 1956 was 218.

© Dr. C. B. Ferguson and Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management
Transcribed by: Susan Gowen




This Page Last Updated: September 5, 2001.
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