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History of
Greene County
New York

with

Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men

J.B. Beers and Co.
1884

Coxsackie
by William S. Pelletreau, A.M.


Transcribed by Dianne Schnettler, Arlene Goodwin, Al Albright and Annette Campbell


The Town of Coxsackie is bounded on the north by the town of New Baltimore, on the east by the Hudson River, on the south by the towns of Athens and Cairo, and on the west by the town of Greenville. Its length from east to west is about seven and three quarter miles, and its width is about five miles. A ridge extends along the river front, reaching its highest point about one-eighth of a mile from the waters edge. Beyond this is a wide extent of level land, known as the Coxsackie Flats, which extend from the lower part of the town of Athens, to a line running west from the mouth of Coxsackie Creek, in the town of New Baltimore. The ranges of rocky hills which divide these flats in Athens, terminate in the southern part of Coxsackie, and the low, flat land, the garden of Greene county, extends unbroken to the base of the Kalkberg, which runs entirely through the town. Beyond this range of limestone cliffs, the country is hilly, and the lofty elevation which begins so abruptly in the town of Athens, near the village of Leeds, and which is commonly called the High Hill or Potick Mountain, terminates as abruptly in this town, about a mile east of the village of Jacksonville. To the west of this the land is not so hilly, and to the western part of the town there is considerable level land, but not so low, or so fertile, as the Coxsackie Flats.  The principal stream in this town is the Coxsackie Creek, which has its head waters in a spring that flows out of the Kalkberg, near the south end of the town, on the farm of Francis Cochran. This stream runs through the flat land, and empties into the Hudson River in the town of New Baltimore.  Four small streams run into it. That farthest south is a small brook called the Fountain Kill, having its source in a large fountain or spring that comes out of the Kalkberg. North of this is a stream supposed to be the outlet of Bronk’s Lake, and called the Stony Kill. The third rises in the hilly country west of the Kalkberg, and through a devious course flows into the Coxsackie Creek, near the middle of the flats. To the stream has been given from early times the name of Murderer’s Creek. The fourth stream rises in a meadow on the farm of Hiram Miller, in the town of New Baltimore, and follows almost exactly the line which divides the two towns. It flows into Coxsackie Creek about three-quarters of a mile north of the upper village.  This brook was called by the Dutch settlers “Diep Kil,” or Deep Brook, and was the northern boundary of the Houghtaling Patent.  Still farther north there is a small brook rising in a spring on the farm of Peter Henry Whitbeck in New Baltimore. To this the Dutch gave the name of Maquaas Kill, or Mohawk’s Brook, and was referred to in old deeds as “the most southernmost kill” in Coeyman’s Patent.

In the western part of the town the only stream of importance is Potick Creek, which is the southwestern part divides into two branches. The east branch of Potick rises in New Baltimore, while the west brand has its origin beyond the limits of the county. The junction of these streams is near the turnpike which forms the southern boundary of the town. A very small brook which flows into the east branch about a quarter of a mile south of Jacksonville, touches at one point the eastern corner of the Stighkoke Patent, and was its starting point.

Sources of Title

The town of Coxsackie includes, or is included within the following Patents, granted by the English governors of the province of New York, as representative of the English crown:

Peter Bronk’s Patent;  the north part of the Loonenburg Patent; the south part of Coeyman’s Patent; the Houghtaling Patent; the Stighkoke Patent, and the “Hundred Acres” granted to Casparus Bronk; the Roseboom Patent; the eastern part of the “First tract granted to John Morin Scott.”

Peter Bronk’s Patent

One of the first parcels of land laid out in what is now Greene county, was purchased of the Indians by Peter Bronk, a citizen of Albany, on January 13th 1662, by deed, of which the following is a copy:

“Appeared before me Johannes La Montague, in the service of, etc., two Indians, the one named Sisketas, and the other named Sachemoes, the son of Keesie Wey, owners, and having authority from the other owners, of the land upon the North River, on the west bank between Martin Gerritse’s [Van Bergen] island and the Neuten Hocck, among the Indians, named Koxhackung; the cleared land being a parcel away in the woods (together with the kill, extending from said kill, which lies over against Marten Gerritse’s island, westward unto the Katskill path, from thence southward along the path to the Stenekil, thence eastward until over against the Notan Hocck, and thence northward along the river to the aforesaid kill, which lies over against Marten Gerritse’s island; which land and kill the grantors declare they have sold, granted and conveyed, as they do by these presents, to Pieter Bronck, inhabitants of the village of Beverwyck, with all the right and title which they, the grantors, therein have, for a certain sum in goods to be paid to the, amounting to about one hundred and fifty guilders in beavers, of which sum the buyer promises to pay the half next May, when he shall come to live there, and the other half on the first of May, A. D., 1663.

“Thus done in Forth Orange, the 13th of January, A. D., 1662, in presence of Jan Verbeeck, Frans Barentse [pastor] and Jan Dareth, as witnesses hereto invited.

                   “This is the mark X of Sisketas with his own hand set.
                   “This is the mark X of Slachemoes with his own hand set.
                   “Peter Bronck.”

This purchase from the Indians was confirmed by a patent granted by Gov. Richard Nicolls, June 11th 1667, recorded page 237, vol. 2, of patents, in the office of secretary of State, Albany, from which the following extract is taken.

“A Patent Granted upon a Purchase made by Pieter Broncks with the Consent of lycence of the Dutch Governeur Petrus Stuyvesant of the Native Indian Proprietors of the Certain Pcell of Land near Albany by the River and being on the Westside thereof between Martin Gerritsen’s Island and a Certain Hooke of Land Commonly called Hoock and by the Indyans Koixhacking which sd Land reacheth into the Woods & hath a Creek or Kill thereunto belonging stretching on the other side of the Kill over agst Martin Gerritsens Island it goes Westward of the woods to Kats Kill path, and running along the sd path South wards it Comes to the Stone Kill from thence it runs Eastward over against the sd Noten Hooke and so Northward along the River to the forest Kill which lyes over against Martin Gerritsens Island Conteyning in all about two hundred and fifty two acres or one hundred twenty six Martgen and one hundred & tenn Rod as by the Deed bearing dater the 13th day of Jan. 1662 and the Certificate of the Measure of the 9th day of Jan. 1665, doth appear, Now for a Confirmacon &c.                                                                                  “R. Nicolls.”

The island called in the deed “Martin Gerritsen’s Island,” is situated at the mouth of Coxsackie Creek. The north line of this patent starts from the river, a little south of the mouth of the creek. It runs nearly west, and crosses the road to New Baltimore at a point about 15 rods north of the bridge over the Coxsackie Creek, where the stream, called by the Dutch the Diep Kloof Kill, empties into it.  Its western end is a the road called the Kings road, which, at that point, runs under the line of hills on the western edge of the flats.  The northwest corner of the patent is on the farm of Peter Henry Whitbeck, at a point five chains south of a large elm tree.  This tree stands on the western end of a stone wall, on the eastern side of the road, and opposite Mr. Whitbeck’s house. This line crosses the West Shore Railroad four rods north of the rock cutting. The Catskill Path forms the  western boundary of the Loonenburg Patent, and the patent of Peter Bronck.  The southern boundary of this patent is a line running east from the point where the Catskill Path crossed the Stony Kill. The point is very near to, if not the exact spot, where the road which leads from the house of Robert Armstrong, to the plank road, crosses it.  It is about half way between the place where Bronk’s grist-mill formerly stood, and the mouth of the kill, where it empties into Coxsackie Creek, and perhaps 40 rods from the old Bronk homestead.  The subsequent divisions of the Coxsackie Patent, which will be noticed hereafter, have entirely obliterated the southern line, but it touched the rover at the place generally called, Reed’s Landing. Nutten Hook is the rocky promontory which projects into the river from the eastern shore, where the ferry landing now is.

The great discrepancy between the amount of land as mentioned, and the quantity actually contained in the patent, may require some explanation. The Dutch settlers recognized as land only what was cleared and fit for cultivation; the woodland and rocky ridges were not taken into account.

It might gratify the curious to say a few words concerning the exact locality which, according to the Dutch settlers, the Indians called by the name Koixhacking, which has been changed into Coxsackie. The name is Algonkin and means literally owl place, probably from the number of those ill boding birds which must have found a congenial place in the dense pine woods that then covered the entire country. The exact locality where the first settlement was made is probably what is now the upper village. The name given to the flats, which form so conspicuous a feature in this town and Athens, was in the Indian language Coniskeek.

We have no knowledge whether Peter Bronk ever actually lived on the tract of land thus purchased. He died previous to the year 1687, and his land descended to his son Jan Bronk, whose name with that of Marte Gerritse Van Bergen, is among the most prominent in our early history.

The Loonenburg Patent

The history of this patent is very carefully given in the history of Athens.

The Fountain Flats

March 28th 1681, Jan Cloet, Jurian Teunisse and Myndert Fredrickse, sold the north part of the Loonenburg Patent to Marte Gerritse Van Bergen, and we appended a copy of the deed, as an illustration of the form of early conveyances of land. The record may be found in vol. III., page 107, of deeds, in the county clerk’s office at Albany.

“Appeared before me Robert Livingston Seer of Albany Colony, Rensselaerwick and Schenectady & in presence of the honorable Heeren Mr. Cornelius Van Dyck and Mr. Dirk Wessels, magistrate of the same jurisdiction, Johannes Cloete, Juriaen Teunisse & Myndert Fredrickse, who declared in true rights, free ownership, to grant convey and make over to and for the behoof of Mr. Martin Gerritse [Van Bergen], in a certain parcel of land lying on the west side of Hudson’s river, over against the little Newtenhoeck, beginning from the land of Peter Bronck on the Catskill path to the fountain, and from the fountain Eastward to the hill of Steefsink, Eastward to the river, and from the river side northwards up to the lands of Hillitie Bronck aforesaid, which they the grantors, to wit, Johannes Cloete and Juriaen Teunisse, do by virtue of patent to them given by the later Governor General, of date the 25th May 1667, and Myndert Fredrickse, by virtue of conveyance to him give by Jan Bruyn, of date the 7th August 1765, which made over to him one-third his inheritance in said Patent, to which reference is herein made, and that free and unencumbered, with no liens standing or issuing against the same (saving the Lord’s right), without the grantors making the least pretension thereto any more, likewise acknowledging to our being paid and satisfied therefore the first penny with the last, therefore given plenam actionem cessam,  and full power the aforenamed Martin Gerritse his heirs successors or assigns to do with and dispose of the aforesaid parcel of land, as he could do with his own patrimonial estate and effects, promising the same to defend against all persons, and free from all liens claims and incumbrances which may be lawful, and further never more to do nor suffer any thing to be done there against in any manner under, pledge as by law provided therefore.  Done in Albany the 28 March 1681.”

                                  “Johannes Clute.”
                                  “Jurian Tunessen.”
                                  “Cornelis Van Dyck.”
                                  “The mark of Myndrit  X Fredrickse.”
                                  “Dirck Wessels, his own hand set.”

                        In my presence
                                   Rob. Livingston,
                                                        “Seer.”

The tract of land thus sold was called Fountain Flats, which name it retained till the beginning of the present century. The northern boundary was the south line of Peter Bronk’s Patent, as before described. The south line commenced at the river on the farm formerly owned by Dr. John Ely, now in possession of Mrs. Lewis Lampman. The stone wall on the north side of the orchard, and about 10 rods north of the house, is the original line.  Its present course is N. 88 degrees W.  It runs some 15 or 20 rods north of the barn on the homestead of Peter Spoor (formerly Myndert Van Schaack’s) and forms the boundary between the homestead of Henry Hallenbeck, and the farm of Isaac Conklin on the rocky ridge called Myneberg. The fountain mentioned is the large spring which comes out of the Kalkberg, on the line between the farms of Jacob Armstrong and Phillip and Edward Van Allen (formerly Phillip Collier’s). The hill called “Steefsink,” or as it is more generally spelled in old deeds, “berg Stevesink,” is the high elevation next east of the Kalkberg at the south end of the flats, which forms so conspicuous a feature in the landscape. The course from the fountain to the hill is some degrees south of east,  but from the top of the hill it was intended to run due east to the river. The whole tract contained 1732 acres.

 The Coxsackie Patent

We have thus seen that Jan Bronk inherited the Bronk Patent from his father, Peter Bronk, and that Marte Gerritse Van Bergen bought the north part of Loonenburg Patent adjoining.

There was another tract of land called the Corlaers Kill Patent, which was owned jointly by Jan Bronk and Marte Gerritse.  In 1687 the two united in petitioning for a patent from Governor Dongan, covering all of these three parcels of land. This patent is called the Coxsackie Patent.  The tract mentioned in this document as being by land of “Gisbert out the Bogard” lies to the south of Athens.

“Whereas Peter Bronks did purchase a certain parcel of land near Albany on the west side of Hudsons river between Martin Gerritsens island and a certain hook called Notten hook, and by the Indians Kockhachingh which said land reacheth into the woods and hath a creek or kill thereunto belonging stretching on the other side of said kill over against Martin Gerrisens Island it goes west ward into the woods to Katskill path and running along the said path southward it comes to the Stonekill, from thence it returns eastward over  against the said Notten hook and so northward along the river to the aforesaid kill which lies over against Gerritsens Island contain about 252 acres or 126 morgen and 120 rod, as by deed of date Jan. 13, 1662—and whereas Gov. Richard Nicolls did June 11, 1667 ratify the sale of the above land to Peter Bronk---and whereas John Cloot, Jurrian Tunnisse and John Hendrick Debruyne by a patent of May 25, 1667 from Gov. Nicolls, became possessed of a tract of land lying on the west of Hudsons River over against the little Newtowne hook beginning from the land of Peter Bronks upon the Katskill path right south along s’d Katskill path to the fountain and from the fountain eastwards to the hill of Stevensink eastwards to the river and from the river side, northwards land of Peter Bronk aforesaid---and whereas Myndert Fredrickse had transported unto him from the said John Hendrick D. Bruyn by deed of date Aug. 7, 1675 all his one-third part of the said land---and whereas the said John Cloot, Juraen Tunnisse and Myndert Fredrickse by deed of date 20 March 1681 made over to Martin Gerristen all that aforesaid parcel of land granted to John Cloot Jursen Tunnisse and John Hendric D. Bruyn by patent as aforesaid, and whereas there is a certain piece of ground beginning from the property of Gisbert out the Bogard northward from a hill called Piez to the flying corner in the Indian tongue called Machawanick stretching along the property of John Cloot, Jan Hendrick Bruyn and Juraen Tunnissen to the old Katskill Indian foot-path, which the said Martin Gerritsen had bought of the Indians—and whereas John the son of Peter Bronk and Martin Gerrit, have made application unto me for a comfirmation &c. now know ye that I the said Thomas Dongan &c. do comfirm unto John Bronks and Martin Gerritsen all the above recited tracts of land, to have and to hold &c., this May 23, 1687.”

                                                       “Signed by
                                                                Thomas Dongan.”

In the year 1670 Jurian Teunisse who owned one-third of the Loonenburg Patent, sold it to Abraham Staats and Johannes Provoost. As the Dutch language is fast fading out of memory, this document is given in full both from its great importance and to preserve a relic of the past.

 “Compareerde voor my Ludovicus Cobes, Secret. van Albany, Colonie Rensselaersw ende Scaneghtede, ten overstaen van de E.  Aehtb heeren commissarisse vanden selvir gerechte Mr. Jan Verbec an Mr. Phillip Pieterse Schuyler, Mr. Jeriane Theunisse Tappen, die welcke verklaerde in waeren rechte vryen eygendam to cedereen, transporteren ende over tedraegen by desen, aen ende ten lihoove van Mr. Abraham Staats ende Mr. Johannes Provosst syn gerechte derde part vban landt hem in compie tostehoort met Jan Bruyns ende Jan Bruyns ende Jan Clute met de schuer ende syne gerechticheden daer op hebbende volgens Coopbrieff daer bvan synde, ende ingevolges de kracht van groonttrieir daer van verleent van den Ed: rechtachte: heer General Nicolls onder Jan Bruyns lerustende, waerted in desen gerefereert wert, ende datory ende onbeswaert sonde eenige lsten daerop staende oft uytgaende behoudens deen heer syn recht sonder dat hy Cedent int minste daer op meer huf te pretenderen, als beckennede daer vban ten genougen voldaen ende betael te waeren den eersten penninck met den lesten door handen van de voorn: Mr. Abraham Staate ende Johannes  Porvoost, gevende derhalvins plenam actionem cessam ende volkomen macht acende voorn: Mr. Abraham Staats ende Johannes Provoost haer eeren ende merkomlinger, oft die naermaels haer recht endeactie mochten uekrygen, omme met het word: derde parte lant schur ende der appenddertien van dien te doen,ende toe disponeerer, als sy met haere patrimoniale goederen ende effecten doer sonden mogen, belovende’t selve derde part scherer en appendentien van dien op ende tegens eenen ygelycker to waare, ende to vryen voor alle comer, naermaenige, ende  bewaerinisse als recht is, ende voorder hier tegens nimmermeer te sullen doen mochte laten geschieden, In rechten nochten daer beyten in geniger manieren onder verbaut als near rechten daer toe staende. Acutm In Albany den 25 Aug. 1670.

                                                                              “Jan Verbveck,”
                                                                              “Jurian Teunisse,”
                                                                              “Philip Pieterse Schuyler.”

 “Known to me,
              “Ludovicus Cobes, Secrett.”

“ I, James Van Ingen, sworn, translator of the Dutch records in the Secretary’s office of the state of New York, duly appointed according to law, do certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the original record in the office of the clerk of the City and /County of Albany.—Albany, August 19, 1814.

                                                                                   “Jas. Van Ingen.”

“Sworn before me
      “this 19th day of August, 1814.
                                 John Lovett,
                     Clerk of the City and County of Albany.”

Translation:

Appeared before me, Ludovicus Cobes, secretary of Albany Colony of Rensselaerwick and Schenectady, in the presence of the worshipful Lord Commissioner of the same jurisdiction, Mr. John Verbeck and Pieterse Schuyler, Mr. Jurian Theuniese Tappen, and declared that he ceded, transferred and made over a full title by these presents to the use of Mr. Abraham Staats and Mr. Johannes Provoost, his equal third part of land, belonging to him with Jan Bruyns and Jan Clute, with the barn and the rights appertaining thereto, being according to a bill of sale and agreeing with the tenor of a grant given by the worshipful and right honorable Lord General Nicolls to Jan Bruyns forever, to which reference is had, and that it is free from any charge or incumbrance, except what is due to the Lord of the Manor, who does relinquish his right. Morever, he claims as acknowledged for the satisfaction thereof that the first penny with the last is satisfied and paid by the hand of the aforesaid Abraham Staats and Johannes Provoost, given  plenan actionem cessam their heirs and assigns, or whoever after them may obtain possession of said third part of land, with barn and appurtenances, and full power and right to do with the same and to dispose thereof as they might do with their patrimonial goods and effects would be able to do, promising to defend the said third part, with barn and appurtenances, against any and all persons, and to free it from every vexation, worry and charge as is right; and, further, that he will never do against this, or suffer it to be done, in court or out of it, in any manner, and will stand by this obligation as it may be lawful to do.

                                                                           “Jan Verbeck.”
                                                                           “Jurian Teunisse,”
                                                                           “Philip Pieterse Schuyler.”

    “Known to me
                “Ludovicus Cobes, Secretary.”
 

It is probable that the actual sale of the Fountain Flats was made some time previous to the time it was deeded which may account for the deed to Marte Gerritse, being dated subsequent to the above conveyance. After the sale of Fountain Flats Jan Hendrickse Bruyn’s share of the Loonenburg Patent came into the possession of Cornelis Machielis October 30th 1685. He sold it to Jacob Hallenbeck and Jochem Collier.

The first left his part to this oldest son, Jacob Casper, Hallenbeck. The second left his part to his oldest son, Teunis Dirck Van Vechten. The third transmitted his share to his sons Casper Jans Hallenbeck, and Jochem Collier let his part to his oldest son, Isaac Collier. A deed reciting the above facts is now in the possession of Jonas Collier.  In this way the families of Provoost, Van Loon, Hallenbeck, Van Vechten and Collier first obtained land within the limits of the town of Coxsackie. Though the mention of the barn in the deed to Staats and Provoost in 1670 indicates an actual settlement, the first notice we have of a house is in a deed dated November 2d 1685, by which John Barker, as attorney for Cornelius Machielis, sold to Jacob Phenix “the half of a farm called Klinkenberg with the barn and the house.”   The principal knowledge that we have concerning the early inhabitants is derived from ancient deeds and conveyances which have been preserved. From these we learn that the part of this town which was first occupied and improved, and upon which houses were built, was the portion of the Loonenburg Patent which lies in the southern part of Coxsackie.  Among the earliest is a deed from Broer Jans to Jan Caspersen, which conveyed to him a piece of land situated near the Fountain Flats, “to wit 17 morgen as the same was divided with the other partners and came to Broer Jans, being bounded with the utmost bounds of Martin Geritse.” This same piece of land was sold January 18th 1711, by Jan Caspersen to Michael Collier and is spoken of as “lying near the foot of the Hill called Stevesink.” This is now the north part of the farm of Jonas Collier.

On the 6th of September 1694 Teunis Tappen, son of Jurian Teunisse, sold to Jacob  Caspersen Hallenbeck:

“All that tract of land over against Claverack called Klinkenburg, as the same was transported to him by  the attorney of Cornelius Machealis on the 18th of June 1687, and by Teunisse Pieterse on the 8th of April 1689, stretching southward and westward as far as the Murderer’s Creek, and northward till over against the Little Nuttern Hook, together with all the right and title of said Jurian Teunisse in the house and barn, the whole of the new orchard and half of the old, namely, ¾ of all the land at the water side eastward of Loonenburg, except the place called Korst Veloren, belonging to the heirs of Maj. Abraham Staats.”

The mention of the old orchard is a proof that the place had been occupied and improved for some years before.  Klinkenberg, or Echo Hill, is the range of elevated land to the north of Four Mile Point. This tract of land, which extended along the river front as far north as the south bounds of the Fountain Flats, continued in possession of the descendants of Jacob Hallenbeck for several generations. The house stood near the present residence of George Houghtaling. The location of the “new orchard” is perpetuated by the fact that  it was used as a burying place by the successive generations of the Hallenbeck family down to within the last fifty years.  One of the first deaths recorded in the records of the Lutheran church of Athens, is that  of the death of Anna Hallenbeck, who died February 25th 1711, aged 17 years and was “buried at Klinkenberg in the new orchard.” It is on the top of a small hill a short distance west of George Houghtaling’s house, and a few rude stones, without inscriptions, mark the last resting place of many generations.

Probably one of the oldest homesteads in the town is the place near its southern border, now occupied by Warren Hallenbeck. This was originally the homestead of Jan Van Loon, grandson of the first settler of the name.  He left it to his son Albertus, whose daughter married John C. Clow, from whose heirs it was purchased by John C. Hallenbeck, father of the present owner. A still older place is that of William Reed Adams, on the west side of the turnpike near Four Mile Point. This was the ancient dwelling place of Jan Van Loon’s father (Jan). The old store house, demolished many years ago, stood by the side of the road, at the southeast corner of the door-yard of Mr. Adams.  On the east side of the turnpike, about ten rods from the road, is an old, neglected burying ground, where the early generation of this family rest.

Another of the ancient homesteads is the old Van Schaack place.  This farm of 100 acres was given by Jan Van Loon, June 30th 1719, to his son-in-law Arent Van Schaack, who married his daughter Maria. Van Loon is his deed describes it as on the west side of his patent, by a small creek or spring of water that came out of  a hill near his house. The annual rent to be paid for this land was one scheppel of wheat (about three pecks) and two fowls. This place continued in the family till the present generation.  It is at the head waters of the Coxsackie Creek, under the high cliffs of the Kalkberg, and is owned by Francis Cochran.

On the Spoorenberg road from Coxsackie to Athens, and on the north side of Murderer’s Creek, and within sight of the West Shore Railroad, is an old stone house that has long been a landmark. This is the “old Spoor place,” and the dwelling place of that family from the earliest times. December 30th 1741, Jan, Albertus, Nicholas, and Matthias Van Loon sold to Johannes Spoor “45 acres of wood land in Loonenburg, now in his possession, and adjoining the land of Johannes Hallenbeck,” Here he built his house and from him the locality took the name Spoorenberg. Johannes Spoor left the property to his son.  It descended to his son, John D. Spoor, who died a comparatively young man. He was a very skillful surveyor, and his maps, of which many yet remain, are models of neatness. At his death the place descended to his son Derrick, who was the last of the family to inhabit the old homestead. It passed into the hands of strangers. But with a respect for the memory of his ancestors, which few of the descendents of the Dutch settlers seem to possess, he, although comparatively poor, had their graves enclosed with a substantial fence, and procured monuments to mark their graves. A respect for the  sentiments so creditable to the man, prompts us to lend our aid to perpetuate their memories and his own by putting the inscriptions in a form more durable than marble.

    “Johannes Spoor, died February 15th 1761, aged 60.”
    “Eve, wife of Johannes Spoor, died September 7th 1786, aged 84.”
    “Derrick Spoor, died September 12th 1826, aged 85.”
    “Judith, wife of Derrick Spoor, died April 20th 1796, aged 58.”
    “Sacred to the memory of John D. Spoor, Esq., son of Derrick and Judith Spoor, who died at Sackett’s Harbor, December 13th 1812, aged 39.”
    “He commanded a company of militia stationed at Sackett’s Harbor, for the defense of that frontier.”
    “Sophia, wife of John D. Spoor, died August 2d 1833, aged 57.”  
    “Derrick Spoor, son of John D. and Sophia Spoor, died February 26th 1880. this stone is erected by his friends.”
    “Abraham D. Spoor, M. D., born March 14th 1791, died December 28th 1873.”

There are several inscriptions on the stone walls of the old house, but from none of these can we determine when it was built.  The highway that runs past, is very frequently mentioned in old deeds, as “the road from Derrick Spoor’s to Athens. “

Old Settlers and their Homes

Marte Gerritse Van Bergen and Jan Bronk seem to have held the land described in the Coxsackie Patent, including the land granted to Peter Bronk and the Fountain Flats, in equal proportion. In 1695 Jan Bronk conveyed to Marte Gerritse:

“A certain parcel of land, on the west side of Hudson River, right over against Little Nutten Hook commonly called Fountains Flats, lying to the north of the parcel of land which Marte Gerritse hast conveyed to the said Jan Bronk, which land runs north from the said land of Jan Bronk to Coxsackie Creek, being in breadth from the creek to the spruyt, with all his right, but that the said Jan Bronk shall have the privilege of hewing timber and wood for building fencing and burning, The said Marte Gerritse to have the privilege of sawing as such timber as he may fit at his saw-mill.”

The word “spruyt,” which will be noticed in the above description, frequently occurs in old Dutch deeds, and denotes a low piece of land.  The piece of land alluded to probably lies to the southeast of the Kings road not farm from the farm now owned by John Fiero.

A deed from Martin and Gerrit to their brother Petrus, dated January 8th 1725, recites that a patent had been granted by Gov. Dongan to Jar Bronk and Marte Gerritse in 1687, for a certain tract to land at Coxsackie, and another piece of land therein named and that since the decease of Marte Gerritse a division had been made between Jan Bronk and the Van Bergens, and they had conveyed to each other a just half of the lands remaining undivided, except the land of Phillip Conyn and the land of Jan Caspersen.

The two brothers conveyed to Petrus Van Bergen all their right in the Coxsackie Patent, and by a deed of the same date, Petrus conveyed to his brothers all his right in the land at Catskill and Corlaers Kill.

At what time Petrus Van Bergen came to live on his land at Coxsackie, we have no certain knowledge. His father certainly never lived here.  Jan Bronk lived and died in what is now the village of Leeds.  The first intimation we have of any person actually settling on this tract of land is found in a deed by which Gerrit Van Bergen sold to Jan Caspersen Hallenbeck.:

“A certain parcel of land at a place or flats called Kaniskeek, nigh the bounds of Jan Bronks there, on the west side of a certain place called  the Modder Kill, Beginning  at the bounds of the land of Jan Bronk there, and stretching south along the said Kill, and by sundry lines, till it makes near upon a square 30 morgen of land as the same is now in fence, and it the possession of the said Jan Caspersen.  And also one other piece of land situate lying and being on the east side of Coxsackie creek, where the house and barn of the said Jan Caspersen is, and not in the tenure of Jan Van Hoesen, containing 2 morgen. Which two pieces were sold to the said Jan Caspersen by Martin Gerritse father of the said Gerrit by deed April 14, 1683.”

The consideration of this deed was an “annual rent of ¾ bushels of good winter wheat.” The date of this deed is May 24th 1717. The document  is now in the possession of Edwin C. Hallenbeck. The land above described is the homestead which long remained in the possession of the Hallenbecks, and is now owned by John Fiero.

The next notice that we have of an actual settler, is a deed from Jan Bronk, “of Catskill,” to Philip Leenderse Conyn. This deed recites, that the Coxsackie Patent was granted by Governor Dongan, that Marte Gerritse was deceased, and that the estate devolved upon Jan Bronk as survivor, and that Philip Leenderse Conyn had been for several years, by virtue of grants made by Jan Bronk and Marte Gerristse, in peaceable possession of a certain farm:

“Bounded on the north so as the same is in fence, on the west by the common highway, on the east by a valley or spruyt, and so far to the north till it completes and takes in 25 morgen, or 50 acres. Together with a piece of pasture land and Hoffestead with the house, so as the same now lies enclosed between the fence and Coxsackie creek or kill, containing 2 morgen more or less.”

Jan Bronk by this deed, dated March 8th 1710, confirmed the same to him for an annual rent of “1 scheppel of wheat, or three pecks of winter wheat.” * (*this farm now lies on the south side of the street in the upper village, and on the east of the Kings road. The homestead was on the opposite corner west, where the large double house of Peter Van Bergen now stands.)  In 1731 Jan Bronk and Petrus Van Bergen sold to Philip L. Conyn, a piece of land, beginning at the southeast corner by a run of water which was the northeast bounds of land of Hendrick and Robert Vandenberg, (sons of Richard) at a rocky place in the run of water, and going from thence over the ridge of the first hill, that lay to the north of the bridge by Phillip Conyn’s, and so along to a swamp that run to Coxsackie Creek. We find that Jan Bronk sold or confirmed to Thomas Williams, who probably married his daughter, Hillietje:

“A piece of land beginning at a small slink or spruyt which comes into Coxsackie creek a little be south of the bridge behind the dwelling house of Phillip Conyn, and up along the spruyt as far as it runs, and thence west to the old Catskill path, and from thence south ward to the orchard of Petrus Van Bergen, now in possession of Richard Vandenberg, and so along on the north and east side of the fence of the orchard, to the middle fence between this tract and the land of Petrus Van Bergen, and thence easterly along the fence of Coxsackie Creek, and thence along the creek to the place where it begins except so much as has been heretofore conveyed to Conradt Houghtaling.”

This is dated April 18th 1729, and the land was sold the next day by Thomas Williams to Richard Vandenberg.  This land lies on the south side of the turnpike, west of the bridge, over Coxsackie Creek.  The “spruyt” or “slink” is the low marshy piece of ground about 40 rods south of the road, extending west from the creek.

The exact time when the Vandenberg family came to Coxsackie is unknown.  Tradition states that they were acquaintances or relatives of the Van Bergens, and at their invitation came here and settled. They were evidently here in 1729. Land was leased to Richard Vandenberg by Petrus Van Bergen. This tract is thus described in the deed as:

“Lying on the west side of Koxhagkie kill, and beginning by a certain kill or creed, called Moodenaers kill, where it comes into Koxhagkie path. From thence northerly along the path till it takes in the Orchard now in possession of said Richard Van Den Brock, thence south by the land of Thomas Williams, and thence southeast ward along the fence to Koxhagkie kill, and along the same to the place of beginning, as it is now in possession of said Richard Vandenberg.”

The annual rent was to be “five scheppels of good merchantable winter wheat, to be paid on the 25th day of March.” This rent continued to be paid till about 1820, when a satisfactory arrangement was made between the heirs of Van Bergen and Vandenberg, by which it was extinguished.

The original lease and the deeds to Phillip Conyn,  and Thomas Williams are not in the possession of Walter Vanderberg of Amsterdam, New York. 

September 14th 1737, a sale was made by Jan Bronk to Nicholas Egmont, which is described as:

“Situated on the Northwest side of Coxsackie kill, beginning at a black oak tree standing near the Kings road by a bridge on the spruyt of Saaren Crepel bosch. From thence along the road as the same runs northward to the foot of the hill near by the Diep kill, thence eastwards along the foot of the kill as it runs to the Koxhacksie kill, thence southerly along the same as far as the land of the said Egmont to the south of the spruyt of Saaren Crepel bosch, and along the land of said Egmont on the south side of the spruyt to the place where it begun.”

This tract lies on the west side of Coxsackie Creek, some distance north of the turnpike which crosses the bridge over the creek in the upper village.  The phrase “Saaren Crepel bosch” is translated in some deeds “Sarah’s Swamp,” at that time the low land at that place was undoubtedly a marshy thicket.  The Diep Kill is the first brook that crosses the Kings road north of the bridge over Coxsackie Creek.  This tract was given by Nicholas Egmont in his will to his “step grandson,” Anthony Winne, 1772, and he sold it December 14th 1772 to Hendrick and Robert Vandenberg. The tract south of this which was sold by Bronk and Van Begen to Phillip Conyn in 1731, was left by him to his sons, Phillip and Johannes, in 1732.  The latter sold his part to Hendrick and Robert Vandenburg October 10th 1754, and by these various purchases the Vandenberg family become the owners of the large tract of land to the west of the upper village.  The old Conyn homestead is now owned by Peter Van Bergen. A tavern was kept there before the Revolution. On the south or east bank of Coxsackie Creek about half a mile above the bride in the upper village stands an old stone house, now in the possession of John Whitbeck. This was the old homestead of Peter Bronk, the oldest son of Jan Bronk, the first owner of the land, and his father’s will makes what would now be considered a strange discrimination in his favor because of his right of primogeniture, as will be seen in the following extract:

“Imprimis I give to my eldest son, Rector Bronk, four morgen or eight acres of land near the deep kill at Coxsackie, in right of primogeniture, and to debar him of making any further pretence of Eldership or BIRTH RIGHT . Item I give to my five sons namely Peter Bronck, Leonard Bronck, Jonas Bronck, Phillip Bronck, & Casparus Bronck, the remainder of all my share in and to the undivided lands within the limits and Boundaries of the Patent of Koxsackie, formerly granted to me and Martin Gerritsen. That is to say to each son one equal fifth part, with the exception Namely Peter, Leonard, Jonas and Phillip Bronck, or either of them or their heirs or assigns shall not by any way whatever, cut down, destroy nor carry away any such tree or trees, that shall be standing or lying on any part of the undivided lands, that shall be suitable for saw logs, I having reserved, and do reserve them for the improvement of saw-mill of Koxsackie, So that it is my will, and I do order that Peter, Leonard, Phillip, & Jonas Bronck, or either of them or their heirs or assigns hall not molest nor hinder Casparus Bronck form cutting down or carrying away any such trees suitable for saw logs, for the improvement of saw-mill at Coxsackie, standing or lying on any part of the heretofore mentioned lands after Division be made between the said Peter, Leonard, Jonas, Phillip and Casparus Bronck.

“Lastly I do appoint my son Casparus Bronck to be the sole executor of this my last will and testament. * * In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal in Catskill at the dwelling house of the testator, the day and year first above mentioned.”

                                                                                     Jan Bronck

 “In presence of us,
                  “Silvester Salisbury,”
                  “William Salisbury,”
                  “Jacob Frese.”        

The above will was proved October 6th 1743.

In 1784 the place was the home of John T. Bronk, the son or grandson of Peter, and the old house now standing is a typical Dutch homestead.

About thirty rods east of the Kalkberg range of hills, on the banks of Murderer’s Kill, is the old homestead of the Vandenberg’s.  The present stone house was built about 1764, by John R. Vandenberg, but the original house built by his grandfather, Richard, before 1725, stood a few rods east. The Catskill Path crossed Murderer’s Kill by the ridge of high ground west of the house, and the west line of the garden fence, north east of the house is exactly on the line of the path trodden by the “wilden”  (as the Dutch termed the Indians), many years ago.  The place is now owned by John M. Truesdell. In the list of ancient homesteads we must not fail to notice that the Collier family, under the Kalkberg, and next south of the Fountain Flats. The name of Michael Collier occurs as early as 1705, and a deed from Jan Caspersen Hallenbeck, dated January 18th 1711, conveys to him:

“A piece of land near Coxsackie at or near the Fountain Flats, 34 acres, being the same that fell to the share of Broer Jans, being bounded with the land of the heirs of Martin Gerritse, to wit, their utmost  bounds, near the foot of the hill called Stevesink.”

This land is now a part of the farm of Peter Collier, and has descended to him form his ancestors. At its northwest corner is the spring from which the Fountain Flats derive their name.  On the old maps of Coxsackie patent, the Catskill Path is marked as diverging from its general course to reach the spring under the rocks, which must have been a source of much needed refreshment to travelers on their long journey.

It only remains to locate the homes of Petrus Van Bergen, the ancestor of all the Van Bergens in Coxsackie. This was on or near the site of the stone house now owned by William Farmer, on the north side of the street in the upper village,  and next west of the stream pump of the West Shore Railroad.  The following is probably a list of all the heads of families within the limits of Coxsackie, prior to 1725:

Peter Bronk, Phillip, Bronk, Leonard, Bronk, Casparus Bronk, Phillip Conyn, Michael Collier, Jan Van Hoesen, Jan Van Loon jr., Jacob Hallenbeck, Jan Casperse Hallenbeck, Petrus Van Bergen, Thomas Williams, Nicholas Egmont, Anthony Winne, Aaron Van Schaack, Caspar Jans Hallenbeck, Hans Jurgen Clow, and Jonas Bronk.

Coeyman’s Patent

In 1673 General Lovelace granted to Barent Pietersen

“A tract of land on the west side of Hudson’s river to the north of a place by the Indians called Koxhaexy, stretching in length to the highest place where Jacob Flodder did use to roll down his timber, named by the Indians, Siekatoms, to the south of the Island belonging to Jan Reyersen, and into the woods as far as the said Indiana Sachems right goes, as also the wood land, kills, creeds, valleys and meadows, thereunto appertaining without any reservation as purchased by said Barent of the principal Sachems at the Katskill.”

This grant is generally known as Coeyman’s Old Patent. In 1685 a patent was granted to Killian Van Rensselaer which conveyed to him.

“All that tract of land called Rensselaerswyck lying upon the banks of Hudson’s river in the County of Albany, heretofore known by the name of the Colony of Rensselaerswyck. Beginning at the south end or part of Beeren Island in Hudson’s River extending northwards up along both sides of said river, unto a place heretofore called the Kahoos or the Great Falls of the said river, and extending itself east and west all along from each die to the said river backwards into the woods 24 English miles.”

In 1714 Andries Coeymans, son and heir of Brent Pietersen, made application for a new patent of confirmation for the tract of land granted to his father by Governor Lovelace, and in compliance with this application a new patent was granted him August 16th 1714, which conveyed to him as follows:

“The Lands in & near the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, of which his Father died seized & bounded as follows. Beginning at a creek called Peter Bronck’s creek or the creek of Coxsackie including the same creek, on the west side of Hudsons River thence up along the said River as it runs to over against the middle of Jan Ryersen’s Island to a small run of water, thence from the said River backwards up into the woods W & by N. half a point more northerly 12 English miles being the northern bounds of said land; & the southern bounds beginning at the north of the said Peter Bronck’s creek & thence up the same, including the same as aforesaid, until it comes to Coxsackie, and thence up into the woods by a due west course until it is 12 English miles distant from the mouth of said creek, from the west end of which distance last mentioned a straight line being drawn northerly until it meets and closes with the west end of the aforesaid northerly bounds makes the western bounds thereof, and the easterly bounds thereof in the said River, according to a grant made by Gov. Lovelace April 7, 1673, to said Barent Petersen, and an adjustment of boundaries made by deed dated Oct. 22,1706, between Killam Van Rensselaer, and the said Barent Pietersen and Andries.”

Beeren Island is the small rocky island below Coeyman’s Landing, and as the north bounds of the tract granted to Barent Pietersen were far beyond this, it will be seen that Van Rensselaer’s patent encroached upon it and made a tract of disputed lands.  The contest which then arose between the parties claiming the land in dispute was settled by Killiam Van Rensselaer’s giving to Andries Coeymans a deed releasing to him all his right and title to the whole trace.  This deed is referred to in the patent granted to Coeymans in 1714, and is recorded in book H of deeds, page 209, in the county clerk’s office at Albany.

In those early days large grants of land were frequently made, with boundaries that encroached upon prior patents or grants.  In such cases the earliest grant was generally sustained, and, as land was of little value, one of the parties generally bought the claims of the others.  The patent granted to Peter Bronk was of earlier date than any other in the part of the country. The north boundary, being a line running west from the south side of the mouth of Coxsackie Creek to the Indian foot-path, was established by arbitration, as stated in a description of the 12th allotment of Coeyman’s Patent, contained in the field book of the survey and division, in the county clerks office in Albany.  The place which the  Indians called Coxsackie was undoubtedly at the upper village, and a line running west from the bridge over the creek was always considered the south boundary of Coeyman’s Patent.  That the land between the bridge and the Catskill Path was a part of the Bronk Patent was never disputed.

Division of The Fountain Flats

The tract of which was sold to Marte Gerritse Van Bergen at the northern end of the Loonenberg Patent, was held by him and Jan Bronk jointly, and although included in the Coxsackie Patent, was always considered a tract by itself.  From time to time undivided shares were sold, and in 1783, the owners of the tract resolved to divide it among themselves.  The facts connected with the division are stated in the partition deed, of  which following is an extract:

“This Indenture made the 9th day of January 1783, Between Isaac Provoost, Henry Provoost, Abraham Porvoost, Luke Kiersted, Goes Van Schaick, Myndert Van Schaick, Merte Hallenbeck and Leonard Bronk of the county of Albany, of the first part, And John L. Bronk, Phillip Bronk, Charlotte Bronk, Peter Bronk, Richard Bronk, John B. Bronk, Phillip P. Bronk, John Whitbeck, Anthony Van Bergen, Henry Van Bergen, Peter Van Bergen, Hermanus Cuyler, and Elisabeth, his wife, of the Second part.  Whereas the parties of the first part are the owners of an undivided one-third part of a certain tract of ground commonly called the Fountain Flats, which is part of the Patent called Loonenburg, Beginning at the head of the spring near the hill in the land now occupied by Isaac Collier, and runs form thence easterly along the lots, into which part of the Patent has been divided, to the Hill Stevesink, and from thence east to Hudson river, and thence up along the river to the bounds of the Patent granted to Peter Bronk, thence westerly along the bounds of the Patent to the Stony Kill, and thence southward along the ancient Indian foot-path to the place of beginning. And whereas the parties of the second part are the owners of he remaining undivided two-thirds of the tract of land. And both parties having by articles of agreement appointed Robert Yates Esq. to survey and divide the same. And the said Robert Yates having established a partition line, which line begins at the foot of the hill, on the old Katskill Indian foot-path, by a Black oak tree, marked with the letters R. Y., and runs from thence, as the needle pointed in December 1781 S. 71 degrees, 20 minutes East 50 chains and 80 links, and then N. 89 degrees, 20 minutes East, 213 chains, to the banks of Hudson’s River, thereby dividing the tract into two parts, the south part containing one-third, with the additions of 10 acres for the use of Marten Hallenback, and his heirs, and the north part containing two-thirds (excepting 10 acres). Now this Indenture witnesseth, that the parties of the first part release and convey to the parties of the second part all the land to the north of the line, excepting and reserving to Marten Hallenbeck, the right and title he has to the old farm whereon he now lives, and such title as he has under the Van Bergens for cutting wood on the land for fuel and fencing.

And the parties of the second part also release all their clam to the land south of the line. “

The original deed is now in possession of Robert Henry Van Bergen, of Coxsackie.

The south line of this tract has already been described.

The north lien of the Ely farm, now owned by Mrs. Lewis Lampman, and the highway that runs west by the evaporating establishment, are on the dividing line marked by Yates.  The west end of the line is at a high ledge of rocks, at the corner between the farm of Robert Armstrong and the Van Allen farm.  In 1788, the third south of the line was divided among its owners, by Leonard Bronk.  It was divided into eleven lots. Lot No. 1 was the west end of the tract, from the Catskill Path to Coxsackie Creek. It contained 45 ½ acres, and belonged to John L. Bronk, who sold it to Phillip Collier, and it is now the property of his descendants, Phillip and Edward Van Allen.  The piece of wood land belonging to Derrick Lampman, which is so conspicuous a feature in the landscape, is the west half of Lot. No. 9; and the north part of the Ely farm next to the river, is Lot No. 11.

Division of Coxsackie Patent

As has already been mentioned, several large tracts of land were sold to various persons in the early days. Only two others remain to be noticed. In 1730, Jan Bronk conveyed to his “son, Leonard of Coxsackie, a piece of land next and opposite to the homestead of said Leonard, and also a piece called the ronde vlackie or round Flat.”  This fixes approximately the time of the building of the older part of the Bronk residence. The “round flat” is near the creek to the north.

A tract of 160 acres, bounded west by the Catskill Path and north and east by Murderer’s Creek and Coxsackie Creek, was sold by Peter Van Bergen to Silas Rushmore  October 21st 1789. Rushmore sold 12 acres of this tract at the junction of the two creeks to Martin Hallenbeck January 15th 1785.  The remainder or the south portion of it, next to the Catskill Path, was sold to John L. Bronk the same year. It is now owned by Mrs. Lewis Lampman, and still bears the name of the Rushmore Lot.  The part next to Murderer’s Kill was sold to Hendrick Vandenberg. That portion of the patent which remained undivided in 1784, and which was almost three-fourths of it, was in that year divided into 64 lots which were apportioned equally between the families of Bronk and Van Bergen. The work was done by James Van Rensselaer and G. Lansing.  Duplicate maps were made which are fortunately still in existence.  One of these is now in possession of Robert H. Van Bergen, the other of John B. Whitbeck. A map of the Fountain Flats, made by Leonard Bronk, was found among his papers, and a copy of it has been placed in the county clerk’s office.

It may be of interest to show the locations of some of the original lots, the whole of the active business part of Coxsackie Landing is on Lot No. 48, which belonged to the Bronks. The Upper Landing, the port of the town in years gone by, is on Lot No. 50, and the old Wells house stands on the northeast corner of it.  The Lower Landing comprises Lots No.46 and No. 47. At the northwest corner of the patent were five large lots each containing 103 acres. Lot No. 18, which was bounded on the north by the patent line, is now the south part of the farm of Peter Henry Whitbeck.  The road which runs east from the Kings road, opposite the house of Luman Miller in the town of New Baltimore, is on the dividing line between Lots 14 and 15. The New Baltimore line runs through Lots 14 and 19. Lot No. 45 is at the southeast corner of the map and is the land on the north of the Ely farm.  It should be remarked that the map does not include the south third of the Fountain Flats, but extends only to the partition line fixed by Robert Yates in 1787. At the junction of King’s road and the road to Greenville, near the New Baltimore line, on the northwest corner, opposite the present residence of Henry Wolfe, stood during the Revolution, and for years after, the noted tavern kept by Peter Bronk, a grandson of the first settler. This house, which was on the north line of Lot No. 14, and a few rods east of the Catskill Path, in days of yore was a great resort for travelers on the road to Albany. A few remnants of brick and stone, in the corner of the orchard of Luman Miller, are all that is left of it now.

 Old Town of Coxsackie

March 24th 1772, the northern par of what is now Greene county was formed into a district called the District of Coxsackie, and it was erected into a town March 7th 1788. Of the public records made during the time it was a district, scarcely a vestige remains, except the laying out of a few roads.  The only document which is of a public nature, that has been found, is the assessment roll of the year 1787, and the importance of this, as being the only list of taxable inhabitants of this part of the county at that date, fully justifies us in giving it entire. It includes what are now the towns of Durham, Greenville, Coxsackie, New Baltimore, Athens and Cairo.

A Tax List of the District of Coxsackie, agreeable to a warrant assigned to us the subscribers' assessors of said District, dated the 12th day of June 1787 by the Board of Supervisors for the County of Albany, at 2 1/2 d. on a pound:

FIRST NAME LAST NAME TAX(£)
GARRIT ABEEL

15

DR. PETER ADAMS

8

EPHRAIM ADAMS

1

MR. ALDRICK

2

MR. ALDRICKS

2

JOHN ALLISTON

2

JOHN ANDERSON

1

MR. ANDERSON

4

MATHISE ANDT

8

JOHN JR. BAKER

8

JOHN BALIS

8

REUBEN BALK

4

JESSE BARBUR

1

JAMES, ESQ. BARKER

14

RICHARD BARKER

16

THOMAS BARKER

8

NATHAN BARNS

8

ROBERT BARNS

2

WILLIAM BARTOW

1

DAVID BATES

5

HARME BECKER

14

SILVESTER BEEDLE

2

MR. BELL

8

ABRAHAM BOGARDUS

5

EGBERT BOGARDUS

15

EPHRAIM BOGARDUS

8

HENDRICK BOGARDUS

1

JACOB BOGARDUS

2

JACOB JR. BOGARDUS

5

JAMES & PETER BOGARDUS

15

JOHN BOGARDUS

6

SON IN LAW BOGARDUS

3

EPHRAIM BOGARDUS JR.

6

JOHN BOOM

1

MATHISE BOOM

5

ANDREW BOSTWICK

2

GODFREY BRANDON

6

FREDERICK & SON BRANDOW

47

HENDRICK BRANDOW

1

PETRUS BRANDOW

8

MR. BREWSTER

4

MR. BRIGGS

6

CASPARS BRONCK

6

EPHRAIM BRONCK

5

JOHN L. & SONS BRONCK

216

JOHN PHILIP BRONCK

26

PHILIP BRONCK

39

RICHARD BRONCK

23

MR. BROWN

9

JOHN BURKS

4

JAMES BURRIS

2

NATHAN BURRIS

6

ROBERT BURRIS

2

ISAAC BUTS

6

DANIEL CAMADAY

4

WILLIAM CAMADAY

7

JAMES CAMBLE

7

WILLIAM CAMMERON

1

DR. CAMP

6

ROBERT CANASDAY

1

VENIR CANFIELD

5

CHARLES CARMAN

7

JACOB CARMAN

13

LOT CARMAN

19

THOMAS CATER

3

HENRY CATHONDT

1

JACOB CATIN

10

MR. CHANIN

6

DAVID CHAPLY

1

JOHN CHAVILIER

1

STEPHAN CHAVILIER

4

JAMES CHICHESTER

6

WIDOW CHICHESTER

1

BENIJAH & CO. CHILDS

12

JOHN CLAIR

4

CASPAR CLOW

8

FRANZ CLOW

4

JERRY CLOW

16

JOHN J. CLOW

1

JOHN & JERRY CLOW

24

PETER CLOW

2

JAMES CMMADAY

1

JACOB COLE

1

JOHN COLE

2

STEPHEN COLLINS

8

JOASKIM COLLYER

5

ARCHIBALD COMMB

1

SANDY COMMINS

1

CORNELIUS CONINE

16

JEREMIAH CONINE

8

JOHANUS CONINE

18

PHILIP CONINE

39

PETER CONNIN

16

PHILIP JR. CONNIN

16

JOHN COOK

1

MOSES COOK

6

MR. COOK

8

JOHN COOMLY

13

JOHN CORBIN

4

NATHANIEL COTTON

4

EVIRT COURRON

18

ISAAC COYLER

72

MICHEAL COYLER

17

NICHOLAS CRIGSLAN

3

BENJAMEN CROWFOOT

2

FREDRICK CRUGILAER

4

MR. CUSHING

10

HARMANUS CUYLER

42

DERICK DANCILRON

2

URIAH DAVIS

6

NICHOLAS DEAN

6

HENDRICK DEDERICK

4

FREDERICK DEDRICK

1

FREDRICK DEDRICK

4

WILHELMUS DEDRICK

6

CORNELIUS DEGROOT

8

PETER DEGROOT

3

LUKR JR. DEWITT

8

JOHN DICKERSON

6

JOHN DIES

13

JOHN DIES

4

ROBERT DRUMMAND

2

BARNT DUBOIS

5

BENJAMEN S. DUBOIS

26

CORNELIUS DUBOIS

5

HUBARTUS DUBOIS

62

MR. DUDLY

3

CHRISTPHEL DUGOR

3

WILLIAM EDWARDS

1

PETRUS EGBERTON

3

CORNELIUS EGBERTSON

12

BARRINT JR. EGBURTS

1

BARNT EGBURTSEN

5

JOHN ELLIS

4

ARTHUR ELLSWORTH

3

ANDRUS EYCULAIR

21

HARMAND EYKEBURG

3

JOHN PLANK EYKEBURY

8

AARON FAULKNER

2

FALTA FIERO

9

AMOS FINCH

6

THOMAS FISH

15

JOSEPH FISK

2

LEONARD FIXE

6

CONRAD FLAKE

36

BENJAMIN FLOWERS

16

BENJAMEN FOSTER

4

NATHAN FOSTER

6

RDWARD FOSTER

4

WILLIAM FRUDIE

1

JOHN FRULIGH

8

BENJAMEN FRUTIGH

4

REMEMBRENCE GAEF

11

ISAAC GARRIT

3

JOHN GARRIT

21

SIMEON GARRIT

15

THOMAS GAY

15

JOHN GOES

4

JACOB GOETCHIUS

10

ARENT GORS

6

MATHISE GORS

10

JOHN GRANT

1

GERSHAM GRIFFIN

8

JAMES GRIFFITS

4

WILLIAM GROOM

16

STEPHEN HAIGHT

4

JACOB HALENBECK

153

CASPAR JANS HALLENBECK

78

CASPER W. HALLENBECK

31

CORNELIUS HALLENBECK

6

ISAAC HALLENBECK

1

JACPB J. HALLENBECK

2

JOHN HALLENBECK

13

JOHN HALLENBECK

14

JOHN C. HALLENBECK

3

JOHN I HALLENBECK

7

NANNING HALLENBECK

25

PETER HALLENBECK

4

WILLIAM HALLENBECK

83

JEREMIAH HAMBURG

1

JOHN HAMBURG

1

DANIEL HANGIN

2

THE PLACE OF HARES

3

JOHN HARRY

10

MR. HARTE

3

ROBERT HATFIELD

5

DURKEE HATH

6

JOSEPH HAXTON

1

HENRY HENDRICKS

11

ASIAH HENRIFF

2

JEREMIAH HENRIFF

8

RICHARD HENRIFF

6

ABRAHAM HERDICK

3

GOSA HERMANUS

11

SAMUEL HERRICK

16

DAVID HICKOX

4

JONATHAN HILL

1

MR. HINES

4

MR. HMISTEAD

4

ABRAHAM HOLINBECK

16

MARTIN HOLINBECK

126

WIDOW HOMESTEAD

4

STEPHAN HORTON

7

ANDRIES HOUGHTALING

15

CONRAD HOUGHTALING

22

HESTER HOUGHTALING

87

JOHNATHAN HOUGHTALING

1

RICHARD HOUGHTALING

22

THOMAS HOUGHTALING

114

MR. HOW

2

SAMUEL DR. HOWE

1

BENJAMEN HOWUKS

3

MR. HUDSON

3

MR. HUSTED

4

SYBRANDT HYNENBERG

10

JACOB JACKSON

1

JOHN JACKSON

1

CONRAD JANSEN

2

PETRUS JANSEN

28

JOHN JENKINS

5

ELIAH JESMANS

8

PETER JONES

3

MICHEAL KINFUR

1

HENRY KNOLL

6

MR. LACY

3

DAVID LAKE

2

EDWARD LAKE

7

STHEPHEN LANDMAN

9

NICHOLAS LANDTMAN

17

PAZZI LAPHAM

15

ABRAHAM LEDEW

5

OLIVER LEDEW

5

BENJAMEN LISK

12

JAMES LITCHFIELD

1

PETRUS LONDEMAN

2

JACOB LUMAN

2

JARRY LUMAN

28

MR. MANSFIELD

2

ENOCH MARRIMAN

1

MR. MARRIN

8

JAMES MATHEWS

5

JAMES MCGEE

1

WILLIAM MCKINSEY

20

HARVE MCMILLEN

5

JONATHAN MILLER

16

ISAAC MINOR

6

JAMES MOOR

23

SAMUEL MOTT

2

MR. MUDGE

8

MR. NICKERSON

3

SUSA NOALS

8

THOMAS NOALS

8

AMBROSE NORTON

2

ELI NORTON

2

JACOB NUKIRK

6

JOHN ORR

5

JOHN OSBURN

3

GYSBERT OSTERHAUT

2

PETER OSTRANDER

1

PETER OUDIN

6

CLEMENT OVERPAUGH

13

ISAAC OVERPAUGH

4

PETRUS OVERPAUGH

10

EPHRAIM PAGE

2

ABRAHAM PALMER

4

DAVID PALMER

8

JONATHAN JR. PALMER

6

NATHANIEL PALMER

5

SOLOMON PALMER

1

STEPHEN PALMER

3

DAVID PARKS

4

JONAS PARKS

8

NICHOLAS&CASPAR(SON) PARRY

40

PAUL PASSABLE

4

MR. PATIN

3

ROBERT PATTERSON

4

JOHN PEIRSON

41

JOHN JR. PEIRSON

6

JOHN PERSON

1

HENDRICK PETRE

3

DANIEL PETTIT

1

JERRY PLANK

16

MR. PLATT

6

ABRAHAM POST

3

ABRAHAM POST

1

AMOS POST

6

RICHARD POST

6

EDWARD POUELL

6

MOSES POWELL

4

ABRAHAM PROVOST

62

ELICE PROVOST

14

ISAAC PROVOST

36

CALEB PURDY

8

STHEPHAN QUIMBY

6

WILLIAM RAE

38

REUBEN RANDEL

2

MR. RAYNE

5

SILVESTER RICHMOND

1

EDWARD ROBISON

7

ABRAHAM ROSA

2

GARRIT ROSA

15

HENDRICK ROSA

7

EDWARD ROSE

2

ELIJAH ROSE

1

DIRCK ROSSBURG

30

ISAAC ROSSBURG

8

JACOB RUSHMOOR

6

THOMAS RUSHMOOR

9

SILAS RUSHMORE

21

RULOF RYNE

2

ABRAHAM SALISBURY

54

BARENT STAATS SALISBURY

13

FRANCIS SALISBURY

38

FRANCIS JR. SALISBURY

8

WESEL SALISBURY

23

WILLIAM SALISBURY

73

HAMMIS SANTMAN

4

JACOB SCHERMERHORN

2

JOHANIS SCHERMERHORN

4

JACOB SCHOONMAKER

2

WILLIAM JR. SCHOTT

5

CLEMENT SCHRAM

1

CLEMENT SCHRAM

3

ISAAC SCHRAM

1

PETER SCHRAM

4

WILLIAM SCHRAM

8

JOHANES SCHUNEMAN

31

JOHN JR. SCHUNEMAN

22

HENDRICK SCHUTT

1

JOHN SECOR

2

PETER SHADDON

17

GAYSBERT SHARP

12

JOHN SHARP

5

CROMINUS SHAW

3

JOESEPH SHEPARD

2

TIMOTHY SHEPARD

1

WILLIAM SHEPARD

8

MR. SHROD

3

SHADRACK SILL

 

CONRAD SLYTER

2

BENJAMEN SMITH

4

CALEB SMITH

2

DANIEL SMITH

5

JACOB SMITH

2

JOSHUA SMITH

2

MICHEAL SMITH

3

PETRUS SMITH

1

WILLIAM SMITH

9

WILLIAM SMITH

14

MR. SOALS

4

JOHN SOMER

13

PETER SOMER

10

HENRY SOPER

2

DANIEL SOUTHERLAND

1

JOEL SOUTHERLAND

6

RUEBEN SOUTHERLAND

6

SMITH SOUTHERLAND

10

CORNELIUS SPOOR

30

DIRCKS SPOOR

31

ISAAC SPOOR

11

JOHANNES I. SPOOR

19

MR.ESQ. SPUSE

8

MR. STEEDMAN

1

ROBERT STEEN

14

MR. STOCKINGS

2

CAPT. STOREY

23

MR. STRAWBRIDGE

2

MR. STRAWBRIDGE

2

JACOB STROOP

3

NICHOLAS SVERSON

7

JONA TAMADGE

16

EDWARD TAYLOR

1

MR. TEED

4

JOHN THOMPSOM

5

DR. THOMPSON

10

BENJAMEN THORN

1

WILLIAM THORN

1

ZADOCK THRESHER

5

MR. TIBBITS

3

NICHOLAS TIMMERMAN

4

MR. TIPPIT

3

CHARLES TITUS

6

SAMUEL TITUS

6

SAMUEL TOTTEN

6

MR. TOWNLY

1

GEORGE TRAVOR

3

BENJAMEN TRYON

6

JOCHAM TRYON

11

TUNIS D. VAN ALBIN

12

ANTHONY VAN BERGEN

128

DAVID VAN BERGEN

4

GARRET VAN BERGEN

5

HENRY VAN BERGEN

100

MARTIN VAN BERGEN

14

PETER JR. VAN BERGEN

10

WILLIAM VAN BERGEN

73

ANDREW VAN BORSICK

3

JOHN VAN BUSKIRK

1

JOHN L. VAN BUSKIRK

4

LAWRENCE A. VAN BUSKIRK

30

FRANCIS VAN CLOW

12

ROBERT VAN DEN BORCK

150

RICHARD H. VAN DER BIRCK

10

WILHELMINUS VAN DER BIRCK

16

JOHN VAN DER BORCK

3

MATHISE VAN DER BORCK

22

PETER VAN DER BORCK

17

RICHARD VAN DER BORCK

22

ALBERT VAN DER ZEA

27

JAMES VAN DER ZEA

30

JAMES VAN DUSEN

5

LUCAS VAN DUSEN

8

STEPHAN VAN DYCK

5

ABRAHAM VAN GARDEN

6

PETER VAN GARDEN

3

CASPER VAN HOESEN

57

CASPER VAN HOESEN

46

CORNELIUS VAN HOESEN

10

JOHN VAN HOESEN

20

ALBERT VAN LOON

25

ALBERTUS VAN LOON

78

ALBERTUS JR. VAN LOON

6

JACOB VAN LOON

20

JACOB ISAAC VAN LOON

36

JACOB I. VAN LOON

8

JOHN VAN LOON

55

JOHN J. VAN LOON

5

JOHN M. VAN LOON

78

JURRY VAN LOON

73

BENJAMEN VAN ORDEN

9

JOAKINS VAN PELT

2

NICHOLAS VAN SCHAAK

6

ARENT VAN SCHAIK

37

MYNDERT VAN SCHAIK

48

AMALIE VAN SLYKE

39

JAMES VAN SLYKE

30

LIBUCKE VAN SLYKE

10

MARITIE VAN SLYKE

72

PETER VAN SLYKE

28

TEUNIS VAN SLYKE

6

LAMBERT VAN VALKENBURG

8

JACOB VAN VECHTEN

34

SAMUEL VAN VECHTEN

83

CORNELIUS VAN WOORMAN

3

NICHOLAS VAN WORT

28

CATHERINE VEEDER

77

JOHN G. VOUGHT

30

CALEB WADINS

6

ABEL WAKELAND

2

MR. WARNER

2

JACOB WATERMIER

19

THOMAS WEADON

21

HENRY WEBBER

4

ABRAHAM WELLS

9

MARY WELLS

1

NICHOLAS WELLS

3

WILLIAM WELLS

9

WILLIAM WELLS

1

JAMES JR. WELLS

13

JOSUAH WHIGS

4

FREDRICK WHITE

3

JAMES WHITE

2

MR. WHITSON

6

BENJAMIN WICKHAMS

3

MR. WIGGS

2

MR. WILCOX

5

THOMAS WILLIAMS

2

GEORGE WILSON

6

CASPER WIMM

3

JOHNSON WIN

1

JOSEPH WIN

1

JOHN WINNE

4

ISAAC WITBACK

46

ANNAKA WITHAK

45

HELMUS WOLF

6

JOHN WOLF

2

PETER WOLF

1

TEUNIS WOLF

6

THOMAS WOODS

3

JOHN & ANTHONY YEOMANS

2

HENDRICK YOUNG

8

NATHAN YOUNG

10

DR.@VAN LOONS ???

2

(Total) ---------  6,540 pounds

Tax -------------  69 pounds, 5s, 4d

"We the Subscribers do hereby certify the above to be a true assessment Roll as the pounds are delineated in the first Column of the above list. Given under our hands this 23rd day of June 1787."

Dirck Spoor
Oliver Laden
Wesel Salisbury

Although for many years after Peter Van Bergen and Jan Bronk settled upon their lands, the town could hardly boast of more than a score of families, their comparative proximity to Albany, and their location on the river—that great highway to New York—rendered them liable to be brought in frequent contact with the world, and even this small village, like its neighbor Loonenburg, furnished soldiers for the wars that brought so much destruction upon various parts of the country. Thus in 1704 we find Jan Bronk and Jan Van Loon entering a petition that their quit rent might be remitted “in consideration of their Services during the war.”

At the time of the Revolution few portions of the county furnished a larger number of men in proportion to their population.

As early as April 28th 1740, John L. Bronk was commissioned captain of a company in a regiment, “whereof Sybrant Van Schaick is colonel,” as the old commission reads and October 20th 1775, he was commissioned 2d major of the 11th regiment, of which Anthony Van Bergen was colonel.

Time had fortunately preserved the original commission granted to John L. Bronk by the Provincial Congress of New York, and as such documents are rare, a copy is appended as a relic of Revolutionary times.

“In Provincial congress for the Colony of New York the Twentieth Day of Oct. 1775.

    “To John L. Bronk, Esq., Greeting:

“By virtue of the authority reposed in us, we do hereby nominate, authorize, constitute and appoint you the said John L. Bronk, Second Major of the Eleventh Regiment of Militia of foot in the Count of Albany, whereof Anthony Van Bergen is Colonel, hereby requiring you before you enter into the exercise of your said Office to make in writing and subscribe in Presence of the Chairman of the Committee of the City, Town, District, or precinct where in you reside, the Declaration appointed and directed by the Eleventh Section of the Seventh Resolve, contained in the Rules and Orders for regulating the militia of the Colony of New York recommended by this Congress on the 22d Day of August 1775, and authorizing you fully to execute all the powers belonging to your said office by virtue of the said Rules and Orders, and the said Declaration. And we do hereby require all person under your command, to pay due Obedience to you according to the said Rules and Orders and such further Rules and Orders as shall be made and recommended for the Militia of this Colony by the present or any future Continental Congress, or Provincial Congress of this Colony.”

                                                                         “By Order
                                                                                 Nathaniel Woodhull,”
                                                                                            “President.”

 “Attest Robt. Remsen.”
                “Secretary.”

List of officers in Colonel Anthony Van Bergen’s regiment, 1777:

Colonel, Anthony Van Bergen; adjutant, John L. Bronk; quarter-master, ____Van Orden; lieutenant, Joachem Tryon; ensign, Cornelius Conine; sergeant, Derrick Leversen; fifer, John Van Buskirk; captain, John Witbeck;  lieutenant, Wessle Salisbury; ensign, ____Van Bergen; lieutenant, _____Goes; lieutenant, John Van Vechten; lieutenant, ____Dubois; 2d lieutenant, John Wigram.

Captain, Henry Van Bergen’s company, 1777:

Henry Van Bergen, Richard Vandenberg, Cornelius Conine, Peter Bronk, Cornelius Egbertsen, Peter Shadden, Ephraim Bogardus, Peter Van Pelt,  Tunis Van Slyck, Nicholas wells, Thomas Houghtaling, William Wells, Richard Bronk, Edward Roberts, Henry Houghtaling, Henry Rosa, Peter Conine, Jeremiah Conine, Philip Conine, Peter Vanderberg, John Vanderberg, Richard Houghtaling, Joachem Van Pelt, Baltus Van Slyck, John Wagoner, Mathias Boom, Peter Joans, Thomas Joans, Hermanus Cuyler, Ephraim Bogardus, Jacob Bogardus, Henry Bogardus, Nanning Bogardus, Samuel Folton, Lucas Van Dusen, Jacobus Van Slyck, Richard Fuerman, Hendrick Van  Slyck, Dirck Van Baptiste, John Dyse, Tunis Vanderzee, James Magee, Peter Conyn, Peter Van Slyck, John Wigram, Ephraim Bronk, John G. Bronk, Philip P. Bronk, Christopher Dice, Anthony Van Bergen, Peter A. Van Bergen, Michael Collier, Robert Vanderberg, Hendrich Vanderberg, Richard Vanderberg, John Vanderberg, Martin Vandenberg, Godfrey Brandow, John Brandow, Stephen Lantman, Peter Lantman, Samuel Van Pelt, Wilson Ostrander, Cornelius Sluter, James Chichester, John Watson, Caleb Foster, William Watson, Abraham Parmun, Solomon Parmun, Steven Parmun, Jacob Parmun, Daniel Clark, Samuel Mott, Nathan Stanton, Ebenezer Stanton, James Stanton, Joseph Stanton, Silas Freeman, Samuel Chichester, John Garret, Samuel Garret, John Carle, Leonard Fore, Lawrence Tead, Robert Trips, Joseph Wilts, Adam Wood, Solomon Wigs, Isaac Garret, John Jans, John Boom.

That the owners of the fertile flats of Cocksackie were sometimes called upon to contribute of their produce to feed the army in times of emergency, is evident from the following document:

“By virtue of the power and authority to me given by his Excellency George Clinton, Governor of the State of New York, General and Commander in chief of all the Militia of the same.  To Leonard Bronk, Greeting.  The occasion and emergency requiring the same, you are hereby authorized to impress ten tons of flour, or an equivalent in wheat, twenty thousand weight of beef or fat cattle equivalent thereto for the use and service of the army.  For doing of which this shall be your warrant. Given under my hand, this 5th year of Independence, and on the 7th day of August 1780.”

                                                                               “G. Van Schaick.”  

During the war both sides had sympathizers. While the Hallenbecks on the flats and in what is now Athens, were noted patriots, the Hallenbecks and Provoosts at  Klinkenberg were equally noted tories. And the old stone house of Jacob Hallenbeck, by the side of the river, was a great resort to which the friends of the royal government were much more welcome than the agents of the Continental Congress. But their number was too small, and this influence too limited, to effect much in the great struggle, and although a few met their just deserts by the confiscation of their property, it is better that their names should not be brought forth from oblivion.

A list of 9 months men of John Vanderberg, 1776:

John Vandenberg, Robert Vandenberg, Richard Vanderberg, William Vandenberg, Peter Bronk, Peter Van Slyck, Albert Vanderzee, Peter Shaddon, Jeremiah Conine, Philip P. Bronk, Christopher Deys, Ephraim Bronk, Casparus Bronk, Richard Sherman, Godfrey Brandow, Johannes Brandow, and Stephen Lantman.

Matthias Houghtaling’s Patent

A person standing in any part of the upper village at Coxsackie will see, to the west of the flats, the high cliffs of the Kalkberg, and a hilly region beyond., This region, extending from the stone Kill on the south, to the Diep Kill in the town of New Baltimore, on the north, is included in a patent granted July 8th 1697, to Matthias Houghtaling, by Governor Benjamin Fletcher, as representative of the English crown. This patent is  recorded in book 7 of patents, page 127, in the office of the secretary of State of Albany.  The description and extent of the land as found in the patent is as follows:

“A certain tract of land in our County of Albany, situated and being behind a place called Kockshacky, beginning over the path of Catskill, form the south side of the Diep kill or creek, on the north side of and along the path to the Stony kill to the back side of a lake, pool or pond of water, and from the said lake, pool or pone of water to the diep kill due north or northwest from the said lake, and along the Diep kill to the said Catskill path.”

The Diep Kill crosses the Catskill Path almost exactly at the line between the towns of Coxsackie and New Baltimore. It was the custom of those times for the owners of a patent to claim all the land that could by any possible construction of its boundaries, be included in its limits.  The northwest corner of the patent was held to be at the head waters of the Diep Kill on the farm now owned by Hiram Miller. The boundaries at the “lake, pool or pond of water” now called Bronk’s Lake, were somewhat indefinite, and occasioned a dispute with the owners of the Roseboom Patent on the south as to which party owned the lake. The extensive land purchases made by Leonard Bronk in after years included all the land around this lake, and a deed to him from Thomas Houghtaling seems to include the greater part of it.  A map of the small tract of land in dispute between the two patents, near the lake, made by John D. Spoor, in 1807, is in the county clerk’s office in Catskill. The corner between this patent and the Roseboom Patent, west of the lake was originally a large tree, now replaced by a large black stone on the borders of the land of Rev. Lewis Lampman.

The west line of the patent which ran from the head of the Diep Kill to Bronk’s Lake, crossed the road from Coxsackie to Jacksonville, a short distance west of the old toll gate on the plank road, and is the dividing line between the homestead of William Thorn, and what is known as the Brownwell farm, no owned by the heirs of Amos Brownwell.

Matthias Houghtaling, the patentee, died, leaving among other children, two sons, Conrad and Hendrick,  and a daughter, Catrina, who married Richard Vandenberg. Conrad, the eldest son, conveyed to his brother Hendrick a small tract at the northeast corner, extending along the Catskill Path 710 yards. This was afterward the homestead of his son Thomas, and is now owned by Truman Mackey, of New Baltimore. The old burying ground to the east of the homestead on the land of Henry Wolfe contains a line, the graves of four generations of the Houghtalings. Thomas Houghtaling died February 1st 1824, aged 93 years 3 months. His wife Elizabeth, daughter of Andries Whitbeck, died July 29,th 1820, aged 82. Henry Houghtaling died October 15th July 1820, aged 70. John Staats Houghtaling died September 26th 1840, aged 52 years 9 months and 6 days. Henry J. Houghtaling died September 7th 1847, aged 30.

The old homestead of Thomas Houghtaling stood a few feet east of the house now owned by Truman Mackey.

A deed from Hendrick Houghtaling to Hendrick and Robert Vandenberg, dated October 20th 1770, recites the fact that the land known as the Houghtaling Patent (excepting so much of it as had been conveyed by Conrad Houghtaling to his brother Hendrick and to Caspar Collier) was then owned by Hendrick Houghtaling, and Hendrick and Robert Vanderberg, and that Hendrick Houghtaling, for the sum of 10 shillings and other consideration, did convey to Hendrick and Robert Vanderberg, 

“All the southernmost just half of the whole tract * * * containing 1743 acres, exclusive of 10 acres lying by the three falls of water on Murderer’s Kill, and four acres lying by the Stony Kill * * * also another small piece of land lying near the small lake * * * donating 27 acres * * * also another small piece of land released to the said Hendrick Houghtaling * * *about 5 acres, Reserving one-half of the stream called Murderer’s Kill with 2 ½ acres of land by the first fall, and 4 acres by other falls * * *also 8 acres on the north side of Stony Kill * * *and one-half of all mines which may be hereafter found on the above lands.”

The reservation of the mines on the tract of land, calls to mind an old tradition, that in the early days of the settlement at Coxsackie, the Indians were said to have gone out early in the morning to the hills somewhere in this region, and brought back quantities of lead before breakfast time.  There have not been wanting rumors of silver mines in this same region, nor minds credulous enough to act upon these rumors and make repeated efforts to discover them, it is needless to say without success.

There is a tradition concerning a search for lead mines in this tract, that in the days of patentee, an Indian chief offered to sell him the secret to the place where this metal was found. Upon being refused the price demanded he declared, in a rage, that the mine should never be found while the land remained in the hands of any who bore the name of Houghtaling. This story of the Indian’s prophecy has often been given as an explanation of the failure of all attempts to discover the place whence the natives drew their supply. In recent times certain half crazed spiritualists have vainly endeavored to obtain from the sprits of the dead warriors, the secret they kept so well while living.

The tract of land thus set off the Vandenbergs is popularly known as the Vandenberg Patent, though it was not an original grant. At a subsequent period it was divided into lots, and by deed of December 21st 1745, Hendrick Vandenberg conveyed to Richard, Willhelmus, and John Vandenberg, 17 of the lots, each supposed to contain 50 acres, and of one of them the story is told, that by some reason it contained 60 acres. This fact becoming known to one of the Vandenbergs, he went to Leonard Bronk, its owner, and bought it as a 50 acre lot. The temptation to communicate the success of his shrewdness to the world, was too strong to be resisted, and Judge Bronk, who had strong objections to being overreached in this manner, promptly commenced a suit, which, after going to the Court of Chancery, resulted in his favor.  Since that time it has gone by the name of Chancery Lot. The farm of William Steele is located on it. The turnpike leading to Jacksonville runs through the Lot No. 12. The place of beginning of this tract on the Catskill Path is a short distance north of the turnpike, near the house of Mr. Chase, and the line which separates it from the north half of the patent is now the north boundary of the farm of Robert Henry Van Bergen. The falls in Murderer’s Creek are where Van Bergen’s mill stands, on the road to Jacksonville. The north part or half of this patent was divided into lots, and some portion of it is now in the hands of the descendants of the patentee.

Roseboom Patent

April 12th 1751 a patent was granted to Jacob Roseboom, John Jacob Roseboom and John G. Roseboom, for a tract of land which is thus described:

“All the certain tract of land situated in the County of Albany, on the west side of Hudson’s river, adjoining to the Patent of the Great Flats. Beginning at two small maple trees growing from one Root, and marked with three notches on four sides and X on the west side, standing on the Catskill Indian foot path, and on the west bounds of the Patent Loonenburg, and on the east side of a ridge or Rocky hill, and north side of a cave in the side of the hill, to the north of Joachem Jansen’s house.  And this tract runs from the said place of beginning, North 65 degrees West 100 chains. Then North 29 degrees West 130 chains to a brook or creed called Potick Creek, thence up the stream to the corner of a tract granted to Abraham and William Salisbury and Casparus Bronk. Then along their line North 10 degrees West, 22 chains, to the South corner of a tract granted to Casparus Bronk. Then along his lines, North 40 degrees East, 160 chains, and then North 50 degrees West, 55 chains and then South 81 degrees East, 115 chains to a tract of land granted South Matthias Houghtaling. Then along his bounds and the bounds of a small tract of land granted to Casparus Bronk, to the said Old Catskill foot path on the bounds of the Patent of Loonenburg.  Then along the same to the place where this tract first begun. Containing 4,530 acres with the usual allowance for Highways.”

The annual quit rent to be paid for this tract was 2s. 6d. for each 100 acres.

The southern part of this patent is in the town of Athens and encroaches on the Catskill Patent.  The south line is the same as the north line of Expense Lot No. 1 as marked on the map of Athens, the location of which is fully described in the history of that town. The whole of the 6th division of the Catskill Patent, although included in the bounds of the Roseboom Patent, was held by its former owners.

The north boundary of this tract was “Bleecker’s line” or one of the lines run as the south boundary of Coeyman’s Patent. Its true north boundary was the “Confirmation Line.”

John G. Roseboom obtained his share of the patent in behalf of John Henry Lydius, a prominent citizen of Albany, and transferred it to him by a deed, July 5th 1751. Jacob Roseboom, John Roseboom, and John Henry Lydius, sold one-eighth of the patent  to Frederick Wormer, July 6th, and it was sold by him to John L. Bronk, September 17th of the same year, for the sum of £50.

When the patent was obtained, it was agreed that Cadwalader Colden should have one-fourth of it, and that share was conveyed to him by Jacob Roseboom, May 3d 1753. Cadwalader Colden sold his share to Nicholas Paree and Dirck Van Vechten, August 15th 1759, for £250. The original deeds for these transfers are now in the possession of Mrs. Lewis Lampman, of Coxsackie.

Dirck Van Vechten sold his part to Isaac Collier and Gerrit Roosa, August 14th 1760.

The deed is now in the hands of Mr. Jonas Collier. Nicholas Paree transferred one-eighth to his sons Isaac and Daniel, March 10th 1761, and Isaac sold his part to Derrick Spoor, January 1st 1770. January 10th 1771, and agreement was made to divide the patent. At that time the owners were Martin Lydius, John L. Bronk, Derrick Spoor, Jacob Roseboom, William Hallenbeck, Arent Van Schaick, and Laurence Van Buskirk. Robert Yates, a lawyer of Albany, was employed to divide the tract into lots. It was also agreed that he should made four tickets, writing on each ticket the number of lot or lots intended to make one full fourth part of the whole patent, and four other tickets, writing on each the names of the proprietors of a fourth share. These tickets were to be put in separate boxes, and drawn out alternately by a disinterested person. After the drawing, mutual deeds of release were to be executed. The original articles of agreement are now in the hands of Robert Henry Van Bergen, with a copy of the map. The patent was divided into 12 lots, the three last being the disputed lands in the Catskill Patent. A line drawn south from the west side of Bronk’s Lake divided the rear of the tract into two portions. Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, lay to the east, and Lots 5, 6, 7, and 8, to the west of the line.  Lot No. 1 was on the south side of the Stony Kill and Bronk’s Lake, and Lot No. 8 was on the west of it.  In the division, Lots 1 and 8 fell to Dirck Van Vechten and others, Nos. 3 and 6 to Hallenbecks, and Nos. 4 and 5 to Martin Lydius, who, with his wife Genevieve, sold to Dirck Van Vechten these lots, “reserving the mill and stream of water where his mill stands,” January 23d 1772. The mill was on the stream which flows out of the steep rocks of the Kalkberg, and which is the head waters of Coxsackie Creek, near of the house of Francis Cochran.

This patent, from the fact of its being granted at a later date than any of the patents around it, is frequently called in old deed, “The new Patent.” The whole is extremely rocky and hilly, the north end of the High Hill being within its limits, and upon the whole tract there are very few inhabitants, in proportion to its extent.

Stighkoke Patent

The bounds and extent of this patent are fully set forth in the following Indian deed to Casparus Bronk:

“Know all men by these presents that we Herman Backer, Tanighsanow, Konghan, Aquahannit, and Tansaghoes,   native proprietors of the tract of land hereinafter described, have for and in consideration of goods to the value of 13 pounds 10 shillings, to us in hand paid by Casparus Bronk. Have bargained and sold, and by these presents of bargain and sell unto his Majesty George  the Second of great Britain France and Ireland Kind &c., and to his heirs and successors. All that tract of land called by the name of Stighkoke, situated and being on the west side of Hudson river, and in the County of Albany, and Province of New York. And also another smaller tract lying between said Stighkoke and Hudson river.  The first tract begins at two small white teper wood trees, and a black oak, marked on four sides with three notches an a blaze, standing on the west side of a very small run or stream of water,  where the same takes a short turn around the said trees. And the said tract runs form the place of the beginning along the line of trees blazed on two sides, South 40 degrees west, two English miles or 160 chains, to a spruce trees, marked with three notches on four sides, and C. C. on the west side thereof, standing on the east side of a small knoll. Thence North 50 degrees West, two miles.  Thence North 40 degrees East, two miles.  Thence South 40 degrees East, two miles, to the place of beginning, containing 2560 acres of land, The other of the said two tracts begins at a white teper wood trees, marked on four sides with three notches and a blaze standing on the north side of a run of water called the Stony Kill, and on the West side of the old Catskill path where it crosses the said kill, and runs from the said place of beginning along the said path southwards to a black oak tree marked with three notches and a blaze on four sides, standing under the east side of  a high ledge of rocks. From thence North 38 degrees West, 82 chains to a dry tree marked on four sides standing on the north side of said stony kill, between a small walnut and tow iron wood saplings.  Thence down along the north side of the kill as it runs to the place of beginning, containing 100 acres of land. * * to his Majesty and his heirs, for the uses and purposes mentioned in a license granted his Majesty’s Lieut.-Governor of the Province, to the said Casparus Bronk, Hendrick Remsen, Gerrit Van Bergen in Martin Van  Bergen, dated 9th day of April 1742. In witness whereof we have set our hands this 6th day of January 1742-3.”

The above deed  may be found in vol. XIII. Of land papers, page 134, in the office of the secretary of State, at Albany.  June 30th 1743 a patent was issued to Casparus Bronk, Martin Van Bergen, Gerrit Van Bergen, and Hendrick Remsen for the tract as described above. This patent is recorded in the book XII., page 198, in the office of the secretary of State, at Albany.

The first tract, which still bears the name of Stighkoke, is in the western part of the town. It will be seen that it is a square, two miles on each side, and with its corners coinciding nearly with the cardinal points. So completely has the knowledge and remembrance of the location of this patent passed away, that it has required the most persevering efforts to locate its boundaries.  The east corner of the patent on the “small run of water,” where it took a “short turn around the trees,” is about half a mile east of the village of Jacksonville, on the east side of the farm lately owned by Amos Finch, and now in possession of Joseph Earl. The small runoff water is the little brook with crosses the road at the foot of the hill, a little east of the house, and making a turn to the west runs into the east branch of Potick Creek, a short distance below the village. A short distance south of the barn on the Finch farm are the remains of a dam, where a saw-mill stood in the latter part of the town, and it is marked on the map of the patent made in 1792 as “Roosa’s mill.”  The corner of the patent is on this run of water, about forty rods north of the road.  The west corner of the patent is not far from the Greenville town line, and is at the west end of the farm of John Halstead. The southerly lien of the patent is the division between this farm and that of Abel Waters, adjoining. The south corner is on the road from Jacksonville to Cornwall’s mills, about a quarter of a mile north of the saw-mill. The north corner is short distance north of the school-house in district No. 12.

 Division of the Patent of Stighkoke

June 16th 1744, Gerrit and Martin Van Bergen, and Hendrick Remsen, conveyed to Casparus Bronk their three-quarter share of the patent. “The said Patent having been procured for the said Bronk, and the money having been procured for the said Bronk, and the money having been paid by him.” The deed may be found in book G, page 70, county clerk’s office, Albany.

In March 1752, Casparus Bronk sold the whole patent to Teunis Van Vechten, and in the same month Van Vechten sold to Abraham and William Salisbury each one-fourth of the whole tract. By deed of November 6th 1770, Francis, Abraham and Wessel Salisbury, three sons of Abraham Salisbury (then deceased), sold to Johannes and Frederick Brandow one-fourth of the patent. The deeds, very beautifully executed, are now in the possession of Robert Henry Van Bergen.

By will, dated January 1786, Johannes Brandow left to his son William one-fourth of his share, and the remainder to his daughters, Elizabeth, Maria and Margaret. William Brandow, by will dated July 1788, left his one-fourth to his daughters, Sarah and Jane Brandow.

Frederick Brandow, by will dated September 1787, left to each of his daughters, Elizabeth, Catharine, Sarah and Margaret, one-sixth of his share; one-sixth to his grandson, Peter Eckler, and the remaining one-sixth to Annatje, wife of Johannes Souser.

Teunis Van Vechten left his share by will, August 1782, to his sons Teunis and Abraham.

Elizabeth, daughter of Johannes Brandow, married Johannes Conyn; Maria married Samuel Allen; Margaret married Wilhelmus Brandow; Elizabeth, daughter of Frederick Brandow, married Henry Webber; Margaret married Robert Vandenberg.

By means of these various sales, devises, divisions and sub-divisions, the patent in 1792 became the property of the following parties, and in the proportions stated: William Salisbury, Teunis and Abraham Van  Vechten (sons of Teunis), each one-fourth part; the daughters of Johannes Brandow (Elizabeth, Maria and Margaret), each one-thirty-second part; the heirs of Frederick Brandow (Elizabeth, Catharine, Sarah, Margaret, Annatje and Peter Eckler, a grandson), each one-forty-eighth part; and the heirs of William Brandow (Sarah and Jane) each one-sixty-fourth part.

On the application of Robert Vandenberg, the husband of Margaret, daughter of Frederick Brandow, the Court of Common Pleas, in 1792, appointed Leonard Bronk, James Barker, and Elijah Yeomans commissioners to make partition of the patent among its several owners.

They began by dividing the tract into two parts by running a line, commencing at a point on the patent line, 27 chains south of the place where the patent began and running north 86 degrees 30’west to the opposite side, which was at a point about four rods south of the west corner. More than half the tract encroached on the Coeyman’s Patent and the line thus run was supposed to be the south line of that patent and thus separated the disputed from the undisputed lands.  This line at the west end is now the division between the lands of Washington Hill and John Halstead.  The disputed lands on the north side of the line are divided into four lots of 384 acres each, of these Lot No. 1 was divided into 10 smaller lots, and fell to the Brandow family; Lot No. 2 fell to Abraham Van Vechten; Lot No. 3 to Teunis Van Vechten; and Lot No. 4 to William Salisbury.  Lot No. 1, or the Brandow Lot, is on the northwest side of the tract, and part of it is now owned by their descendants. The undisputed lands south of the line were also divided into 4 lots of 266 acres each, and Lot No. 1 fell to Abraham Van Vechten, Lot No. 2 to William Salisbury, Lot No. 3 to Teunis Van Vechten, and Lot No. 4 to the Brandows.  Lot No. 4 was subdivided into 11 smaller lots.  A lot of 22 acres, situated at the east corner of the undisputed lands, fell to Peter Eckler. It lies on the sough of the road at the east end of the village of Jacksonville, and is now owned by Ambrose Green. A small barn is standing on the west end of the lot, a short distance west of the buildings on the Finch farm.  The east line of the lot by the small barn is the original patent line.  The village of Jacksonville is wholly within this tract and near the east corner.

Coeyman’s Confirmation Line

Probably few things have been so much both the cause and the prevention of hotly contended law suits as the line above mentioned.  According to the terms of Coeyman’s Patent, its south boundary was to be a line to extend due west from Coxsackie till it reached a point 12 miles distant from the mouth of Coxsackie Creek. In 1749 Samuel Coeymans and David Verplanck employed John R. Bleecker to run the south line of the patent, which he did, and the line thus run was called Bleecker’s Line. It is this line which was considered as the north boundary of the Roseboom Patent.  In 1767 John Morin Scott and others petitioned the governor for certain lands which were said to be within the bounds of the Coeyman’s Patent, which they believed to be vacant. The owners of this patent then issued a caveat against the petition, upon which there was a hearing before the governor and council, and it was adjudicated that the boundary of the Coeyman’s Patent should be surveyed. The order of the council was issued to the surveyor general, and he directed his deputy, Nanning Visscher, to run and mark the south line of the patent and make report to him. This was done in 1768, and the line thus run was called the confirmation line, and was ever after considered the true south boundary of Coeyman’s Patent. Both this and Bleecker’s line started from the bridge over Coxsackie Creek, but they were simply imaginary lines until they reached the west boundary of Houghtaling’s Patent, and from that they became actual boundaries. Now these lines were run with ordinary compasses, and apparently no attention was paid to variations, and the result was that when  they reached the west boundary of Houghtaling’s Patent they were a long ways apart, and the distance continued to increase until they reached the end of the line.  The location of the confirmation line is well established. It crosses the west line of Houghtaling’s Patent a few rods south of the road from Coxsackie to Jacksonville on the west line of the farm of William Thorn, and runs across the meadow which lies at the foot of High Hill. It crosses the road a short distance west of the school-house in district No. 8, and runs four rods north of the hotel in Jacksonville.  Beyond the east branch of Potick it is the south boundary of the farm of Richard Cornwell. This is probably the line which divided the Stighkoke Patent into disputed and undisputed portions.

 The Forestville Commonwealth

One of the most interesting episodes in the history of the western part of this town was the community established there about 60 years ago. In 1824, Robert Owen, an English socialist, came to this country, preaching the doctrine of communism, which name had then the baleful significance it has at the present time. It was his favorite theory that the welfare and happiness of mankind could be increased by unity in communities in which all property should be held in common, and it was claimed that this, with associated labor, would greatly enhance the welfare of mankind. Through the influence of his lectures district communities were started in various places, and, among them, one at Haverstraw, on the Hudson. The principals and object of the community was to better their own condition and that of their fellow-men, which they considered could be done by living in community, and having all things in common, giving equal rights to each, and abolishing the terms mine and thine.  Thus organized, they attempted to exemplify their theories by practice, but by some means their affairs became disordered, and the experiment came to an end in about five months.  After the breaking up of this concern some of the members came to Coxsackie, and, uniting with some persons who were already settled here, they formed a new community, to which they gave the high-sounding name of Forestville Commonwealth. The founders of this undertaking were Samuel and Nathaniel Underhill, William G. Macy, Jethro Macy, John Norbury, Jacob Peterson, John S. Quimby, Henry Dickinson, Jacob Dickinson, Henry C. Fosdick, and Robert Weeks. Of these, the Dickinsons and Quimbys were here before.  The site of this community was at a place called Lapham’s Mills, on a tract of land at the north end of the Stighkoke Patent on the east branch of Potick.

A. M. Lapham, who had a saw and grist-mill there is the latter part of the last century, was accidentally killed by his own machinery.  The principles of this community were the same as those of the Haverstraw community, and met with no better success.  Their capital was small and they were much in debt.  They attempted to carry on an extensive business. Besides a large tract of land and their mill, they had a tannery, a wheelwright shop, and were engaged in shoemaking and other small manufacturing. From the little record they left behind, they seem to have had too many persons engaged in talking and law making, who did not work at any useful employment.  The verdict of one of their number was, that “There were few good men to steer things right. We wanted men and women who would be willing to live in simple habitations and on plain and simple diet, and be contented with plain and simple clothing, and who would work together for each other’s good.  With such, we might have succeeded, but such attempts cannot succeed without such men.”  The experiment came to an end in a little more than a year, and on the 23d of October 1827, Henry Fosdick, Samuel Underill, and James Underhill, sold to John Norbury, James Underhill, and John S. Quimby, “A tract of land, 315 acres, being the whole lands lately occupied by the Forestville commonwealth.” Those who survived and retained the same views, went to Ohio, where they joined what was known as the Kendal Community, in Stark county. John S. Quimby remained for some years in Coxsackie, and had a son, Moses Quimby, the noted bee-keeper, whose work on bee-keeping is a standard authority on the subject. The principal house that was occupied by the community still stands, near the cemetery, and is owned by Amos Butler. The place still bears the name of the community, though not a man in all that region could give a definite account as to how it came by the name.

 The Salisbury Patent, or 700 Acre Tract

April 20th 1749, a patent was granted to Casparus Bronk, Abraham Salisbury, and William Salisbury, for a tract of land which lies on the south of the Stighkoke Patent, and which is thus described:

 “Beginning at two spruce pine trees, marked with three notches on four sides, standing on the northeast side of a creek or brook called Potick Creek, four chains below a large fall in said creek. And runs from the said tree north10 degrees west, 22 chains to the most southerly corner of a tract of land granted to Casparus Bronk, then along the line thereof north 50 degrees west, 160 chains to the most westerly corner of the same.  Then south 106 chains to the most westerly corner of the same. Then south 106 chains and then south 81 degrees 30 minutes east, 127 chains to the place where this tract first begun. Containing 700 acres of land, and the usual allowance for highways.”

In March 1752, Casparus Bronk sold his share, one-third of the tract, to Teunis Van Vechten for £50, together with “one equal undivided one-third part of the saw-mill on the said lands, and one-third of all the utensils and implements belonging to the said mill.” Teunis Van Vechten soon afterward sold it to Abraham and William Salisbury, “reserving the one-third of the saw-mill and one-third of the utensils, with the liberty and privilege to ride or lay down saw logs and planks in a convenient place near the mill.”

Abraham Salisbury, by will dated Mary 1756, left his share of the whole to his son Wessel Salisbury.

In November 1770, Wessel, his brothers Francis and Abraham joining in the deed, sold to Johannes and Frederick Brandow one-half of the tract, and one-third of the saw-mill. Johannes Brandow, by will dated January 1780, left to his son William one-quarter of his share and the rest to his daughters Elizabeth, Maria and Margaret. The share of William Brandow was devised by will to his daughters Sarah and Jane. Frederick Brandow, by will September 1787, left one-sixth to his grandson Peter Eckler; and the remaining one-sixth to Annatje, the wife of Peter Souser.

Teunis Van Vechten, August 1782, left his share in the saw-mill lot to his sons, Teunis and Abraham.

These various changes resulted in making William Salisbury the owner of one-half of the whole patent, exclusive of the mill site; the daughters of Johannes Brandow (Elizabeth, Maria and Margaret) each one-sixteenth; the daughter of his brother William (Jane and Sarah), each one-thirty-second; and the heirs of Frederick Brandow, including his grandson, Peter Eckler, each one forty-eighth part.  It will be seen that this patent was owned principally by the same parties that owned the Stighkoke Patent, and in the same proportions, and the property was partitioned among them by the same commissioners in 1792, who first laid out the mill lot, “Beginning at 3 large rocks near a hemlock tree upon a course north 11 degrees 30 minutes east, and 3 chains distant from the southeastern corner of the tract, and running on the same course 5 chains to a heap of stone; then south 65 degrees west, 7 chains to a stake and a heap of stones on the west branch of Potick Creek; then south 59 degrees east, 2 chains 52 links to the place of beginning, containing 2 ½ acres.”

The rest of the tract was then divided into two parts by a line drawn from the middle of the east line to the opposite side. This south part, containing 377 acres, fell to William Salisbury. The northern part was then divided into five lots by lines drawn from north to south, and the western lot (which was the largest) was subdivided into 6 lots of 31 ½ acres each.

The survey and map of this tract were recently found in Albany, and are now the records in the county clerk’s office at Catskill.

The mill, lot, and streams were sold to William Sutherland, from whom they passed to Henry Cornwell, and for many years a very extensive business was carried on, the place being known far and wide as Cornwell’s Mills.  Henry Cornwell, who probably did more than any other man to develop the western part of this town, was a native of Dutchess county, and came to this town about 1800. He married Sarah, daughter of Nicholas Van Hoesen.  He was one of those men who seem intended by nature to subdue the wilderness. By hard work and skillful management he accumulated a comfortable fortune.  He left two sons, Henry and Richard, by whom the mills have been sold to Reuben Jump, of Athens.

At the northwestern corner of this patent is a lot now belonging to Abel Waters, which in the division, fell to Robert Vandenberg. A small stream which flows into the west branch of Potick Creek runs through it, where a saw-mill was built by Mr. Vandenberg. This has long since disappeared, but the remains of the dam are yet visible near the house of Abel Waters.  The north boundary of Mr. Water’s farm, which separates it from the land of John Halstead, is the original line between the “700 acre tract” and the Stighkoke Patent. A the extreme northwestern corner is a high knoll, from which there is a very extensive view to the east. The stream which has been mentioned runs along the foot of the hill, on its easterly side. The southwestern corner of the patent is near the Schoharie Turnpike and near the west line of the town.

John Morin Scott’s Patent

In the year 1770, John Morin Scott and 70 others applied to the governor to the province of New York for three tracts of land, which are principally in the town of Greenville. A portion of the first tract is in the southwestern corner of the town of Coxsackie, and the boundary of the whole tract, so far as it lay in the town of Coxsackie, was as follows:

“Beginning at a white oak tree standing on the northeast corner of the brook called Catskill, and is the northerly bounds of the lands granted to Capt. Sylvester Salisbury and Marte Gerritse [Van Bergen] as the said bonds were established in the year 1764, by the commissioners appointed to make a division of said lands, and runs along the then north bounds [of the Catskill Patent] to the southwest corner of the tract of 700 acres granted I 1749 to Abraham and William Salisbury, and Casparus Bronk; then along the west bounds of the last mentioned tract as the compass pointed in 1749, north, 106 chains to an ironwood tree marked for the westernmost corner of a tract of 2430 acres granted in 1743 to Casparus Bronk and others [Stighkoke Patent]; then along the line of the last mentioned tract as the compass pointed in 1743. north 50 degrees east, 110 chains to an elm tree marked with the letters and figures S. M. 1768, standing in an old line of trees formerly marked for the south bounds of the lands granted to Andries Coeymans; then along the said line of marked trees, as they run N. 82 degrees, 15 minutes W., 168 chains to a beech tree standing in the east bounds of a tract of 3300 acres granted in 1749 to Abraham Salisbury and others.”

Only a very small part of this tract is in Coxsackie, and the town line runs through it a short distance west of the Stighkoke Patent and the 700 acre tract.  The northwestern part of the town is included in the 7th and 8th allotments of Coeyman’s Patent.

Casparus Bronk’s 100 Acres

Included in the Stighkoke Patent, but distinct from the main tract, was a small tract of 100 acres granted to Casparus Bronk.  This tract lies in the hills west of Coxsackie Flats and is thus described:

“Begins at a white pine tree, marked with 3 notches on  4 sides, standing on the north side of a brook called the Stony Kill, and on the west side of the old Catskill foot path where the path crosses the Stony Kill, and runs thence along said old path southerly, to a black oak tree, marked with 3 notches and a blaze on 4 sides, and standing on the west side of said path, and on the east side of a high ledge of rocks. Thence north 38 degrees west, 33 chains to a dry tree marked on 4 sides, and standing on the north side of the Stony Kill between a small walnut and two iron wood saplings, and thence along the north side of the said Stony Kill as it runs, to the place where it begun, containing 100 acres of land.”

Annatje Bronk, the only daughter and heir of Casparus Bronk, sold the north half of this tract, “including a grist-mill and grind stones, and a small house, and the right to dam up the creek on her land for the use of the mill, and also the free privilege of a road up into the woods” to John L. Bronk, for the sum of £255. The original deed, dated December 8th 1764, is now in possession of Mrs. Lewis Lampman, to whom the land has descended from her ancestors.  Probably few localities in the town have been better known, from that time to this, than Bronk’s Mills.

Annatje Bronk had previously married John A. Whitbeck; they sold, August 21st 1773 to John L. Bronk, all their title to the land in Peter Bronk’s Patent, and also all their share in that part of the Fountain Flats, which lay between the Catskill Path and the creek.

Such is an account of the Coxsackie of the olden time. It is needless to state that the population was small and almost entirely confined to the flats in the eastern part of the town. Like its neighbor Loonenburg, the population was composed of the few families that descended from the Dutch settlers, who retained their ancient customs, spoke Dutch language of their forefathers, and read with pious care, and treasured with zealous pride, the old, ponderous, brazen-clasped Bibles brought from the Fatherland. The peculiarities of the Dutch settlers have been a constant theme for the ridicule of those whose ignorance and whose prejudice have made them incapable of appreciating the force of character and determined will of the race that contended so valiantly for freedom, against the mightiest of modern empires, and who made New Amsterdam a city, when Boston was a wilderness.

The population of the old town of Coxsackie, when it included Durham, Greenville, Cairo, New Baltimore and Athens, in 1786 was as follows: number of males under 16, 762; over 16 under 60, 670; over 60, 53; females under 16, 724; over 16, 684; male negro slaves 209; female Negro slaves, 186; total, 3288.

The price of slaves in old time may be judged from the following:

“Benjamin Moore sells to Leonard Bronk, 1803, Negro wench Gin, 28 years old, price $150.”

“Isaac Hallenbeck sells to Leonard Bronk, 1805, Negro man Tom, 24 years old, price $300.”

Town Organization

From the old territory of the district of Coxsackie was formed to the town of the same name, March 7th 1788. Its great extent was however soon reduced. Durham was taken off in 1790, a part of Cairo and Greenville in 1803, New Baltimore in 1811, and the north part of Athens in 1815.

The north line of the present town commences in the middle of Hudson River, at a point opposite to a rock called by the Dutch “Platte Pan.” Doubtless so called from a flat rock which suggests the name, and running thence north 80 degrees west, 615 chains. The west line is a straight course of south 10 degrees west, to the Schoharie Turnpike. The south line begins at a tree at the south end of Paddock’s Island, and running west and intersecting of Schoharie Turnpike at High Hill, then follows the turnpike to the west line of the town.  Paddock’s Island derived its name from Captain Laban Poddock, who bought from the heirs of Dr. John F. Tolley, in 1810, a large tract of land on the west side of the Albany and Greene Turnpike.

Captain Paddock also bought the farm on the east side of the turnpike, which included the tract called the “island.”  The south line of this farm was the north boundary of the old Korst Veloren farm.  It was sold to Frederick Barnard, in 1822, and he sold it to William Jerome, June 17th 1827. In all the old deeds it was designated as “the 4 Mile Point Farm.”

Four Mile Point Light House

Will Jerome and wife Alida sold to the United States “2 acres, 2 roods, and 25 rods of land, at a place commonly called Four Mile Point, and within the Patent of Loonenburg, being part of what is commonly called Paddock’s Island.” This sale was made February 12th 1831, and the light house was established the same year. It is a tradition that the tract of swampy ground between the island and the main land was once an open channel through which sloops could pass at high tide.

There is a singular interest connected with this tract of land, from the tales that have been told of buried treasure having been found within its limits.  William Jerome died and left it to his father, Moses Jerome, who sold it to Captain William Beck, in 1839. Concerning this man strange and incredible, tales still float in the air, and rumors of buried gold, obtained and hidden after the manner of Captain Kidd, have in years past tempted over credulous and avaricious minds.  And it is said that clairvoyants and spiritualists have been invoked in vain to reveal the hiding place to those who forget that man’s lot on earth is to gain his bread by the sweat of his brow, and not by divinations. The light house is under the charge of Moses Waters. 

Roads in Coxsackie

The oldest highway in the town is the Kings road which is mentioned in the very earliest deeds, and was the great highway leading from Albany to Esopus (or Kingston). It was probably laid out as early as 1710. The following are records of some of the most important roads in the town.

The highway leading from the Kings road (by Luman Miller’s) to the river was laid out in 1790.

“Beginning at the public road north of the house of Peter Bronk, running easterly between the line of Peter Bronk, Richard Bronk and Anthony Van Bergen, to the lot of land of John and Phillip P. Bronk, easterly across the same as the trees are marked out to Coxsackie Creek, below where the old saw-mill did use to stand, crossing the same, thence easterly on the line between Conrad Houghtaling and Richard Bronk, to the road which runs north and south, between the water lots and other lots thence north to and opposite the lot of land of Ephraim Bogardus jun. thence east to a small log house, thence as the road goes through Henry Van Bergen’s Lot of land to the house of Ephraim Bogardus jr. and to the dock of Ephraim Bogardus jr. on the North river at the low water mark.”

The road by the head of the street at the landing was thus defined in 1893:

“Upon the application of Eliakim Reed and others, for a certain road to be laid out leading from the dwelling house of Eliakim Reed to Coxsackie Landing. The Commissioners decide that the old road commonly called the French Doctor’s road [Dr. Claude Ducalon] is established at the breadth of the two roads, and that the road that turns off from this road to the house of Eliakim Reed should be of the same width.”

The road commonly called “Johnny Cake Street” was laid out in 1828 and as the records say:

“Begins at the centre of the road that leads to Reed’s Landing, and runs from thence N. 20 degrees West, 6 chains 50 links. Then North 45 East 4 chains 50 links, 9 links East of the northeast corner of Silas Deane’s house, and from thence to the road to the Upper Landing.”

The greatest improvement of the kind was the establishment of the Coxsackie Turnpike in 1806 which opened up a communication with the western part of the town and county; and the Albany and Greene Turnpike made a new and much needed road along the river. 

Civil List

The supervisors of Coxsackie have been: Jonas Bronk, 1800, 1801; Abraham Hallenbeck, 1802-5; Conradt Houghtaling, 1806; Jonas Bronk, 1807; Abraham Van Dyke, 1808, 1815; Robert Vandenberg, 1809; Simeon Fitch, 1810, 1811; Epenetus Reed, 1812; Stephen Warren, 1813, 1814; John L. Bronk, 1816-24, 1826, 1827; Dorrance Kirtland, 1825; William V.B. Heermance, 1828; Joseph B. Cottle, 1829; Anthony M. Van Bergen, 1830, 1834; Thomas W. Gay, 1831; Benjamin N. Burroughs, 1832, 1833, 1835, 1836; Simpson T. Bell, 1837, 1838; Silas Holbrook, 1839; Peter H. Sylvester, 1840; Morris Hallock, 1841, 1842; Andrew B. Houghtaling, 1843, 1844; George N. Keith, 1845; David M. Hamilton, 1846, 1847, 1861; Barnet Gay, 1848, 1854; Augustus Cornwall, 1849; John B. Bronk, 1850; Jacob C. Van Dyck, 1851; Simpson S. Bell, 1852, 1853; Ambrose Greene, 1855; Jacob G. Bedell, 1856’ Edwin N. Hubbell, 1857; Aaron Hallenbeck, 1860; George Houghtaling, 1862, 1863, 1865; John C. Mackey, 1864, 1866, 1867; J.C. Van Dyck, 1868; William K. Reed, 1869, 1870, 1871; Platt Coonley, 1872, 1873; Sylvanus Finch, 1874; Aaron G. Van Schaack, 1875-78; Albert Parker, 1879-83. 

The New Village of Coxsackie

The person who looks upon the two small tracts of wood land, called Cochran’s and Lampman’s groves, will see a fair specimen of the original that covered the greater part of the flats a century ago. When some of the principal roads on the flats were laid out, they were run through the woods, and indicated by marked trees.

At Coxsackie Landing, where the business part of the town now is, there was but one house.  This was a stone building which stood at the head of the street that leads to the landing, on the site now occupied by the house of Dr. Collier. The owner of this solitary house was Claude Ducalon. He was here as early as 1744, for in the record of the Lutheran Church of Athens is the baptism of “Catherine, child of Clawdy Ducalon, Frans Doctor, and his wife Jane,” May 27th 1744.  He also had children, Louisa, born March 29th 1746; Stephen, born 1748; and William born in 1755. He was living here in 1784.

At the beginning of the present century, what is now Coxsackie Landing was a rocky point, separated from the main land by a marsh which at high tide was frequently covered with water. This marshy tract extended to the foot of the high land at the head of the street, and to the north as far as the Eagle Hotel. The whole with 25 or 30 acres adjoining to the south and west, constituted Lot No. 48 in the Coxsackie Patent, and belonged to the Bronk family, it was bought by Eliakim Reed, who established a small wharf and warehouse on the rocky point, and the place soon obtained the name of Reed’s Landing.

November 3d 1804, Eliakim Reed sold to Thomas E. Barker, William Judson and Ralph Parker:  “A tract of land in the town of Coxsackie being known by the name of Reeds Landing, beginning at the distance of 50 links from southwest corner of old store, the first building erected by the said Eliakim and Roswell Reed,” From this place the lot extended south along the river, (including the rocky point), as far as the lower wharf, and then “west to the east bounds of Leonard Bronk’s land, and along his line north to the land lately owned by the family of Colonel Van Bergen deceased, and then along the south line of that to Hudson River, and then down the river till it strikes a line drawn from a direct course from the division partitions of the store houses on the wharf, and then along the said line to the lowest side of the wharf, and then southerly to the place of beginning.” This tract which was 25 acres included at the business part of the place. The storehouse which was the place of beginning was on the site of the present store house of Reed & Powell, north of the ferry landing. In 1810 the present street was laid out, the land divided into lots, and maps were made which are now in possession of Miss E. C. Heermance, and John B. Whitbeck.

Eliakim Reed at the same time sold the same parties Lot No. 27 in the Coxsackie Patent, bounded north by Lot No. 28 belonging to Leonard Bronk, south by Lot No. 26 belonging to Jonas Bronk, east by the highway leading from Coxsackie village [upper village] to Gibbs and Wilson’ Landing, and west by the highway leading from Coxsackie village to Phillip Vosburg’s.  This tract containing 45 acres, was a narrow strip extending a long way west of the turnpike. Lot No. 48 on which the landing was situated included a large tract on the hill west of the business street, and was at that time principally covered with woods.

The Lower Landing

Peter and Richard Bronk sold to “Israel Gibbs, merchant of the town of Catskill,” March 7th 1794, Lots 46 and 47 of the Coxsackie Patent, the former containing 14, the latter 35 acres. They were bounded north by Lot No. 24, 25, 26, and partly by Lot 27. Elam Gibbs sold two-fifths of this to George Wilson, June 15th 1805, and February 20th of the next year, Wilson sold the same to Elam Gibbs and John Luck, excepting the small lots sold before, one to Joseph Chaplin, “on which the Potash works now stands,” and “also reserving 14 feet square where Mrs. Nancy Gibbs and Paulina Gibbs are buried.”  Previous to that time, the only house in that region was one that belonged to Mary Wells, and stood near the place now occupied by the large ice house of the Knickerbocker Ice Company. This was on Lot No. 47, where Joseph Chaplin’s potash works stood, and the place was know as Molly Wells’ Point. Farther south, by the river side, were two or three small houses inhabited by squatters, whose reputations may be surmised from the fact that they were generally known as the “Algerines.”  At or near this point, Israel Gibbs established a wharf, and Gibbs’ Landing soon became well known.  The large ice house is very near the southeast corner of Lot 47. The north line of this lot is near the wharf of Parker and Salisbury. The greater portion of Lot No. 47 was afterward sub-divided into small lots, a map of which is in the county clerk’s office.

The business of the town seemed for some years to concentrate at Reed’s Landing, where a thriving village sprang up, and continued to increase and prosper till the time of the fire, August 13th 1864. The store-house of Mygatt & Burroughs, where the fire started, together with its contents of lumber and hay, was consumed, and also a number of buildings adjoining. Another fire broke out on the following day and consumed several buildings.  The loss was estimated at $35,000.  After this fire, the street leading to the landing, which was very narrow, was widened to its present extent.  The task of arranging and re-locating the lots was performed in a very satisfactory manner by Robert H. Van Bergen.

The Upper Landing

Previous to the beginning of the present century, this was the only landing place in the town. Several Houses had been built here at a time when there were few, if any, below.

Ephraim Bogardus had a ferry here soon after the Revolution, and William Rea and Peter Cuyler had houses near the river.  One of the first acts of the County Court, in 1800, was to license Bogardus to run his ferry. The oldest house now standing at the Upper Landing is the Old Wells house, built by William Wells, who came from New England before the Revolution. This stone dwelling, by the river bank, has been a noted landmark for more than a century.  It stands on the northeast corner of Lot No. 52 in the Coxsackie Patent, and south of the road from the upper village to the landing.  The house and land adjoining were sold at sheriff’s sale, in 1818, to Leonard Bronk. The place at that time belonged to Isaac Wells, and the deed includes the house and lot, “also a certain island opposite called Wells’ Island, containing 8 acres.”  The house now belongs to Isaiah Briggs. This island, with two others next north of it, was granted to Marte Gerritse Van Bergen. Its old name was Nutten Flat; the one next north was Blinder Flat, and the one above that was called Dover Flat. The island in front of the mouth of Coxsackie Creek is named on old maps, Marte Gerritse Island. A map of these three islands, with other lands granted to Van Bergen, is in the office of the secretary of State, Albany. 

Schools in Coxsackie

Our knowledge of the schools in the early days of the Dutch settlers is exceedingly meager. The domines of the church were accustomed to take private pupils into their families, and a school was kept in the village, in which the teacher was expected to combine religious and secular instruction. The population was very small, and the schools were few until the advent of the enterprising race from beyond the Berkshire Hills. The following is a list of school trustees and teachers in the (then) town of Coxsackie in 1795. We have indicated such localities as we have been able to identify.

Anthony Rogers, teacher (Coxsackie village); Electus Backus, Abraham Hallenbeck, Matthias Vandenberg, trustees: Daniel Kanaday, teacher (unknown); Jacob Parrish, Henry Van Bergen, trustees: Edward Morrison, teacher (Athens); John W. Hallenbeck, Isaac Van Woert, trustees: Joseph Calder, teacher (unknown); John MacIntyre, James Litchfield, trustees: Amos Hubble, teacher (Jacksonville); Isaac Mapes, Storm Roosa, Henry Voorst, trustees: John Bower, teacher (East of Jacksonville); Isaac Roosa, Nathan Burnes, Caspar Collyer, trustees: Benajah Preston, teacher (Cairo); Daniel Sayre, Sebury Fish, trustees: Thadeus Hurd, teacher (Greenville): Aaron Hull, Japhet Collins, Reuben Rundle, trustees: James Leland, teacher (New Baltimore); Jonathan Miller, Stephen McCabe, trustees.

Rev. Henry Ostrander, pastor of the Dutch Reformed church in Coxsackie from 1801 to 1810, kept a school in the old stone house on the north side of the turnpike, and here the sons of the wealthy Van Bergens and Bronks studied Latin, at that time considered a mark of distinction.

Among the papers of Judge Leonard Bronk are articles of agreement between Henry Vandenberg, Robert Vandenberg, and Henry Van Bergen, “trustees of the seventh school district of Coxsackie,” and Henry Dickinson, in which the latter engages to “erect and build a frame school-house, 18 X 22 feet, and 9 feet posts, in a workmanlike manner, to be judged by said trustees, for the sum of $150; $10 of which he is to pay for a stove.” This is dated January 10th 1814. 

Village Incorporation

The village of Coxsackie was incorporated by an act of the Legislature passed April 5th 1867, and is bounded as follows:

“All that part of the town of Coxsackie, in the county of Greene, described as follows, viz: Beginning at a point in the west channel bank of the Hudson River, said point is south eighty-seven degrees east, four chains and fifty links, from the centre of the mouth of a spring, near the Hudson River, upon the lands of William Scott, and running from thence north eighty-eight degrees west, along the north line of lands belonging to the heirs of John Ely, deceased, and the south line of lands belonging to the heirs of William J. Stevens, deceased, and across the land of Hamilton & Smith, and along the centre of the road leading past Isaac C. Collier’s farm, known as the Vosburgh farm, sixty-four chains and fifty links to a stake and stones in the centre of said road; thence north five degrees west across the lands of Isaac C. Collier, lands of Henry Hollister, lands of Egbert Cochran, lands of Isaac Brandow, lands of Edwin N. Hubble, lands of Maurice Roche, lands of Phebe Puffer, and lands of Jacob C. VanDyck, one hundred chains and sixty-five links to the centre of the road leading from the Upper Village or Street, so called, to the Upper Landing; thence north eighty-four degrees east, along the centre of said road and across the lands of Thomas P. Bedell, and lands of Walton S. Stoutenburgh, thirty-three chains and thirteen links, to a post in the south line of the old road over the hill to the Upper Landing (said post is near the house of C.S. Conine); thence north eighty-five degrees east across the lands of C.S. Conine, lands of Hiram Gates, and lands of Mrs. Purtle, twenty-five chains and sixty links, to a point in the west channel of the Hudson River; thence south nine degrees east along said west channel bank as it winds and turns to the place of beginning, containing about six hundred and ten acres of land, be the same more or less.”

Coxsackie Cemetery

This cemetery was laid out in 1826, a piece of land having been bought for the purpose of Simeon Fitch, who sold:

“To the minister, Elders and Deacons of the Reformed Dutch Church of Coxsackie, all that certain piece of ground on the south-west side of the road that leads from the village of Coxsackie to the lower landing, containing 1 29-100 acre. The said piece having been bought by certain individuals as a place of burial, according to the articles of agreement in a certain subscription paper, March 26th 1826.”

This list is given in full as not only showing the owners of the lots, but also a list of all the prominent men of that time who were living in that vicinity.

“Whereas it is proposed to purchase a piece of ground as a place of burial in a convenient situation to accommodate the inhabitants of the village of Coxsackie and the Landing and those in the vicinity, and a suitable place has been found for that purpose in a lot belonging to Simeon Fitch, lying on the southwest side of the road leading from the village of Coxsackie to the Lower Landing and adjoining the lot occupied by Isaac Delamater, on the southeast, containing 1 ¼ acres, and it being proposed to purchase the said piece of ground and to raise the sum of about $300 for the purchase of the ground and for clearing, fencing, seeding and laying out of same.”

The committee appointed were to lay out 100 lots of 30 feet in length and nine feet wide, according to a plan “hereto annexed.” It was also agreed that the price paid by each person for a lot should be considered as so much paid toward the price of the lot, and the lots remaining unsold to be under the control of the committee. The following is a list of the subscribers.

Abraham Van Dyck, Simeon Fitch, Morris Batterson, Nicholas J. Lampman, Talmadge Fairchild, Dydinus Shepherd, James Carl, Richard Shipman, William Bisac, William Chapman, Phillip Conyn jr., Gilbert R. Livingston, John Ely, George Mandarville, John Helton, Thomas Halstead, Olney F. Wright, Samuel King, Samuel Goodrich, Abner Makedy, William Kimpton, George Rea, Russell Judson, James Titcomb, Widar S. Butler, Louis Reed, John L. Bronk, Martin Herrick, Sebury Fish, Walton Stoutenburgh, Ralph Barker, Nathaniel Godfrey, Alanson Worden, George Beatty, Silas Wood, Joseph Godfrey, P. Stephenson, Moses H. Powell, William Judson, William Van Vote, Minor Hubbell, Peter Hubbell, Henry Smith, Charles Bartlett, John Bartlett, Silas Dean, David Finch, Daniel Benjamin, Isaac Smith, Jeremiah Gay, Edward Wells, Epenetus Reed, Thomas W. Gay, Elnathan H. Taylor, Jacob E. Bogardus, and David Sharp. 

Riverside Cemetery

This cemetery association was organized at a meeting held December 8th 1873. The persons present were, Jacob C. Van Dyck, Martin G. Van Slyck, Simpson S. Bell, John L.B. Silvester, George H. Bomus, William J. Leigh, Lucius F. Botsford, William K. Reed, and S.W. Briggs. L.F. Botsford, chairman, stated the object of the meeting and it was voted to purchase land for a burial place, to be called Riverside Cemetery. The following officers were elected: L.F. Botsford, president; M.G. Van Slyck, vice-president; Sidney A. Dwight, treasurer; William K. Reed, secretary. Twenty acres of land were purchased of Alida Van Slyck. Burton G. Thomas laid it out and made a map of it. This cemetery is beautifully located on the river bank north of the Upper Landing and west of the old turnpike.

First Reformed Church

The Dutch Reformed church in the upper village is one of the oldest in Greene county. Most, if not all, of the early settlers, the Van Bergens, Bronks, Conyns, and Van Hoesens were connected with either the church at Leeds or at Calverack. The difficulty of attending churches so distant as these, caused the founders of Coxsackie to establish a church here as early as 1732, and the church then organized has continued till the present time.

There is no certain knowledge as to when the first house of worship was built. An inscription in the baptismal register, “Het Doop Rock Van de Gemeinte Van Koksakje, Anno 1738, January 21,” would indicate that it was as early as 1738, and its view is strengthened by the fact that a site for a church was bought of Petrus Van Bergen, July 16th 1732, described as follows: “All that certain piece or lot of ground situate, lying, and being at Kockshackie, on the north side of the common road way or street, which leads eastwards towards Hudson’s river. To begin about seventy-six feet by east of the pasture ground of Philip Conyn. Containing in length along the street fifty feet, in breadth south and north forty feet, with the church or God’s house thereon erected. To Have and to Hold the said piece or lot of ground, church or God’s house thereon erected for the use, and to the public service and worship of God, for the nether Dutch Christian congregations, in the exercitation of the Protestant Reformed religion according to the profession of faith, use, and practice of the Reformed churches of Holland, grounded and conformable to the Holy Scripture and agreeable with the articles of faith of the Synod of Dortrecht.”

This church stood on the site of the present house of Benjamin Eaton in the upper village, and in front of the small burying ground of the Adams and Van Bergen families. The building stood on this site till May 1798, when it was pulled down. A lot for a new church was given in exchange for this by Henry Van Bergen, on the south side of the road and near opposite. The second church was built on this lot the same year, which stood until 1861, when the present edifice was built on a new site a quarter mile east of the old church. The first minister who officiated in Coxsackie was Domine George Michael Weiss, whose name appears as a witness on the deed for the church lot. He was a native of the Palatinate on the Rhine, and came to America in 1727. He returned to Holland in 1729 to solicit aid for churches in America, but was here again before 1731. His field of labor included Catskill and other places. According to a statement in the “Manual of the Reformed Churches in America,” he remained in this part of the country about 14 years, when he went to Pennsylvania and preached to congregations west of Philadelphia. He is said to have died in 1762. In 1730, he is mentioned as “a bright young man.” He left no descendants. The second minister was the far-famed Domine Johannes Schuneman, who served this church, in connection with that of Catskill, from 1752 to 1794. The first entry made by him in the baptismal register is dated July 2d 1752, “Dese voorgaende kinderen zyn my Johannes Schuneman gedoopt maer van andere levars.”

The third pastor was Rev. Jacob Sickles, born at Tappan, in 1772. He labored at Coxsackie and Coeymans, from 1797 to 1801, and afterward preached at Kinderhook. He died in 1845.

The fourth pastor, Rev. Henry Ostrander, was born at Plattekill, 1781, and graduated at Union College, in 1799. His pastorate in Coxsackie was from 1801 to 1810. In 1806 William H. Vandenberg sold to “Henry Ostrander, minister of the Gospel.” 20 acres of land on the north side of the road to Coxsackie, and bounded west by the Catskill Path; and at the same time sold him “two acres of land to the west of the same, with the buildings, as the same was formerly sold by Thomas Houghtaling to Hendrick Vanderberg, reserving the privilege of the fountain of water.” This is the old stone house on the north side of the Coxsackie Turnpike, under the hills, now owned by a Mr. Case. In addition to his pastoral duties he kept a school there, in which he taught Latin to the children of his wealthy parishioners. The latter part of his life was passed in Ulster county.

The fifth minister was Gilbert R. Livingston, who was born at Stamford, Connecticut, 1786 and was pastor from 1811 to 1826. His labors here were productive of much good. In a revival in 1821, 373 persons were brought into the church. From this place he went to Philadelphia, where he died in 1834.

The sixth pastor was Rev. Jeremiah Searles, a native of Atkinson, N. H., born in 1795. His pastorate in Coxsackie began in 1825 and terminated in 1851.

Rev. Phillip Pletz, a native of Pennsylvania, was the seventh minister and preached here from 1851 to 1857.

Rev. Jacob Dutcher, the eighth incumbent, came to this town from Bergen Point in 1857, and preached one year, when he removed to New York.

The ninth minister was Rev. S. G. M. Hastings, whose pastorate began in 1860, and closed in 1870.

The next pastor was Rev. Maurice G. Hansen, a native of Holland. He commenced here in 1871, and continued until 1881. He was succeeded by the present pastor, Rev. Bergen B. Staats, who was born in Cecil county, Maryland, but whose early life was spent in Somerset county, N. J. He is a graduate of Rutger’s College and of the Theological Seminary, and at one time preached in West Hurley, Ulster county. He became the pastor of Coxsackie church in June 1882. 

Second Reformed Church

In March 1833, a petition was presented to the consistory of the First Reformed church of this town, representing that the increasing population of the Landing rendered it advisable to establish a new church for their better accommodation, and that the stockholders of the brick church, had offered to sell it to any of the various denominations which had been accustomed to use it for religious worship, and that the opportunity that then presented itself was too favorable to be neglected, and requesting the consistory to unite with them in their application to the classis to be established as a new church. The signers of this petition were: Abner Wakeley, Lawrence Van Dyck, Clarrissa Van Dyck, John Holton, Priscilla Kempton, Henry Wolf, Abigail Ely, Adelaide Ely, Elizabeth Mackey, Jane Van Schaack, Molly Benjamin, Abigail Wolf.

In accordance with this petition, the classis passed a resolution that the request be granted, and the organization was effected on the 4th of June 1833. The church was composed of 32 persons, who received certificates of dismissal for the parent church. Henry Wolf and Lawrence Van Dyck, were chosen elders, and William D. Kirtland, Abner Wakeley, and John Holton were chosen deacons. “The church was thus declared to be duly organized, and was commended to the care of the Shepherd and Bishop of souls.” The following is a list of the original members: Abner Wakeley, John Holton, William D. Kirtland, Henry Wolf, Lawrence Van Dyck, Lucy Reed, Abigail Ely, Molly Benjamin, Esther Judson, Phebe Wakeley, Priscilla Kempton, Jane Van Schaack, Eleanor Dean, Robert Brown, Clarrissa Van Dyck, Agnes Myers, Alice McDonald, Catherine Van Alstyne, Abigail Wolf, Deborah Herrick, Mary Cure, Eliza Van Woert, Mary Shurts, Eve Vosburg, Elizabeth Van Valen, Elizabeth Mackey, Adelaide Ely.

The colored members were: Quas Reed and Ann his wife, Mary Ann Van Volkenberg, Jane Edwards, Eve Harriman, and Elizabeth Moor.

It was nearly a year before a minister was settled. The first pastor was Rev. William Cahoone jr., who commenced in 1834 and continued until 1847, when he removed to Fordham, New York. He was succeeded by Rev. Paul D. Van Cleef, who served till 1849. He was succeeded by Rev. Samuel M. Woodbridge in 1850, who remained until 1852. His successor was Rev. John Steele, who commenced in 1853 and continued till 1858. The next pastor was Rev. Francis N. Zabriskie, from 1859 to 1863. He was succeeded by Rev. Alexander McKelvey, who served one year, leaving in 1866. His successor was Rev. Ezra W. Collier, who was here in 1867. Rev. Anson F. Munn became pastor in 1868, and continued till 1877. He was succeeded by Rev. John A. Lansing, who remained one year. His successor, and the present pastor, is Rev. John H. Salisbury, a native of this county, a graduate of Rutger’s College, and of New Brunswick Seminary. His connection with this church began in 1878.

The church edifice was struck by lightning in 1875 and badly injured, but the damage was repaired, and it is now one of the finest churches in the town. 

Methodist Episcopal Church

This society was organized in 1836 with 12 members. Services were first held in a union church and afterward in a building on the corner of Church and Ely streets, belonging to Mr. Stevenson.

In 1838 a lot on Church street was bought at a cost of $360 and the erection of a church to cost about $2,000 was commenced. It was dedicated October 7th 1840. Rev. Noah Levings preached in the morning from Hebrews VIII. 10; Rev. William E. Collins in the afternoon from Acts XVI 25.

Among the early members of this church were E. Hyatt, and wife, Stewart Austin, John J. Powell, Jason Wells, Tunis Cochran, Samuel J. Carey, Peter R. Garrett and wife, Electa Brown, Theoron Burnett and wife, and Catharine Cochran.

At first Coxsackie was included in the Coeymans circuit, and the following preachers were on the circuit: 1836, Elbert Osborn, F. W. Sizer; 1837, William F. Collins, E. Cook, A. Ackerly; 1838, William F. Collins, O. G. Hedstrom, A. C. Fields; 1839, O G. Hedstrom, D. B. Turner, A. C. Fields; 1840, D. B. Turner, W. H. Smith, R. Scott; 1841, D. J. Wright, W. H. Smith, R. Scott; 1842, D. J. Wright, A. Rogers, William Bloomer; 1843, William Bloomer, John Davey. In 1843 the circuit was divided and Coxsackie was left in the Catskill circuit. 1844, E. S. Helbert, L. S. Weed; 1845, E. S. Helbert, A. Davis; 1846, P. S. Hoyt, Joel Croft; 1847, P. S. Hoyt, S. G. Stevens; 1848, William C. Smith, J. K. Still, T. B. Smith; 1849, William C. Smith, J. C. Chatterton; 1850, A. F. Sellick, A. Rogers; 1851, James Birch, James Dayton; 1852, J. Birch, William Hall.

In 1853 Coxsackie became a station and since that time the following have been pastors: 1853 and 1854, Thomas Ellis; 1855 and 1856, William B. Mitchell; 1857 and 1858, B. M. Genning; 1859, Silas Fitch; 1860 and 1861, J. H. B. Wood; J. Birch; 1864, R. S. Shurter; 1865 and 1866, J. W. Breakey; 1867, G. W. Corey; 1868 and 1869, Charles Gorse; 1870-72, W. F. Brush; 1873-75, J. Millard; 1876-78, G. Draper; 1879-81, T. La Monte; 1882-83, T. W. Chadwick.

A parsonage was bought in 1859, opposite the church. In 1874 a new parsonage was built adjoining the church, at a cost of about $4,000. In 1866 the church was enlarged and repaired at a cost of $4,700 and was reopened February 13th 1867. In 1883, under the pastorate of Rev. T. W. Chadwick, the church and lecture room were repaired and improved at a cost of about $2,600.

The church has a membership of 258. A prosperous Sunday-school is connected with the church, numbering 120 scholars. 

Protestant Episcopal Church

This church was organized in 1853, and the church lot was sold by William R. Finch to Rev. Jonathan Coe, May 10th of that year. At the time of the sale a church building was standing on the lot, which had been built some years before by the Baptist society, but concerning which little information could be obtained. This edifice was blown down and destroyed in a furious storm, in 1854, but the organ which was in it was uninjured. The present church was built soon after. The church was for many years connected with that of Athens, and supplied by the same ministers. The following is a list of the various rectors: Jonathan Coe, D. D., Rev. Joseph Johnston, Rev. Albert Danker, Rev. I. W. Trumbull, Rev. Newton Dexter, Rev. John Joyce, and Rev. Andrew Merkle, the present rector. The congregation is small but select, and the church edifice built of brick stands on a fine site overlooking the village and river. The present church officers are: Dr. N. Clute, Robert J. Washburn, wardens; Herman Nalbach, William Farmer, Andrew B. Houghtaling, H. A. Jordan, N. H. Vosburg, Dr. A. W. Van Slyck, vestrymen. 

Roman Catholic Church

The first church services of this denomination were held in the dwelling house of Mr. Stephen Brady, as early as 1845. The church edifice stands on one of the Lower Landing lots laid out by Captain Isaac Smith, and was built in the spring of 1847. The principal members of the church at that time were James Hartley, Luke McCormick, James Fox, Timothy Donegan, John Welch, Owen Tynan, Thomas Hartley, John Daly, and John Schelly. A large part of the work on the edifice was done by Stephen Brady, who is at the present time one of the oldest living members. The first priest who officiated here was Rev. William Howard, who was succeeded by Rev. Fathers Hurtley, Henry Finegan, Morris Roach, William Carroll, and Martin Stanton. The present pastor is Rev. Thomas P. Wash, who, to the cares of this church, unites those of Coeymans and Athens. The church edifice is a neat building, which has been recently repaired, and the society is in a flourishing condition. 

Fraternities 

Coxsackie Lodge, No. 50, F. & A. M. The organization of this lodge was effected at a meeting held at Foot’s Inn, December 24th 1796, with the following principal officers: W.M., Philip Conine, jr.; S.W., Isaac Rosa; J.W., Benjamin Moore; secretary, John Barr; treasurer, Jesse Wood. The other charter members were Giles Gridley, Stephen Truesdell, John Bostwick, Solomon Palmer, John McIntyre, and Storm Rosa. The regular communications of this lodge were held at Foot’s Inn until the year 1804, when the meetings were discontinued and the charter was returned to the grand lodge. 

Ark Lodge, No. 271, F. & A.M., was organized in 1816 by virtue of a dispensation granted to Talmadge Fairchild, W.M., Amariah Foster, S.W., and William Bliss, J.W. The lodge meetings were held at Foot’s Inn until 1821, and afterward in the village. The anti-masonic excitement, induced by the alleged abduction of William Morgan in 1826, resulted disastrously to the lodges throughout the State, and the communications of this lodge were discontinued until 1846, when it was reorganized as 

Ark Lodge, No. 48, F. & A.M. Since this time the lodge has enjoyed uninterrupted prosperity. Meetings are held in Masonic Hall, on the first, third and fifth Monday evenings of the month. The number of members October 1st 1883 was 101. 

The successive worshipful masters of the Coxsackie lodges have been: 

Philip Conine, jr., 1796; Isaac Rosa, 1797; Jesse Wood, 1798-1802; Adonijah Miner, 1803; Talmadge Fairchild, 1816-19, 1822-24, 1846; William V.B. Heermance, 1820, 1821; John G. Bedell, 1847-54, 1859-63, 1865-69; Gilbert Bedell, jr., 1855, 1856; Henry M. Beach, 1857; John B. Bronk, 1858; Alexander Reed, 1864; Albert Parker, 1870-74, 1878-81; J.A. Houghtaling, 1875, 1876; William K. Reed, 1877; A.W. Van Slyke, 1882. 

The officers in 1883 were: A.W. Van Slyke, W.M.; Samuel C. Bennett, S.W.; Abel J. Kent, J.W.; S.W. Briggs, treasurer; William K. Reed, secretary; J.A. Houghtaling, S.D.; H. Nalbach, J.D.; James Strange and John Van Wormer, M. of C.; F.M. Sharp, T.; Albert Parker, C. 

Coxsackie Chapter, No. 85, Royal Arch Masons, was organized in 1824. The first officers were Talmadge Fairchild, H.P.; Percel Cook, K.; and Nathan Clark, S. Meetings were held until 1831, when the lodge was disbanded. In 1866 a reorganization was effected under a charter granted to Gilbert Bedell, H.P.; Abram H. Knapp, K.; and Peter Stover, S. 

The successive high priests have been Gilbert Bedell, Abram H. Knapp, Elbert O. Beatty, and Albert Parker. 

Meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesday evenings of each month. 

The officers in 1883 were: Albert Parker, H.P.; Isaac Mygatt, K.; Almeron Powell, S.; William Cochran, treasurer; W.R. Church, secretary; A.V.D. Collier, C. of H.; William K. Reed, P.S.; S.W. Briggs, R.A.C.; A.W. Van Slyke M. of 3rd; Charles H. Crippen, M. of 2nd; E. W. Mackey, M. of 1st; J.J. Jackson, T. 

Eureka Lodge, No. 131, Knights of Pythias, was instituted March 30th 1875, with the following charter members: Alexander Cummings, A.V.D. Collier, M. Hallenbeck, George H. Scott. J.L. Hollister, Albert Parker, W.K. Reed, E. Briggs, S.W. Briggs, P.R. Bedell, P.G. Van Schaack, C. Fitchett, J.V. W. O’Connor, N.H. Vosburg, W.D. Griffin, C.N. Van Wie, E.W. Smith, F.W. Tolley, B.S. Hutchings, J.B. Van Wie, E.R. Cummings, H.T. Bedell, and M.H. Green. 

The first officers were: C.C., A.V.D. Collier; V.C., Albert Parker; prelate, George H. Scott; K. of R. and S., J.V. W. O’Connor; M.A., J.B. Van Wie; M. of  F., P.G. Van Schaack; M. of E., W.K. Reed; I.G., E.W. Smith; O.G., H.T. Bedell. 

The lodge meetings were held in the old Masonic Hall during the year of organization, and afterward in the hall of the Sons of Temperance, and subsequently in Good Templar’s Hall. This hall being sold, the lodge was left without a room, and the meetings were for a time discontinued. In January 1882, the lodge was re-organized, and since that time the meetings have been regularly held in the Grand Army Hall. 

The following persons have been chancellors commander: A.V.D. Collier, Albert Parker, J.V.W. O’Connor, George H. Scott, B.S. Hutchings, W.K. Reed, and N.A. Calkins. 

The officers in 1883 were: N.A. Calkins, C.C.; B.S. Hutchings, V.C.; T.B. Alcott, P.; H.T. Bedell, K. of R. and S.; M.D. Fiero, M.A.; Samuel Marsh, M. of E.; M.H. Green, M. of F.; W.P. Freligh, I.G.; H.T. Whiting, O.G.; W.K. Reed, P.C. The district deputy grand chancellor is George H. Scott. Meetings are held on Tuesday evening of each week. 

Division No. 1, A. O. of H., Coxsackie: Motto: “Friendship, Unity and true Christian Charity.” This division was instituted March 28th 1883, by county delegate Captain M.J. Slattery of Albany. The officers in 1883 were: Thomas Prendergast, county delegate; Martin D. Maloney, president; Matthew Moran, vice-president; Thomas Mullins, secretary; Michael Prendergast, treasurer; John M. Burke, sergeant-at-arms. The number of members, October 1st 1883, was 34, of whom 15 were charter members. The county delegate has power to organize divisions in his county, and to act as marshal on all public occasions. Only persons of good moral character, from 18 to 45 years of age, are eligible to membership. The association is beneficial in its operations, a sick or disabled member receiving five dollars per week while disqualified from performing his accustomed labor. An allowance of $50 is made for funeral expenses of a deceased member. Meetings are held every alternate Thursday evening in Grand Army Hall. 

Hollister Post, No. 85, G.A.R., was organized December 29th 1874 with the following charter members, including officers: M.H. Greene, C.; John I. Spoor, S.V.C.; Warner Vandenburgh, J.V.C.; A.V.D. Collier, adjutant; E.C. Garrigan, O.D.; Louis Jerome, O.G.; P.G. Van Schaack, Q.M.; Jacob Vandenburgh, S.; J.B. Van Wie, C.; Thomas C. Garrigan. S.M.; John Hiseerd, Q.M. S.; William Vandenburgh, Matthew Shute, Richard H. Whitbeck and Michael Dowling. 

The names of past commanders are M.H. Greene, A.V.D. Collier, M.V.B. Ashley, John I. Spoor and N.A. Calkins. 

The number of post was changed to 27 in 1879. The present number of members is 69. 

The officers for 1883 were: Thomas C. Garrigan, C.; Joseph Bronk, S.V.C.; George C. Speanburgh, J.V.C.; R.H. Whitbeck, chaplain; M. Downing, quartermaster; John Hiseerd, O. of  D.; A. Benton, O. of G.; Lewis Stickles, surgeon. 

Meetings are held every Friday evening in Grand Army Hall. Since its organization, Hollister Post has successfully conducted two grand field days with sham battles, one at Coxsackie, and one at Hudson, and is one of the most prosperous organizations of its kind. 

Coxsackie Council, No. 122, Royal Templars of Temperance, was organized August 21st 1882, with the following charter members, including officers: John Frank, councilor; Charles Scott, vice councilor; W.H.C. Boocock, secretary; Henry Cheritree, treasurer; Alfred W. Curtis, financial secretary; E.M. Wood, past councilor; Robert Boocock, chaplain; Robert Boyd, William L. Pettit, C.S. Van Orden, Hugh W. Mosher, Thomas Dummery, Frank Mosher, Mrs. G.M. Boocock, Mrs. Mary E. Scott, Mrs. R. Mosher, Mrs. Emeline Pettit and Mrs. Mary M. Mead. 

The officers ins 1883 were: councilor, John Frank; vice-councilor, Miss Anna Spoor; secretary, William L. Pettit; treasurer, Stephen Winans; financial secretary, Robert Boocock; past councilor, E.M. Wood; chaplain, Henry Cheritree; medical examiner, Robert Boocock. 

The society numbers about 40 members. Meetings are held Wednesday evening of each week in hall in Lampman’s building. 

The Women’s Christian Temperance Union of Coxsackie was organized October 19th 1881. The first officers were: president, Mrs. T. Lamonte; vice-presidents, Mrs. J.H. Salisbury, Mrs. Robert Boocock and Mrs. J. B. Whitbeck; treasurer, Mrs. C.A. Sloan; recording secretary, Mrs. R.H. Whitbeck; corresponding secretary, Mrs. W.H. Hollister. 

Meetings are held every alternate Thursday afternoon. The society has a membership of about 35. The officers for 1883 were: president, Mrs. Robert Boocock; treasurer, Mrs. J.B. Whitbeck; recording secretary, Mrs. R. H. Whitbeck; corresponding secretary, Mrs. W.H. Hollister. 

Various other temperance organizations have been in successful operation here at different times, among which may be mentioned the Father Matthew T.A.B. Society, No. 1, of Coxsackie; Coxsackie Division, No. 75, Sons of Temperance; Brown Lodge, No. 275, I.O. of G.T., organized May 14th 1867; and Bodine Section, No. 15, Cadets of Temperance, organized February 10th 1868. 

Fire Companies 

Hudson River Engine Company, No. 1, was organized June 6th 1860. The first chief engineer was William Martin, and J.C. Mackey was foreman. The company used the engine Deluge No. 1, for a time. An engine house was built where the furniture and undertaking establishment of Reed & Frank now stands. The building cost $250, and was paid for by subscription. In 1863 the company purchased a Button hand engine at a cost of $1,400, which was raised by subscriptions of insurance companies, members, and citizens. In 1879 the village authorities erected a new brick engine house for the company, at a cost of $1,000, on the site of the old lock-up. 

The company was reorganized February 8th 1881, and George H. Scott was appointed foreman. The other officers in 1883 were: William A. Edwards, first assistant foreman; E. Buskirk, second assistant; William B. Leete, secretary; and Egbert W. Stone, treasurer. The company numbers about 50 members in good standing. 

D.M. Hamilton Engine Company, No. 2. A village election was held August 11th 1868 for the purpose of levying a tax to raise funds to purchase a new steam fire engine and appurtenances, to procure lots on which to erect engine house, etc. This movement was defeated, and the matter for a time was dropped. A second election for this purpose was held February 6th 1871, and a vote was passed to levy a tax of $3,500 for the purchase of a new engine and hose. A new company was organized February 18th 1881, and named Kuxakee Engine Company, No. 2, but at the first regular meeting of the company, held March 7th 1871, the name of the company was changed to D.M. Hamilton, No. 2, in honor of the largest tax-payer in the village. A new Button steam fire engine and hose were purchased at a cost of $3,500. The first officers were: foreman, William K. Reed; assistant, J.B. Miller; secretary, E.O. Beatty; treasurer, Albert Parker; engineer, J. Newbury; fireman, W. Cook. In 1872 a lot was purchased on River street for $850, and a brick engine house was erected at a cost of $2,190. The company, which had previously disbanded, was re-organized. The officers of the company in 1883 were: foreman, Alexander Reed jr.; assistant, W.R. Church; treasurer, A.C. Dwight; secretary, W. Irving Merihew; engineer, Jay Newbury; assistant, John H. Bomus. 

In June 1871 William K. Reed was elected chief engineer of the Coxsackie fire department, and Albert Parker assistant. The present chief engineer is A.G. Case, and E.D. Fancher is assistant. Both companies belong to the New York State Fireman’s Association.

The Press 

The first newspaper published in Coxsackie was the Greene County Advertiser, which was established by Henry Van Dyck, in 1832, in the upper village. In 1836 it was changed to the Standard, and afterward, under the management of Thomas B. Carroll, was called the Coxsackie Standard. In 1851 a new paper was started under the editorial management of Frederick W. Hoffman, of Albany; and in January 1857, it was transferred to D.M. & B.S. Slater, by whom it was published for some years.

The only newspaper now published in the town is the Coxsackie News. Mr. William P. Franklin commenced publishing this paper here, May 23rd 1867, since which time it has been continued under his management.  In 1874 it was issued daily for about two months, during the excitement caused by the trial of Joseph Walsh for murder. A paper called the New Baltimore Sun was published here for about six months, commencing in September 1875. The Coxsackie News is issued weekly, and is a well sustained and popular paper, and has a wide influence. 

Banks 

The Coxsackie National Bank was organized in 1865, with a capital of $112,000. The first officers were: W.V.B. Heermance, president; J.C. Van Dyck, cashier; W.V.B. Heermance, Leonard Bronk, T. Burroughs, R.H. Van Bergen, M.G. Van Slyke, Luman Miller, William Farmer, C. Van Der Zee, and W.A. Judson, directors. 

The first president was succeeded by J.C. Van Dyck, who was followed by the present incumbent. 

In 1869 a new bank building was erected on Reed street. 

The present officers are: president, Alexander Reed; cashier, S.A. Dwight; directors, Alexander Reed, W. Powell, D.M. Hamilton, M.G. Van Slyke, C. Van Der Zee, E.H. Van Orden, C.C. Ham, and Isaac Mygatt. 

The Coxsackie Savings Institution was incorporated in 1868, with the following first officers: Charles Starr, president; O. Lampman, vice-president; S.A. Dwight, secretary and treasurer; E.N. Hubbell, W. Powell, P.O. Williams, J.C. Van Dyck, D.M. Hamilton, M.G. Van Slyke, P.H. Sylvester, L. Bronk, and William Farmer, trustees. 

The first president was succeeded by Alexander Reed. The amount of deposits September 1st 1883, was $183,000. 

The present officers are: president, Albert Parker; 1st vice-president, William Farmer; 2nd vice-president, A.G. Case; secretary and treasurer, S.A. Dwight; trustees, Alexander Reed, Albert Parker, N.H. Richtmyer, A.G. Case, S.A. Dwight, C.I. Collier, I. Mygatt, Platt Coonley, William Farmer, and M.C. Van Slyke. 

Hotels 

There are three hotels in the village. The Hamilton House, at the corner of Reed and River streets, was recently built by the present proprietor, Alexander Cummings. This hotel is first-class in every respect, and is largely patronized by the travelling public. Carriages from the hotel connect with all trains and boats. The livery stable connected with this house, is in charge of E.R. Cummings. 

The Larrabee House is on River street, near the boat landing, and is owned and conducted by Nelson Larrabee. 

The Eagle Hotel, on Mansion street, is owned by William Cummings and conducted by George W. Loud. 

Manufacturing 

The Coxsackie Malleable and Grey Iron Company, the most important manufacturing enterprise of the village of Coxsackie, was established in 1833 at Oak Hill, Durham, by Adams & Thorp. The original buildings were destroyed by fire about the year 1865, and substantial brick buildings were erected at Coxsackie in 1866. In January 1871, the buildings were again destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of about $50,000. The class of goods manufactured embraces malleable and grey iron castings and fittings of all descriptions. The power used is a 40-horse power steam engine. Employment is furnished for about seventy-five persons, and about 300 tons of pig iron is annually consumed. Capital stock, $30,000. The officers of the corporation are: F.S. Greene, president; S.A. Dwight, treasurer; Albert Parker, secretary; Isaac Mygatt, superintendent. 

The Steam Flour, Feed, and Plaster Mill of E. Miner, at Coxsackie Landing, was established in 1870, by D. Hallock. This mill annually consumes 15,000 bushels of grain and 300 tons of plaster. A 20-horse power Carpenter slide-valve engine is used. Five men are employed. 

The machine works of A. & B. Newbury were established in 1854, at Windham Center. In 1866 the business was removed to its present location, on River street, Coxsackie. The original firm was succeeded in 1881 by the present proprietor, B. Newbury. The class of goods manufactured embraces the Newbury printing presses, machinery, and castings. Ten persons are employed, and a six-horse power steam engine supplies the power. 

The canning factory of E.H. Lounsbury & Co., is situated on Academy street. The proprietors are E.H. Lounsbury, of Coxsackie, and Joseph F. Brown, of Poughkeepsie. The green sweet corn which is extensively canned here, is brought by the growers to the factory, husked by a force of girls, and taken to the cutter in crates. The cutter is a machine capable of cutting enough corn in a day to fill 5,000 cans. The cut corn is carried to the filler, an ingenious machine capable of filling 10,000 cans per day. The canning of other vegetables and fruit is also carried on here. The establishment employs about 80 hands during the busy season. 

The magnitude of fruit interests of the county renders the manufacture of barrels an important industry. The barrel factory of T.B. Allcott, on River street, is by far the most extensive establishment of its kind in Greene county. During a successful fruit year, upwards of 60,000 barrels are made and sold. The business was established in 1874, and furnishes employment for from six to twelve persons. 

The Ice Business 

The first cargo of ice ever carried from Greene county to New York was in February 1828. That winter, the river was closed by ice in December, but broke up in January. At that time the sloop Ancona, Captain Alanson Warden, came up the river, and as ice was scarce in New York, the captain conceived the idea of loading his sloop with it at Coxsackie, and taking it to the city. He loaded the vessel, and landing at the Battery, sold his cargo for $300. 

The first attempt to store ice in large quantities was about 1850, when Hiram Van Steenburgh, of Catskill, came to Coxsackie, and in company with Charles Backus, hired some empty warehouses at the Lower Landing, belonging to Captain Isaac Smith. These were filled with ice, which was hoisted into the houses by horse power. 

Ice Houses in Coxsackie 

LOCATION.

OWNERS.

TONS CAPACITY

WHEN BUILT.

4 mile point (south)

Brewers Co.

60,000

1877

4 mile point (above)

Harper P. Rogers

13,000

1883

Klinkenberg

James Sanders

7,000

1877

Pine Grove

Knickerbocker Co.

15,000

1875

Pine Grove

Knickerbocker Co.

45,000

1877

Lower Landing

Knickerbocker Co.

45,000

1873

Lower Landing

Knickerbocker Co.

30,000

1857

Upper Landing

Hudson River Co.

18,000

1877

Upper Landing

Knickerbocker Co.

30,000

1875

Upper Landing

National Ice Co.

5,000

1881

Upper Landing

Ray Co.

6,000

1879

Coxsackie Island

Knickerbocker Co.

12,000

1877

Coxsackie Island

John Clark & Co.

30,000

1874

Coxsackie Island

John Clark & Co.

40,000

1880

Rattle Snake Island

National Ice Co.

45,000

1882

 

 

401,000

 

Jacksonville 

The only village in the western part of the town is a small hamlet called by the above name. The first inhabitant in this place was Gerrit Roosa, who, as we have seen, owned a share in the Roseboom Patent. His home was the farm now owned by the Burroughs family on the south side of the road east of Jacksonville. Near the stone wall on the east side of the farm, some 20 rods south of the turnpike, are two or three graves marked by rude stones, one bearing the inscription, “G.R., 1776,” and another, “Here lays the Body of the late wife of G.R., 1787, April 28.” This marks the last resting place of the first settler and his wife. Some of his descendants are now living in the vicinity. A tavern or stopping place was established in the village as early as 1799, built by Joseph Bullis, who had a distillery on the opposite side of the street. For many years the place was familiarly designated by the inelegant title of “Swill street.” The name Jacksonville was given to it by James Fairlee Burroughs, who came from Greenville, and established a store in this little village. The goods which he purchased in New York were directed to “James F. Burroughs, Jacksonville, Coxsackie,” and when they arrived at the landing, excited some wonder as to where the place could be, for no one had heard of it before. It is needless to say that this was at the time when “Old Hickory” was at the zenith of his popularity. About 1796 Shadrack Hubbell bought the farm on the south side of the road by the school-house in district No. 8. The farm is bounded on the north by the confirmation line, which crosses the road at the small bridge west of the school house. The Jacksonville church was built in 1857 by the Lutherans, through the efforts of Rev. William H. Emerick. Within a few years it has been reorganized and is now a union church, and at the present time is supplied ministerially from the Christian church at Medway. The church edifice is a plain frame building of neat appearance, standing on the north side of the road, a little east of the hotel. 

In the extreme southwestern corner of the town is a small Union chapel built in 1829. The land for the site was sold by Jacob Bush, to Henry Cornwell, Abel Butler, and Eleazur Lacy, as trustees of Union Society. The building of this church was the fruit of the labors of Rev. John Spoor of Freehold. Among the contributors for the building were Henry Cornwell, Abel Butler, John Webber, David Halstead, Oliver Butler, Peter Chevalier, and John Halstead. It was reorganized in 1858, and is doing much good in that portion of the town. It has connected with it a flourishing Sunday school. 

In the early days of the settlement at what is now Jacksonville, the principal business was connected with saw-mills. The Cornwell mills have been already mentioned. The saw-mill on the east branch of Potick, a little south of Jacksonville, is at the west end of the lot in Stighkoke Patent, which fell to Peter Eckler, and was sold to Robert Vandenberg who built the mill. It is now owned by Mrs. Sarah A. Losee. The mills on the same stream, farther north, at what is called “The Community,” were first established by Pazzi Lampman, a well-known inhabitant of early times. 

Biographical 

Judge Leonard Bronk

The subject of this sketch, born in 1752, was the son of John L. Bronk. At the death of his father, in 1794, he inherited the old homestead. John L. Bronk was in his day, one of the prominent citizens of Albany county. In 1770 he was commissioned captain of militia by Lieutenant-Governor Cadwallader Colden, and at the beginning of the Revolution was appointed 2nd major by the Provincial Congress.  Throughout his life he was a prominent man, and by his death the county lost one of its most valued citizens. His son, Leonard was appointed first lieutenant by the convention of this State in 1777, and in 1778 he received a similar commission from Governor George Clinton. He was commissioned major of infantry in 1793, and lieutenant colonel in 1796. In 1786, 1789,1792 and 1805, he was a member of the Assembly of this State. From 1787 to 1792 he was one of the Justices of the peace for Albany county,  and in 1796 he was elected State Senator.  On March 29th 1800,  he was appointed first judge of the Court of Common Pleas, a position which he retained for many years.  Judge Bronk inherited from his father a large estate, which he greatly increased by judicious purchases. He married Catherine, daughter of Robert Vandenberg, January 11th 1779.  The children from this marriage were:  

1. Catherine, born November 15th 1784, who married Abraham VanDyck, and who died August 24th 1834. Her husband survived her one year, and died February 4th 1835, at the age of 50.

2. John L., born January 23rd 1787, married Alida, daughter of Phillip Conyn, Jr., December 22nd 1808. Their children were Catherine S. (wife of Peter H. Sylvester), Mary Alida, Leonard (born June 21st 1817, died February 21st 1832), and Margaret, who married Abraham Varick.  

In the family Bible is entered the following notice: "John L. Bronk died at Coeymans on the 21st day of May 1835, at 20 minutes past one in the morning, at the house of Dr. Freydenburg, aged 48 years, 4 months. He was scalded and otherwise injured on board the steamboat Advocate, whose boiler collapsed at Coeymans, on the 4th of May 1835, and occasioned his death."  

3. Robert, born January 30th 1789. He was educated for the ministry of the Reformed Dutch church, and was pastor at Watervliet for 12 years. His wife was Catherine, daughter of John  R. Vandenberg. He departed this life January 16th 1837, and his remains rest in the family burying ground on the Bronk homestead.  

4. Susannah, born April 7th 1792.  

5. Leonard, born June 27th 1797.  He graduated at Union College, in 1820, studied the profession of law, and was admitted to the bar shortly after. He married Maria, daughter of Dr. John Ely, and had three children: Edwin Ely, who graduated at Williams College, in 1850, and was admitted to the bar in 1852, died unmarried, June 22nd 1861; Leonard, also a graduate of Williams College, admitted to the bar in 1853, and died unmarried, July 23rd 1854; and Adelaide, who married Rev. Lewis Lampman, December 5th 1871, and has two children, Leonard Bronk, and Maria Bronk Lampman.  

6. Elsje, married Rev. Joseph Sickles, and had a son John, who died in childhood.  

The old Bronk homestead on the Coxsackie Creek, near its junction with the Stony Kill, has long been a landmark, and is probably the oldest house standing in the town. The earliest mention of it is October 8th 1736, when Jan Bronk conveyed to his son Leonard, land "opposite to his house." Additions have been made at various times, and on one part is the inscription, "J.B  J.B. L.B. C.B. 1792."  The initials of Jan, Jonas, Leonard and Casparus, four of the sons of the first settler.  On a still older part is the date 1738. This homestead, with the large tract of land adjoining, and including the larger part of "Bronk's hundred acres," with the Stony Kill, and lots in the Roseboom and Houghtaling Patents, are now the property of Rev. Lewis Lampman and his wife Adelaide, grand daughter of Judge Bronk.  

In the family burying ground on the farm is a tombstone with this inscription:  "In Memory of Leonard Bronk, who died April 22nd 1828, aged 76 years."  "I am the resurrection and the Life. John XI. 25."  

The Houghtaling Family

wpe8.gif (249362 bytes)The ancestor of this family was Matthias Houghtaling, born about 1644, to whom a patent was granted for a large tract of land in the town of Coxsackie, a full account of which is found in another place (in the Beers History).  He died about 1706, and left children Conrad, Hendrick, Catryntje, wife of Richard Vandenberg, Syche, who married Francis Morris, and after his death, married Patrick McCarty, Rachel, who died unmarried, and Matthias, born about 1694, probably died young.  

Conrad Houghtaling married Tryntje, daughter of Willem VanSlyck, 1688, and had children: Willem, born 1692; Maritje, 1694; Mathys, 1696; Peter, 1698; Beeltje, 1700; Hendrick, 1703; Teunis, 1705; Johannes, 1708; Janetje, 1710; Jonathan, 1712. There are descendants of these in various parts of the State, but we have no knowledge of them.  

Hendrick, son of Matthias Houghtaling, married Hester Pritcher, September 12th 1729, and had a son, Thomas, born December 23rd 1731, and a daughter, Maria, born February 22nd 1747.  

Thomas married Elizabeth, daughter of Andries Whitbeck, 1757, and had children, Andrew, Henry, Conrad, Peter, Thomas (who died without offspring), and Hester, wife of Peter VanBergen.  Of these sons, Conrad had three children, Thomas, Abraham and Anthony.  

Henry married Elizabeth Staats; had children, Abraham, John Staats, Jacob and Thomas. Peter married 1st, Sarah VanDuzen, 2nd, Sarah VanDyck; sons Thomas, John, and Andrew.  

wpeB.gif (592943 bytes)Andrew, the first son of Thomas Houghtaling married Polly N. VanBenthuysen, January 13th 1782, and had children; Elizabeth, born January 1st 1783, married Isaac A. Staats, 1803; Barent, born August 20th 1784; and had children, Andrew E., George, Edward, and John;  Thomas, born June 25th 1786, died an infant;  Gerrit, born February 1st 1788; had sons, Anson, Stephen and Andrew;  Thomas, born May 11th 1791; no children;  Anthony, born March 14th 1793, married Maria VanBergen November 28th 1816, and had children; Andrew, born May 3rd 1819; Maria, born 1821; Catherine, born 1823. The second wife of Anthony was Sarah Bronk, married October 12th 1817.  

Andrew, son of Peter Houghtaling (son of Thomas), married Elsie VanLoon, and has children, Aaron, Sarah, Rachel A., Elizabeth, Jacob A. (of Coxsackie Landing), Peter, James, Thomas, Stephen, Catherine, Lena, Andrew, Edward and Maria.  The father of this family is now (1884) living in the town of Coxsackie at the age of 84.  

The homestead of Thomas Houghtaling, which was probably owned by his father Hendrick, is by the south side of the Diep Kill at the northeast corner of the Houghtaling Patent.  In a little burying ground east of the kill is a tombstone bearing this inscription: "In Memory of Mr. Thomas Houghtaling, who died February 1st 1824, aged 93 years and 3 months."  His wife Elizabeth died July 29th 1820, aged 82. By the side of their graves are those of the next three generations.  

Henry Houghtaling, died October 15th 1827, aged 70.

wpe8.gif (249362 bytes)John Staats Houghtaling, died September 26th 1840, aged 52.

Henry Houghtaling, died September 7th 1847, aged 30.  

The house of Truman Mackey is on the site of the old homestead. The residence of Mr. George Houghtaling is on the side of the Hudson River, at the place called by the Dutch settlers "Klinkenberg" or Echo Hill. This was the original dwelling place of the "Klinkenberg Hallenbecks," and here Jacob Hallenbeck, and his son Major Jacob, and other generations lived and died, and are buried on a small hill northwest of the dwelling house, in what was called the "new orchard" as long ago as 1717. The original stone house stood on the site of the present mansion. The last of the race that owned the place was John Jacob Hallenbeck. The north line of this farm wpeB.gif (592943 bytes)is at the point which the early settlers called "Fish Hook." The land to the north was the farm of Nanning Hallenbeck, and his house directly in front of the present residence of Samuel Stevens, in still more ancient times was the site of an Indian encampment. Stories of treasure buried on the Klinkenberg farm by Hallenbecks of Revolutionary days still excite the credulous to searches which are not successful.    

Hon. Albert Parker

The ancestors of the subject of this sketch were residents of Vermont, where his father James M. Parker was born July 27th 1809. When a boy, he came to this county, and learned the business of brick making, which he carried on in after years in a very extensive manner. His brick yards were located in Coxsackie, where the Malleable Iron Works now stand. It is stated as one of the events of his early life, that both James and his brother walked from their native state to Coxsackie.  

Mr. Parker married Ann, daughter of Francis S. Salisbury of Catskill, a descendant of the original grantee of the Catskill Patent. She was born March 15th 1813, and married Mr. Parker April 16th 1842. There were two children born from this marriage, John W., who died in childhood, and Albert the subject of this article.  

wpe3.gif (227436 bytes)Albert Parker was born February 20th 1843. His education was obtained in the public schools of Coxsackie, his native town, at the Claverack Academy, and at Eastman's Business College. At the beginning of his business career, he was one of the firm of Parker & Crippen, grocers, and afterward engaged in the stone business with W.R. Finch.  He was also for a short time engaged in the Malleable Iron Works, of which company he is now the secretary.  In 1870, he engaged in the coal and lumber business, in partnership with his maternal uncle, William H. Salisbury.  

Mr. Parker has always been connected with the democratic party in politics, and in the fall of 1879 was elected member of the Assembly, by a vote of 3,833 against 3,051 for James Stead, republican, and 653 for John A. Erson, national. While in the Legislature, Mr. Parker was on the committees on internal affairs, and roads and bridges, and his legislative career was deemed creditable to himself and his constituents. In 1879 he was elected supervisor of the town of Coxsackie, in which position the votes of his fellow citizens have retained him to this time. In addition to his other duties, he is president of the Coxsackie Saving Institution. He was president of the village in 1882 and 1883.  

Mr. Parker is a prominent member of the masonic fraternity, and was master, and high priest of the chapter for many years; is also a member of LaFayette Commandery, of Hudson.  

Mr. Parker found a companion for life in the person of Miss Kate Carter, whom he married October 16th 1864. They have three children: Hattie G., Elizabeth, and James M.


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