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Immigrants to New Netherland


1638
In the Wapen van Noorwegen
(Arms of Norway)
Sailed from the Texel in May, 1638
Arrived at New Amsterdam about August 4, 1638


Persons to the Colony of Rensselaerswyck:

Abraham Stevensz
In the earliest accounts referred to as Abraham Stevensz Jongen (the boy), later as Abraham Stevensz Croaet (the Croatian), and in 1650 as Abraham Stevensz de Capeteijn (the captain); he is credited with six years' wages from Aug. 14, 1638, two years at f30 a year, two years at f40 a year, and two years at f50 a year; for 4 1/2 years he served under Teunis Dircksz van Vechten. In 1646, he is referred to as maet (partner) of Claes Teunisz, alias Uylenspiegel. Abraham Stevensz leased the Valeije or maizeland, behind the farm of Broer Cornelis, Feb. 3, 1650, at an annual rent of one and a half beavers, taking upon himself all expenses; at Easter 1654, he turned the lease over to Barent Pietersz.


Adriaen Cornelisz From Barsingerhorn (province of North Holland); also referred to as Adriaen Cornelisz Berghoorn and Adriaen Cornelisz van Barsingerwout; was engaged May 10, 1638, for three years, as foreman under Maurits Jansz, and sailed on het Wapen van Noorwegen. His wages in the colony, at f140 a year, began Aug. 14, 1638. He does not appear after 1643.


Claes Gijsbertsz
Was, apparently in 1641, in the service of Michiel Jansz and may have come out with him by het Wapen van Noorwegen, in 1638.


Jan Dircksz
From Amersfoort, (in the province of Utrecht); is entered in the accounts as Jan dircksen Engelsman van Amersfoort, showing that he was a native of England; was engaged as farm laborer, for six years, at wages ranging from f30 to f50 a year. His service in the colony began Aug. 16, 1638, and he appears at first as servant of Michiel Jansz, so that he probably arrived with the latter on het Wapen van Noorwegen. In 1644, he was employed by Reyer Stoffelsz. Nov. 19, 1648, Claes Gerritsz testified that Ruth Jacobsz ordered him to beat Jan Dircksz Engelsman, if he proved refractory.


Jan Michielsz
From Amersfoort, (in the province of Utrecht); is entered in the accounts as Jan dircksen Engelsman van Amersfoort, showing that he was a native of England; was engaged as farm laborer, for six years, at wages ranging from f30 to f50 a year. His service in the colony began Aug. 16, 1638, and he appears at first as servant of Michiel Jansz, so that he probably arrived with the latter on het Wapen van Noorwegen. In 1644, he was employed by Reyer Stoffelsz. Nov. 19, 1648, Claes Gerritsz testified that Ruth Jacobsz ordered him to beat Jan Dircksz Engelsman, if he proved refractory.


Michiel Jansz
From Schrabbekercke ('s Heer Abtskerke in the province of Zeeland); came with his wife and two servants by het Wapen van Noorwegen in 1638. He was originally engaged as farm hand, but before his departure from Holland was promoted to farmer; he served as foreman in 1638 and 1639, and from 1640 to 1646 was farmer on the farm called de Hoogeberch. July 27, 1646, he received permission to leave the colony and to reside at the Manhatans, on condition that his accounts be settled. Oct. 8, 1648, the court ordered him to prepare a full statement of his accounts by Saturday next, or sooner, "if his voyage should thereby be delayed." Oct. 10, a similar order was issued and a few days later Director van Slichtenhorst asked that the court impose on Michiel Jansz the penalty of death or such other sentence as it shall see fit for the sale of ammunition to Indians during the war, together with a fine of f50 for beavers sent to Fort de Hoop, 1644, without paying duty. May 29, 1649, the court once more ordered Michiel Jansz to render a detailed account and July 27, 1650, he was asked to sign the account rendered by him.


Rijck Rutgersz
Was engaged for six years, beginning Aug. 16, 1638, at wages of f120 a year. From 1640 to 1644, he served under Teunis Dircksz van Vechten, with whom he would seem to have come on het Wapen van Noorwegen. He leased Bethlehem's Island, Nov. 29, 1648, for the term of six years, but left the island, March 17, 1650, perhaps as the result of a quarrel with Christoffel Davids, who struck him on the head with a club on March 3, 1650. Jan Reyersz, from Houten, succeeded him on the farm.


Symon Jansz Henypot
From Munnickendam; son in law of Pieter Cornelisz; sailed by het Wapen van Noorwegen and was apparently in the colony for a short time in 1639.


Teunis Dircksz van Vechten
From Vechten, a small village near Utrecht; arrived with his wife, one child and two servants by het Wapen van Noorwegen, in 1638, but appears as early as July 20, 1632, as farmer on Pieter Bijlvelt's farm at the Manhatans. He is occasionally referred to as Teunis Dircksen Poentie. He worked in 1638 and 1639 as a farm laborer, but from 1640 to 1663, and perhaps later, occupied a farm at the south end of Greenbush, adjoining the farm at one time occupied by Teunis Cornelisz van Vechten and later by Cornelis Hendricksz van Nes. He had in 1648 and 1649 a half interest in the colony's brewery, in Greenbush, which was offered for sale on March 7, 1650. In Feb. 1651, he was prosecuted for calling Director van Slichtenhorst, in the presence of many people, een ouwde graeuwe dief en schelm (an old gray thief and a rascal); for calling Domine Megapolensis an informer and threatening to stab him with a knife; for selling his wheat at f11 a mudde, contrary to the orders of the patroon; for ordering Willem Menten four times during the night of Sept. 18, 1648, to fire off a musket in the brewery, thereby causing Monsr. Labatie and some soldiers of the fort to cross the river; for calling Teunis Cornelisz a thief and a rascal and striking him on the head for having leased the six morgens of his, Teunis Dircksz', farm which the authorities of the colony had reserved; for fighting with Pieter Hartgers and Abraham Staas; and for letting two horses stand in front of Jan Verbeeck's house, in severely cold weather, without cover or food.


Willem Meynten
Served as a farm laborer under Cornelis Maesen for the period of six years, beginning Aug. 14, 1638, at wages ranging from f40 to f60 a year. Thereafter, he carted stone for the foundation of the house of Domine Megapolensis, graded the latter's garden and did other day labor. In Sept. 1648, he seems to have been in the employ of Teunis Dircksz van Vechten.






Source: #76, #78








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