David M. Hinman

From the Biographical Review, Volume XXXIII, located at the Durham Center Museum.
Transcribed by Arlene Goodwin


David M. Hinman, the popular merchant of New Baltimore. Greene County, N. Y., was born in this town on the last day of January, 1863. He is the only surviving son of the late William C. Hinman, who established the Hinman store, and who for many years was one of the leading citizens of New Baltimore. Mr. David M. Hinman’s grandfather was a native of Connecticut, and came from that State to Albany County, New York, when it was being cleared and settled. He was a school teacher by profession, and followed that calling through a long life. He taught music as well as the common branches of learning. He died at the age of eighty.

William C. Hinman was born in Albany County, and reared on a farm near Ravena. He pursued his studies in the district school, and in addition was privately instructed by his father. In early life he learned the carpenters’ trade. Later he became a tradesman on a small scale near Utica, and subsequently to that he came to New Baltimore. Here he was clerk for John G. Raymond for a time, and he subsequently established the business, which has since become the largest of its kind in the town. The buildings now in use were built by him some time after the business was started. At first he was in partnership with his brother, Herman H. Hinman, later with William Fuller down to 1876. Then for eleven years, or up to the time of his death in 1887, he carried on the business alone. He died aged sixty-nine years. His wife, whose maiden name was Jane Terry, was born in Coeymans, N. Y. She was one of the ten children of John Terry, a lifelong farmer of that place. She is now seventy-five years of age. Of her seven children three are living—Elizabeth, Annie, and David M. Both Mr. and Mrs. William C. Hinman were active in the affairs of the Methodist church, and both worked earnestly to secure the building of the church edifice, Mr. Hinman being on the committee having the matter in charge. He was for years the strong man in the church, and to him all looked for counsel. He was a Republican in politics. At the time of his death he was the oldest merchant in the town.

David M. Hinman attended the public schools of New Baltimore, and subsequently received private instruction for some time. He went to work in the store at an early age, and soon became his father’s most trusted and efficient clerk. Upon the death of his father he succeeded to the business, which he has since successfully managed. He carries a large stock of general merchandise, including groceries and provisions, dry goods, hardware, paints, oils, glass, oil-cloths, and ladies’ and gentlemen’s furnishing goods. The store has been the largest in the town since it was started fifty years ago. Mr. Hinman’s sister now acts as book-keeper, and she is also the operator on the Western Union Telegraph line here. There is a long distance telephone in the store. Mr. Hinman has in a measure stepped into the place his father formerly occupied in the church. He is a member of the Board of Stewards, for six years has been superintendent of the Sunday-school, and he is vice-president of the Epworth League, of which he has been a member ever since the branch here was organized. His politics are Republican. He has held the office of Town Clerk for a year.


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