French's Towns of Broome Co. NY
Source: French, J.H., Gazetteer of the State of New York, Syracuse, N.Y.: R. Pearsall Smith, 1860.

In French's Gazeetter on pages 180-184, there are overviews of each township written during the 1858-60 time frame. I have reproduced those excerpts here, except for the fact that I have reformated the footnotes, changed the numbering scheme and have placed them immediately after the town they applied to, instead of at the end of the page. The footnote number includes a 2 digit code to identify the township.


BINGHAMTON–was formed from Chenango , Dec. 3, 1855. It lies at the junction of the Susquehanna and Chenango Rivers, and extends S. to the S. line of the co. The surface is hilly in the S., but the N. part embraces the wide and beautiful intervales extending along the two rivers at and near their junction. The hills are 300 to 400 feet above the river, and are generally arable to their summits. The soil in the valleys is a deep, rich, alluvial and gravelly loam, and upon the hills it is a fine quality of slaty loam. BinghamtonBI1 (p. v.) was incorp. April 2, 1813. By a subsequent charter, passed May 3, 1834, its limits were enlarged and its territory was divided into 5 wards. It is beautifully situated on the N. bank of the Susquehanna at its junction with the Chenango. It contains the State Inebriate Asylum,BI2 the Binghamton Academy, and the Susquehanna Seminary,BI3 3 female seminaries,BI4 a commercial college,BI5 2 water cures,BI6 9 churches,BI7 5 newspaper offices, and several manufactories. The village is an important station upon the Erie R. R., and is connected with Syracuse by the S. B. & N. Y. R. R. It is also the S. W. terminus of the Chenango Canal and of the Albany & Susquehanna R. R. It is the center of a large trade, [p.181] and is an important point for the transhipment of coal.BI8 Pop. 8,818. Hawleyton (p. o.) is a hamlet in the S. part, near the Penn, line. The first settlement was made in 1787, by emigrants mostly from New England.BI9 The first religious services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Howe, (Bap.,) in 1788. Hon. Daniel S. Dickinson is a resident of this town.


BI1 Binghamton was originally called Chenango Point." It's present name was given in honor of William Bingham, the original purchaser of a large tract of land lying on both sides of the Susquehanna, and including the site of the Village. He made liberal donations of land to the village.

BI2 The New York State Inebriate Asylum was incorp. in 1854 for the term of 50 years. It is designed for the medical treatment of restraint of inebriates. It owes its origin mainly to the persevering efforts of Dr. J. Edward Turner. Every person donating 10$ is deemed a subscriber and stockholder. The building is located E. of the village, on a beautiful site, 240 feet above the water. It is 365 feet long by 82 feet broad, built of stone and brick in the Tudor castellated style of architecture. The citizens donated a farm of 250 acres, upon which the buildings were erected.

BI3 This institution is under the charge of the NE denomination, and is designed for a large boarding school. The building is a 4 story brick edifice, pleasantly located NW of the village upon an eminence overlooking the valley.

BI4 River Side Seminary, established in 1848 by Miss R.S. Ingalls; Miss Barton's Seminary, established in 1857; and Harmony Retreat Seminary, established in 1857 by Misses March.

BI5 Lowell & Warner's Commercial College.

BI6 Binghamton Water Cure, established in 1855 by O.V. Thayer; and the Mt. Prospect Water Cure, unter the supervision of J.U. North.

BI7 2 ME and 1, each, Bap., Presb., Cong., Prot. E., Univ., R.C., and AF. Meth.

BI8 There was transhipped from the Del., Lackawanna & Western R.R. cars to the Chenango canal boats, in 1857, 51,700 gross tons of coal, and from these boats to the cars 25,895 tons of Clinton (Oneida Co. ) iron ore.

BI9 Among the early settlers were Capt. Joseph Leonard, Col. Wm Rose, the two brothers Whitney, ****** Lyon, Jesse Thayer, Peter and Thos. Ingersoll, Saml. Harding, Capt. John Sawtell, ***** Butler, and Solomon Moore. The first birth was that of Amasa Leonard, Sept 23 1788; the first marriage, that of Ezekiel Crocker and Polly Benton; and the first death, that of Mrs. Blunt in 1787. Lewis Keeler opened the first inn, and Delano and Monroe the first store. Ezekiel Crocker erected the first gristmill in 1794. The first school was taught by Wol. William Rose, in 1794. For details of early history see Wilkinson's Annals of Binghamton.


BARKERBA1–was formed from Lisle, April 18, 1831. A part of Greene was annexed April 28, 1840. It lies upon Tioughnioga River, N. W. of the center of the co. The surface consists of a high, broken plateau divided into two distinct parts by the valley of the river. The declivities of the hills are in some places very steep; but their summits spread out into a broken region ties of the hills are too steep for cultivation, but their summits spread out into a broken region generally covered with timber and adapted to pasturage. The highest point, in the N. W. part of the town, is about 1400 feet above tide. The river valley is very narrow, but the limited amount of intervale is excellent land. Halfway Brook flows through a narrow valley in the E. part of the town. In this valley brine springs have been found; and here also the unsuccessful boring for salt was made.BA2 The soil in the valley is a rich alluvium and gravelly loam, and that upon the hills is a clayey loam mixed with disintegrated slate and shale. Chenango Forks (p. v.) is situated mostly in this town, at the fork of Chenango and Tioughnioga Rivers. It is a station on the S. B. & N. Y. R. R. Pop. 506,–in Barker 287, in Chenango 127, and in Greene (Chenango co) 92. Barker is a p. o. in the central part of the town. The first settlement was made in 1791, by John Barker, from Branford, Conn.BA3 There are 3 churches in town. BA4


BA1 Named from John Barker, the first settler.

BA2 See p. 178 -- (directions to page 178 are probable to the 2nd footnote on that page: A few years since, a boring was commenced in Lisle, on the site of an old deer lick, and was continued to a depth of more than 400 feet, without any practical result. The theory of the operators was, that the salt came from the same source as the as the Onondaga brine, and that, to obtain water of the same amount of saltness, all that was necessary would be to bore to the geographical level of those wells.)

BA3 Simeon Rogers, John Allen, Asa Beach, and Sol. Rose, from Conn. settled in town in 1792. The first marriage was that of Simeon Rogers and a dau of John Barker, in 1792; the first birth, that of Chauncey, a son of Simeon Rogers, in 1793; and the first death, that of Thos. Gallop, the same year. Simeon Rogers opened the first inn, in 1795, kept the first store, and built the first mill. The first school was taught by Thos. Cartwright, in 1795.

BA4 2 ME and Cong.


CHENANGO–was formed Feb. 16, 1791. Windsor was taken off in 1807, Conklin in 1824, and Binghamton and Port Crane in 1855. A part of Union was annexed Feb. 26, 1808, and a part of Maine, Nov. 27, 1856. It lies upon the W. bank of Chenango River, a little W. of the center of the co. Its surface consists of the river intervale and several high ridges extending in a N. and S. direction and separated by the narrow valleys of small streams. The declivities of the hills are steep, and their summits are 300 to 600 feet above the valleys. Castle and Kattel Creeks, tributaries of Chenango River, are the principal streams. The former was named from the location of an Indian castle near its mouth, and the latter from a family of early settlers. The soil upon the N. hills is a gravelly loam mixed with disintegrated slate and underlaid by hardpan, but farther S. it becomes a deeper and richer gravelly loam. It is productive, but, from its moist character, it is largely devoted to grazing. Stock growing and dairying form the leading branches of agricultural interest. Castle Creek (p. v.) is on the creek of the same name, in the W. part of the town. Pop. 185. Glen Castle, (p. o.,) on a branch of the same stream, is in the central part. Chenango, (p. o.,) on Chenango River, is a station on the S. B. & N. Y. R. R. Kattelville is a hamlet on Kattel Creek. The first settlement was made in 1787, by Thos. Gallop. CH1 There are 4 churches in town. CH2


CH1 Stephen Palmer and Jared Page were among the earliest settlers. The first birth was that of Sally Smith, in 1791.

CH2 3 ME and 1 Bap.


COLESVILLECL1–was formed from Windsor, April 2, 1821. It lies upon the Susquehanna, E. of the center of the co. Its surface consists principally of a high and broken upland divided into 2 parts by the deep valley of the river. The summits of these uplands are 400 to 700 feet above the valley, and considerable portions are still covered with forests. The soil upon the river bottoms is a deep, fertile, gravelly loam, and upon the summits of the hills it consists of clay and slate. It is generally much better adapted to pasturage than tillage. Harpersville, (p. v.,) on Susquehanna River, contains 3 churches and has a pop. of 230. Center Village, CL2 (p. v.,) on the Susquehanna, has a pop. of 147. New Ohio, (p. o.,) in the N. part of the town, Osborne Hollow, (p. o.,) in the W. part, West Colesville, (p. o.,) in the S. W. part, Colesville, (p. o.,) S. of the center, Ouquaga, (p. o.,) and Nineveh, (p. o.,) on the Susquehanna, are hamlets. Valonia Springs and Unitaria are p. offices. The first settlement CL3 [p.182] was made in 1785, by John Lamphere, from Watertown, Conn. The first religious services were conducted by Rev. Joseph Badger, in 1793. There are 10 churches in town. CL4


CL1 Named from Nathaniel Cole, one of the first settlers.

CL2 At this place is a tannery, which turns out 50,000 sides of leather per annum.

CL3 Lemuel and Nath'l Badger and Casper Spring settled in the town in 1786; Nathaniel and Vena Cole, Daniel Picket, Jed. Merchant, Bateman S. Dickinson, **** Wilmot, Daniel Crofott, and Titus Humiston, in 1795, in 1795; John Ruggles and Isaac Tyrull, in 1796; and Eli Osborne and Peter Warn, in 1800. The first birth was that of Louisa Badger, May 28, 1788; the first death, that of John Lamphere, the same year; and the first marriage, that of Benj. Bird and Mrs. John Lamphere, in 1794. Benj. Bird kept the first inn, in 1794 and Bateman S. Dickinson the first store, in 1805. The first School was taught by Job Bunnel.

CL4 4 ME, 2 Bap., 2 Union, Prot. E., Presb.


CONKLINCN1–was formed from Chenango , March 29, 1824. A part of Windsor was taken off in 1831, and a part was annexed from Windsor in 1851. It lies upon the Susquehanna, S. of the center of the co. Its surface consists of the fine broad intervale of the river and high, broken uplands which rise upon each side. The summits of the hills are 400 to 600 feet above the valley. The declivities upon the W. side of the river are very steep, but upon the E. they are generally more gradual. Little Snake Creek flows in an easterly direction through the S. W. part. Its valley is narrow and is bordered by steep hills. The soil upon the summits of the hills is a hard clayey and gravelly loam largely intermixed with fragments of slate. In the valley the soil is a deep, rich alluvium and gravelly loam. Kirkwood (p. v.) is situated on the E. bank of the Susquehanna, in the S. part of the town. It is a station on the Erie R. R., and contains 25 houses. Conklin Center and Corbettsville are p. offices, and Millburn and Conklin are hamlets. At Millburn are extensive pyroligneous acid works. The settlement of the town was commenced in 1788, at the mouth of Snake Creek, by Jonathan Bennett, Ralph Lathrop, and Waples Hance. CN2 The first religious services were conducted by Revs. David Dunham and John Leach, Methodist missionaries. There are 4 churches in town; M. E., Presb., Bap., and Christian.


CN1 Named from Judge John Conklin, one of the early settlers.

CN2 Among the early settlers were Gerret Snedaker, David Bound, Daniel Chapman, Peter Wentz, Asa Rood, Nathaniel Tagot, Asa Squires, John Bell, Silas Bowker, Joel Lamoreaux, Abraham Sneden, David and Joseph Compton, Abraham Miller, Ebenezer Park, Noel Carr, and Thos. Cooper. The first birth was that of William Wentz, Feb 18, 1795; the first marriage that of Noel Carr and Sally Tousler in 1803; and the first death, that of Silas Bowker. The first gristmill was built at "Fitchs Creek: in 1790. The first school was Taught by George Lane, in 1801.


LISLELI1–was formed from Union, April 7, 1801. Nanticoke, Barker, and Triangle were taken off in 1831. The line of Berkshire was altered in 1812, and a part was annexed to Union in 1827. It is the N. W. corner town of the co. The surface is mostly a hilly and broken upland, divided by the valley of Tioughnioga River into 2 unequal parts. The summits of the hills are 400 to 700 feet above the river, and their declivities are generally steep. Dudley or Yorkshire Creek flows easterly through near the center of the town, its narrow valley breaking the continuity of the W. ridge. The soil along the valley is a rich, gravelly loam, but upon the hills it consists of clay and a slaty gravel underlaid by hardpan. The declivities of the hills are usually too steep for easy cultivation, and the soil upon the summits is a moist clay loam, better adapted to grazing than grain growing. Lisle (p. v.) is situated on the W. bank of the Tioughnioga. It is a station on the S. B. & N. Y. R. R., and contains about 30 houses. The old Catskill & Ithaca Turnpike, built in 1796, crossed the river at this point. Yorkshire, (Center Lisle p. o.,) near the center of the town, contains about 30 houses. Killawog, (p. o.,) in the N. part, on the Tioughnioga, is a station on the S. B. & N. Y. R. R. The first settlement was made in 1791, by emigrants from N. E. LI2 The first religious services were conducted in 1795, by Rev. Seth Williston. There are 5 churches in town.LI3


LI1 Named from Lisle, in France

LI2 The first settlers were Josiah Patterson, Ebenezer Tracy, Edward Edwards, David Manning, Eliphalet Parsons, and Whittlesey Gleason. The first birth was that of Henry Patterson in 1793; the first marriage, that of Solomon Owen and Sylvia Cook; and the first death, that of Wright Dudley. The first gristmill was built in 1800, by Jacob Hill. The first store was kept by Moses Adams, and the first tavern by O. Wheaton, in 1799.

LI3 2 Bap., Cong., Presb., and ME


MAINE–was formed from Union, March 27, 1848. A part of Chenango was taken off in 1856. It is the central town upon the W. border of the co. Its surface consists of ranges of hills divided by numerous narrow valleys, the principal of which extends in a N. and S. direction. These hills are 400 to 600 feet above the valley of Chenango River. The principal streams are Nanticoke, Bradley, and Crocker Creeks. The soil is a gravelly loam largely intermixed with the underlying slate. Maine, (p. v.,) situated on Nanticoke Creek, W. of the center, contains 3 churches. Pop. 220. East Maine is a p. o. The first settlement was made in May, 1797, by Daniel Howard, Alfred and Russell Gates, and Winthrop Roe. MA1 There are 4 churches in town; 2 M. E., Bap., and Cong.


MA1 Benjamin Norton settled in the town in 1798. The first birth was that of Cynthia, dau of Winthrop Roe in July 1797. The first school was taught by Betsey Ward, in 1802. Daniel Howard built the first gristmill, in 1810; Jared Ketchum kept the first store, in 1825, and Oliver Whitcomb, the first tavern, in 1829.


  NANTICOKE NA1 –was formed from Lisle , April 18, 1831. It lies upon the W. border of he co., N. of the center. Its surface consists of an upland broken by a few narrow ravines. [p.183] The summits of the highest hills are 100 to 300 feet above the river and 1,200 to 1,400 feet above tide. The town is drained principally by the two branches of Nanticoke Creek, which flow S. through the central portions of the town. The soil upon the hills is a slaty loam underlaid by hardpan. The settlements are principally confined to the valleys. Lambs Corners, in the central part of the town, contains about 12 houses. Nanticoke Springs, in the S. part, and Glen Aubrey, are p. offices. The first settlement was made on Nanticoke Creek, in 1793, by Philip Counselman and John Beachtle, from Luzerne co., Penn. NA2 There are 2 churches in town; Bap. and M. E.


NA1 This name is derived from the Indian name of Nanticoke Creek.

NA2 The first birth was that of Betsey Stoddard, in 1794, and the first death, that of Miss Bird, sister to Mrs. Stoddard.


PORT CRANE PC1 –was formed from Chenango , Dec. 3, 1855. It lies upon the E. bank of Chenango River, extending from the central portions of the co. N. to the borders of Chenango. Its surface consists principally of a high and rolling upland region. The valley of the Chenango is very narrow, and the hills rise steeply to an elevation of 500 to 700 feet above the river. Page Brook flows in a southerly direction through the center of the town, dividing the uplands into 2 distinct ridges. The soil upon the hills is a clay and slaty loam underlaid by hardpan, and in the valleys it consists of a fine, rich gravelly loam and alluvium. Port Crane, (p. v.,) on the Chenango Canal, in the S. part of the town, has a pop. of 193. Doraville, (p. o.,) in the N. part, is a hamlet. Settlement was commenced in 1788, by Elisha Pease.3 The first religious services were conducted by Rev. John Camp, in 1798. There is a M. E. church in town.


PC1 Named from Jason Crane, one of the engineers on the Chenango Canal.

PC2 Jared Page and **** Vining were among the first settlers. The first birth was that of Chester Pease, in 1793; the first marriage, that of Gardner Wilson and Polly Rugg, in 1800; and the first death, that of Mrs. Pease, in 1789. Elisha Pease erected the first sawmill, in 1797, and Thomas Cooper kept the first store, in 1813. The first school was taught by Ozias Masch, in 1800.


SANFORD–was formed from Windsor, April 2, 1821. It is the S. E. town of the co., bordering upon Delaware River. Its surface is principally occupied by the high, mountainous range that extends between Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. The summits of the hills are 600 to 900 feet above the valley, and the declivities are usually very steep. SA1 The deep, narrow valley of Oquaga Creek, flowing S. through the center of the town, separates the highlands into 2 parts. This valley and that of Delaware River are both bounded by nearly precipitous mountain declivities. In its course the creek has numerous falls, furnishing an abundance of water power. The soil in the valleys is a fertile, gravelly loam, but upon the hills it is a cold, clayey loam underlaid by hardpan. Considerable portions of the central and S. parts of the town are still unsettled. Lumber and leather are largely manufactured. Deposit (p.v.) is situated partly in this town and partly in Tompkins, (Delaware co.) The depôt, several hotels, and about half of the dwellings are in this town. Pop. 1249,–656 in Sandford, 593 in Tompkins. SA2 Sanford, in the central part of the town, N. Sanford, in the N. part, and Gulf Summit, in the S., are p. offices. Settlement commenced in 1787, by Wm. McClure, from N. H., — Whitaker, and Capt. Nathan Dean. SA3 There are 3 churches in town; Bap., M. E., and R. C.


SA1 The highest point between the two rivers, by the State Road Survey, is 1688 feet above tide.

SA2 See page 265 -- Probably a reference to the following paragraph on page 265 of the original book, under Delaware, Co.: Deposit (p.v.) is situated on Delaware River, at the mouth of Oquaga Creek, on the line of Sanford, Broome co. It was incorp. April 5, 1811.6 It is the center of a large lumber business, and is an important trading station and wood depôt upon the N. Y. & Erie R. R. It contains a seminary,7 printing office, sawmill, a large tannery, and 4 churches. Pop. 1249,–of which 593 are in Tompkins and 656 are in Sanford, Broome co.: the depôt and R. R. buildings are in the latter town.

SA3 Amongt the first settlers were Daniel Race, Noah Carpenter, Nathan Austin, Simeon Alexander, Russel Farnham, S.P. Greene, Anthony West, Joseph Page, John Pinney, J.p. Appleton, Silas Seward, Capt. Parker, Isaac Denton and Dexter May. The first marriage was that of Conrad Edict (sic-should be Edick1) and Elizabeth Whitaker, in April 1787; the first birth, that of Phebe Edict, in 1788; (sic-should be Edick1) and the first death, that of Stephen Whitaker, Oct 23, 1793. Capt. Dean built the first sawmill, in 1791, the first gristmill in 1792, opened the first store in 1794 and kept the first inn. The first school was taught by Hugh Compton, in 1793.

      1. The surname recorded as Edict in French's is probably Edick; at least that is how it is spelled in other records.


TRIANGLE TR1 –was formed from Lisle , April 18, 1831. It is situated in the extreme N. part of the co., bordering upon both Cortland and Chenango. Its surface consists of a hilly and rolling upland divided into ridges by the valleys of Otselic River and Halfway Brook. The summits of the hills are 300 to 500 feet above the valleys. The soil is generally a gravelly loam, better adapted to grazing than to tillage. Whitneys Point, TR2 (p. v.,) situated at the junction of Otselic and Tioughnioga Rivers, contains 3 churches and has a pop. of 205. Upper Lisle, (p. v.,) on the Otselic, in the N. part of the town, contains 2 churches and 35 houses; and Triangle, (p. v.,) on Halfway Brook, in the S. E. part, 3 churches and 175 inhabitants. The first settlement was made at Whitneys Point, in 1791, by Gen. John Patterson, from Berkshire co., Mass. TR3 The first religious services were conducted by Deacon Josiah Lee, in 1792; and the first sermon was preached by Rev. Seth Williston, in 1795. There are 9 churches in town. TR4


TR1 This name was applied to the tract s. of the Military Tract and "Twenty Towns" and between the Chenango and Tioughnioga Ribers. It was bought by Col. Wm. Smith, at 3 shillings 3 pence per acre. The Chenango Triange embraces Smithville and part of Greene in Chenango co., and Triangle and part of Barker in Broome.

TR2 Named from Thos. Whitney.

TR3 In 1792, David Seymour and family settled at Whitneys Point; and between 1794 and 1797, Timothy Shepherd, Asa Rodgers, Benj. and Hendrick J. Smith, and John Landers, settled at Upper Lisle. The first death was that of Mrs. Hannah Lee, in 1791. The first school was tought by Martha Seymour, in 1793.

TR4 4 bap., 2 ME, 2 Cong., and 1 Univ.


[p.184] UNION–was formed Feb. 16, 1791. A part of Norwich and Oxford (Chenango co.) were taken off in 1793, a part of Greene (Chenango co.) in 1798, Tioga (Tioga co.) in 1800, Lisle in 1801, a part of Chenango in 1808, Vestal in 1823, and Maine in 1848. A part was annexed from Tioga, (Tioga co.,) April 2, 1810, and a part from Lisle, April 11, 1827. It lies upon the N. shore of the Susquehanna, S. W. of the center of the co. The surface consists of the Susquehanna intervale and the hilly region N. of it. The highlands are nearly centrally divided by the deep valley of Nanticoke Creek. The soil in the valley consists of a mixed clayey, sandy, and gravelly loam and alluvium, and is very productive. The hills have a rich soil of slaty and gravelly loam, and are cultivated to their summits. Union, (p. v.,) situated near the Susquehanna, in the S. part of the town, is a station on the N. Y. & E. R. R. The Union News is published at this place. Pop. 520. Union Center, (p. v.,) on Nanticoke Creek, partly in this town and partly in Maine, contains 2 churches and about 40 houses. Hooper, (p. o.,) in the S. part of the town, is a station on the Erie R. R. The first settlement was made in 1785, by Joseph Draper, Nehemiah Crawford, Bryant Stoddard, Nathan Howard, Jabesh Winchop, Caleb Merriman, and Winthrop Roe. UN1 The first church (Ref. Prot. D.) was organized in 1789, at Union Village, and Rev. John Manley was the first settled preacher. There are 4 churches in town.UN2


UN1 Among the early settlers were Joshua and John Mersereau, Gen. O. Stoddard, Nehemiah Spaulding, Walker Sabin, Capt. Wm. Brink, Moses Chambers, Ezekiel and Oliver Crocker, Jeremiah and Benjamin Brown, Amos Patterson, Abner Rockwell and Medad and Elisha B. Bradley. The first death was that of Mary J. Fisk, June 13, 1789. James Ross and Jabeah Winchop built the first gristmill, in 1791, and the latter opened the first tavern, the same year. The first school was taught by Flavel Sabin, in 1787. The first birth was that of Joseph Chambers, July 4, 1790.

UN2 2 Presb. and 2 ME


VESTAL–was formed from Union, Jan. 22, 1823. It lies upon the S. bank of the Susquehanna, and is the S. W. corner town of the co. The surface consists of the river intervale and the hilly region immediately S. of it. The soil upon the hills is a fine quality of slaty loam, and in the valley it is a deep, rich, gravelly loam and alluvium. It is adapted to both grain raising and grazing. Vestal, (p. v.,) near the mouth of Big Choconut Creek, contains 1 church and about 45 dwellings, Vestal Center, (p. v.,) on the same stream, 1 church and about 20 houses, and Tracy Creek, (p. o.,) in the W. part, 1 church and about 10 houses. Settlement was commenced in 1785, by emigrants from New England.3 The M. E. church at Vestal was the first religious organization in town.4


VE1 Samuel and Daniel Seymour, David Barney, Daniel Price, Wm. Coe, Ruggles Winchel, and Asa Camp, were the first settlers. Samuel Coe kept the first inn, in 1791, and R. Winchel built the first grist mill, in 1786. The first school was taught by John Routch, in 1793.

VE2 The census reports 3 churches; Bap, ME and Ref. Meth.


WINDSORWI1–was formed from Chenango , March 27, 1807. Colesville and Sanford were taken off in 1821, and a part of Conklin in 1851. A part of Conklin was annexed April 18, 1831. It lies upon the S. border of the co., S. E. of the center. Its surface is principally occupied by 2 high ridges separated by the valley of the Susquehanna. Upon the E. side of the valley the hills attain an elevation of 400 to 800 feet above the river, and culminate in several sharp ridges; on the W. the hills are less elevated, though the highest summits attain an elevation of 400 to 800 feet above the valley. WI2 The declivities of these hills are generally quite abrupt. Oquaga Hill, in the N. E. part of the town, is one of the highest peaks, and it has some historical notoriety. The valley of the river is generally narrow. The soil is a deep, rich, gravelly loam in the valleys, and a slaty loam underlaid by clay and hardpan upon the hills. Considerable portions of the E. and S. parts of the town are yet uncultivated. Windsor, (p. v.,) situated on the Susquehanna, near the center of the town, contains 3 churches and Windsor Academy. Pop. 339. Stillson Hollow (West Windsor p. o.) contains about 20 houses. Randolph CenterWI3 (p. o.) is a hamlet. The first settlement was made on the Susquehanna, at the mouth of Doolittle Creek, in 1786, by John Doolittle, from Conn.WI4 The first church (Cong.) was organized Aug. 15, 1793, by Rev. Mr. Judd. There are 5 churches in town.WI5

WI1 Named from Windsor, Conn.

WI2 The surface of the Susquehanna in this town is about 910 feet above tide.

  WI3 So called from its being the center of Randolph's Patent.

WI4 David Amaphad and Cyrus Hotchkiss, John Gurnsey and ***** Swift, settled in town in 1787. The first birth was that of David Doolittle, Dec 27, 1786; the first marriage was that of Capt. Andrew English and Miss Rachel Moore; and the first death, that of Mrs. Ashley, the interpreter at the Oquaga Mission, in Aug 1787. Josiah Stow opened the first inn and store, in 1788, and Nathan Lane built the first gristmill, in 1797. The first school was taught by Stephen Seymour, in 1789.

WI5 2 ME, and 1 each F.W. Bap., Bap., and Presb.

       

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