Genealogical Gleanings from the
Windham Journal
1858

Transcribed by Mignon Matthews from microfilms of the original records, obtained by Sylvia Hasenkopf


January 7, 1858

BUSINESS CARDS

S.A. & C.C. Givens
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
opposite the Post office, Main street,
Catskill, NY

F. James Fitch,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
Catskill, NY.  Office one door west of the
Catskill Bank

James B. Olney
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW
Prattsville, Greene County, NY  Office
opposite the Prattsville House

A. R. Macomber
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW
Windham Center, NY

Olney & Osborne
ATTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT LAW
 
John Olney,

ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW
Windham, Greene County, NY

W. F. Spencer
DEALER IN CLOCKS, WATCHES AND JEWELRY,
Windham, Greene County, NY
 

Ebenezer Haight
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW
Cairo, Greene Co., NY.  Will pay prompt attention to all Business entrusted to his care.

E. P. More
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW
Prattsville, Greene Co., NY.  Collecting done with promptness.

King  & Mattoon
ATTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT LAW
CATSKILL, NY
Rufus H. King    Peleg C. Mattoon

A. H. Terheun
MANUFACTURER OF WINDOW SHADES
175 Canal Street, between Mott and Elizabeth
New York

E. Colburn
SURGEON DENTIST
Windham, Greene County, NY.  All work Warranted

Charles H. Porter
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW
Ashland, Greene County, NY
 

Loud & Smith
Will be happy to see their friends at their House, west end of Main Street, Catskill, NY

 James S. Edmonds
DEPUTY SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY
Office at Windham Center

Mallory & Vedder
CLOCKS, WATCHES, JEWELRY, CUTLERY
Fancy Goods, Silver and Silver Plated ware, &c., &c., in great variety, good and cheap. Clocks and Watches repaired and warranted. At the old stand, Main Street, opposite the Tanner’s Bank, Catskills, NY

A. Martin, Jr.,
DEALER IN STOVES, NAILS, HARDWARE, CUTLERY
Agricultural and Mechanical Implements and Tools, iron, steel, &c., &c.  Merchants supplied at New York prices.  Main Street, Catskill, NY.

Sashes and Blinds
SASHES AND BLINDS made to order by L. R. CHAPMAN, Big Hollow, NY

CHILDREN’S Fancy Hats and Caps – a fine assortment cheap for each. By H. F. OLMSTED, Catskill 

Justice’s Court
Before Isaac Brandow, Esq., Justice.
Ives D. Mattoon against Stephen Hedges.  S.P. Ives for Plaintiff and A. R. Macomber for defendant.  Action commenced to recover $1 per day for sixty-five days work – Plaintiff admitted having received $19. – Trial occupied one day and a half, and resulted in a verdict of $8.50 for plaintiff.

The People against Henry M. Judd.  Before L. Brandow, Esq., Justice. Action commenced for disturbing a religious meeting.  S.P. Ives for People, and A. R. Macomber for defendant.  This case was tried on the 6th inst., but decision not yet rendered.  

LARGE PIGS – Josiah Stannard, of Durham, recently sold in Catskill, four pigs, weighing respectively, 503,482, 398 and 379.

. S. Brownell, Esq., of Hobart, Delaware Co., has sold his tavern stand to Hugh Scott.  

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS  

For Sale  
ONE Horse, 16 hands high, eight years old, suitable for a family horse or team.  One fancy one-horse Wagon, nearly new. – One one-horse lumber-box Wagon, nearly new.  Also, one one-horse Harness, nearly new, all which will be sold low, to close a concern.  Inquire of S. C. BIDWEEL, Ashland or E. E. MILLEGAN, Red Falls

Town Insurance Meeting  
ALL persons interested in the re-organization of the Insurance Company, of the town of Windham, are requested to meet at the House of B. H. Waldron, in the town of Windham, on Saturday, the 9th day of January, at 6 o’clock P.M., to take into consideration the propriety of adopting a constitution and by-laws, proposed by a committee appointed for that purpose, and to transact such other business as may be brought before the meeting.  
C. V. BARNETT    S. P. IVES Committee for calling Meetings

Medical Notice  
THE semi-annual meeting of the Greene County Medical Society will be held at the house of Lewis Eagleston, in Cairo, on Tuesday, the 12th of January inst., at 11 o’clock, A.M.  A full attendance is earnestly requested, as business of importance is to come before the Society on that occasion. J. H. WHEELER, President C. V. BARNETT, Secretary

Large Assortment  
OF GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS AT THE  

Windham Variety Store.  

SOUTH SIDE OF MAIN STREET
H. R. POTTER, Windham Centre, NY, has just purchased a large and varied assortment of Dry goods, groceries, provisions &c., which are now open for inspection.  Also, a large assortment of Ready-made Clothing, Family Groceries, Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, Glass and Putty, Dyestuffs, Hardware, Nails, Queensware, Woodenware, Hooks, Leather and Findings, Hats, Caps, Boots Shoes, Umbrellas, Parasols, and in fact all articles Usually sold in country stores.  All of which Have been carefully and skillfully selected and will be sold on the Most Reasonable Terms Call and examine his stock before purchasing elsewhere. Windham   December 31, 1857

DRY GOODS & GROCERIES AT PANIC PRICES S. W. STIMPSON will offer his stock of Goods at prices to suit the hard times for CASH, commencing January 1st, 1858.  Country produce taken at cash value in exchange.Reader, if you want goods at Panic Prices for cash, go to S. W. STIMPSON’S. If you want as good Groceries as can be bought in the country, and cheap for cash or ready pay, go to S. W. STIMPSON’S If you want Crockery of a good quality, at prices to suit the times, go to S. W. STIMPSON’S Go to S. W. STIPMSON’S if you want any Patent Medicines, Pills or Salves. If you want any of the Grafenberg Medicines, S. W. STIMPSON’S is the agent in Windham Centre. In fact, if you want any Dry Goods, Groceries, Provisions, Crockery, Glass, Wood or Stoneware, Hardware or Yankee Notions, Drugs, Dyestuffs, Patent Medicines, Oils, Burning Fluid, Camphene, Paper Hangings, Putty or Window Glass from 6X8 to 20x30, at prices to suit the times for cash or ready pay, go to S. W. STIPMSON’S Windham Centre, December 31, 1857.

HARRISON’S COLUMBIAN  
HAIR DYE SIZE ENLARGED, STYLE IMPROVED
It has double the quantity and strength of any other. It gives a perfectly natural color. It colors every shade from light brown to jet black. Its use is easy and rapid. It is perfectly harmless to the skin. Its effect is instantaneous and permanent. It is the best, quickest, cheapest and safest dye ever made. Directions for use accompany each box. Price – 1 oz. $1; – 2 oz.$1.50; – 4 oz. $3; – 8 oz. $5 
Manufacturer
, APOLLOS W. HARRISON, 20 South 7th St. PHILADELPHIA  
For sale by W. F. Spencer, Windham; and by Dr. G. H. Noble, Cairo

Cooper Wanted  
THE subscriber wishes to employ a good Cooper, one who understands his business may hear of steady employment, at good wages upon application, personally or by letter to S. A. TAYLOR Hobart, Del. Co., NY 

Mrs. E. Spencer  
IS NOW RECEIVING HER FALL AND Winter Goods at her Millinery Store in Windham Centre.

SPANISH QUARTERS taken for twenty-five cents at W. P. SPENCER’S 

BEAR HUNTING – We learn that Silas Winne, of Woodstock, in company with some neighbors, one day last week went in pursuit of bears.  Winne, having with him a very valuable dog.  After wandering to what is called Bushkill, in the town of Shandaken, they fell in with a large gentleman of the shaggy species, who upon discovering his foes, ran into his hole.  Winne immediately followed the bear into this hole and shot, wounding the animal.  The infuriated bear made a hasty rush at his human assailant, between who and him a scramble ensued for exit from this tight fix, and Winne managed to get exit first.  As soon as the bear gained the mouth of the hole, the dog fastened upon him, but it proved but a moment’s job for the old shaghide to lay him a dead and shapeless mass, which accomplished, he started in full chase for the man, seizing him and tearing nearly all of his clothing from him.  Winne escaped and ran for the creek, the bear followed to the bank, but seeming to dislike a cold bath, halted, enabling Winne to reload, (using gravel stones for shot,) fire and kill the furious monster.  He weighed 560 pounds. – Saugerties Telegraph.

DEATHS BY DROWNING – Mr. B. VanDerzee, of Bethlehem, left Coyemans landing on Friday evening, Dec. 11th, with his team to proceed to his home.  He was discovered the next morning by a person sent to search for him in the creek, just above the village. – When discovered, he was lying under his team, which was also in the stream.  It is supposed that instead of driving over the bridge near by, he had driven into an adjoining brickyard, and upon discovering his mistake, he had attempted to turn around, and backed himself and team into the stream.

Mr. Leonard Colvin, of New Baltimore, left the village on Monday evening, Dec. 23, to proceed in a small boat to his residence a short distance down the river.  The next day, his boat containing his hat, was found near Stuyvesant Landing.  His body has not been discovered.  They both have families. - Examiner

A STEAM FERRY AT ATHENS – We have at length, says the Columbia Republican, a fair prospect of the establishment of a good steam Ferry Boat to run between this city and the village of Athens, after the expiration of the present lease, which will be on the first of February, 1859.  The authorities of this city have already leased from the Trustees of Athens all the right, title and interest of the latter in the Ferry for 10 years from the above date, the Consul agreeing to cause to be put on a new steam Ferry Boat of not less than 85 feet kneel, 24 feet beam and 8 feet deep with new boilers and engine; the boat to be finished and furnished equal to that now on the Catskill Ferry.

ARRESTS – F. B. Lamont Esq., a week or two since, went in pursuit of a man named Lewis Griffin, and succeeded in arresting him in Michigan.  The arrest was made on a warrant issued in this county, on a charge of firing the barn of Joseph Huggins in Lexington last spring.  He was brought to this county, and lodged in the jail at Catskill. – Mr. Newton Chase also arrested a man named Brandow Huggins, on a charge of being an accomplice in firing the barn, and for stealing sheep.  The latter was arrested, we learn, in the town of Lexington.


January 14, 1858

STATE of NEW YORK, HEAD QUARTERS
ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE
ALBANY, Dec. 24th, 1857

 

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 45

To towns of Stuyvesant, Kinderhook, Ghent, Chatham, New Lebanon, Cannan and Austerlitz in Columbia County are hereby detached from the 28th Regimental and 12th Brigade districts and annexed to 21st Regimental and 8th Brigade districts.  The Commandants of Companies in these towns will, without delay, report themselves and commands for duty to Col. Joseph Wright of Poughkeepsie commanding the 21st Regiment.  The remaining portion of the 28th Regimental district is hereby detached from the 12th Brigade district and annexed to the 21st Regimental and 8th Brigade districts.  The Commandants of Companies therein, will, without delay, report themselves and commands for duty to Col. George W. Pratt of Kingston, commanding the 21st Regiment.  The 28th Regiment is hereby disbanded.  All officers rendered superfluous by the operation of this order, will report without delay to this department.

*          *            *            *            *            *            *            *            *            *            *            *

The Commandants of the 20th and 21st Regiments will re-arrange the lettering of their regiment and transmit corrected Rosters, thereof, to this department.

By Order of the Commander in Chief
FILKIRK TOWNSEND, Adjutant General 

Alhambra Saloon  
The subscriber would respectfully inform his friends that he has established a saloon near the central part of this village of Ashland where he will serve up OYSTERS in almost any style.  Having made arrangements to be supplied regularly with good oysters, he hopes to give satisfaction to those who favor him with their patronage.  A choice assortment of Confectionary, Fruit, Nuts, etc., always on hand. A. G. RUNYAN Ashland, Jan. 1, 1858 

The Weather
The winter thus far has been an open and unusually pleasant one, but very changeable.  On the 6th inst., we had fine sleighing.  On the 11th, we had a thaw, and rain enough to sweep away our snowy carpet – leaving many travelers scattered thro’ the country to make the best of their way home with sleighs on bare ground.

GREENE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY – At the annual meeting of this Society, at Cairo, on the 4th inst., the following gentlemen were elected officers for the ensuing year: - Lewis Sherrill, President; Cyrus Field, Vice President; A. P. Jones, Treasurer; J. L. Day, Secretary, and Edmund Johnson and Luke Roe, Directors.  A good set of officers and all gentlemen who will do their utmost to promote the interests of the society.

DONATION PARTY – The friends of the Rev. George Woodworth, of the M. E. Church, have determined to give him a benefit, at his residence in Ashland, on Wednesday afternoon and evening, January 27th.  As Mr. Woodworth, in common with other clergymen, feels the force of the monetary pressure, a general attendance is desired, that he may be materially aided.


Thursday, January 14, 1858

Notice to Clubs  
The Windham Journal will be furnished to Clubs on the following terms:
Six copies to one post office, 1 year, $5.00
Twelve copies to one post office, 1 year, $9.00
Sixteen copies to one post office, 1 year, $12.00
Twenty copies to one post office, 1 year, $15.00

Justice’s Court
The People against Henry M. Judd.  We made mention of the above trial in our last issue, but as our reporter finds one or two errors, we publish the same again, with the verdict of the jury.  The case was tried before Meritt Osborn, Esq., and a jury.  The warrant was issued on complaint of James Rice, that the defendant had, at various times, willfully disturbed and annoyed the religious meetings held in the neighborhood of the complainant, by his language and conduct.  The complainant called quite a number to disprove the same.  The defendant also attempted to show that the complainant was induced to enter the complaint, by the influences of parties who had not been present at these meetings and who were actuated by malicious feelings towards the defendant, which evidence was ruled out by the Justice.  The jury, however, after having deliberated but a short time, returned with a verdict of not guilty of the offence charged.  S. P. Ives for People and A. R. Macomber for defendant.

Engine Company No. 1
At the Annual meeting of Engine Company No. 1, at the house of B. H. Waldron, on Saturday evening last, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year:

Foreman – B. H. Waldron
Assistant Foreman – E. Colburn
Clerk – Jas. H. Woolhiser
Treasurer – Lucius S. Graham
Engineer – J. S. Edmonds
Assistant Engineer – Levi Andrus

ERRATUM – An error occurred in our issue of last week which we very much regret, inasmuch as, if allowed to go uncorrected, it would result detrimental to the reputation of an innocent person.  We stated, on the strength of a letter from Prattsville, that a young man named Woodbine, had been arrested and lodged in the jail at Delhi on a charge of setting fire to Totten’s mills in North Harpersfield, on the 24th ult.  The item should have read “one Woodvine”, instead of “a young man named Woodbine”.  The person who was arrested was an old gentleman, a resident of Prattsville, and one whom we have always heard spoken of as an honest, industrious, and respected citizen.  And although one person testified or stated that he saw Mr. Woodbine in the neighborhood on the morning of the fire; and, although tracks were found near the mills which corresponded with those made by Mr. W., two other persons swore that they had each made similar tracks at about the same time and place.  We think, therefore, the charge is an unfounded one, and one which will not be supported by a shadow of guilt.  Young Mr. Woodvine is a stranger in this section, we learn, having lately removed to Prattsville from the west, bringing with him industrious habits and an unblemished reputation.

ENTERPRISING – The dwelling house of Mr. Abram Hill, of Prattsville, which was destroyed by fire a short time since, is already nearly replaced by a new building.  Before the time for planting arrives, the house will be completed, and we hope Mr. H’s crops will be sufficiently remunerative to cause him to forget his severe losses.  It is a source of much satisfaction to know that the dwelling of Mr. D. F. More, in true hospitality, was thrown open for the comfort of the unfortunate family, and that they received every possible attention while there which kind hearts could dictate.

COTILLION PARTY – A Cotillion Party will be held at the Hotel of Mr. H. B. Smith, on the west side of the creek, in the village of Prattsville, on Friday evening, January 22d.  Mr. Smith has but recently taken the Hotel and his friends should testify their appreciation of his efforts to please by a good attendance.

MILITARY – The 28th Regiment, N.Y.S.M., late under the command of Col. G. W. Pratt, has been disbanded.

The following affidavits were handed us for publication; and inasmuch as Mr. Story fells aggrieved and injured by a statement which appeared in the JOURNAL of the 31st ult., we insert them – but only as an advertisement.

Gentlemen, with whom we have spoken, regarding Mr. Lull, invariably advance the idea that “his mind is shattered.”  In charity for him, let us hope this conclusion is correct. – [Ed. JOURNAL]

Advertisement  
Greene County,
ss

Huldah A. Story, of the town of Prattsville and county aforesaid, being duly sworn, doth depose and say:  that on the night of the 10th day of December, William Lull was invited by my husband, James Story, to stay with us over night, and that the said William Lull came home with Mr. Story from a meeting held at the school house in this district.  During the evening, Mr. Lull’s conversation was very vulgar, and unbecoming for any person to use in company, and during the evening his whole conversation was very unbecoming for a Christian.  I told Mr. Lull that he must sleep with Mr. Decker, as my beds were all full.  He said he would as soon sleep with a pig as to sleep with a man.  Mr. Lull further said he would sleep in the front side of the bed, so as to keep Mr. Decker from getting up and going to bed with the young woman.  Mr. Story showed Mr. Lull and Mr. Decker to bed about ten o’clock in the evening.  During the night, Mr. Lull got up and came into the kitchen, and complained of the tooth-ache.  It was light enough in this room for him to see to go to the stove or any other part of the room.  I called to Mr. Story to come down and he came down and Mr. Story and Mr. Lull sat by the stove about one hour, and then they retired to bed again.  Mr. Story slept upstairs with the boys and Miss Myers slept with me that night.  I was awakened by Mr. Lull the second time in about one hour.  I cannot tell the exact time, but should think it was about one hour.  He was on the back side of the bed.  I slept on the back side of the bed.  He woke me by drawing the clothes off of my shoulders.  I slapped him in the face, and hollered out “you old devil”.  Mr. Story and Mr. Decker called to me and asked “What is the matter?”  I said they would find out if that old devil did not go back go bed and stay there.  Mr. Lull did not speak but got off the bed and went to the stove.  He then went across the room to the bookcase and got a pipe, and then went to the other side of the room and got the tobacco and sat down by the stove and went to smoking.  It was light enough to see if any part of the room from the light of the stove.  He then went to the buttery and I asked him if he wanted a candle to go to bed.  He said no, it was light enough to see to go to bed without a light.  He then went back to his room.   I did not hear Mr. Story and Mr. Lull say anything about cutting wood that morning.  Mr. Lull asked me whre Mr. Story was.  I told him he had gone to milk.  He told me to call him back and when Mr. Story came back to the house, Mr. Lull turned to him and said, IIf I don’t prey for you, your cow will kick your mild over.”  He then got down on his knees and prayed.  The then went away. HULDAH A. STORY

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of January, 1858.
GEORGE HOAGLAND, Justice of the Peace.

Greene County, ss
Mary C. Myers, of Prattsville, and county aforesaid, being duly sworn, doth depose and say:  I stayed at Mr. Story’s on the night of the 10th day of December, 1857.  Mr. Lull came here with Mr. Story and stayed all night.  During the evening, Mr. Lull’s conversation was very vulgar and unbecoming for any man to use in the presence of any person.  He also said he would rather sleep with the pigs than to sleep with a man.  Mr. Lull said to me that he thought it was a good time for me to get married.  He asked me to get him some water, and when I brought him a glass of water, he said to me that Mr. Decker must sleep in the back side of the bed, so that he, Mr. Decker, would not get up and sleep with this young lady.  During the night, Mr. Lull got up and came and sat by the stove.  I was awake and saw him.  It was light enough so that I could see perfectly plain.  Mr. Lull sat by the stove about one hour and then went to his room.  I slept with Mrs. Story, and was awakened by Mrs. Story’s screaming.  I asked her what was the matter.  She said that if that old devil did not go to bed, I would find out what the matter was.  I felt something on the foot of the bed, but did not see what was there, but believe it was Mr. Lull.  I soon saw Mr. Lull standing by the stove.  He then went and got the tobacco and pipe and sat down by the stove and smoked about one hour.  He then went to the buttery.  Mrs. Story asked him if he wanted a light.  He said no, he didn’t want a light.  He then went back to his room.  I did not hear them make any bargain about cutting wood.  In the morning after Mr. Lull had got his overcoat on and hat in hand, ready to start off, he said “we must have a word of prayer before I go or the devil will have us before night”.  He then made a prayer and then went off.  This is all I know about it.

MARY C. MYERS
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of January, 1858.
GEORGE HOAGLAND, Justice of the Peace 

Greene County, ss  
Isaac Decker, being duly sworn, deposes and says: that he stayed at the house of Mr. Story on the night of the 10th of December, 1857.  I worked, for Mr. Story, chopping wood.  Mr. Lull stayed at Mr. Story’s that night.  I think Mr. Lull’s conversation, during the evening, was very vulgar and unbecoming to use before any company.  I slept with him that night.  Mr. Lull said before we went to bed, that he would as soon sleep with a hog as to sleep with a man.  Mr. Lull told me the would advise me to get married to Miss Myers and he could marry me in a few minutes, and if I didn’t like her very well, I would like her well enough after I got to bed.  Mr. Lull and myself went to bed together about half past nine o’clock in the evening.  He told me I must get in the back side, or I would be getting up and going to bed with that young lady.  I slept in the back side of the bed.  We were in bed about an hour when Mr. Lull complained of the tooth-ache.  He got up and went into the kitchen and stayed there about an hour, and then returned to bed.  Mr. Lull stayed in bed about an hour, and then got up, put on his stockings, and went into the kitchen.   He said his tooth pained him again.  I think it was about one minute afterward when I heard Mrs. Story holler.  She said, “you old devil, get off of here.”  I asked Mrs. Story what the matter was.  She said “you will find out, if this old devil don’t get off of here and go to bed.”  He was gone about an hour before he came back to bed.  The bedroom in which I slept was adjoining that of the kitchen, in which Mrs. Story slept.  There was a fire in the stove, so that the room was quite light.  The light was caused by the stove door being broken.  After Mr. Lull came back to bed, he said he believed he had held his face so close to the stove that he had burnt it.  I did not hear Mr. Story and Mr. Lull say anything about cutting wood that morning or any other.  I left after breakfast for my work.

            his
ISAAC M. DECKER
           
mark   

Signed in the presence of Sanford Christian.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of January, 1858
GEORGE HOAGLAND, Justice of the Peace

Greene County, ss  
James Story, of the town of Prattsville and county aforesaid, being duly sworn doth depose and say:  On the 10th day of December, 1857, William Lull came to my house about eleven o’clock in the forenoon.  He asked if we were getting dinner or breakfast.  I told him dinner.  I told the boy to call Isaac Decker to dinner.  Mr. Lull asked me what Decker was doing.  I told him he was chopping wood.  He asked me what I gave a cord.  I told him two and sixpence and boarded, and I think he said, “I will go over and get my axe and chop too.”  I told him I had engaged Mr. Decker to chop all the wood I wanted cut.  After dinner, he spoke of going to Stone Bridge.  I invited him to come back and go to meeting, and stay all night with me.  He came back just as we had got thro’ supper.  He said, “I will not stay for supper now, for it’s meeting time.”  I told him he had better have supper, and my wife went and got supper for him, and we went to meeting together, and Mr. Lull came home with me to stay all night.  There was nothing said next morning about cutting wood, and I never made any bargain with Mr. Lull to chop wood for me.  I believe the affidavits of Huldah A. Story, Mary C. Myers, and Isaac Decker, which I have heard read, are correct.

JAMES STORY
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of January, 1858.
GOERGE HOAGLAND, Justice of the Peace.


Thursday, January 21, 1858

Serious Accident  
An accident occurred in the village of Ashland, on Wednesday last, which resulted in some serious bruises to Mr. John Peck of Jewett, and other members of his family, and also in the death of a valuable horse.  Mr. Peck, accompanied by his wife and wife’s mother, (Mrs. Hosford), visited Ashland, intending to take home his daughter, who was attending the Ashland Collegiate Institute.  One their way to the Seminary, they met Miss Peck coming down the hill, upon which an attempt was made to turn round; but, the road being narrow, the wagon tongue was broken, the horses became unmanageable and ran away.  The two ladies and Mr. Peck were considerably bruised.  The horses ran to the turnpike, turned to the right, and pursued their way down a short distance until they ran into a small bridge by the roadside, where they were brought to a stop by one of the horses breaking a forward leg.  The horse was killed immediately.

Mr. Peck returns his thanks for the citizens of Ashland, for the kindness which they manifested on the occasion.

Town Insurance Meeting  
Pursuant to a call made last week, a meeting of the Town Insurance Company of the town of Windham, was held on Saturday afternoon at the hotel of B. H. Waldron, in this village, when By-Laws were adopted, and the following gentlemen were elected Directors: 
H. R. Potter           Meritt Osborn        Isaac Brandow             S. P. Ives
Albert Chase         Hollis Frayer

The Directors held a meeting at the office of S. P. Ives, Esq., on Tuesday evening, and the following gentlemen from the Board of Directors were elected officers of the Company for the ensuing year.

H. R. Potter, President
Meritt Osborn, Vice President
S. P. Ives, Secretary and Treasurer 

We learn from a reliable source, says the Coxsackie Union, that Mr. Leonard Colvin, of New Baltimore, left that village on Monday evening, December 21st, to proceed in a small boat to his residence a short distance down the Hudson, since which time nothing has been heard of him.  The next day, his boat, containing his hat, was found near Stuyvesant Landing. 

ALHAMBRA SALOON – Mr. A. G. Runyan has established himself in the village of Ashland, where he has fitted up a neat Saloon, under the title of “The Alhambra”.  He proposes to furnish the citizens of Ashland with Oysters in almost every style, and to keep a general supply of choice refreshments.  As this is the only saloon in the village, Mr. Runyan cannot but do a thriving business.  Success to him.


January 28, 1858

OMITTED – In our notice of the Town Insurance Company organization last week, the name of Mr. Sylvester Austin was either accidentally omitted or not sent in with the other names.  It should have appeared among the Directors of the Company.

Tribute to Hon. John K. Paige
At a regular communication of Oasis Lodge, No. 199, held at their Lodge Room, Prattsville, Greene County, NY, January 8th, 1858, A L. 0808, on motion of H. E. Millegan, a committee of three were appointed to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of the Lodge, on the death of their friend and brother JOHN K. PAIGE, who was a petition member and for a long time Master of said Lodge., whose death took place at Schenectady, NY, December 10th, 1857, whose remains were followed to their final resting place by the Masonic Fraternity of that city and Albany – thereby testifying to the moral and Masonic worth of our departed brother.  Brothers E. E. Millegan, E. P. More and J. B. Olney were appointed such committee – who reported the following preambles and resolutions, which were adopted by the Lodge.

Whereas, in the mysteries of his providence, it hath pleased the Grand Master of the Universe to remove from us by Death, our faithful, well-beloved and truly worthy brother, JOHN K. PAIGE, and to take him from his labor here, we trust to a refreshment in a higher, holier and happier sphere “to that house not made with hands, eternal in the Heavens”, to call him from his labor and the rough Ashlar in the quarries of time, to his final rest in the eternal temple, whose walls, as seen in the vision of our great patron, were composed of the perfect Ashlar of Jasper of sapphire and other precious material, the main pillars of which are Wisdom, Strength and Beauty, devised as established and beatified by the all wise hand of the supreme Architect of the Universe, therefore

Resolved, That it becomes us, his brethren, to bow in humble submission to the will of Him from whom came the stern decree, which has severed our earthly connection.

Resolved, That in the death of our brother, the Fraternity has lost one of its most faithful and exemplary members; the family circle a kind and affectionate companion, and society at large an honest and peaceful citizen.

Resolved, That we deeply sympathize with the family, and others who sustained a more endearing relationship in that afflictive providence.  We recommend them to the God of the widow and the fatherless.

Resolved, That the members of this Lodge wear the usual bade of mourning for the space of thirty days.  It is further

Resolved, That the Secretary, in token of our deep and sincere sympathy, cause a copy of these resolutions to be presented to the family of our deceased brother and forward a copy to the Masonic Mirror and Keystone, Windham Journal, Albany Atlas & Argus, and Bloomville Mirror, for publication.

J. M. FANNING
Secretary of Oasis Lodge, No 119

LECTURE OF PROF. FOX – Prof. Fox, of the Ashland Collegiate Institute, delivered a lecture at the Court House, in this village, on Thursday evening last, to a very crowded auditory on the subject of “Self Culture.”  Prof. Fox is a gentleman of much ability, and his lecture was the most forcible and practical one that has been delivered here on that subject.  The audience was evidently much interested in the subject, and the youthful portion greatly instructed by the discourse of the lecturer.  Prof. Fox is Principal of the Ashland Institute, and he left upon the minds of this community a deep conviction of his peculiar fitness for his responsible and delicate station.  The Institute commenced its fourth quarter of the second Term yesterday, the 20th inst. – Recorder.  

ASHLAND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE – We are gratified to learn, through a friend, that this Institution is in a most flourishing condition, and that the prospects for the next term are cheering.  Many parents have been deterred from placing their children at school during the past four or five months on account of the great stagnation of commercial pursuits, who will, with the brightening Spring, commence anew.  Messrs. Fox & Rutherford have just secured the services of an excellent Professor of music, and have now as talented a corps of Professors and teachers as any Institute in the country.

REVIVAL – Quite a revival, it is said, is and has been in progress in the Methodist Episcopal Church, in the village of Durham.  Rev. Mr. Andrus is the pastor.  Many conversions have already taken place, and much interest is manifested.

TRIAL OF HEAGNEY POSTPONED – At the last Circuit Court for Delaware county in Delhi, the case of John Heagney, indicted for the murder of his wife in Hobart, was put over to the next session.  The case was postponed on motion of defendant’s counsel, although Heagney expressed a wish to be tried immediately.

Notice
IS HEREBY GIVEN TO ALL PERSONS having SHIRTS.  In the course of manufacture for the subscriber, to return the same immediately to our store, Hensonville.  As we are receiveing a fresh supply from New York, we are under the necessity of closing the old stock without delay.

W. & J. LOUGHRAN
Hensonville, January 26, 1858

Valuable Property for Sale  
THE subscriber, being about to change his business, offers for sale the following named valuable village property.  One dwelling-house, with lot containing three-quarters of an acre of ground and all necessary outbuildings.  Also, one Wagon Maker’s Shop, with complete stock of tools, &c., &c.  This property is centrally located in the village of Windham Center, and in a good place for business.  This house and lot, and wagon shop, will be sold separately or together, as may best suit purchasers.  For particulars, apply to the subscriber on the premises.

T. D. TRAPHAGAN
Windham Center, Jan. 26, 1858

AUCTION SALE  
THE Subscriber will sell at public venue on Monday, the 13th day of February next, his entire stock of DRY GOODS, consisting of Broad Cloths, Velvets, Paramatias, Delains &c., &c.  Yankee Notions, Groceries, Hardware, Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, Crockery &c.  Sale to commence at 10 o’clock, A.M., and continues on from day to day until the stock is disposed of.  A credit of three months will be given for all sums over $3, without interest, or a longer credit with interest from date.

EZRA SNYDER
Cornwallsville, Greene Co., Jan. 26, 1858


February 4, 1858

Hadn’t the Pluck

The following letter has been handed to me for publication.  It is said to have been written by a resident of Red Falls, whose initials we suppress.  After writing the dreadful document and securing the services of a boy to carry it to his wife, he disappeared for the day.  Upon a search being instituted, however, he “turned up on his own pins” some half a mile from his intended gibbet – the birch tree:--

Margaret when you read this I am no more and this fatal blow all on your account.  I have not taken any comfort with you for this 10 years past you and your children have ruined my Sole And Body and you will have it to think of when I am ded and gone take good care of John William and bring him up better than the rest of your Children.  I love my Children and Wife, but they don’t care for me therefore I don’t wish to live any longer you will find me above in the Woods hanging in a burch tree on the left side of the road after you get up the big hill.  The tree laes up from the ground.  Just rite for my business you may say that I am crazy but I am not but in my rite mind.  Good by forever

I wish you Hell


February 11, 1858

ANOTHER FIRE IN SCHOHARIE            -  We learn from the Schoharie Republican that on Saturday evening 23d ult., a very large barn, belonging to Mr. Peter Bergh, about two miles from the village of Schoharie, was entirely consumed by fire, together with four cows, two horses, sixty tons of hay, and nearly the entire crop of grain from a large farm.  The loss to Mr. Bergh is about $2500, upon which there is an insurance of but $200.  The origin of the fire is enveloped in mystery; but is supposed to have been caused either by the careless smoking of a hired man, or by a couple of vagrants who have sometimes slept in the barn.

Ashland Collegiate Institute

We are happy to learn that the enterprising principals of the Ashland Collegiate Institute propose opening with their next session a Normal Academy of music, in which facilities equal to any in the country will be furnished to those who desire to attain a thorough musical education.  Especial attention will be given to church music.  In pursuance of this design, they have engaged the services of Prof. Edward Ambuhl, a distinguished instructor and composer, formerly one of the board of examiners of the Music Vale Seminary, Salem, Conn., and a pupil of the celebrated German professor J. Trinckler.  Young ladies who wish to enter that department should make application as early as possible, as those who first enter will have the choice of instruments.

A PROLIFIC NEIGHBORHOOD – In School District No. 1, in the town of Greenville, this county, a friend informs us there are seven pairs of twin children – the oldest 16 years and the youngest two weeks of age.  Among the lot there are three pairs of girls.  Good for Greenville.  If any single School District in the State can beat this, we should be glad to know it.

CATSKILL GAS COMPANY – The citizens of Catskill are about to make application to the Legislature for the passage of an act authorizing the Trustees of the village to loan the credit of said village to the amount of six thousand dollars, for the purpose of erecting Gas Works and supplying said village with gas.  The prospects now are that the movement will be carried through.

PRESENTATION – A. Raaney, Esq., is about to present to the Fire Company which has most liberally patronized his Gift Book establishment, a beautiful silver trumpet.  Also to the military Company which has most extensively patronized his establishment a splendid sword, said to have cost over $300.  Those gifts are said to be most beautifully engraved, and the finest ever exhibited in New York city.  Mr. R’s establishment is at No. 203 Broadway.  See his advertisement in another column. 

A FINE PRESENT – Col. George W. Pratt, lately presented the Washington Rifle Company, of Kingston, with a fine painting of Gen. George Washington.  The Company look upon it with much pride, and return thanks through the columns of the journals in a becoming manner.

THE PEOPLE PRESS – This able and welcome weekly journal, comes to us under a new heading and much improved in appearance, giving unmistakable evidence of its increasing prosperity.

Three men, named Edward McCauley, R. Poore and David Lyon, were executed for murder on the 11th day of December, in Sonora, California.  The Bloomville Mirror believes them to be the murderers of John Blakely, of Kortright, Delaware county. 

Notice

IS HEREBY GIVEN TO ALL PERSONS having SHIRTS in the course of manufacture for the subscribers, to return the same immediately to our store, Hensonville.  As we are receiving a fresh supply from New York, we are under the necessity of closing the old stock without delay. W. & J. LOUGHRAN  Hensonville, January 26, 1858 

NOTICE

Splendid opening for any person wishing to engage in the Mercantile Trade. H. R. POTTER

Of Windham, being desirous of setting up his business, will sell his stock of DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES and rent his Store on very reasonable terms.  The Store is large and commodious, and well calculated for the trade, and is located in the most business part of the town. For the next thirty days, the subscriber will sell his goods AT COST, for cash only.  For further particulars address H. R. POTTER  Windham, Feb. 2d, 1858

 For Sale Cheap

THE Subscriber offers for sale a large quantity of property, comprising, one five horse Steam Engine and Boiler; one double Carding Machine; one Picker; one Hat Former; two Hat Lathes; a quantity of Hat Blocks; one Sewing machine, two Hatters’ Kettles; Dye Stuffs, Wool Hats &c., &c.  Also, one one-horse Wagon; one Cutter; one Buffalo Robe; one Wheelbarrow; one circular Saw and frame for sawing wood.  Also, the hat shop Building and land thereunto belonging, lately owned and occupied by Messrs. Conine and Tompkins.  The above real estate and machinery will be sold together or separate, as may best suit purchasers. S.C. BIDWELL Assignee of Conine & Tompkins Ashland, January 12th, 1858

Valuable Property for Sale

THE Subscriber, being about to change his business, offers for sale the following named valuable village property.  One dwelling house, with lot containing three-quarters of an acre of ground, and all necessary outbuildings.  Also, one Wagon Maker’s Shop, with complete stock of tools, &c., &c.  This property is centrally located in the village of Windham center, and in a good place for business.  This house and lot, and wagon shop, will be sold separately or together, as may best suit purchasers.  For particulars apply to the subscriber, on the premises. T. D. TRAPHAGAN Windham Center, Jan. 26, 1858


February 18, 1858

Drawing Match

A trial of the strength of two horses, one belonging to J. De Noyelles, Esq., of Prattsville, and the other to Mr. Samuel Wiltse, took place near the Prattsville House, in the village of Prattsville, on Tuesday of last week.  A heavy two horse bob sleigh was placed on bare ground, and the horses attached single.  Mr. Wiltse’s horse moved the sleigh, with thirty-four men seated on it.  Neither horse exerted his entire strength.  An estimate was made that Mr. Wiltse’s horse pulled sixty-five hundred pounds, and Mr. De Noyelles’ about sixty-three hundred and fifty pounds.  Taking into consideration that this feat was performed upon bare ground, it is rather remarkable.                     

A Fish Story

One of the best fish stories we have heard of late is that Mr. David Winchell, of East Jewett, took from his spring a sucker and enclosed it in a paper, drove two miles or more to church, stayed there until the services were over, carried it one mile after church, saw it move, placed it in cold water, let it remain two days, cut off its head, dressed it and when half cooked, it moved again.  This is a rather remarkable fish story, but the parties are of the most reliable authority, and the statement must therefore be true.

HORSE’S LEG BROKEN – A valuable horse, belonging to J. E. Matthews, Esq., of this village, had his right hind leg broken two or three inches above the fetlock joint, on Saturday night last.  Mr. Matthews heard an unusual noise in his stable late in the evening, and upon going out, he found that the horse had caught one foot between two upright planks at the side of the stall, and thus broken the limb.  An effort is being made to safe the horse, but whether it will prove successful or not remains to be seen.

DISAPPEARANCE – A man named John Kissack, left his home in Hobart three weeks ago to take a load of butter to New York for a neighbor.  Stopped in Prattsville; left a sick horse with J. De Noyelles, and borrowed another.  Went on to Catskill; left his team at Birdsley’s tavern; sold two firkins of butter, started for New Yrok with the balance, and has not been heard of since.

WASHINGTON’S BIRTHDAY PARTIES – Two Washington’s Birthday parties are to come off on Monday evening next, one at the hotel of J. De Noyelles, Esq., in Prattsville, and another at the Westkill House, kept by D. C. Deyo, Esq.  The prospect now is that we shall have fine sleighing at that time; and if so, look out for lively times.     

MUSICAL, DRILL AND CONCERT – A musical Drill will be held in Gilboa on Tuesday next, and will continue four days – closing with a Concert on Friday evening.  The Drill will be under the direction of Prof. David Morse, assisted by Prof. E. B. Morse, with Miss Ruth A. Reed as pianist.

WASHINGTON BALL – Don’t forget that a Washington Ball will take place at the hotel of C. B. Dickinson, Esq., in Durham, this (Thursday) evening, and that a grand time is expected.

Military

The general orders, No. 9, from the Adjutant General’s office, Albany, New York, contain the following:--

On the report of Colonel George W. Pratt, commanding the 20th Regiment, in pursuance of General Orders No. 45, of December 24, 1857, it is hereby ordered that the company of Artillery commanded by Lieutenant Dederick be consolidated with the company of Infantry commanded by Captain Webster.  The companies thus consolidated will hereafter form an Infantry company and be designated by the letter A.

Captain Haulenbeck’s company of Infantry will hereafter be designated by the letter B.

Special Orders organizing Captain Derenbacker’s flank company of rifles are hereby cancelled, and the command is hereby re-organized as an Infantry company and will hereafter be designated by the letter C.

Captain Davis’ company of Infantry will hereafter be designated by the letter D.

Captain Penniman’s company of Infantry will hereafter be designated by the letter E.

Special Orders organizing Captain Flynn’s company as a flank company of artillery are hereby cancelled, and the command is hereby re-organized as an Infantry company, and will hereafter be designated by the letter F.

Captain Van Bergen’s company of Infantry will hereafter be designated by the letter G.

Captain Von Beck’s company of Infantry will hereafter be designated by the letter H.

The company of Light Artillery commanded by Captain Pettit will hereafter be designated by the letter R.

Captain Edgar Russell, Paymaster of the 8th Brigade, late Lieutenant Colonel of the 28th Regiment, is hereby directed to collect without delay, at the expense of the State, the public property in the late 28th Regiment, not in use of some organized company of the 20th Regiment, and to return the same to the Arsenal in the city of New York.

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Adjutant General

Circuit Court

The February term of the Greene County Circuit Court commenced its session in Catskill on Monday morning.

Among the Grand Jurors we notice the names of Messrs. Lucas North, Jewett; Lucas E. Brandow, Prattsville; Orrin Osborn and Eli Spencer, Durham; Ira Sherman, Windham, and No. Ormsbee, Ashland.

Among the Pettit Jurors are the names of Messers. D. C. Hinman, James Loughran, Ahira Barney and Frederick North of this town; C. C. Humphrey, Durham; E. M. Bouton, Prattsville; T. O’Brien, E. L. Ford, David Pond and W. L. Distin, Jewett; and Addison Steele and Daniel Ives, Ashland.  There are fifty-three cases on the calendar, but our limited space this week forbids its publication.

The Rev. Thomas Richey, for three years past Rector of St. Luke’s (Episcopal) Church, in this village, has accepted a call to the Rectorship of Mount Calvary Church, Baltimore, Md.  He enters upon his new field of labors immediately.  During his brief stay among us, he has won the respect of the people, and carries with him their best wishes for a pleasant future. –Examiner.


February 25, 1858

STUDENT’S SLEIGH RIDE – Some twenty-five or thirty students from the Ashland Collegiate Institute visited our village on Saturday afternoon last for a sleigh-ride.  They were accompanied by one or both of the Principals and seemed to enjoy themselves finely.  The roads were in excellent order, and the occasion will undoubtedly be long remembered by the students as one of the happiest of their school days.  As they passed the Journal office, three hearty cheers were given; and on their return from the upper end of the village, our devils were startled by the shrill tones of a gong, which we presume had been brought expressly for the benefit of a hungry set of printers.  Perhaps our friends intended to remind us of people who always have plenty to eat, and of the lean and lank appearance of printers in general.  However, we’ll be merciful this time, and appreciate the compliment paid us.  We humbly return thanks.  May the lives of the students pass in the smooth and untroubled avenues of health, peace and plenty, and their days be as profitably spent as while they are under the guardianship of Messrs. Fox & Rutherford.

 THE TRUMPET AND THE SWORD – We see by the New York papers that the presentation of a beautiful trumpet took place at the La Farge House, in New York, on Saturday evening.  The donor was A. Ranney, Esq.  The trumpet was given to Engine Company No. 11, but there being no military delegation present, the sword was returned, for the present, to Mr. Ranney.  Appropriate speeches were made, and a pleasant jubilee took place.  The number of tickets purchased by the lucky company was 387.

POISONED – A colored woman, known by the name of Caroline Havely, died suddenly at Gulnia Hill, a few miles from this place, on Thursday of last week.  The evening before she had attended a “spree” where it is supposed she took poison, which had been mixed into the liquor, and then given her to drink.  Suspicion rests upon a negro known as “Moll’s Tom”, who, it appears, had been imprisoned some time before by deceased. – Coxsackie Union

CAUGHT AT LAST – On Wednesday of last week one Matthew Beatty was arrested in this village on suspicion of being the guilty party who has been, for some time past, engaged in the “chicken coop robberies”.  The evidence produced against him was of a circumstantial character, but very strong.  Justice Russell committed him to jail to await the action of the Grand Jury.  His case will probably be disposed of at the present court. – Recorder & Democrat.

FATAL ACCIDENT – A man by the name of ___________Hallenbeck came to his death one day last week, in the following manner.  While on his way to this place with a load of wood, the sleigh capsized, throwing the wood onto Mr. H., killing him instantly.  He leaves a family to mourn his loss. – Cox. Union.

Circuit Court

The Circuit Court and Court of Oyer and Terminer of this county was held at Catskill last week, Judge Gould, of Troy, presiding. 

Quite a large number of cases were disposed of and Judge Gould seems to have left with a very favorable opinion from the people of the county attending the Court, as to his ability to adorn the position he occupied.  A remarkable fact is mentioned of this session, that only one case was submitted to a jury, the Judge himself having disposed of the cases in a manner peculiar to himself.

Only one criminal case was tried, the People against Newton Gay. Gay was indicted some five or six years since for burglary, it being alleged that he was one of the parties who broke into the office of D. K. Olney, Esq., and stole important papers from the desk in Olney’s office.  The prosecution abandoned the case after having become satisfied of their inability to convict the prisoner, and the Judge directed the jury to render a verdict of “not guilty”, which was accordingly done.                                  

DONATION PARTY – The friends of the Rev. Wm. Goss will pay him a Donation Visit at his house on Wednesday afternoon and evening next, March 3d.  His friends should bear in mind that he has labored for them faithfully during the past year, and on this occasion visit him with open and liberal hands and hearts.

CAUCUS – A Democratic Caucus will be held at the house of B. H. Waldron, in the town of Windham, on Saturday evening, February 27th, at 7 o’clock. P.M., for the purpose of nominating suitable persons for town officers, to be supported at the town meeting to be held on Tuesday next, March 2d, 1858.

By order of Town COMMITTEE

Mortgage Sale

WHEREAS Lyman Robinson and Martha his wife of the town of Ashland, in the country of Greene and state of New York, by their certain indenture of mortgage, dated the fifteenth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, to secure the payment of the sum of seven hundred dollars and the interest thereon, according to the conditions of said mortgage, and a certain bond, bearing even date with and accompanying said mortgage, did convey and mortgage unto John Tuttle, of the town of Ashland aforesaid, and to his heirs and assigns forever, all those certain lands and premises described in said indenture of mortgage, as follows:  “All that certain piece or parcel of land situated in the town of Ashland, county of Greene, and bounded as follows:  commencing at a stake and stones on the north side of the turnpike road, it being at the corner of Lawrence Winne’s fence, as it was on the twentieth day of November 1854, and running a westerly course forty-three feet five inches; from thence a northerly course one hundred and nine feet to Albert Tuttle’s barn yard fence; from thence an easterly course on said fence to Lawrence Winne’s line, forty three feet five inches; from thence to the place of beginning, about one hundred and nine feet, containing one eighth of an acre of land be the same more or less; reserving the privilege of A. Tuttle’s conveying water in logs or lend  pipe from L. Winne’s dwelling house through said premises by keeping them covered; likewise his reserve of water; also all that certain other place or parcel of land situated on the south side of the turnpike road, commencing at a maple tree opposite of A. Tuttle’s garden and running an easterly course thirty feet to the line of White and Winne; from thence a southerly course to the center of the creek; from thence a westerly course thirty feet; from thence to the place of beginning; reserving the privilege of conveying water in a race or canal through said lot, with the privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise appertaining.”  Which said mortgage, with the power of sale therein contained, was duly recorded in the Clerk’s office of the said county of Greene in book No. 29 of mortgages, on page 437, &c., on the twentieth day of February, 1856; and on which said mortgages, there is claimed to be one at the time of the first publication of this notice, the sum of one hundred and forty-nine dollars and fifty-three cents in the payment of which, default has been made, according to the conditions of said mortgage, and the whole sum remaining unpaid on said mortgage at the time of the first publication of this notice, is six hundred and forty-nine dollars and fifty-three cents; and no suit or proceeding in law or equity having been instituted for the recovery of said sum or any part thereof; now therefore, notice is herby given that by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage and in pursuance of the statute in such case made and provided, the said mortgage, will be foreclosed by a sale at public auction, of the said mortgaged premises, for the whole amount unpaid on said mortgage, and discharged from any further lien for the same at the public house kept by William Allen, in the town of Ashland, and county of Greene, on the twenty-second day of May next, at one o’clock in the afternoon of that day. – Dated February 25, 1858.

JOHN Tuttle, Mortgagee
J. Olney, Attorney


March 4, 1858

TOWN MEETINGS

The annual town meetings for Greene county took place on Tuesday of this week, but the hour (Wednesday afternoon) at which we go to press, precludes the possibility of our giving any returns, except of one or two towns.  In Windham, the following persons were elected by the majorities marked after each name: --

Supervisor, Stephen Steele, 18; Town Clerk, A. R. Macomber, 4?; Justice, S. W. Stimpson, 82; Assessor, M. B. Austin 1; Com. of Highways, Russell Steele, 7; Poor-masters, Austin B. Hitchcock, 14, and James McLean, 5; Collector, Edwin Brockett, 67; Constables, James S. Edmonds, S. W. Miller, L. R. Chapman and Isaac Winfield; Inspectors of Election, Ira Sherman, 8; and I. B. Steele, 14; Town Sealer, Charles Matthews, no opposition; Town House at M. B. Rider’s.

Ashland – John S. Ives, (Rep.) is elected Supervisor (23 maj.) and Alden Ferris, (Rep.), Town Clerk.

Catskill – Francis Wilson, is elected Supervisor by 50 majority.

Cairo – Luke Rowe, (Dem.) is elected Supervisor by 40 majority.

It is reported that E. P. More (Dem.) has been re-elected Supervisor in Prattsville; E. P. Bushnell (Dem.) is elected in Lexington; and George Beach (Dem.) re-elected in Jewett, by 6 majority. 

FAREWELL COTILLION PARTY

We regret to learn that our friend Isaac Swart, Esq. of North Kortright, Delaware County, is to leave his popular hotel on or about the first of April. He gives a Farwell Cotillion Party on (to morrow) Friday evening. During his residence in that section he has, by uniform kindness and gentlemanly endeavors to please, made many warm friends, whose unanimous good wishes and kind remembrances will go with him wherever he may go. His friends, we learn, are determined to show him, by a general attendance on this occasion, that he is a favorite of that region.

DISEASE IN HORSES

Lung fever, we learn, is a disease quite prevalent among horses, just now, in this section. A valuable horse belonging to Mr. David Pond, of Jewett, died of it on Monday of last week. Mr. Samuel Osborn, of Jewett, also lost one by the same disease on Sunday the 14th ult.

ACCIDENT – Mr. Townsend, a traveler and dealer in Yankee notions and fancy goods, met with an accident on Wednesday of last week.  He was passing along the main road between Jewett Center and Lexington, when he came to a very icy spot beside a high bank.  While crossing this spot, his sleigh commenced sliding and continued to do so until his horse, sleigh, &c., went over the embankment, killing his horse and making a complete wreck of his sleigh and stock of goods.  We are glad to learn that Mr. Townsend escaped without injury.

FROZEN TO DEATH – A man named Elijah Hubbard, residing in the town of Consesville and formerly of this town, while on his way from Conesville to Potter’s Hollow, sat down by the roadside, in the snow, and when found on Sunday last, was frozen to death.  He was missed on the 8th of February and had therefore, it is supposed, been dead about three weeks.  His remains were interred on Monday.  He was 62 years of age and had no family.

For Sale Cheap

The Subscriber offers for sale a large quantity of property, comprising, one five-horse Steam Engine and Boiler; one double Carding Machine; one Picker; one Hat Former; two Hat Lathes; a quantity of Hat Blocks; one Sewing machine; two Hatters’ Kettles; Dye Stuffs; Wool Hats, &c., &c.  Also, one one-horse Wagon; one Cutter; one Buffalo Robe; one Wheelbarrow; one circular Saw and frame for sawing wood.  Also, the hat shop Building and land thereunto, belonging, lately owned and occupied by Messrs Conine & Tompkins.  The above real estate and machinery will be sold together or separate, as may best suit purchasers.

S. C. BIDWELL
Assignee of Conine & Tompkins
Ashland, January 12th 1858

Mortgage Sale

WHEREAS, Edmund Avery and Elizabeth, his wife, of the town of Windham, in the county of Greene, and State of New York, (now deceased,) by indenture of mortgage bearing date the seventeenth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, for the purpose of securing the payment of the sum of one hundred and twenty dollars ($120), and the interest thereon, according to the conditions of a certain bond executed simultaneously with said indenture of mortgage, did mortgage unto Daniel Williams of the town of Sugar Creek, County of Walworth, and State of Wisconsin, and to his heirs and assigns forever, certain premises described in said mortgage as follows, to wit: “all that piece or parcel of land, situate in said town of Windham, described generally as follows.  Beginning in the center of the highway leading from the Windham turnpike, or stage road, to the town of Jewett; it being the north-west corner of lands occupied by Phillip Sparling; thence running a southerly course, nine and one-half rods, to a stake and stones; thence a south-westerly course, four rods to a stake and stones; thence a north-westerly course, along the line of lands owned by James Radcliff; nine and one-half rods to the center of the said highway; thence along the center of said highway, four rods, six and one-half feet, to the place of beginning.  Containing one-fourth of an acre, be the same, more or less” with the appurtenances and all estate, title and interest of the said parties of the first part therein, which said mortgage, with the power of sale therein contained, was duly recorded in the office of the clerk of the county of Greene, on the sixth day of March, 1855, which said mortgage, there is now claimed to be due at the date of the first publication of this notice, the sum of one hundred and forty-five dollars and sixty-nine cents.($145.69,)in the payment of which default has been made according to the conditions of said mortgage, and no suit or proceeding having been instituted for the recovery of said monies, or any part thereof.  Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that by the virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage and in pursuance of the statute in such case made and provided, the said mortgaged premises will be sold at public auction, to the highest bidder, or the twenty-seventy day of May next, at ten o’clock in the forenoon of that day , at the public house kept by Matthew Rider in the town of Windham, in the country of Greene, aforesaid, and the said mortgage will be then and there foreclosed by such sale.

Dated, March 1st, 1858.
DANIEL WILLIAMS, Mortgagee
S. P. Ives, Attorney

LEGAL NOTICES

Mortgage Sale

WHEREAS Lyman Robinson and Martha, his wife, of the town of Ashland, in the country of Greene and state of New York by their certain indenture of mortgage dated the fifteenth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, to secure the payment of the sum of seven hundred dollars and the interest thereon, according to the conditions of said mortgage, and a certain bond bearing even date with and accompanying said mortgage did convey and mortgage unto John Tuttle, of the town of Ashland, aforesaid, and to his heirs and assigns forever, all those certain lands and premises described in said indenture of mortgage as follows: “All that certain piece or parcel of land situated in the town of Ashland, county of Greene and bounded as follows:  Commencing at a stake and stones on the north side of the turnpike road, it being at the corner of Lawrence Winne’s fence as it was on the 20th day of November, 1854 and running a westerly course forty-three feet five inches; from thence a northerly course one hundred and nine feet to Albert Tuttle’s barnyard fence; from thence an easterly course on said fence to Lawrence Winne’s line forty-three feet five inches; from thence to the place of beginning, about one hundred and nine feet containing one eighth of an acre of land be the same more or less; reserving the privilege of A. Tuttle’s conveying water in logs or lead pipes from L. Winne’s dwelling house through said premises by keeping them covered; likewise his reserve of water; also all that certain other piece or parcel of land situated on the south side of the turnpike road, commencing at a maple tree opposite of A. Tuttle’s garden and running an easterly course thirty feet to the line of White and Winne; from thence a southerly course to the center of the creek; from thence a westerly course thirty feet; from thence to the place of beginning; reserving the privilege of conveying water in a race or canal through said lot with the privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in any wise appertaining.”  Which said mortgage with the power of sale therein contained, was duly recorded in the Clerk’s office of the said county of Greene, in book No. 29 of mortgages on page 437, &c, on the twentieth day of February 1856; and on which said mortgage, there is claimed to be due at the first publication of this notice the sum of one hundred and forth-nine dollars and fifty-three cents, in the payment of which default has been made, according to the conditions of said mortgage, and the whole sum remaining unpaid on said mortgage, at the time of first publication of this notice, is six hundred and forty-nine dollars and fifty-three cents; and no suit or proceeding in law or equity having been instituted for the recovery of said sum or any part thereof; now, thereby, notice is hereby given that by the virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, and in pursuance of the statute in such case made and provided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed by a sale at public auction, of the said mortgaged premises, for the whole amount unpaid on said mortgage, and discharged from any further lien for the same, at the public house kept by William Allen in the Town of Ashland, and county of Greene on the twenty-second day of May next at one o’clock in the afternoon of that day. 

Dated February 25, 1858
JOHN TUTTLE, Mortgagee
J. OLNEY, Attorney

Mortgage Sale

WHEREAS James Radcliff and Elizabeth, his wife, and David Radcliff, then of the town of Windham, in the county of Greene, and state of New York, by their certain indenture of mortgage, bearing date the tenth day of September, one thousand eight hundred and forty-nine, to secure the payment of the sum of three hundred and sixty three dollars, and the interest thereon, according to the conditions of said mortgage and a certain bond bearing even date with, and accompanying said mortgage, did convey and mortgage to James Robertson, Jun., then of the town of Windham, aforesaid, and to his heirs and assigns forever, “all that certain piece or parcel of land lying, being and situate in the town of Windham, aforesaid, bounded and described:  Beginning at the most northerly corner of a tract of two hundred acres of land granted to William Cockburn, in the year 1790, and runs thence along the South line of lands of William Shutts north twenty-five degrees, west seventy-five links, to a stake and stones; seventy-five links, to a stake and stones, thence south sixty-six degrees fifteen minute, west eleven chains seventy-five links to a stake and stones, easterly from a certain spring; thence south eighty-six degrees thirty minutes, west thirty-nine chains to a stake and stones on the line run by John Cox as the north bound of the Hardenburg Patent; thence along said line south fifty-two degrees east thirty-seven chains to the most westerly corner of said tract granted to William Cockburn; and thence along the west line thereof north thirty-four degrees east thirty-five chains to the place of beginning; containing sixty and one-half acres of land, be the same more or less; being the same premises then occupied by the said James Ratcliff.”  Which said mortgage, with the power of sale therein contained, was duly recorded in the Clerks office of said county of Greene, in book No. 31 of mortgage on pages 356 and 357 on the second day of February, 1858; on which said mortgage there is claimed to be due at the time of the first publication of this notice, the sum of three hundred and forty-six dollars and seventy-two cents ($346.72) in the payment of which default has been made according to the conditions of said mortgage; and no suit or proceeding at law having been instituted for the recovery of said moneys or any part thereof; Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that by virtue of the power of sale in said mortgage contained, and in pursuance of the statute in such case made and provided, the said mortgaged premises will be sold at public auction, to the highest bidder, on the first day of May next, at ten o’clock in the forenoon of that day at the public house kept by H. H. Waldren, in the town of Windham, and county of Greene aforesaid, and the said mortgage will be then and there foreclosed by such sale.

Dated February 4, 1858
JAMES ROBERTSON, Jun. Mortgagee
J. OLNEY, Attorney


March 11, 1858

Supervisors for 1858-9

The JOURNAL, last week, was made up in great haste, and in consequence of this haste and the early hour at which we went to press (Wednesday morning,) several errors occurred.  A notice was sent to this office, that Francis Wilson was elected Supervisor of Catskill by 50 majority.  It should have read, “Alexander Wiltse, re-elected by 21 majority.”  This error occurred, however, in only a few copies of the paper, when it was discovered and corrected.

The Board of Supervisors for 1858-9 will stand thus:

Athens – Prentiss W. Hallenbeck, Dem.
Ashland – John S. Ives, Rep.
Catskill – Alexander Wiltse, Dem.
Coxsackie – E. N. Hubbell, Dem.
Cairo – Luke Roe, Dem.
Durham – Wellington Peck, Dem.
Greenville – Russel Wakely, Union
Hunter – James Douglas, Rep.
Jewett – George Beach, Dem.
Lexington – E. P. Bushnell, Dem.
N. Baltimore – John G. Raymond, Dem.
Prattsville – E. P. More, Dem.
Windham – Stephen Steele, Rep.
Democrats, 9; Rep. 3; Union, 1

6 members are returned from the old Board viz: - P. W. Hallenbeck, A. Wiltse, E. Hubbell, Jas. Douglas, George Beach and E. P. More.

It is stated that a tie, on Supervisor, occurred in Halcott.  Another statement is that Conger Avery, Esq., was elected by one majority.  We shall look for something reliable between now and next Fourth of July.

The following officers were elected in their respective towns, by the majorities marked after each name.

ASHLAND – Supervisor, John S. Ives, 21; Town Clerk, Sanford Tuttle, 26; Justice, Austin Smith, 37; Assessor, Isaac Barlow, 8; Com. of Highways, Wilson Howard, 4; Poormasters, William Brandow, 10, and William Sutton, 7; Collector, Sylvanus Parker, 2; Constables, S. Parker, R. K. Martin, F. S. Makcan, and Wilbur Finch; Inspectors of Election, L. Brandow, 12; A Mallory, 4; Town Sealer, L. Winne, 5.

DURHAM – Supervisor, Wellington Peck, 14; Town Clerk, L.P. More, 87; Justice Erastus T. Peck, 43; Assessors, John J. Kerr, 13 and Henry Rockefeller, 4; Commissioner of Highways, Richard B. Smith, 65; Poor masters, C. A. Baldwin 8; Israel Brown, 16; Collector, Jas. Turbash, 1; Constables, Jas. Terbush, Russell Rogers, Oswell Chittenden and Salman E. Tyler; Inspectors of Election, 1st district, John Lorton, Horace Strong; 2d district, Henry Hervey and Joel N. Head; Town Sealer, Philander P. Pratt.

HUNTER – Supervisor, Jas. Douglass, 71; Town Clerk, Robert Elliot, 137; Assessor, L. Wilcox, 18; Com. of Highways, Judson Howard, 45; Justice, Abram D. Miller, 50; For Collector, a tie;  Poor master, Peter Hyser, 79; and Oliver Ingals, no opposition; Constables R. S. Hadden and W. H. Hunt, no opposition, and Jas. Connelly and John Torrens, Jr., each 40; Inspectors of election 1st district, J. L. Schutt, Chas. W. Haines; 2d district, Francis Goodrich and R. C. Smith elected by large majorities.

PRATTSVILLE – Supervisor, E. P. More, 18; Town Clerk, John D. Adams, 92; Justice, Gilbert Becker, no opposition, and S. Winfield, for vacancy, 90; Assessor, Henry Haner, 40; Collector Hiram White, 24; Constables, Hiram White, 20; and balance of Democratic ticket elected.

Town House at H. B. Smith’s.

ACCIDENT – Last Wednesday, a horse belonging to J. Lefever, of Catskill, ran away throwing Mr. L. out, breaking his arm, and otherwise severely injuring him. – Examiner.

ASHLAND, March 8th, 1858

To WINTER HOGS CHEAP – Mr. Editor -- I visited Capt. A. J. Keator, of Roxbury, last week, and saw how he has wintered five hogs.  He takes the fine part of his hay, together with the seed on the barn floor, and scalds it in a barrel with hot water, he then sprinkles on about two quarts of bran and canell, on two pails full of this scald hay, for one mess in the morning; and the same repeated in the evening is all they have been fed this winter.  They are in excellent condition.  When he has not enough of this fine seedy stuff, he takes fine hay, and cuts it short, which answers the same purpose.  He gives the credit of this improvement in wintering swine to his German laborer.
L. W.

ADMINISTRATOR'S SALE

In pursuance of an order of the Surrogate of the county of Greene and State of New York, made on the 17th day of February, 1858, upon the hearing of an application to sell the personal property of the late Abel Edmond, deceased, and Joel Edmond, for the payment of their debts, I shall offer for sale, at public auction, at the late residence of the said Abel and Joel Edmond, in the town of Ashland, in the said county of Greene, on Thursday, march 18th, 1858, at 12 o'clock, P.M., the following property, to wit: - One yoke of oxen, two mows of hay, a quantity of farming utensils, together with household furniture, and other articles too numerous to mention.
J.S. Edmond, Administrator, Windham, March 9th, 1858.

SUPREME COURT - Greene County, - Benjamin H. Waldron against Heman Copely and David Murphy: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint of Benjamin H. Waldron, plaintiff, which was filed in the office of the County Clerk of Greene County, on the 25th day of February 1858, and to serve a copy of your answer on the subscriber, at his office, in Gilboa, Schoharie County N.Y., within twenty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and if you fail to answer said complaint, as hereby required, the plaintiff will take judgement against you for one hundred and thirty dollars, with interest from the 7th day of April 1857, besides costs.
Wm. L. Baldwin, Plaintiff's Attorney.


March 18, 1858

FOUND DEAD – A few weeks since we published an item on the death of a Mr. Hubbard, between Conesville and Potter’s Hollow.  An error occurred in that item which we are requested to correct.  The circumstances respecting the matter are as follows:

A man named Elijah Hubbard, of Conesville and Durham, was found dead in the fields, between the residences of Messrs. Eleazer Hubbard, and Sylvester Scoville.  He left Conesville on the 8th of February, to go to Durham and was last seen at Mr. Scoville’s, the same day.  His friends supposed him to be in Durham, and he therefore was not missed until the 26th of February, when a search was immediately instituted, and he was found on the 27th.  The cause of his death is unknown.  He was 62 years of age, and had no family.

We are requested to ask those of our contemporaries who copied the item to make these corrections.

RETURNED – Mr. Kissock, of Hobart, Delaware County, whose mysterious disappearance was chronicled a few weeks ago, has returned to his home.

FRIEND STEELE -  I wish to return the thanks of many poor people of the town of Ashland to Mrs. Pratt, and Mrs. Sanford, of Prattsville, and Mrs. Merwin and Mr. Hiram B. Clark, of Ashland, for great and frequent kindness to the poor, during the past winter. Through their benevolent acts much suffering has been prevented, and many wants supplied. The thanks of the community are due to them, and as "they who give to the poor lend to the Lord." they will receive a rich reward in the world to come. They have "cast their bread upon the waters, and it will return unto them after many days." Yours Truly, M.

FROZEN TO DEATH - A man named Hazard Smith was frozen to death last Friday night near East Worcester, Otsego Co. He left East Worcester, about 11 o'clock at night with his sleigh and horses for his home on South Hill, rather the worse for liquor. - About a mile from the village his team left the road and wandered into some bushes and stopped. He was not found until Saturday night, and then some twenty rods from the team; had his coat and boots off, and laid on his back in the snow his his hands folded across his breast. He was about 70 years of age - Bloomville Mirror

ACCIDENT ON THE ICE - Henry Turck crossed the river at Saugerties on Friday of week before last with a horse and wagon; but before terra firma was reached his horse broke through the ice, and was saved only by his kicking the wagon loose from him, which left him in such a state that he could be rescued. The wagon contained a mail bag, which was found after it had sunk with the wagon, and the postal matter saved, though well saturated with water. Rondout Courier

A CHANGE - It is understood as settled that Capt. Jonathan Rowe retires from the steamer "Catskill," and that Wm. R. Lynes takes his place. Mr. Lynes is well and favorable known as Captain and clerk of the boat formerly. - While in that capacity he secured the favorable consideration of the travelling public. - Examiner

SUPREME COURT -  Greene Co - Roderick S. Blish against S. Ives Chatfield Samuel P. Ives and Jasper Carl. To the defendants, Sirs. You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action which be filed in the office of the clerk of Greene County, N.Y. within twenty days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the complaint as aforesaid the plaintiff will take judgement for the sum of two hundred and forty-four dollars and seventy-five cents with interest from the fifth day of April one-thousand eight hundred and fifty-three on two hundred dollars and from November 16th 1853, on fourty-four dollars, besides costs of this action. Dated Feb. 13, 1855

F. JAmes Fitch, Plaintiff's Attorney


March 25, 1858

SUICIDE – A girl named Lydia Jane Colvin, of New Baltimore, aged about 16 years, committed suicide by hanging herself in the barn of Peter R. Bronk, on Sunday afternoon last.  She had made several attempts to take her life before.  On Sunday, she left the house about 1 o’clock, and had been absent nearly two hours, when Mr. Bronk, who was passing his barn, discovered that a ladder had been misplaced, which excited his curiosity, and he went to the barn, and looking in, saw her hanging by a rope which was fastened to a beam.  She was immediately taken down, but life was extinct, she having broken her neck in jumping from the beam.  No cause is assigned for the rash act.  The deceased was of respectable parentage, and was highly esteemed by all that knew her.  Her funeral was held in the Dutch Reformed Church at New Baltimore on Monday. – Cox. Union. 

Supreme CourtGREENE COUNTY – Roderick S. Blish against S. Ives Chatfield, Samuel P. Ives and Jasper Carl.  To the defendants, Sirs.  You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action which will be filed in the office of the clerk of Greene County, NY, and serve a copy of your answer on me, at my office, in Catskill, Greene county, NY, within twenty days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the complaint, as aforesaid, the plaintiff will take judgment for the sum of two hundred and forty-four dollars and seventy-five cents with interest from the fifth day of April one-thousand eight hundred and fifty-three on two hundred dollars, and from November 16th 1853 on forty-four dollars besides costs of this action.

Dated Feb. 13, 1855
F. JAMES FITCH, Plaintiff’s Attorney

Supreme CourtGREENE COUNTY –Benjamin H. Waldron against Heman Copley and David Murphy.  To the defendant David Murphy: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint of Benjamin H. Waldron, plaintiff, which was filed in the office of the County Clerk of Greene County, on the 25th day of February 1858, and to serve a copy of your answer on the subscriber, at his office, in Gilboa, Schoharie County, NY, within twenty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and if you fail to answer said complaint as hereby required, the plaintiff will take judgment against you for one hundred and thirty dollars, with interest from the 7th day of April, 1857, besides costs.

Wm. L. BALDWIN, Plaintiff’s Attorney


April 1, 1858

DROWNED – On Sunday morning last, Mr. Peter I. Fiero, residing about two miles from this Village on the Hunter turnpike, drowned himself in the Cauterskill Creek.  He had been in a very melancholy state of mind for several days previously, and about five o’clock on Sunday morning, he arose and walked to the Creek, where he deliberately drowned himself, the water being only about four feet deep.  It is supposed he was laboring under religious excitement at the time, as he was in perfectly easy circumstances.  His body was recovered on Sunday afternoon, and Coroner Brace held an inquest over hi, at which a verdict of “Suicide while in a state of temporary insanity”, was rendered. – Recorder.

PURE WINES – On our return from the city a few days since, we found on our table a bottle of choice brandy, two bottles of Isabella wine and a demijohn of Elderberry wine, for which we are under many obligations to George L. Rundle, Esq., of Greenville.  The quality of each has been thoroughly tested by experienced judges, who unite in pronouncing them superior to anything of the kind usually found in this country.  We presume Mr. Rundle is prepared to supply orders, as he is engaged in the manufacture of these articles. – His address is Greenville, Greene Co., NY.

FIRE AT ATHENS – A fire broke out, on Saturday evening, 20th ult., in the store of Hon. G. S. Nichols in Athens, and spread to the adjoining buildings, belonging to the New York Ice Company, the dwelling house of Lafenwell, and three or four other houses, two belonging to the Dry Dock Company.  There were 30,000 tons of ice in the building on which a great loss occurs, as it is smoked, covered with cinders and will require to be washed and repacked.

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

1858
STEAM TRANSPORTATION

New York and Catskill
FREIGHT & PASSENGER LINE

THROUGH without Landing, and connecting with the Mail Stages West.  The Catskill Steam Transportation Company will run the favorite steamer CATSKILL, Capt. Wm. R. Lynes.  The season of 1858 for freight or passengers as follows:  Leaving CATSKILL for New York on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 6 o’clock, P.M., and leaving NEW YORK for Catskill from foot of Franklin Street on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:00 P.M. and Saturdays at 9 A.M.  The Steamer CATSKILL possesses accommodations for passengers unsurpassed for elegance and comfort.  Her Saloon and State Rooms are not excelled by any Boat on the River.  Having been recently rebuilt and enlarged and also furnished with new boiler, she is all that can be desired for speed or safety.  Passengers on this boat can rely on arriving in New York at an early hour and at Catskill in time to take the Stages west.

FARE $1   BERTHS FREE.  Breakfast will be furnished on the Boat to Passengers going West, if required.

THE CATSKILL STEAM TRANSPORTATION CO., Catskill, March 17, 1858

BUSINESS CHANGE
H.R. Potter, Esq. has disposed of his store, goods, etc., to Messrs. H. P. Peck and M.C. Osborn. These gentlemen are both young, well acquainted wit the trade they have engaged in, and will no doubt do a handsome business. Success to them.

HOUSE AND LOT FOR SALE
For sale - a convenient dwelling House and Lot, situated in the village of Windham Center, on Water street, a few rods north of Traphagan's Carriage Shop, and now occupied by Henry Brandow. Said House is nearly new, and will be sold cheap. Terms easy. Enquire of A. Newbury, Windham Center, or the subscriber, at Ashland village.

S.C. Bidwell
March 24, 1858


April 8, 1858

At the late term of the Greene County Court, Matthew Beatty, indicted for stealing chickens and breaking locks, was convicted and sentenced for two years in the State Prison.

FATAL ACCIDENT – James Vosburgh, a young man employed as a fireman on the Central Railroad, while standing on the top of a car, was struck by a bridge and instantly killed.  It seems that Vosburgh exchanged places with one of the brakemen, and was probably struck while passing from the engine to the cars. – Mr. Vosburgh resided at Hudson, and was about 21 years of age.

DISTRESSING CASE OF SUICIDE – On Saturday afternoon last, says the Recorder & Democrat, Mr. Samuel Smith, residing about six miles from this village at Kiskatom near the Hunter turnpike, hung himself about thirty rods from his house.  He was discovered shortly afterwards, by Mr. Thomas Wilson, a constable who had been doing some business for him, attracted to the spot by the barking of a faithful dog, where he found Smith quite dead, with a pocket handkerchief tied round his neck and fastened to a small sapling.

Col. Benton is much worse.  He sent for a clergyman on Monday, saying that he had not long to live and wished to prepare for this departure.

Frederick Hill, Esq., of Catskill, has been appointed Notary Public. 

ASHLAND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE

It is with unfeigned pleasure, and with a due sense of the importance of the fact to the people of Greene County, that we announce today our firm belief that the Ashland Institute is now under the management of a Principal and Faculty that will make it an honor to the County and a blessing to our rising generation.  The Principal, Rev. H. J. Fox, M. A., is a well known and tried Christian minister, a man of extensive literary acquirement, an accomplished orator, a thorough business man, and above all these, a successful man – one whose every undertaking has prospered – a fact fraught with good omen for the Institute.  The Vice Principal, Rev. Edward Stratton, M. A., is a finished scholar, a man of varied and high attainments, of energy, and of sterling worth.  The Professor of Ancient Languages, Benjamin Garvey, is an enthusiast in education, who has studied thoroughly the science of education in all its details, and who is intimately and practically acquainted with all the European systems. – He is the only man we know of who every day brings into the classroom the philosophy of language in connection with ordinary English, Latin or Greek grammar.  In his hands, language ceases to be the dry, tedious study which we dreaded, and becomes, through graphic and beautiful illustrations, through philosophic and profound investigation, a source of absolute enjoyment; and every recitation is looked forward to with pleasure by his pupils.  Hence it is that in one short term he has turned out students so well acquainted with the structure of the English and Latin languages as Sheriff Ormsbee’s two sons, and Henry Bassett and R. H. Sheldon.  We speak but the sentiments of the students, and of such teachers as have had an opportunity of hearing and judging of the merits of Professor Garvey’s lectures, when we request him to put his manuscript lectures into text book form, and publish them for the benefit of his classes.

The Professor of Mathematics is our well known and tried friend, John G. Murphy, in whose hands this department is safe.  Should he have the same success which he already has had in a similar department, our young men will rank with the first mathematicians of our country, and will thus have access to offices of honor and emolument.  When Professor Murphy can devote all the energies of his mind and his untiring industry to this one department – though it is extensive – he will, we have no doubt, establish an enviable reputation for himself and for the Institute.  In connection with this department, we understand that there will be, this summer, a supply of suitable apparatus for field operations in Engineering and Surveying, as well as for carrying on systematic Astronomical observations.

The Professor of Music, Edward Ambuhl, is the composer of several popular and beautiful pieces.  He is an exquisite performer, and an enthusiastic teacher.  In his hands, the theory and the practice of music will be thoroughly taught and many of our young ladies will be fitted to fill situations of high honor and rich emolument – to bless with chaste and elegant delights, with exquisite musical performances, the various scenes of domestic life.

We cannot go into any further remarks on the faculty.  We believe the lady preceptress and the other assistants, to be admirably qualified for their various departments.

The examination was continued during a whole week.  And during that time, there was evinced, in connection with Grammar, Etymology, Arithmetic, Algebra, Latin, Greek, French, &c., &c., so thoroughly scientific a system of mental culture that the amount of knowledge attained during the term must be continually increasing by the spontaneous action of the intellect.  The students’ minds are aroused, and consequently they will acquire and treasure up knowledge upon these branches.  We might indeed prophecy for several of the students the high and noble character of finished scholars.  The Misses Longyear, Thorp, Smalling, Bassett, E. & C. Owen, &c.; the masters A & C. Ormsbee, A. Vanderzeo, R. H. Sheldon, Bassett, Batch’ord, Woodrough, Johnson, Slater, &c., &c., will certainly occupy high positions as educated ladies and gentlemen; and be thus in a position to recompense their parents and friends for their trouble and outlay, and to bring honor upon their families and names.

A few words only in regard to the Exhibition are necessary, for nearly every one that could go was in attendance and they certainly had a rich treat – exquisite music from Professor Ambuhl and his promising pupil Montgomery Curtis (who certainly has all the elements of a finished musician within him; which we trust will be duly drawn out); the ravishing vocal music by the Misses Wetmere, Richardson and E. & C. Owen; pleading extraordinary by H. J. Botchford, in a masterly manner; Salathiel’s address by H. Bassett, in a thrilling style.  We cannot particularize all that deserved commendation, so wishing hearty success to Phelix O’Calligan, (Master Beckwith,) for his admirable acting, we will turn to master A. Vanderzee’s address, which we give in full, and to the beautiful, episode which followed: -

ADDRESS OF ANDREW VANDERZEE
THE STUDENT’S HOPE

No more ennobling hope can take possession of a youth than that of becoming a scholar; this induces him to make social and other pleasures of secondary importance, if their enjoyment would hinder the accomplishment of the great object which he holds in view.  Regarding such pleasures as desirable enough in the proper place, he rests his hope upon something more lasting, more enduring.  The enjoyments of thoughtless youth do not present allurements sufficient to seduce him from his earnest hope of future honorable usefulness.  Under the influence of such a hope, he marks his early course by no reckless conduct; but, with steady perseverance, he presses on to the accomplishment of some noble object, which becomes the pole star of his life, giving true and certain direction to his entire course; and which ultimately guides him to some honorable distinction.  But who is the student?  What is his hope and what realization of it awaits him?  It is evident that all who pass a portion of their time in schools or colleges, are not worthy of this honorable name.  To be a student is to apply oneself diligently to study, with a view to some worthy object – not with the view of passing away one’s time.  He is not a student who applies himself in such a manner as merely to accomplish imperfectly whatever he undertakes.  No!  The real student studies, because he loves to study.  To him, the acquisition of knowledge is a fountain of pleasure.  While his schoolmates find enjoyment in the social circle or in places of less innocent amusement, he luxuriates in the investigation of truth, in the search after knowledge, in the reception of light into the mind.  Thus he finds his pleasure, pleasure not of a transient nature, but that which carries with it the idea of futurity and of usefulness; journeying on amid the varied fields of learning, he gathers in rich stores of knowledge from every side; and still his desire for knowledge increases with his acquirements and with his mental discipline.  It is the student who feels, to its fullest, extent the value of time, which, when wasted, awakens his conscience to accuse.  In short, the student is one who , fired by a laudable ambition, resolves in building up a reputation to lay a broad and deep foundation, upon which the hope of his life may rest with absolute security.

Now, what are the student’s hopes?  In the first place, they are to become a thorough master of the most important branches of Education; so that he may be equal in intelligence to the age in which he lives; - next, to have his mind so disciplined that he can grasp with power whatever subject is presented to him and that he can thus, through real merit, occupy an honorable position in society.  Such hopes as these cannot fail to make him a man, in the highest sense of the term.

There are persons, self-styled practical men, who do not desire a liberal education, believing that their object in life can be accomplished as well without as with it.  Such thoughts as these, however, the student spurns, and his soul chafes at the idea of restraint in learning.  He feels that every person would be benefited, would be exalted by a liberal education, which chastens the mind, corrects its observations and strengthens its powers.  It removes errors and prejudices, and clothes its owner with armor that will successfully resist every thrust which ignorance or vice can make at him.  Moreover, it is a disgrace to live in such times as these and to be ignorant of the solid branches of education, including a thorough mastery of one’s mother tongue. – For the effort put forth in the acquisition of these gives to the mind a disciplining of incalculable benefit, a disciplinary, which makes a man master of himself under all circumstances; which hinders his thoughts from wandering off on random excursions, which husbands his mental power, and expends it only for a manifest result obtained.  And because the mind that is disciplined to study is disciplined to think, the latter, being the natural result of the former, and it being discipline and education, rather than talent, which for the most part make the differences between men.  One possessed of these can hand his name down to posterity as one of the earth’s noted ones; while another, of equal talent, without them must remain in obscurity.

To a person of thorough disciplined mind, the difficulties of the world are mere trifles; he knows how to go work – how to remove them.  He forms new ideas, he makes original investigations, he brings to light the arcane of nature and thus he reaps a harvest of benefits, for himself, and bestows lavish benefits upon mankind.  Relying upon education and its attendant discipline of mind, the student is sure to occupy an honorable position in society. 

It is easy to foresee the realization of these hopes which awaits the scholar.  Entering upon manhood, he is prepared for the battle of life in whatsoever rank he may be placed, whatever his calling may be.  And, if his calling harmonizes with his turn of mind, he will discharge its duties faithfully, and so obtain its rewards.  Every youth hopes for success in life; the scholar most certainly obtains it.

Many enter upon the voyage of life under favorable auspices, and sail along prosperously for a season, but adversity comes upon them and they are overwhelmed.  They wonder that they fail, but to one looking at the matter carefully, their failure does not seem strange; for they are, as it were, without compass, chart or pilot.  On the other hand, the scholar enters upon the voyage with well founded hopes of success.  He can steer himself clear of the shoals upon which they were wrecked.  Fitted alike for sunshine or storm, he must and will complete his course and perform his voyage successfully.  No fears attend his progress.  He sees no obstacles without seeing at the same time the means for overcoming them.  Thus success attends his every step; and his well-spent youth ripens into a prosperous manhood, and he becomes an honor to his friends and an ornament to society.

Fellow Students, a parting word to you. – A few more hours will find us each going to our respective homes.  This is an occasion for thinking and feeling, rather than for speaking.  Emotion rises in the breast of each of us at the thought of parting.  Looking back upon the term about to close, we see many reasons why this should be so.  Here have we formed friendships that will last through life.  Memory’s retrospect in after life will call to mind many of its joyous scenes, and the actors in them, when those scenes will be enacted no more and we have bid adieu forever to the participators in them.

It is scarcely probably we will ever, after parting as a band of brothers, meet again. – Some few indeed may return to take another draught of the plerian spring, from which we have all been drinking here; many, if they would, could not, being forced to enter upon more active duties.  But what one is there who will not love to dwell upon the associations connected with the hours spent in this Institution?

Here has been the common field of our labors; here have we been engaged with one another in strife for the mastery of learning.  This similarity of pursuits holds us together by the strongest ties.  While we have thus striven, like the aethletes at the ancient games, no jealousies have arisen to mar our friendship but rather has the strife cemented it. – We cannot dwell upon our lingerings here without emotion, when we remember that many of us will linger here no longer to meet the recitation class or join the devotional exercise. 

These halls, rendered dear by association, will soon no longer re-echo to our voices; the activity and life which now animates and enlivens them will soon depart and be heard no more until another term shall bring its new supply of happy ones to fill our vacant places.  Is it to be wondered at we grieve to part?  Can those tendrils of affection, which have entwined about and clasped our hearts so firmly together, be torn away without a sense of pain?  Can we, in view of all the relations existing between us, ever forget each other?  No, never.  That parting hand given in friendship, and the fond farewell pronounced shall be to us a pledge of everlasting, sweet remembrance.

Teachers, we are now on the point of taking leave of you.  We are about to go forth from this Institution, where, under your charge, we have so pleasantly and usefully spent this session.  We are about to sever the ties existing between us.  It is a feeling of no ordinary emotion which rises in the breast of each one of us, as we contemplate past and present scenes when you have ever watched over our interest with unabated care; you have ever been solicitous about our advancement as scholars.  It would be base in us not to make some manifestation of the gratitude we feel toward you.  The student who has no feeling of gratitude toward his instructor must be one devoid of all the nobler feeling.  The devotion you have manifested towards us finds a responsive echo in every heart.  In the language of another you have been striving to lead us up the hill of science that we may see these pleasant fields spread out beyond through which we will journey in after life. The advancement we have made in our classes is in a great measure owing to your encouraging efforts with us.

From your hands have we received assistance when necessary, and been encouraged when difficulties presented themselves.  For these, receive our most cordial thanks.  The debt of gratitude due to you can hardly by us be paid.  We regard you not in the same light that we do those from whom we receive ordinary favors, as you have rendered us assistance in those things which will make us happy and useful throughout life.

Nobly have you acquitted yourselves of duty and repaid the confidence reposed in you.  We have naught of which to complain.  On the other hand feel bound by duty to commend your ability and patience with us.  The only way we conceive of repaying your devotion is by holding you ever in fond remembrance, and following in the paths you have marked out, that you may have the satisfaction of seeing us one day worthy of the privileges we enjoyed while here.  What we have accomplished this term shall remain as monuments to your honor, not our own.  It shall speak volumes in your praise, while we love you as our friends.

To you, dear honored Principal, allow me to present, as a token of our confidence and esteem, this goblet bearing the inscription “Presented to the Rev. Henry J. Fox, on his assuming the Principalship of the Ashland Collegiate Institute, by the Faculty and students.”  It is with unfeigned pleasure that we all unite in presenting this testimonial to our respect for you.  Since our connection with this Institution, we have ever found you to be the true gentleman, the faithful teacher and the firm and devoted friend, unceasing in your efforts to promote the interest of all. – The Faculty have ever found you ready to cooperate with them in every good work, and willing to listen to any suggestions which was made that the well-being of the school demanded.

Teaching will become a pleasure to them now; they feel no restraint thrown upon their efforts to promote the welfare of their scholars.  The students feel you to be a friend on whom they can rely; a friend who will respect their feelings and who will surround them with influences both useful and agreeable.  The course you have pursued for the last few weeks, while acting in the capacity of sole Principal of this Institution, has won our admiration and esteem.  Your course has been firm and manly.  Believe it, the hearts of all are with you, and we pray this Institution may receive, under your benignant influences, the patronage it so richly merits, and may become an honor to the Town, the State and the Country.

_________________________

At the closing of this presentation, Mr. Fox hesitatingly and with evident feeling roe in reply. 

MR. FOX’S REPLY

This is one of those events which only occasionally occur in a man’s life time, and which have a tendency to greatly bewilder and embarrass him.  To say that I am embarrassed would very inadequately express my sense of the position in which I find myself.  To be addressed, Sir, as you have just addressed me; receive, as I just have, this beautiful token of the esteem of those you represent, is to be overwhelmed with emotions as varied as they are profound.  It was an occasion of great interest to me, when, as my youth was verging into early manhood, I left the banks of Humber to seek a field for enterprise in this Western World.  It was an occasion of still greater interest to me, when, after the usual anxieties and trials of a stranger in a foreign land, I found my way to this country as a Minister of the Lord Jesus Christ.  That, Sir, was fifteen years ago.  Since then, I have received various honors and distinctions, but not one, Sir,that I appreciate more highly than the one you have just conferred upon me.

Under ordinary circumstances, an event like this would be merely complimentary and commonplace, but coming, as it does, at a very eventful period in the history of the Institution with which we are associated, it has a significance which I should be dullard indeed if I did not mark and appreciate.

My position in this Institution for the last six months, has been as you are aware, an anomalous and painful one.  Nominally at its head, I was forced by an associate with me in a position that entirely prevented my carrying out that policy of kindness and unslumbering concern in an Institution of this kind on which I do not hesitate to affirm all permanency and success depend.  When this folly brought upon our beloved Institution the very calamity which I foresaw must result; when the students were being driven away, and when pecuniary ruin stared us in the face, it was then, Sir, that I again undertook to rescue it, and place it upon a firm foundation.  I did not, however, put my shoulder under this heavy burden until the very individual who had boasted his ability to sustain it alone, had refused to touch it, even with his little finger.  You remember then Sir, how on my addressing myself to this task, folly was changed into malignity and slander; how it was sought to ruin a reputation which it has taken me twenty long years to build up, and which I need scarcely say is dearer to me than life itself.  I say, Sir, that you, and those whose names stand associated with this beautiful memento, know all this.

Do I mistake then, Sir, when I say that I have, in the sentiments which pervade this entire community, in the feelings which you and your fellow students have embodied in outspoken and unanimous resolutions in the enthusiasm of this hour, and the interesting event in which you have so gracefully borne so conspicuous a part, not only an endorsement of the part I have had to adopt, but also an emphatic repudiation of the slanders which malignity and impotency have dared to utter.

To you, Sir, personally, I must be permitted to give expressions of the highest regard.  You have been recognized by the faculty as standing at the head of all our classes, your fellow students have paid to your correct deportment and to the dignity of your character, the homage of their respect.  You leave this Institution with the esteem of all who know you, and we shall follow you with our best wishes, hoping and believing that the day will come when your name will be associated with higher honors than any it is in our power to confer.

For your fellow students I may be permitted to say that I have had during the short period the Institution has been under my exclusive control, such overwhelming evidences of their attachment to, and respect for me, that I should be recreant to the impulse of my higher nature, if I was not ready to devote all my energies to advance their future interest, and conduct them to that position of honor and usefulness, to which a judicious and liberal education ever leads.

It is a source of no small gratification to me that the Faculty of this Institution has identified themselves with the expression of regard.  Of course, none are better able to judge the true position of a Principal, than those who share his responsibilities and labors.  I feel thankful that I have their confidence.  It has seldom fallen to the lot of one standing as the head of an Institution of this kind to find himself surrounded by men as capable as those which surround me.  They will allow me to express a hope that the pleasant relations which subsist between us may be long continued and that we may each succeed by our labors in building up such an individual and aggregate reputation as shall compense us for toils which no consideration of a salaried nature can every repay.

I must not close these already too lengthy remarks, without one word to the citizens of this and adjoining counties, who have favored us by their presence in such numbers today.  It is to you that we look for final success in all our endeavors.  The history of this Institution has been hitherto one of reverse and misfortune.  May I not hope that it has seen its last dark day.  I think it has.  In visiting the various towns, I find a new disposition manifested; a disposition to foster and sustain it as peculiarly their own.  It is yours; send your children, fill its spacious halls.  It gives me unspeakable pleasure to inform you the prospect was never as bright.  The probability is that the number of students this term will be larger than ever before.  Let your son, your daughter, be of the number.

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

Musical

Miss C. L. CHASE will commence giving lessons on the Piano Forte, Organ, Harmonium and Melodeon, on Monday, 3d day of May next as follows:  Will be at Hensonville every Monday and Thursday, at Windham Center every Tuesday and Friday, and at Jewett Center every Wednesday and Saturday.  Particular attention will be given to thorough ______ and Church Music.  Terms $8 per quarter of 24 lessons.

Oak Firkins

BY THE LOAD OR LESS QUANTITY.  BY THE LOAD six shillings each; less quantity seven shillings each.  BUTTER wanted for which the highest cash price will be paid by

MORSE & MILLEGAN, Red Falls 

Administrators’ Sale 

THE ADMINISTRATORS OF ALBERT E. LORD, deceased, will offer at public sale, on the premises lately occupied by said A. E. Lord, situate in Prattsville, Greene Co., NY, on Tuesday, June 1st, 1858, (Sale commencing at 10 o’clock, A.M.), the following personal property, viz.: Six Carding Machines, two Spinning Jacks, one picker a quantity of Satinet and Cassimere looms, one broad Loom, one Dresser, one Spooler, one Lathe for wood or iron, one Brusher, one Shearing machine, one Trees and Plates, Kettles, Gigs and Brushers, &c.  Including all the articles usually used to and about a Cassimere and Satinet Factory, together with a quantity of mechanical Tools, Carpenter’s tools, &c.

The above named property is nearly new, and in excellent order, and will be sold all together or in parcels to accommodate purchasers, or at private sale at any time before the above date.  Persons are invited to call and examine the property.

LUCY LORD, Administratrix
ELISHA LORD, Administrator
Dated Prattsville, April 1st, 1858


April 15, 1858

Fire 

A fire was discovered issuing from the barn and wagon house connected with the hotel of Mr. J. S. Winsted, in East Durham, at 12 o’clock on Saturday night last, and before the alarm could be given, the flames had gained so rapidly that it was found to be impossible to remove anything from the building, which with its contents, was totally destroyed.  Three horses, one cutter and a harness belonging to Mr. Andrew J. Tuttle, were consumed, upon which there was no insurance. We learn that one cow, some two or three hundred bushels of oats, and a quantity of hay and straw were also consumed.  The building was not insured.  Mr. Tuttle’s loss is about $700, and Mr. Winsted’s some $700.  A man named Barlow has been arrested on suspicion of setting fire to the premises.

HOTEL CHANGE – Jacob T. Huggins, Esq., has leased the hotel recently kept by Mr. Joshua DeNoyelles, in Prattsville, where he will be pleased to see his old friends and former patrons.  Mr. H. has been connected, for the past two or three years, with our old friend, Mart. Lament, Esq., at the Lexington House, in Lexington, where he formed many acquaintances, and made many warm friends, whose good wishes follow him to his new home.  Travelers will find no better hotel between Catskill and Delhi.  Read his card in another column, and give him a call.

COOL – A prisoner named Bean, confined in the jail in Hudson on a charge of grand larceny, broke out recently and a day or two afterwards sent back the following cool letter to the sheriff:

HUDSON, March 27, 1858

Sheriff Waldo – I now set down to write a few lines to you.  I am sorry that I have caused you so much trouble, but when I see the chance I could not help stepping out.  I shall come back three or four days before Court, if you do not catch me before.

Yours truly,             J.F. BEAN,

P.S.  If you please, will you look after my clothes.  I left my coat, one white vest, five dickeys, one pair of pants, two shirts, one hat, a sash, ac’t book, two handkerchiefs and a carpet bag.  I think that is all.  Don’t give yourself any uneasiness as I shall surely come back at the time stated – if I am well; If I am not well, I will write and let you know where I am.  So, good-bye.  Give my love to Wm. Dyer and Cook.  From

J. F. BEAN

Agreeable to his promise, at 2 A.M., April 4th, Bean presented himself at the jail and demanded admission.  The jailor admitted him and secured him with chains.

A Card

The subscriber would hereby tender his warmest thanks to those friends who so generously sympathized with and assisted him in his recent severe affliction and loss, by fire, of house, barn, and contents, at the commencement of winter.  By their assistance, with the blessing of Providence, he succeeded in erecting a new house and getting it ready for the admission of his family in the short space of four weeks.

“A friend in need is a friend in deed.”

ABRAHAM HILL
Prattsville, April 7
Catskill papers please copy.

ARRESTED FOR POISONING– The Kingston Journal says that John Bogardus, a resident of Catskill, has been arrested on a charge of poisoning his wife.  It also states that Bogardus had so brutally treated her that her parents were compelled to take her home, where she died a few days since.

We have been informed by those who are intimately acquainted with the parties that they married against the wishes of her parents, who have been continually trying since the marriage to break up the union.  Also, that Bogardus had treated her affectionately, and offered her the privilege of going home and living with her parents, which she declined to do. When she was first taken sick, however, thinking she should receive proper care, and at the urgent request of her parents, she consented to go home, provided she should be allowed to see her husband daily, which was agreed to.  After her removal, however, her parents denied Bogardus admission to the house, and told him that his wife had said she did not wish to see him.  When the wife inquired for her husband, she was told that he had not been there and probably did not care to see her.  If these circumstances are true, and we receive them from the most reliable source, we think the parents acted cruelly to both husband and wife, and should receive the contempt of the community.

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

Notice

ALL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE FIRM OF MISSES BRYAN & THOMAS, Millinors, are requested to call and settle the same, as one of the firm is about to remove to another place and it becomes necessary that the accounts of the firm be immediately settled.

Windham Center, April 14, 1858


April 22, 1858

SUICIDE – We learn that a man named Thomas Meddick, committed suicide in Acra, on Saturday morning last, at about 10 o’clock, by hanging himself.  He was discovered by his two sons, with the rope tightly drawn around his neck, and his body in such a position that his hands nearly touched the floor.  When first discovered, he was not quite dead, but so far gone that resuscitation was impossible.  He was by trade a tanner, and employed himself in a small tannery of his own in Acra.  He is supposed to have committed the act while laboring under a temporary fit of insanity, produced by pecuniary losses within the past few months, though he had many times told his wife, “he would rather be dead than alive.”  Deceased was about 55 or 60 years of age.

ANOTHER – At about the same time, on Saturday morning last, a man named Jacob Osborn, living about a mile and a half form Leeds, in the town of Catskill, hung himself.  We have no particulars.

A MISTAKE CORRECTED – The Kingston Journal, has discovered that there was no truth in its statement that John Bogardus of Catskill, had been arrested on a charge of poisoning his wife, and made the necessary correction.

SHAD – During the past two weeks shad have been taken plentifully from the river at Catskill Point, and are now selling west of the mountains at from twenty to twenty-five cents.

Rev. Warren Mayo, after about five years labor with the Presbyterian Church at Stamford (Head of Delaware) is about to leave for Kansas.

INFORMATION WANTED – On Sunday morning, March 14th, a lad 7 years old, the son of Mrs. Sarah Bosford, strayed from home and since has not been heard from.  He was dressed in a brown cap with blue band, light drab jacket, brown pantaloons.  He had light colored hair and light blue eyes.  Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his mother or by

G. H. NICHOLLS
Rector of Grace Church
Cherry Valley, March 22d, 1858
Exchanges please copy.

FOUND – The body of a man was drawn up in a net by some fisherman while making a haul in the river at Stuyvesant Landing on Saturday afternoon last.  The man was recognized as the one who was drowned last fall near the spot where the body was found, Mr. Colvin, of New Baltimore.  An inquest was held by Coroner Knapp, and a verdict of “accidental drowning” rendered – Coxsackie Union


April 29, 1858

On the night of the 4th of April, Mr. M. R. Boughton, of Conesville, Schoharie, Co., left for parts unknown, with a young girl of this county, by the name of Renne.  He is a man of about 60 years of age, a merchant, and has been a class leader a number of years.  He leaves an amiable and intelligent wife and family. – Recorder & Democrat. 

WATCH STOLEN AND RECOVERED – Mr. Addison Steele, of the town of Ashland, while in a field at work; on Monday last, noticed a rough looking person coming out of his house.  A few hours afterwards, he discovered that his watch had disappeared.  He therefore gave chase to the stranger, caught him at Moresville, and recovered his watch.  The thief being out of the county where the act was committed, and as it would take some time and trouble to effect an arrest, the scoundrel was allowed to go unwhipt of justice.

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

Notice 

ALL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE LATE FIRM OF POTTER & OLNEY, either by note or book account, are requested to make immediate settlement.  All persons indebted to the subscriber are also urged to call and make immediate payment.  The books, notes and accounts of the late firm and of the subscriber, may be found at the office of J. Olney, Esq.

H. R. POTTER
Windham Center, April 28th, 1858

Notice to Creditors 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, IN PURSUANCE OF AN order of F. J. Fitch, Surrogate of the County of Greene, to all persons having claims against the estate of Able Edmonds, deceased, late of the town of Ashland in the county of Greene, that they are required to exhibit the same with the vouchers thereof to James S. Edmonds, administrator, at his residence in Windham Center on or before the 4th day of November 1858.

JAMES S. EDMONDS, Administrator
Dated, April 28th, 1858


May 6, 1858

WHEREAS John Hyson and Mary Elizabeth his wife, of the town of Ashland, in the County of Greene and State of New York, by their certain indenture of mortgage bearing date the fourteenth day of  February, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven, to secure the payment of the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and the interest thereon according to the conditions of said mortgage and a certain bond bearing even date with, and accompanying said mortgage, did convey and mortgage to Daniel B. Strong and Daniel T. Ruggles of the town of Ashland, aforesaid, and to their heirs and assigns forever, “all that certain piece or parcel of land lying, being and situate in the town of Ashland, and bounded as follows: Beginning at a stake and stones on the south east corner of the lot of land belonging to Benjamin Kinsley above a certain furnace building and running due south two chains and ninety-two links; thence south seventy-three degrees and thirty minutes west to a stump one chain and sixty links; thence up said brook or run of water north, one degree east, three chains and forty links, to a stump on the west side of a certain dam across said brook; thence south eighty-seven degrees east one chain and fifty-four links to the place of the beginning, containing one half of an acre of land, be the same more or less.  Also, one other piece of land situated in said town of Ashland, and bounded as follows:  Commencing at the center of a bridge, on the road north of Benjamin Kinsleys, and near the dwelling house of John Matthews and running its northerly course as the road winds and turns, five chains and fifteen links to the south line of the above-named lot; from thence a westerly course on said lot to the center of the brook; from thence down said brook, as it winds and turns to the place of beginning, containing one acre of land, be the same more or less;”  Which said mortgage, with the power of sale therein contained, was duly recorded in the Clerks office of said county of Greene, in book No. 30 of mortgages on page 395 on the 17th day of February 1857; on which said mortgage there is claimed to be due, at the time of the first publication of this notice, the sum of one hundred and six dollars and eighty-eight cents ($106.88) in the payment of which default has been made according to the conditions of said mortgage; and no suit or proceeding at law having been instituted for the recovery of said moneys or any part thereof; Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that by virtue of the power of sale in said mortgage contained, and in pursuance of the statue in such case made and provided, the said mortgaged premises will be sold at public auction, to the highest bidder, on the thirty-first day of July next, at one o’clock, in the afternoon of that day, at public house kept by Henry Kinsley, in the town of Ashland and county of Greene, aforesaid, and this said mortgage will be then and there foreclosed by such sale. 

Dated May 6, 1858

DANIEL H. STRONG, DANIEL T. RUGGLES            Mortgagees
J. OLNEY, Attorney


May 13, 1858

Acknowledgements

Our thanks are due to Geo. W. Potter, Esq., for a can of choice Galveston Bay oysters, put up in Galveston, Texas, by Stephen Kirtland, Esq., under hermetical seal.  We found them in a good condition, but fear that, now the box is opened, they will too soon disappear.

We are also under many obligations to our friend Wm. Whitting, Esq., for a box of excellent segars.  As the donor is an extremely modest young man, and far above puffing, we shall content ourselves with occasionally puffing one of the segars in remembrance of him.

BODY FOUND  - A body was found in the Hudson River, near the Catskill Point, on Wednesday of last week, which was identified, says the Coxsackie Union, as the body of named Francis Errison, of Coxsackie, who had been missing some time.  Coroner Knapp held an inquest, and a verdict of “accidental drowning” was rendered.

A person calling himself Wm. H. Keator, of Roxbury, Del. Co., yesterday presented at the Catskill Bank for discount, a note for $350, signed by himself  and Cyrus Mead, and purporting to be endorsed by Samuel Keator, Edward Burhans and M. Griffin.  The Cashier, being familiar with the signatures of some of the parties, observing that those on the notes were forgeries, consulted with the President, Mr. King, and as soon as the necessary documents could be prepared, Keator was arrested by officer France.  The examination, at the suggestion of the prisoner, was set down for Wednesday next. – Examiner

MYSTERIOUS MURDER NEAR SACRAMENTO - Henry A. Bush, formerly of Greene Co., New York, was killed near Sacramento by one John Kaler.  The murder was committed in Bush’s ranch, on the north side of the American river, not far from Lisle’s Bridge.  Kaler had gone to the Police Office at Sacramento, and surrendering himself gave the first information of the bloody deed.  He was removed from the Station House to the prison brig.

It appears that he was very communicative on the subject of the murder, and, according to the account in the “State Journal,” said that Bush, with whom he was in partnership, had been for some time attempting to take liberties with his wife and endeavoring to get her to separate from him – that she was not disposed to favor any such arrangement and refused his offers – that in consequence of this course of action on the part of Bush, he was unhappily situated.  A few months ago, Bush had threatened to, or did, attack him, when he struck him with a knife, which caused him to desist and afterwards came in with some neighbors, asked for a reconciliation, and promised to give no more pause for offence.  But a short time elapsed after this, before Bush was acting the same as he had done previous to the encounter with the knife and frequently made such threats against him as to make him afraid of his life.  At the time of the murder, he says Bush was pointing at him or going at him with a gun when he rushed upon him and struck him with the weapon he had in his hand. 

The Coroner visited the scene of the murder, where he held an inquest and took testimony.  Among other witnesses examined were Patrick Kaler, brother of the prisoner, and Eliza A. Kaler, the prisoner’s wife, who were both in Bush’s house, on the night of the murder, and were witnesses to some of the circumstances attending the deed.  They testified that they heard John Kaler, who happened to rise first in the morning, cry out to them to come to his help, as Bush was going to shoot him; that they thereupon jumped out of their beds, and saw Bush and John Kaler struggling, and that the latter felled Bush with a piece of iron, etc.  The Jury returned the following verdict; “We, the undersigned Jury, do find that Henry A. Bush came to his death from blows inflicted with an iron gun barrel, while sleeping in his bed, some time in the night, the said weapon, being in the hands of John Kaler, and that he, the said Kaler, was assisted by his brother Patrick Kaler, and that the same is a willful murder; and we, the Jury, do recommend to the Coroner to cause the arrest of said parties; and, we recommend also the arrest of Mrs. Eliza A. Kaler as a party to the act.

Mortgage Sale 

WHEREAS Gilbert N. More, and Jennet, his wife, of the town of Ashland, in the County of Greene and State of New York by their certain indenture of mortgage, dated the first day of September one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, to secure the payment of the sum of two hundred and seventy-five dollars, and the interest thereon, according to the conditions of said mortgage, and a certain bond bearing even date with and accompanying said mortgage, did convey and mortgage unto Samuel C. Bidwell of the town of Ashland aforesaid, and to his heirs and assigns forever, “all that certain piece or parcel of land situated in said town of Ashland, and bounded as follows:  Beginning at a post on the north side of the turnpike road, and runs from thence north fifty-six degrees and thirty minutes, west three chains, forty-two links, thence north thirty degrees, east one chain, seventy-six links, thence south forty five degrees, east three chains, eighty-five links, thence south forty-seven degrees east one chain, ten links to the place of beginning, being part of lot No. 21, and formerly owned by Zebediah J. Smith, (now deceased), containing one half acre of land be the same more of less.”  Which said mortgage with the power of sale therein contained was duly recorded in the clerks office of the said county of Greene in Book No. 30 of mortgages on page 244 on the eleventh day of September 1856, and on which said mortgage there is claimed to be due at the time of the first publication of this notice, the sum of one hundred and forty-eight dollars and sixty-nine cents, in the payment of which default has been made, according to the conditions of said mortgage, and the whole sum remaining unpaid on said mortgage, at the time of the first publication of this notice, is two hundred and forty-eight dollars and sixty five cents, and no suit or proceeding in law or equity having been instituted for the recovery of said sum or any part thereof.  Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage and in pursuance of the statue in such case made and provided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed by a sale at public auction of the said mortgaged premises, for the whole amount unpaid on said mortgage, and discharged from any further lien for the same, at the public house kept by Henry Kinsley, in the town of Ashland, and country o of Greene on the seventh day of August next, at one o’clock in the afternoon of that day.

Dated May 13th, 1858

SAMUEL C. BIDWELL, Mortgagee
C. H. PORTER, Attorney

Valuable Property for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBERS, ASSIGNEES of Solomon Tompkins, Jr., offer for sale the farm or farms (with or without the crops) formerly belonging to said Solomon Tompkins, Jr., situated in the town of Ashland, about half a mile north-west of the Ashland Collegiate Institute, and containing about 200 acres of land.  On the premises are two dwelling houses, with barns, wagon-houses, and all necessary outbuildings.  The places are well calculated for dairying and may be used together, or divided into two farms, the smallest of fifty acres.  Any information concerning the property may be had on application to the assignor, who now occupies the premises or to either of the assignees, the former residing within half a mile of the premises and the latter half a mile north of Windham Center.  Terms made easy to purchasers.

JAMES TOMPKINS
EDWARD DOLITTLE    Assignees
Ashland, May 1st, 1858

Prattsville House

THE SUBSCRIBER WOULD RESPECTFULLY INFORM his friends and travelers that he has leased the above named Hotel, in Prattsville, Greene Co., NY, where he will be pleased to receive their calls.  The building is in complete order, and no effort will be spared on his part to make it a comfortable home for all who will favor him with a call.  His bar will always be furnished with the most choice imported liquors and cigars.  The stables attached to the house are in good order, and will be promptly attended to.  A share of the public patronage is respectfully solicited.

JACOB T. HUGGINS
Prattsville, April 1, 1858


May 20, 1858

SERIOUS ACCIDENT – An accident of a serious nature occurred in the town of Conesville, Schoharie county, on Sunday, the 9th inst., occasioned by the fright and runaway of a pair of horses belonging to Henry Gaylord, Esq.  Mr. Gaylord’s son started from his residence to attend the quarterly meeting at the M. E. Church in Gilboa, accompanied by two daughters of Mr. Washington Stryker, and a daughter of Mr. Elisha Hammond.  When about to leave the residence of Ira Humphrey, Esq., where they had called for Miss Humphrey, before Mr. G. could get into the wagon, the horses became restless and unmanageable and ran away.  Miss Stryker jumped from the wagon and sprained her foot seriously. – The wagon soon came in collision with a pile of wood by the roadside, throwing the other three ladies out and bruising them all more or less, some of them very seriously, but it is hoped, not fatally.  The horses ran about a quarter of a mile, when the wagon-tongue struck the corner of a meeting house and they were stopped.


May 27, 1858

DISSOLUTION – We notice that the law firm heretofore existing between D. K. Olney and A. Melvin Osborn, Esqs., has been dissolved by mutual consent.  The business of the late firm will be continued by D. K. Olney, Esq., at his office in the basement rooms of the Tanner’s Bank, Catskill.  Mr. Osborn goes to New York to practice his profession there, carrying with him the respect and best wishes of his many friends in Greene County.  Success to him.

MINISTERIAL APPOINTMENTS – The annual Conference of the M. E. Church have made the following appointments in this district.

J. B. Beach, Presiding Elder
Prattsville – W. Hall, S. F. Richmond
Durham – A. F. Selleck
Greenville – A. M. Hough
Coeymans – O. P. Matthews
Coeymans Hollow – J. Birch, A. Wood
Coxsackie – B. M. Genung
Catskill and High Hill – C. M. Eggleston
Leeds – B. L. Burr
Cairo – N. O. Lent
Windham – J. H. Champion, G. Woodworth
Rev. Wm. Goss, who has been pastor of the M. E. Church in this village, goes to Hobart,
Delaware County.


June 3, 1858

COTILLION PARTIES – We notice that the hotel keepers in this section are already beginning to prepare for Independence Cotillion Parties, but as the 4th of July comes on Sunday this year, some of the parties will be held a day or two before that time, and others a day or two after.    Among the parties contemplated, we notice that one is to be held at the hotel of H. B. Smith, Esq., on the west side of the bridge in Prattsville on Thursday evening, July 1st, at which lovers of dancing may look out for a good time.  Another Cotillion Party will be held at the hotel of Messrs. Taylor & Stryker, in Gilboa, on Friday evening, July 2d.  This will be the first party of the kind held at the Gilboa House since the present proprietors entered the establishment.  As they are popular men, and have an extensive acquaintance, a crowd and a pleasant time may be expected.

FIRE AT NEW BALTIMORE – On the night of Monday, the 24th inst., the Paper Mill of Crosswell & Son, in the village of New Baltimore was destroyed by fire, together with about $1000 worth of paper.  The dwelling adjoining also took fire, but was saved by the active exertions of the citizens.  The loss estimated at about $15,000.

LIBEL SUIT SETTLED – The suit commenced by D. K. Olney, Esq., of Catskill, against the editor of the Recorder & Democrat, for alleged libel, has been settled in a satisfactory manner to both parties.  Mr. Joesbury, in a card in his last issue, says:

“Those articles were published under the excitement of a political canvass, and upon information which at the time I supposed correct; but, upon subsequent inquiry and investigation, I am satisfied that the material matters stated in them are incorrect.

I never imputed or intended to impute to Mr. Olney any dishonorable motives or conduct as a lawyer; on the contrary, I have ever regarded him as both honorable in his profession and faithful to his clients.  I take pleasure in saying that I believe that his moral character is irreproachable.” 

COLOURS FOR THE 20TH REGIMENT – The 20th Regiment, Col. George W. Pratt, now comprises nine full companies of well drilled men in the U.S. regulation uniform adopted from our State force.  As a recognition of the spirit and most creditable exertions of officers and men in forming the best military organization over in this County, the Directors of Kingston voted $100 towards the purchase of regimental colors.  The Trustees of Roundout found that their Charter powers did not allow them to do the like, but the sum was made up by liberal individual subscriptions by the public spirited men of our neighbor village.  We presume that the colors will be presented at the Regimental parade. – Kingston Jour.

SUICIDE – The Examiner says that Samuel Slawson, Esq., aged about 51 years, residing in the town of Greenville, hung himself on Sunday last.  Domestic troubles is the cause given for the act.  He left a paper directing how his affairs should be settled.

FATAL ACCIDENT – An accident occurred in the town of Middletown, Delaware County, on the 6th of May, which terminated fatally to a little boy named George Avery, aged eight years.  The circumstances were as follows:  While he was swinging upon a large gate, the hinge broke, throwing him to the ground, when the gate fell upon his head and crushed it in such a manner as to cause death in about ten hours.

Notice to Creditors

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, IN PURSUANCE OF AN order of F. J. Fitch, Surrogate of the County of Greene to all persons having claims against the estate of Abel Edmonds, deceased, late of the town of Ashland in the county of Greene, that they are required to exhibit the same with the vouchers thereof to James S. Edmonds, administrator, at his residence in Windham Center on or before the 4th day of November, 1858.        JAMES S. EDMONDS, Administrator    Dated, April 28th, 1858


June 10, 1858

Mr. Joshua DeNoyelles, formerly of the Prattsville House, Prattsville, is now keeping a hotel in Madison, Wisconsin, and is doing a fine business.  

Greene County Circuit Court 
CATSKILL, June 8, 1858 Tuesday Evening

FRIEND STEELE – The Circuit Court (Judge Hogeboom presiding) commenced its sittings yesterday at the court house in this village.  The only case tried, as yet, is Allen against Wainright, which has just gone to the jury.  The case of C. L. Beach against Montross is now on.  No criminal cases have been taken up as yet, but is understood that they will be commenced on Thursday morning.  The attendance at court is large – the Grand Jury are still in session.            Yours Truly,               X


June 17, 1858

The Prattsville House

This favorite hotel has lately changed hands, and J. T. Huggins, Esq., for the past two or three years one of the proprietors of the Lexington House, has become its occupant.  It is now in thorough repair, and we are glad to see that Mr. H. is doing a fine business. – An excellent ballroom is connected with the house, and Mr. H. intends having an Independence Cotillion Party in it on Friday evening, July 2d.  Ford’s band is engaged for the occasion, and with good music and Supper prepared in the best style, &c., lovers of dancing may look forward to one of the pleasantest events of the times.  This is the first party of the kind held at this place since Mr. H’s entrance, and we bespeak for him a general attendance.

BEARS IN HALCOTT – The citizens of the town of Halcott have been visited on several occasions recently by a bear, who has at each visit manifested his peculiar character and tastes, and left his card in the shape of a deceased and mutilated lamb.  On one occasion, five sheep were killed.  Measures have been taken to secure his bearship.

NEW STORE AND NEW FIRM – J. M. Eagleton, Esq., formerly of this village, and James Loughran, Esq., of Hensonville, have formed a co-partnership in the mercantile line, have erected a fine building for their business and commenced operations in Hensonville.  Success to them.

ACCIDENT BY BURNING FLUID – A young man at Roxbury Academy accidentally broke his field lamp while burning.  The fluid immediately took fire and filled the room with a blaze and burned the young man considerable; but the prompt action of one or two school fellows, by the use of bed clothes, saved his life and the academy from ashes. – Mirror


June 24, 1858

Mortgage Sale 

WHEREAS, Alanson Newcomb and Rachel Ann, his wife, of the town of Prattsville in the county of Greene and State of New York, for the purpose of securing the payment of two thousand dollars and interest to Jacob P. Stryker of the town, county and state aforesaid, did on the 14th day of March, 1854, execute a mortgage to the said Jacob P. Stryker, bearing date on that day, upon certain lands described as follows, to wit:  all that piece or parcel of land commonly known by the name of part of lot Number 13, lying on the Schoharie Creek being in a patent formerly granted to Ory Richtmyer, Hendricks Warner, John Lanning and others and bounded as follows: Beginning at a stone on the east bank of the Schoharie Creek, and being the southernmost boundary of a farm loaned to Abram Van Dam and running from said stone south forty degrees and thirty minutes east to the easternmost boundary line of said Patent; thence southerly along the said easternmost boundary line to the South East corner of said Patent; thence west eighty chains to the bank of the Schoharie Creek; thence down the stream and along the east bank of said creek, as it winds and turns, to the place of beginning, containing or to contain three hundred and twenty acres of land, be the same more or less.  And also a piece of land lying in said Lot and Patent and known by the name of Vitlsurkey lying on the west side of said creek in the town of Roxbury, or part in Roxbury, county of Delaware and part in Bleinheim in the county of Schoharie; the first mentioned piece now lying in Prattsville, Greene County and part in Roxbury, Delaware County, and State aforesaid, and is bounding as follows; Beginning on the west side of said creek where the southernmost boundary line of said Patent crosses said creek and runs eight chains to the foot of the hill; thence north five chains; thence four degrees east seventeen chains to the westerly bank of said creek; thence up the stream and along the bank of said creek, as it winds and turns to the place of beginning, containing or to contain, twenty acres of land be the same more of less.  Which said mortgage, with a power of sale therein contained, was recorded in the Greene County clerk’s office on the 17th day of March 1854, at 9 AM, in Book No. 28 of mortgages, on page 15 and wherein default has been made in the payment of the money accrued by said mortgage according to the conditions thereof, and therein is claimed to be due and unpaid thereon at the time of the first publication of this notice, the sum of ten hundred and ninety eight dollars and eighty-four cents, and no suite or proceeding at law or in equity having been instituted to recover the said sum, or any part thereof, now therefore, notice is hereby given that, by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage and pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided, the said premises will be sold at public auction or venue , on the 24th day of September, 1858, at one o’clock, P.M. at the public house kept by Jacob Huggins in the village of Prattsville, in the said town of Prattsville, NY.  Dated June 21st, 1858.                        JACOB P. STRYKER, Mortgagee WILLIAM T. BALDWIN, Attorney


July 1, 1858

TALL OATS – Messrs Andrew and John Moore, of Lexington, pulled a few stalks of Oats from their farm last week, which measured three feet and two inches in height. – Cannot some of our friends in this neighborhood beat it?

A lad of some 7 years named Benjamin Hopson was drowned at Catskill on Saturday last.


July 8, 1858

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE – A man, named Justus Bostwick, was found lying dead in a meadow belonging to Mr. Vedder, at Leeds, in this Town on Sunday morning last, with a jug of whiskey by his side.  On Friday morning he purchased a quart of whiskey in Leeds, which probably caused his death, as he was not seen afterwards until discovered, as above stated.  He had been an intemperate man for years.  Coroner Brace held an inquest upon the body, at which a verdict of “death from intemperance and exposure” was rendered. – Recorder & Democrat

Mr. John Reed, Supervisor of the town of Gilboa, was severely injured lately by being kicked and trampled upon by a vicious horse.  Immediately after the accident, Dr. Fanning was called to see him and found that three of his ribs were broken and one leg was broken just above the ankle joint.  We hope for speedy recovery of Mr. Reed from these injuries.  He is one of the most active and enterprising citizens of the southern section of the county. – Schoharie Republican


July 15, 1858

Mrs. Wm. A. Parker, formerly of this village, was killed by being struck by an engine while crossing a railroad track at Lawrence, IL, June 15th.  Mrs. Parker was a daughter of John B. Scutt, formerly of Roxbury in this county, and spent much of her early life at that place and Prattsville.  She was very highly esteemed in all the relations of life and the news of her sudden death will carry deep sorrow to a large circle of friends. – Franklin Visitor

A HOAX – A singular hoax occurred in Delaware County last week, arising from the reported death of Judge Munson, in Hobart.  When his death was announced in Delhi, the Court then in session, as a mark of respect to the supposed deceased, immediately adjourned.  The next day, a few of the Judge’s personal friends from Delhi visited Hobart, a distance of sixteen miles, to attend the funeral.   Arriving at Hobart, they were met at the door of the Judge’s residence by Mrs. M., who politely informed the party that her family was never in better health, and that the judge had just gone to Ashland, in this county, to leave his son at the Ashland Collegiate Institute.  The agreeably surprised company returned to Delhi under the impression that they had been mysteriously sold.  The report originated in confounding the name of Judge Munson with that of Major Hunt, who died in Hobart on Wednesday.

TALL TIMOTHY – It is now about time for farmers to measure their tall grass.  On Saturday last, Mr. N. M. Fink of this town, left at this office three stalks of timothy, the tallest of which measured five feet two and a half inches and the shortest five feet two inches.  The tallest timothy in this section last year was raised by Mr. Stephen Pelham, of this town, and measured six feet eight inches in height.  Can anyone beat it this year?

John Reed, Esq., of Gilboa, who was seriously injured a few weeks since by being kicked and trampled upon by a vicious horse, we are glad to learn is slowly recovering, and will be able in two or three weeks to attend to his business.

DISSOLUTION – Drs. Hamilton & Fitch, of Prattsville, have dissolved partnership, on account of the ill health of Dr. Hamilton, who goes to Lansingburg to reside while Dr. Fitch continues his practice in Prattsville.

Major Joseph Hunt, of Hobart, Del. County, died very suddenly on Wednesday of last week while pitching off a load of hay.

The Delaware Gazette says the house of Roger Case, Esq., in Franklin, was struck by lightning on Saturday, 3d inst.  Mr. Case was knocked down and stunned but not seriously injured.

The regatta which took place at Hudson on the 5th inst., resulted in the success of Mr. Frederick Minnerly, a resident of Catskill.  The prize awarded him was $25.

ACCIDENTALLY KILLED – A man named John Harrington, a resident of Moresville, Delaware county, was accidentally killed at Moresville on Friday last, while assisting in moving a barn on the premises of Mr. R. H. Gleason.  He fell from the sill to the cellar, striking on his head.  At the same time, a beam from above fell upon his head, crushing it in such a manner as to cause death in a few moments.


July 22, 1858

Sheriff’s Sale

By virtue of an execution issued out of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, and county of Greene and to me directed and delivered, against the goods and chattels, lands and tenements, and chattels real, of Daniel B. Strong and Daniel T. Ruggles of the town of Ashland in the county of Greene and State of New York, I have seized and taken and shall expose to sale at Public Auction, to the highest bidder, at the public house kept by Henry Kinsley, in the village of Ashland, in the county and state aforesaid, on Friday, September 3d, 1858, at one o’clock, in the afternoon of that day, all the right, title and interest which the said Daniel B. Strong and Daniel T. Ruggles had on the eleventh day of March, 1858, or at any time afterwards or in whose hands so ever the same may be, of, in and to all that certain piece, parcel or lot of land situate, lying and being in the town of Ashland, in said county of Greene and State of New York, and bounded generally and described as follows, to wit: - Beginning at the center of the turnpike road, and running thence northerly along the lands of Daniel B. Strong, westerly by lands of Henry Kinsley, southerly by lands of Levi Ferris and John J. Brandow to the center of the turnpike road, thence easterly along said road to the place of beginning, containing two acres of land be the same more or less.  Also, all the right, title and interest of the said Daniel T. Ruggles of in and to another piece, parcel or lot of land situate, lying and being in the town of Ashland, County and State aforesaid, and bounded and described generally as follows, to wit; North by the center of the turnpike, east by lands of Lydia Tuttle, south by lands of John L. Decker, and west by lands of Daniel B. Strong, containing one half an acre of land, be the same more or less.  Said land being now in the occupancy of Benjamin Garvey.  Together with all and singular the buildings, heredittaments and appurtenances to the same premises belonging or in any wise appertaining. – Dated July 22, 1858

FRANKLIN B. LAMENT, Sheriff
By J. S. EDMONDS, Deputy Sheriff
J. OLNEY, Plaintiff’s Attorney

1858
STEAM TRANSPORTATION

New York and Catskill

FREIGHT & PASSENGER LINE

THROUGH without landing and connecting with the Mail Stages West.  The Catskill Steam Transportation Company will run the favorite steamer CATSKILL, Capt. Wm. B. Lyens, the season of 1858, for freight or passengers as follows:  Leaving CATSKILL for New York on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 6 o’clock, P.M., and leaving NEW YORK for Catskill from foot of Franklin Street, on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5 o’clock P.M., and Saturdays at 9 A.M.  The Steamer Catskill possesses accommodations for Passengers unsurpassed for elegance and comfort.  Her saloon and State Rooms are not excelled by any Boat on the River.  Having been recently rebuilt and enlarged, and also furnished with new boilers, she is all that can be desired for speed or safety.  Passengers by this boat can rely upon arriving in New York at an early hour, and at Catskill in time to take the Stages West.

FARE $1  BERTHS FREE.  Breakfast will be furnished on the Boat to Passengers going West if required.

THE CATSKILL STEAM TRANSPORTATION CO.
Catskill March 17, 1858

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS 

Milton S. Vedder
SILVERSMITH AND JEWELER
AT SYLVESTER’S BAZAAR, OPPOSTIE THE CATSKILL BANK
Repairing promptly attended to and Warranted.  Prices low.

Livery at the Catskill House

 

Roxbury Academy 

THE FALL TERM OF THIS INSTITUTION WILL COMMENCE on Wednesday, August 18th, and continue fourteen weeks.  A full corps of thoroughly qualified teachers is employed, each instructing in his own favorite branches of study.

The price of board including washing is $2 a week.  The whole expense for board, washing, incidentals and tuition in Common English Branches, for a term of fourteen weeks is $33.

For further particulars and circulars, address the undersigned at Roxbury, Delaware County, NY.

July 14, 1858                                                   J. W. MCLAURY

LICENSE TO SELL
WINES &C.
R. P. GORSLINE, having taken Licenses to sell Wines and Spirituous Liquors by the small measure, has now on hand some of the finest old Port, old Sherry, and Malaga Wines, to be found in market, dark and pale Otard, French Brandy, Cherry Brandy, Cider Brandy, Holland Gin, Rum and Alcohol, &c., Turner’s Forrest Wine Bitters, Blackberry Brandy and Raspberry Brandy in bottles, for medicinal use.

R. P. GORSLINE
Windham, July 22d, 1858

INSURANCE AGENCY

Albany Insurance Company  
Incorporated in 1811- Charter Extended in 1838 and 1851.  
OFFICE No. 56 State Street, Albany.  
Farm Houses, Brick, Stone or Wood detached will be insured for three years for $1 per $100.  
TEUNIS VAN VECHTEN, Pres.  
GERRIT Y. LANSING, Vice Pres.  
STEPHEN GROESBEECK, Secretary  

CHAS. CORNWALL, Agent

  Manhattan Fire Insurance Company of the City of New York  
Capital    $250,000 
               
WM. PLATT PALMER, Pres  
A. J. SMITH, Secretary
 CHAS. CORNWALL, Agent  
Catskill, 1857  

HARNESS AND  
Carriage Trimming Shop

It is well known to all who use Carriages and Harness in this vicinity that C. STEDMAN makes the best and most durable work of any other shop west of New York city.  He still continues to manufacture to order and has on hand all kinds of Harness – both coarse and fine, double and single – and of a superior quality to those made in any other shop.  If work does not give entire satisfaction to the person ordering it, he is under no obligation to take it.  All work done in the latest and more fashionable style.  Carriage Trimming done at short notice, and in every style that is done in New York city, with either cloth or leather, and in a workmanlike manner.  A fine assortment of

Trunks Valises and Whips

constantly on hand.  Repairing done at all times.  Orders thankfully received and promptly attended to.

CHARLES STEDMAN  
Windham Center, May 26, 1858

  Montgomery & Sage’s
BOSTON CASH STORE  

AT PRATTSVILLE

STILL continue to keep constantly on hand the largest and best stock of  
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES 
               
CROCKERY, HARDWARE  
                
                CLOTHING, HATS & CAPS  
                                
                STONE WOOD & WILLOW WARE                                                                 BOOTS & SHOES, &c, &c, &c., &c.  
And all other kinds of goods
usually kept in a country store.  If you want Dress Goods, Trimmings and Ribbons
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
If you want Clothing and Fine Cloths  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
If you want Ladies Gaiters, Slippers or Buskins, with or without heels,  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
If you want Gent’s Panama, Leghorn, Silk or Fur Hats  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
If you want Paper Hangings or Window Shades  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
If you want Tapioca, Corn Starch, Gelatin, Irish Moss, Citron, Zantee Currants, Mace,
Worcestershire Sauce, Table Oil or Olives  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
If you want Cod Liver Oil, Bay Rum, or Dr. Jaynes & Son’s medicines  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
If you want Scythes, Scythe Snaths, Rakes, Forks, Shovels, Hoes, Plows, Plow Shares, or any other Farming utensils  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  
In short, good people, for anything you want  
                
                Go to Montgomery & Sage’s  

They sell cheap and will use their best endeavors to give satisfaction.  Remember that the place to buy your goods is at                                                                             Montgomery & Sage’s


July 29, 1858

A BOY DROWNED – A boy about 12 years of age, named Joseph T. LeValley, and another boy were in a skiff, when coming in contact with the wheel of the horse boat, the skiff was upset and the boys thrown into the water. – A coroner’s jury rendered a verdict of accidental drowning – Columbia Republican

Farewell Concert of Prof. E. Ambuhl  

MR. EDITOR – On Thursday last, the closing Concert of the first quarter of the present term was given by members of the “Musical Academy” connected with the “Ashland Collegiate Institute”, and although unadvertised, the large and beautiful Chapel of the Institute was filled.  The Concert was a grand affair and gave great satisfaction to all present.  Some visitors from New York and Philadelphia expressed themselves as being exceedingly delighted with the entertainment. – Several difficult pieces were played upon the piano, with great ability, by Miss Smith, Miss Kellogg, Miss Gilbert and Miss Wetmore, which gave great satisfaction.  Several solos and choruses were played and sung, producing much sensation.  A solo, by Miss Gilbert, called “Not Married Yet,” was received with great approbation.  The “Two Unfortunate Men,” played and sung by Prof. Ambuhl, called out loud applause.  This piece is an addition of four verses to the well known piece called the “Unfortunate Man”.  The addition was composed for the occasion by the Professor.  

After the concluding piece, a duet was played by Miss Kellogg and Prof. Ambuhl.  The Principal gave notice that since this was the farewell Concert of Prof. Ambuhl, and he was about to dissolve his connection with the Institution, he was desirous to make some parting remarks, and an opportunity would now be given.  Prof. A. then, in a very becoming style, delivered the following.  

ADDRESS  

This night, bringing to a close my connection with the Ashland Institute, it seems proper that I should give some parting remarks.

In doing so, permit me to say that in leaving this place, where I have spent many hours of toil and pleasure, I separate from that around which my sincere affections have clustered.   From the very commencement of my duties as professor of music of this Institute, until this moment which closes my duties as such, I have felt a deep interest in the prosperity of the Institution and have striven to make my department of such a character as to win public opinion and public support for it.  To this end, I have spared no pains to make myself more and more competent as a teacher, to understand more fully the principles of music, and to be thorough and complete in importing instruction upon one of the most interesting and profitable subjects, that of music.  I have never consulted ease, or my own selfish interests, since to make the Musical Academy of this Institute of unequaled merit, and of great attraction, has been an object of my darling ambition.  What ever others may say or think of me, I have this fact as a consoling thought, when I shall be far from this place, that I did try to do my duty as a teacher of the musical department, and if I have done aught derogatory to the interest and welfare of the Institution, which I shall ever love, it has not been through design or intention, but the very opposite of this; and though no longer associated with the professors and teachers of this place of learning, though no longer called upon to take any part in teaching, yet I shall continue my affection for the Institution and shall, so far as consistent with my future position, strive to promote its interest.  I have enjoyed myself in connection with the instructors having charge of the Institute and have learned to love them.  That one who has lately left us, I respected as a scholar and as a teacher, and regarded him as a firm friend to whom I might with confidence recount the secret feelings of my soul.  I had no trouble to work in harmony with him, and I loved to have him here, in what ever light he might have regarded me.  Yet, I have always entertained and do now the very best wishes for him and do sincerely regret any occasion, if there be any, for his leaving us. 

To you, the Principal, let me say that in taking my leave of you, I feel as though indeed I was going away from a friend most dear, and though sometimes I may have dif "......................" ".."reat good you have done me in this particular.  You have shown yourself a trusty friend in what has been to me my dark hours, and it is with regret that I am called to separate from you.  You, indeed have my heartiest wishes for great success to attend you in your several callings, and hoping that I may remember and practice your kind advice, I would say, dear friend, farewell.

To Prof. Holloway, the able and efficient successor of Prof. Garvey, you have won my respect and my love, and I feel loathe to part from you, but I go with the assurance that you will have around you friends to cheer, comfort, support and encourage you in your new calling.  To Miss Higgins and Miss Thorp, I would say in parting, I entertain for each of you strong feelings of friendship and desire the highest success to attend you while discharging the responsible duties as teachers.

A word now to my own departure; and first I would bear testimony to the marked ability, perseverance, the fidelity and uniform correct deportment of my assistant, Miss Smith.  I have always found her, under every circumstance, equal to her post.  She has given me the utmost satisfaction, in every particular, and it is a great relief to my mind that I leave the Musical Department in so good hands.  In separating, let me say to you, ever manifest the same spirit, ever exhibit the same fidelity and perseverance that have marked you since acting as my assistant in conducting the Musical Academy.  Love and cherish your calling, while endeavoring to become more and more proficient.  I can honestly and most truly say, in bidding you farewell, that you have done well.

To my class, I would hear testimony of your faithfulness as students of music.  You have evidently tried to learn, and your efforts have not been in vain – for progress, great and sure progress in your knowledge of music, has certainly been made.  In the various branches of education, perseverance in application is absolutely necessary, but especially is this the case in the study of music, instrumental and vocal.  You cannot, dear pupils, be anything like proficient in this art without constant, unwearied application; and to be able to do this, there must exist a love for it; and therefore I would have you to cultivate your taste and realize the advantages, socially and otherwise, of a thorough knowledge of the science of music, that you may learn to love it with true affection.  Do not be persuaded to give up the study of it, for it stands not in the way of any other pursuit, nor prevents one from following the promptings of lawful ambition, but rather gives a helping hand.  It is soothing to the anxious and troubled breast; it binds with charming ties the members of families, and makes one’s home the most attractive place, even during the long hours of winter nights; it hushes the passions of the soul, and brings into action the better feelings of the heart.   I trust you will all become thorough musicians, and be able to testify to the advantages thereof by personal experience.  Let the Piano – one of the noblest of musical instruments – be your constant companion; surely you need not be ashamed of such company.  You will need it even when amid the blessings of connubial life, and its notes will never lose their charm, though chiming chords may sound from little mouths, in numbers equal to that which graces the dwelling of your teacher of mathematics. 

Thanking you for your uniform respect to me, for strict observance of the rules and regulations and expressing my earnest wishes that you may enjoy great prosperity and undisturbed happiness throughout life, I would bide you an affectionate farewell.

Towards all the students I entertain the fondest feelings, and have found them kind and respectful towards me, and desire that in life they may be successful, honored and beloved, and though now leaving you, yet I shall ever have you in dear remembrance – To one and all, permit me to bid a kind farewell.

Music is music only when sweet harmony pervades; this gives its attraction, and the more perfect the harmony, the more deeply does it take hold of our feelings.  Even the untutored ear can discover the want of harmony.  This virtue in music is true in everything else; harmony must exist around the family hearth, or else domestic happiness and peace must take wings and fly away.  Harmony must exist in an Institution like this if prosperity and success are expected.  To insure this harmony, students must understand each others dispositions, and must respect their rights.  Teachers must regard the feelings and rights of their associates as well as of the students committed to their care.  If one professor, in self glory or self importance, attempts to ride over another professor, or if through show of authority or want of good, practical common sense, interferes with the rights and rules and regulations of his fellow instructors or is led to forget his own place and position, and to treat all as inferiors, then unless all are in possession of an angelic amiability, there cannot and will not be anything like harmony in this or any other Institution.  Each one minding his own business and permitting every one else to mind theirs, while studying the peculiarities of dispositions, and thus avoiding breakers ahead, no trouble would there be.  This has been the characteristic of this Institution with but one single exception, and if there has been anything like trouble to my mind, this exception has been the cause.  But, perhaps while this one has been lifted up among the lofty peaks of mathematics, and been troubled with difficult and perplexing calculations, the thumps upon the piano, attracting the gaze of the multitude and the praise of many, he has been bewildered and brought suddenly from his lofty position to unaccustomed regions, knew not what he did and hence ought to be excused.  And since now, the music teacher departs, and the remaining teachers are gentle, let alone men, nothing will occur to cause even the slightest appearance of discord.  In conclusion let me remind the professors of this beloved Institute, that professors are nothing but men after all, even though they be professors of mathematics.  But dropping this I would say, I leave this Institution with the kindest feelings.  I am prepared from my connection with it, to recommend it as the institution to the love and patronage of all.

May continued peace, harmony and prosperity rest upon the Ashland Collegiate Institute and all connected with it, is my earnest heartfelt wish.

Permit me once more, beloved associates, whom I have already named, beloved students and citizen friends of this Institution, to bid you one and all, a kind and affectionate and long farewell.

This was briefly and affectingly replied to by the Principal, testifying to the ability and talent of Mr. Ambuhl as a music professor and of his fidelity and laboriousness in discharging his duties as such in connection with this Institution, and expressing a hope that the art in which he was proficient might, through grace, lead his affections up to God, so that in eternity he could unite with the inhabitants of the skies in singing the praises of Heaven.

At the conclusion of this reply a communication from the members of the Musical Academy, which has been under the charge and training of Prof. Ambuhl, was handed to the Vice Principal, to be read and then presented to Prof. Ambuhl; it was signed by every member.  The letter is as follows.

ASHLAND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE July 21, 1858

MR. EDWARD AMBUHL:

Respected Teacher – Providence has for a short time cast together our lot, and is now about to separate us.  It is therefore meet that the feelings of our hearts towards you, our instructor in music, should find some suitable expression.  You have sought with care and diligence to instill into our minds the principles of the science of music; and have, with equal care, labored to give us knowledge of the art.  We hope that the care and labor you have bestowed upon us, has not been in vain; but that we have derived much benefit from your instructions.

We have spent many pleasant hours together as teacher and taught; you have guided our willing fingers over the keys of our much loved instrument, most gently and patiently, and when we have hesitated or been weary, you have, in the ardor of your disposition, driven them along at a more energetic pace.  That we appreciate your efforts, it were unnecessary here to state.  You have seen it yourself in the eagerness with which we have listened to your directions and endeavored to follow them.  We trust that all who shall ever guide us in the paths of learning may have the fidelity which you have manifested in your labors for our improvement.  There have been times when we may have wished that you would consider that we are only beginners in that science in which you are a proficient; times when we may have thought that you should have been a little more considerate of us.  But, it were better that you had erred, that you erred in being zealous beyond measure, than in being neglectful of us.  Zeal is ever commendable when “according to knowledge”.  We have not the heart to condemn that which you have exhibited towards us.

Accept, now, therefore, worthy instructor, our kind and affectionate wishes for your success in life wherever, in the providence of God, you may be placed.  May your love of music never wane; may  you ever use it as the handmaid of devotion; may it never be in your hands an incentive to or an inspiration of aught that is unholy; and may God bless and prosper you in every undertaking that shall be for the good of man and the glory of your Maker.

Your pupils and friends,  

Lizzie Wetmore                     Lucy A. Kellogg  
Emilie Richardson                Martina C. Gilbert  
Emma C. Ashley                   Ellen Smith  
Addie Humphrey                 Lizzie Johnson  
Mary Smith                            Nicholas Ball’esias  
R. C. Henriquez                     Montgomery Curtis  
 

The musical class, at their own suggestion and private arrangement, gathered around the Piano and under the lead of Miss Smith, who played and sung the piece called “the good-bye”.  It was very affecting indeed. This class showed their attachment to their retiring professor by their tears.  The audience departed with feelings of entire satisfaction; all speak of the exercises as having afforded them peculiar pleasure.

On Friday morning, Prof. Ambuhl met his class for the last time and played and sang for them, but his feelings compelled him to desist.  His class were all in tears and manifested much feeling.  The female members of the class presented him with an embroidered table cover as a token of their esteem.  This must have been a source of great consolation to Prof. Ambuhl, and doubtless, he will ever revert to it with feelings of unmingled pleasure.  He left on Friday with the sympathies and good wishes of all.  We understand that Prof. Fox has made arrangements to have his place filled and the musical department will be continued without interruption.  


August 5, 1858

Obituary

DIED in this village, on the morning of the 29th ult., JAMES HENRY ROBERTSON, son of Col. George Robertson, aged twenty-five years.

If that “life be long, that answer’s life’s great end,” the subject of this notice did not die young.  Encompassed with difficulties that have deterred most young men from attempting to acquire an education, such was his thirst for knowledge that he patiently labored year after year to master the truths of science.  His health might be feeble, and his eyesight might be impaired, but he toiled on, deeming the recompense that he received abundantly sufficient to remunerate him for his pains.  His bodily frame was that of a child, but his mind was the mind of a man.  He would gladly have engaged in the pursuit of business or followed some provision; this, however, was not permitted him, and one of the greatest trials that he was called to experience was that he was obliged to spend his last days in comparative inactivity.  The spirit was willing – felt competent to do its appropriate work – but the flesh was weak and could not discharge it.  Summoned early from this world, he was not removed till he had prepared to meet his God.  He had secured the one thing needful, and laid up for himself an inheritance that shall not pass away.  His end was peace.  “The drapery of his couch he wrapt about him,” and closed his eyes in sleep.  These eyes were again opened.  Perchance dreaming of Heaven in his slumbers he found himself in Heaven in reality.

Franklin Visitor please copy. 

The Tremaine Family

We noticed, a few days since, the fact that this celebrated family of singers would favor our citizens with one of their Concerts early in August.  We now refer our readers to their programme in another column, from which it will be seen that they are to hold a Concert in the Presbyterian Church, in this village on Monday evening next, August 9th.  We have no room at this late hour to copy any of the eulogiums pronounced upon them by the press in places which they have visited, and can only ask that all lovers of music will attend, being confident that a rare musical treat is in store for them. 

DEATH OF A BRITISH OFFICER – Mr. Thomas Maxwell, aged 72, died at his residence in Saugerties, Ulster County, NY, on the 23d inst.  Mr. Maxwell was an officer under Wellington and followed him through his campaign upon the continent; -- he was actively engaged in all the battles of that memorable campaign, which closed with the sanguinary struggle on the plains of Waterloo.  In 1836, accompanied by his family, he set sail for the New World, and settled in Greene County, in this state, from hence he removed to Saugerties, where he purchased a farm and resided thereon to the time of his death, respected and esteemed by all who knew him.

THE TALLEST – The tall rye of 1857 has at length been beaten in ’58.  Henry Kinsley, Esq., of Ashland, exhibited to us on Saturday last, a stalk of rye which measured seven feet seven inches.  The roots and a portion of the head had been broken off, which would have made its actual measurement seven feet eight or nine inches.  It is the tallest thus far this season by two or three inches, and our Windham farmers will have to try once more. 

DEATH OF A VALUABLE HORSE – The grey stallion, Rock, owned by N. G. Osborn, Esq., of this village, died on Sunday morning last.  It has since been discovered that a blood vessel had been ruptured, which caused his death.  Rock was six years, a dapple grey, about sixteen hands high, and for beauty and graceful movement had no superior.  He was called by excellent judges the best horse in Greene county.


August 12, 1858

MILTON S. VEDDER, ESQ. – This gentleman has recently established himself at Sylvester’s Bazaar, opposite the Catskill Bank, in Catskill, where he proposes to labor on time for the benefit of his friends.  He is a neat, cheap and prompt workman, and if any of our readers wish anything in his line, or a neat turnout from his livery stables, they should by all means give him a call.  They may rely upon being honorably dealt by.  See his card in another column.

ACCIDENT – A little girl, some three or four years of age, daughter of Mr. Ahaz Cole, of North Settlement, met with an accident on Tuesday, while playing with a straw cutter in her father’s barn, by which the thumb of the right hand was almost severed.  We have heard of many accidents of this nature occurring and parents should particularly guard against their children playing with implements of so dangerous a character.


August 19, 1858

DROWNED WHILE ON A PLEASURE EXCURSION – On Friday the 6th inst., Mr. Abraham T. Becker, son of H. T. Becker, Esq., of Catskill was drowned while on a pleasure excursion.  The sloop Catskill had been chartered by a party, of which the deceased was one, and while on her return to Catskill, when near Coxsackie, Mr. Becker was seized with a fit and fell overboard.  Capt. John Manning plunged in after him, but did not succeed in finding the body.  It was recovered on Saturday, however, and Coroner Brace held an inquest, which resulted in a verdict of “accidental drowning”.  Mr. Becker was a young man, (25 years of age), and was much respected.  He had been, for the past two or three years, residing with a brother in Selma, Alabama, and was on a visit to his friends at the North at the time of his death, and had but just returned to Catskill from a visit to his brother in Prattsville. 

HARNEY’S LAST WEEK’S RACE – We neglected to state last week that Fenton Harney was to have another race against time, in Prattsville, on Saturday afternoon last, at 3 o’clock.  He was to run eight miles in forty-seven minutes, for $30.  On the day appointed a large crowd collected to witness the sport.  Owing to some delay, however, in making up the purse, the race did not come off until between six and seven o’clock.  Harney ran well, but lost by two minutes – running the eight miles in 49 minutes. 

NEW FIRM – H. S. Lockwood, Esq., late of Hunter, has entered into partnership with A. Martin, Jr., of this village, in the Hardware and Iron trade, under the name of Martin & Lockwood.  Mr. L. has had considerable experience in mercantile pursuits and brings with him a high character for integrity.  The business is at the old stand of A. Martin, Jr. 

The store of Joseph Kritzman, in Catskill, was broken open on Monday night of last week, and goods to the amount of six or seven hundred dollars stolen, mostly in ready-made clothing.  A reward of $75 is offered for the recovery of the goods and detention of the thieves.

 Temperance Society – Greene County

Mr. William C. Burleigh, Corresponding Secretary of the New York State Temperance Society, will address the citizens of this County, in the several Towns, on the dates below specified, at such place in the town, and at such hours, as the friends of Temperance in the respective localities may arrange:

Athens, Sunday, August 22d; Coxsackie, 23d; Greenville, 24th; Durham, 25th; Cairo, 26th; Catskill, 27th, Hunter, 28th; Lexington, 29th; Jewett, 30th; Windham Center, 31st; Ashland, Sept. 1st; Prattsville, 2d.

The Greene County Protective League will hold its Annual Meeting at Cairo, on the 26th day of August inst., when Mr. Burleigh will be present.  It is earnestly hoped that large delegations from the several towns will attend, as business of much importance will be brought before the meeting.

The friends of Temperance through the county are respectfully requested to make all necessary arrangements for the above meetings, and to extend to Mr. Burleigh such assistance and hospitalities as may be in their power.

E. B. DAY                               J. M. DONNELLY
F. N. WILSON                       BENJ. WILTSE
WALTER AUSTIN               REV. HENRY FOX
D. WILLIAMS                       H. S. LOCKWOOD
LEVI KING                 County Central Committee 

AFFRAY – A difficulty occurred in this town, at a place known as “Whiskey Hill,” on Tuesday afternoon, between Mr. Alexander Robb and a man named James Rice.  Rice alleges that during a discussion with Robb, the latter called him a liar, and pounded and beat him severely about the face and head.  The affair was investigated on Wednesday morning upon the complaint of Rice before Isaac Brandow, Esq.,  A. R. Macomber, Esq., for plaintiff and S. P. Ives, Esq., for defendant – Some crooked stories are being told, in the way of evidence, during the progress of the examination, which is now (Wednesday 3 P.M.) being had.

SINGULAR – Mr. E. W. Preston, of the town of Ashland, last spring cut off the top of a last year’s head of cabbage, and set out the stump in his garden, supposing it would grow, and go to seed.  Upon examination a day or two since, however, it was found to have two good sized hard heads of cabbage growing upon it.  The people in the vicinity consider it quite a vegetable curiosity and a thing unheard of before. 

RACE AGAINST TIME – Another match has been made and is to come off on Saturday afternoon, 21st instant, at 5 o’clock.  J. S. Edmonds is to trot his brown mare one mile, before sulky, in three and three-quarter minutes. 

HOTEL CHANGE – We learn that our friend George L. France, Esq., has leased the Catskill House, in the village of Catskill, now kept by Mrs. Van Bergen, and is to take charge on or about the 1st of October. 

District, County and Town Officers

The following list of District, County and Town officers may be interesting and important to refer to occasionally by many of our readers.  Those who have occasion to make such references should clip and post it in some convenient place: 

Wm. F. Russell, Member of Congress
George W. Pratt, State Senator
Wm. B. Wright, Justice Supreme Court
Henry Hogeboom, Justice Supreme Court
Ira Harris, Justice Supreme Court
George Gould, Justice Supreme Court
F. James Fitch, County Judge & Surrogate
John A. Griswold, District Attorney
J. Atwater Cooke, County Clerk
Franklin B. Lament, Sheriff
Frederick Hill, County Treasurer
Matthew Youmans, Justice of Sessions
Wm. H. Brandow, Justice of Sessions
John Feeny, Supt. of Poor
John S. Betts Supt. of Poor
David W. Dunkin, Supt. of Poor
George Beach, Commissioner of Excise
J. W. Baldwin Commissioner of Excise
A. B. Houghtailing, Commissioner of Excise
Abel Brace, Coroner
Willard Marsh, Coroner
A. H. Knapp, Coroner
George H. Noble, Coroner
 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

Ashland, John S. Ives
Athens, P. W. Hallenbeck
Cairo, Luke Roe
Catskill, Alexander Wiltse
Coxsackie, Edwin Hubbell
Durham, Wellington Peck
Greenville, Russell Wakeley
Halcott, Conger Avery
Hunter, James Douglas
Jewett, George Beach
Lexington, E. P. Bushnell
New Baltimore, J. G. Raymond
Prattsville, E. P. More
Windham, Stephen Steele 

Judges Balcomb and Campbell have decided that all Excise money is to be paid over to and disbursed by the County Treasurer, for the support of the County Poor.  The claim of the overseers of the Poor, to the money paid in by respective towns, is adjudged to be unfounded.


August 26, 1858 

DIED IN HARNESS – On Saturday evening, while Mr. Buckbee, of Strykersville, Schoharie county, was driving through this village on his way home, his horse, without giving any signs of weariness, dropped dead in the street.  The horse was very thin, and had evidently been poorly fed and cared for. 

In the case of John Heagney, tried in Delaware County last week, for the murder of his wife in Hobart in July 1857, the jury returned a Verdict of “manslaughter in the second degree,” and Judge Grover sentenced him to seven years hard labor in the Sate prison at Auburn.

 Rural scene at a Funeral

Died on Friday, August 13th, the infant son of Catherine and Abijah Ranson, aged 2 years. 

The funeral was attended on Sunday, afternoon.  At an early hour, friends began to assemble.  Prayer was then offered by Rev. Mr. Boing; the funeral procession then moved slowly to a beautiful grove near the residence of Mr. Ransom, where ample accommodation for seats was prepared.  The little spot lies at the foot of the mountain; the scenery was beautiful, and it almost appeared as if nature herself had arranged it for the resting place of the dead.  In the center of the grove was an open space, about forty feet in diameter.  In the center of this spot, the grave lay open waiting to receive its little tenant. – On the north side of the grave a very neat stage was erected for the speaker and the whole arrangement was the neatest and most affecting I ever witnessed.  The funeral ceremony at the grave was very imposing.  The services were opened by singing, led by Mr. Anson Hull.  The throne of Grace was addressed by Rev. James Smith; after which a most beautiful and touching appeal was delivered by Rev. E. Boing, of Durham village. The little coffin was then opened and the whole audience passed in circle around the grave and thence to their seats.  The afflicted parents cast a farewell look at the idol of their hearts, and the little body was consigned to its last resting place, there to sleep until the morning of the last day.  The Benediction being pronounced, the whole audience dispersed to their homes, dropping a sympathetic tear in memory of the dead.

Weep not for this little flower,
Though faded from this world of pain,
For you have the full assurance,
It’s gone with God to bloom again.
 
Daring Exploit with a Bear

At Woodland, Ulster County, on Sunday, the 15th inst., two brothers, John and Mat Schoonmaker were out fishing, having no weapon but their pocket knives, and no companion but two dogs – one a fox hound, and the other a water spaniel – they were startled to hear the hound utter the well known cry of his species upon scenting game.

One of the men immediately put chase after the dog, and on reaching the spot on the bank of the stream where the dog first found the trail, was not a little surprised to discover the footprints of a large bear on a hemlock log, where he had landed from his morning bath.

The bear had retreated some twenty rods from the stream to a cover and there the dog came upon it.

It was but the work of a moment to acquaint the other man of the state of the case, whereupon, throwing his fishing pole across the stream, he ran up with the other dog.

Then, a regular rough-and-tumble fight ensued, during which, part of the time the bear had the upper hand, and part, the men and dogs; but, in a lucky moment, the spaniel got the bear first by the hind leg, and then, as he turned over to give him – the dog – his quietus, the hound seized the opportunity and the bear, too, by the under jaw, and so the two pinned him to the ground, when John thrust a heavy stake into his mouth and placing his knee on the bear’s head, proceeded with but a sorry specimen of a jack-knife, to perform the operation of tracheotomy upon Burin’s throat and killed him.

They swung him across a pole and carried him between them to the nearest settlement, Snyder’s tannery, two miles distant.

It proved to be a genuine black bear, one of the red nose and most savage kind, and weighed, when dressed, some 300 pounds.

TALL CORN – Mr. Sylvester Hitchcock of the town of Ashland, received from the Patent office, through Hon. Rufus H. King, a sample of the Mexican White Flint Corn – He planted a portion of it, and now has one stalk in his garden which measures twelve feet six inches in height.  If any person can best it with Yankee seed corn, Mr. H. would be glad to hear from them. 

RUNAWAY ACCIDENT – A team belonging to Mr. Burgher, of Hunter, became frightened on Tuesday afternoon, near the schoolhouse in Hensonville, and ran away, throwing Mr. Burgher and his son out of the wagon and seriously bruising them.  Mr. Burgher, we learn, struck on his head and was for some time insensible.  The horses ran about a quarter of a mile and brought up in the wagon house of Mr. M. B. Bailey, where the doors were closed and they were secured. – The wagon was torn into toothpick fragments, and the horses scratched in several places about the legs.

ACQUITTED – WE noted last week that an examination was being held before Justice Brandow, into the alleged affray between Mr. Alexander Robb and a man names James Rice.  The affair was disposed of by the acquittal of Mr. Robb.  The next day, Rice was told (so he says) that his wife would soon be murdered and he (Rice) would be arrested for the crime.  Jimmy was terribly alarmed at the dark prospect, but perhaps he is a little flighty and only dreamed it after all. 

LARGE RATTLESNAKE – Mr. George Jackson, of this town, exhibited to us on Tuesday evening, the skin of a large Rattlesnake, which he had that day killed in the Clove, a short distance above the Toll Gate of Martin Bonestel.  The snake was four feet eight inches long, and had thirteen rattles.  As they are three years old before having any rattle, and one each succeeding year, this snake must have been sixteen years old. – Recorder & Democrat 

CAESAR JOHNSON – Caesar Johnson of West Catskill, advertises his professional capacities in the Democratic Herald, thus:

Johnson the barber, at prices fair,
Will shave, shampoo and cut the hair,
With scented soap and razor keen
Johnson will shave you smooth and clean.
Poetical for a barber, very!

At the Republican county Convention held at the hotel of Peck & Gunn, in Catskill, Monday evening, 16th inst., John A. Cooke, Esq., of Catskill, and John Clough, Esq., of Coxsackie, were appointed Delegates to the State nominating Convention, to be held at Syracuse on the 8th day of September. – Joshua Fiero, Jr., and Andrew B. Houghtailing, were chosen alternatives.  Messrs. J. P. Hauley of New Baltimore, Henry Greene of Coxsackie, L. P. More of Durham, Stephen Steele of this town, and G. L. France of Catskill, were appointed Delegates to the Congressional Convention, with power of substitution.

A barn belonging to Wm. M. Scribner, in the town of New Baltimore, was destroyed by fire on the 15th inst.  Loss $600.  Insured in the New Baltimore Mutual Insurance Association for $266 on the barn and contents fully covered.

The Rondout Courier says that a son of Wm. H. Bridger, about 7 years of age of Rodout, was accidentally drowned in the Rondout creek, at Burgess’ Hook on Thursday afternoon last, by falling overboard from a small boat.  His body was soon after recovered.


September 2, 1858

AMUSING ANECDOTE – Daniel Webster had an anecdote of old Father Searl, the minister of his boyhood, which is too good to be lost.  It was customary then to wear buckskin breeches in cool weather.  One Sunday morning in the autumn, Father Searl brought his breeches down from the garret, but the wasps had taken possession during the summer, and were having a nice time of it in them.  By dint of effort, he got out the intruders and dressed for meeting.  But, while reading the scriptures to the congregation, he felt a dagger from one of the enraged small waisted fellows, and jumped around the pulpit slapping his thighs.  But the more he slapped and danced, the more they stung.  The people thought him crazy, but he explained the matter by saying: “Brethren, don’t be alarmed; the word of the Lord is in my mouth, but the devil is in my breeches!”  Webster always told it with great glee to the ministers. 

SINGULAR DEATH OF A HORSE – Mr. David Lasher, a resident of the north part of this town, lost a valuable mare on Friday morning last, under very singular circumstances.  About four or five weeks ago, she was taken with the horse distemper, and while under the influence of this disease, most of the grass she ate passed out through her nose to the ground.  The neighbors and Mr. Hallock of Durham, who was called, pronounced it the horse distemper.  When about recovering, or nearly well, a change in her breathing was noticed, similar to a horse with the heaves.  This continued, growing shorter gradually for about a week, when she died.  An examination into the cause of her death was afterwards made.  The heart, liver, &c, were found to be in their natural state, while the lungs, upon cutting open were found to contain a spire of grass 6 inches in length, imbedded in a portion of the bronchial tubes, and in another portion also, was found a stalk of oats about 12 inches long, doubled or folded together.  These things evidently had caused inflammation and death. 

ATHENS VISITOR – We have received a copy of the first number of the Athens Visitor, published by R. Denton, at Athens, in this County.  It is a neatly printed sheet, and exhibits the peculiar marks of a good workman.  The people of Athens should give it their hearty and united support.  It is published every Saturday, at $1.50 per annum. 

SERIOUS ACCIDENT – An accident of a very serous, if not fatal character occurred to Mr. Jesse Barker, of Jewett, from the explosion of a fluid lamp on Sunday evening last.  It appears that after the rest of the family had retired, Mr. Barker, being engaged in reading and finding the fluid in his lamp getting low, took the can – which was also nearly empty – and then, while holding the lighted wick at a distance of at least two feet from the can and lamp, commenced filling the lamp, when a violent explosion took place, by which the can and lamp were both torn into fragments.  Mr. Barker’s head face and hands are burned in a most shocking manner.  Nothing but a very heavy woolen coat, which he happened to have on at the time, saved him from almost instant death.  We would here state emphatically that the fluid used by Mr. Barker was manufactured from that famous receipt, having for its ingredients, in part, sulphuric ether and spirits of niter.  The receipt was sold by a Mr. Bloodgood, about the mountain towns, last winter, and warranted not to explode.  Knowing the danger to which this professedly good man, Bloodgood, was exposing our citizens at that time, we wrote and published in the Journal a full exposure of the great liability to such accidents and begged our friends to avoid it as they would a powder magazine.  Some, however, must learn by experience. 

PROLIFIC – Mr. Edward Doolittle, of this town, left at this office a package of 1,915 grains of rye, the product of one seed.  Who can beat it? 

Mr. S. Parker, of Ashland, sent to this office on Thursday last a singular looking bird, which was pronounced by some a fish-hawk, by others a hen-hawk, and by one or two a genuine American Eagle.  It measured five feet three and a half inches across its wings.  Mr. Parker shot it near his residence, the ball passing through one side, and breaking its right wing.  It was alive when received, but died a few hours after. 

Mr. T. F. Doolittle, of this town, has a full blooded Cotnell sheep, one year old, from which he sheared a few weeks since six and a half pounds of wool, a portion of which was fourteen inches long.  This, for a sheep only one year old, is remarkable. 

BUSINESS IN ASHLAND – Mr. Albert Moulton of Newark, N.J., has purchased the hat shop, machinery and material formerly occupied and used by Mr. Lyman Robinson, in the village of Ashland, and will commence the manufacture of hats immediately.  He paid $3,000 for the property.  He has also purchased or leased – the old Bidwell stand, near Red Falls, of B. G. Morss, Esq., and we learn it also is to be put in immediate operation.  This is cheering news for the journeymen hatters in this section, and for their benefit, and that of the place, it is devoutly to be hoped that his business may prove more successful than heretofore.


September 9, 1858

Delegates

At the Democratic County Convention held at the house of J. H. Person, in Cairo, on Saturday last, John Olney, Esq., of this village, was elected a Delegate to the State nominating Convention to be held at Syracuse on Wednesday next, 15th inst.

Messrs. E. P. More, of Prattsvile, E. P. Bushnell, of Lexington, H. Kinsley, of Ashland, George Beach, of Jewett, D. K. Olney, of Catskill, Frank D. Winans, of Durham , and Matthew Yeomans, of New Baltimore, were elected delegates to the Congressional Convention.

An American County Convention was held at J. H. Person’s hotel in Cairo, on Tuesday, 7th inst., and Messrs. G. H. Doty, of this village, and J. H. Van Gorden, of Catskill were elected Delegates to the State nominating Convention in Syracuse yesterday, Sept. 8th.  Mr. Doty substituted B. O. Stone, Esq., of this village.  Messrs. E. E. Millegan, of Red Falls, S. W. Stimpson and C. V. Barnett, of this village, A. L. Waters, of Cairo, and J. H. Russ, of Catskill, were elected Delegates to the American Congressional Convention. 

SINGULAR DISEASE OF A HORSE – A horse belonging to a Mr. Gorse, of Hudson, was taken ill at Prattsville a week or two since, and left at the stables of Mr. Cyrus Smith for medical treatment.  Proper care being taken, the horse soon apparently recovered, and while weak and feeble was turned into a pasture lot in the neighborhood.  Soon after, while two or there persons were in the field, the horse, which was lying down, made an effort to get up, and broke both hind legs in the attempt, the bones having become very brittle in consequence of an excessive deposit of earthy matter. The same difficulty is frequently observed in the human subject, and is in them attended with the same result. 

Sad Accident at South Jewett - SOUTH JEWETT, August 30th, 1858.

MR. EDITOR – I am seated to inform you of a sad accident which occurred in this place yesterday morning.  Some eight or nine school children, arriving at the school house before the teacher, went down to the stream and ventured out in a boat.  The oldest was a girl about 13 years of age; the others younger – three of them quite small children.  As near as can be ascertained upon information from the survivors, the boat filled rapidly as they got into deep water, when the oldest one jumped out, tipping the boat so as to throw all the rest, save one, into the water.  An alarm was made, and several persons were soon at the scene of the disaster.  But what a sight for them to behold!  The teacher and two mothers had arrived.  Some of the children were still visible, far out in the deep water.  It was a heart rending scene indeed.  Those first on the ground were unable to rescue the little sufferers but slowly.  However, all were finally brought to the shore, and efforts made to resuscitate them, but two were beyond help and are to be buried on Saturday.  Both are to be taken to the same church, and the clergyman is to officiate for both at the same time.  The oldest, a daughter of Mr. Stephen Skiff, and the other a son of Mr. Ira Chase, were the two who were drowned.
Yours Truly,                   J. W. B.

[FOR THE WINDHAM JOURNAL]

On the Burial of Mrs. D. Noble Chase 

A hearse, followed by a long train of carriages, leaves the door of a neat white dwelling, and winds its way slowly, solemnly down the green hillside into the quiet vale below.  Mournfully sounds the measured tread of horses feet, and the low rumbling of many wheels, and we know that sad, aching hearts beat in unison with the solemn sounds, and slow movements of the funeral procession.  A cherished friend has been suddenly snatched away, and friendship weeps.  A useful member of society, a sister in Christ, has been taken from our midst, and a church is shrouded in gloom, a wide circle of Christian friends mourn her departure, and feel of a truth, “God moves in a mysterious way.” – Aged parents, bowed beneath a weight of grief and years, follow a dear and valued child to her long home; gentle sisters and an only brother, feel their hearts stirred by a bitterer grief than they have ever known before; two lovely children, hitherto strangers to affliction, with all the keenness of youthful sorrow, weep over the remains of their best earthly friend, a faithful and devoted mother; a tender, affectionate husband finds a beloved, nay an almost idealized wife, torn from his embrace, and his bereaved heart, rent with indescribably anguish, in this our of darkness and desolation, will hardly allow him to say, as he has been wont to do in time of trial, “Thy will be done.”  The fell destroyer of earth’s highest hopes has fearfully robbed him; devoted love, the attention of friends, the skill of physicians, all, all was powerless to save; we shrink from yielding the form so lately inhabited by a bright scintillation from the Deity, to the cold arms of death; we know the lonely tomb once held the King of Kings, and his followers, like Him, shall one day burst its bands, when the power of death is all destroyed; we know that to our friend the grave has lost its gloom. “Oh, death, where is thy sting?” was the language of her last hours, and we doubt not she was divinely supported thro’ the dark waters, welcomed by the shining ones on the other shore, and now sings by the side of her “angel boy” among the spirits of the just made perfect.  We know, too, she would not exchange her inheritance in the realms of bliss for a place among us in this vale of sin and sorrow; still we cannot help wishing her back, her presence cheered us, and this earth seems but a dreary place without her.  She was like a star, gleaming upon our pathway, whose light becoming suddenly quenched has left us sad and lonely.  Henceforth, we shall watch in vain for her approach; in vain wait for the welcome sound of her footstep upon the threshold; in vain listen for the animated tones of her voice; no more shall we take sweet counsel, or sit in the house of God together; we shall miss her everywhere;  in the home once graced by her presence, in the social circle, in the sanctuary, and by the couch of sickness and suffering, where, like a ministering angel, she was so often to be found; in all the relations of life.  In the station in which she was placed she labored faithfully, earnestly, until her Master said “It is enough, come up higher!”  We will see her no more on earth; but who shall say that the spirit ever so ready to minister to others, will not sometimes hover around the bereaved friends, whispering resignation and peace.  We cannot say to the stricken ones “weep not.”  We know the unbidden tears will flow; but amid all the mournful luxury of grief, remember your loved one sleeps in Jesus!  Her aching head is at rest and in the morning of the resurrection, we hope to see her come forth, wearing a crown of victory, and joyfully ascribing all the glory of her salvation unto Him who has redeemed her and bought her with His own most precious blood.

M.P.

LARGE VEGITABLES – Mr. Willis Clark, of this town, sent to this office last week a monster field potato.  It weighs eighteen ounces and measures fourteen and a quarter inches in circumference.

Mr. Wm. H. Garvey, of this village, has raised the largest tomatoes we have seen this season.  One of them measured seventeen and a quarter inches in circumference.  If there are any larger ones in this neighborhood, we should be glad to see them.

We were shown, this week, by Mr. A. B. Chichester, of this village, a stalk of the common white field bean, on which were thirty-two well filled pods and all from one seed.

CHOICE PLUMS – Our thanks are due S. P. Ives, Esq., of this village, for a fine sample of Blue and Washington Egg Plums, the finest we have yet seen.  The package received exhibits the fact that as good fruit may be cultivated in the range of the Catskill Mountains as in any other part of the State. 

SHOOTING MATCH – Mr. M. B. Bailey of Hensonville, is to have a Shooting Match at his house on Thursday next, 16th inst., at which great sport may be expected.  See notice in another column. 

HIGHWAY ROBBERY – A bold robbery was made on Tuesday evening, Aug. 31st.  Charles Johnson and his wife, of Cairo, had been to Athens, and were returning with a load of household commodities.  While crossing the Athens flats, two tall men, muffled and disguised, emerged from the bushes, stopped the wagon and plundered. it.  No clue has been obtained to the robbers. – Examiner


September 16, 1858

SUDDEN DEATH IN OAK HILL – (DURHAM) – On Monday, September 2d, Mr. Henry Dewitt, of Oak Hill, in the town of Durham, died suddenly while in the field ploughing.  At noon, Mr. Dewitt partook of his usual meal, without any signs of illness, after which he went to the field.  Soon after, a daughter having occasion to pass the place where she supposed her father was at work, saw the team alone, and on looking for her father, found him dead in the furrow of the plough, a short distance behind.  Mr. Dewitt was aged fifty years; a man of unquestionable integrity and honored by all his acquaintances – and they were many throughout the county – for the many attributes which exalted him as a man, a neighbor and a Christian citizen. 

FATAL ACCIDENT – An accident occurred in Lexington on Friday, the 10th inst., which proved fatal in causing the death of Edwin P. Chamberlain, son of Albert H. Chamberlain.  The young man was engaged in removing a pair of shackles from a horse, when the horse kicked him, knocking him down, and while upon the ground trampled upon his stomach and injured him so seriously as to cause death in a few hours.  Deceased was about 17 years of age. 

MORE LARGE VEGITABLES – Ahira Barney, Esq., of this town, has a pumpkin which measures four feet three inches in circumference.  It is a monster, and we doubt if it can be beaten in this section.

West Chase, Esq., of Jewett Center, sends us a monster head of cabbage, which measures three feet four inches in circumference, and weighs twenty-one pounds and three quarters.  It is the largest we ever saw, and would certainly “pass muster” at the County Fair. 

MONEY RECOVERED – Last week, Mr. Sutton of the Gas Works, in Catskill, was robbed of his pocket book containing about $500, which was taken from his desk during his temporary absence.  On Monday morning, the pocket book was found in the desk – having been restored to its place.  About $40 in gold had been taken from it, but the residue in bills was found as it was left. 

OLD APPLES – Master Romeyn C. Robertson left at this office this week a choice lot of apples over a year old.  They were raised on the farm of Ahira Barney, Esq., of this town and from the way a friend at our elbow is “going in” we have an idea that they are in a better state of preservation now than they will be one week hence.


September 23, 1858  

IMPORTANT SURGICAL OPERATION – Doct. J. B. Cowles, of Durham, assisted by Dr. Norwood, performed an important and successful surgical operation upon Mr. Israel Smith of Rensselaerville, about three weeks since, for strangulated Hernia, in which operation it became necessary to remove a portion of spleaclated omentum, (caul,) and adipose membrane.  The patient is now about his business and nearly well. 

LARGE PUMPKINS – Mr. B. H. Robinson, of Prattsville, has two pumpkins, one of which measures four feet nine inches, and the other four feet eight inches, in circumference. – These will certainly do to “show up,” but Mr. L. T. Davis, of the town of Ashland, left a larger one at this office on Monday.  It measures four feet ten inches in circumference, and weights forty-three pounds.  Merrit Osborn, Esq., of this village, has one vine on which were twenty-two good sized pumpkins, the product of one seed. 

MONSTER SQUASH – Mr. Lewis T. Davis, of the town of Ashland, left at this office on Friday last, a California winter Squash of enormous dimensions.  The vine was brought with it, and is twenty-four feet in length. – The Squash measures four feet six inches in circumference, and weights forty-one and a half pounds.  We challenge the County to beat it.


September 30, 1858

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS 

Lost

BETWEEN STAMFORD AND Moresville, Delaware Co., on the 19th of August, a steel mixed Cloak, without lining, bound and trimmed with black Morre Antique.   The finer will be liberally rewarded by leaving it at the Prattsville House, Prattsville, or at the hotel of S. M. Stevens in Stamford.

A. J. CHURCHILL, Prattsville, Sept. 27, 1858

Notice

WHEREAS MY WIFE ANNETTE LEWIS,  of the town of Ashland, did, early on the morning of the 25th day of August, 1858, leave my bed and board, without my knowledge or consent, and without just cause of provocation, this is to forbid all persons harboring or trusting her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting.

ALBERT LEWIS
Ashland, Sept. 27, 1858         

Notice                                              

WHEREAS MY WIFE ANNA BRANDOW, of the town of Prattsville, has left my bed and board without just cause of provocation, and refuses to return thereto, this is to forbid all persons harboring or trusting her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting.

JOHN BRANDOW
Prattsville, Sept. 27, 1858

Prattsville House

THE SUBSCRIBER WOULD RESPECTFULLY INFORM his friends and travelers that he has leased the above named Hotel in Prattsville, Greene Co., NY, where he will be pleased to receive their calls.  The building is in complete order, and no effort will be spared on his part to make it a comfortable home for all who will favor him with a call.  His bar will always be furnished with the most choice imported liquors and cigars.  The stables attached to the house are in good order, and will be promptly attended to.  A share of the public patronage is respectfully solicited.                

JACOB T. HUGGINS
Prattsville, April 1, 1858


October 7, 1858

TEACHER’S INSTITUTE – The Teachers’ Institute commenced its session on Tuesday morning at the Ashland Collegiate Institute and opened very auspiciously, there being over sixty teachers present by noon on the first day.  The Hon. H. H. Van Dyck, Superintendent of Public Instruction, will address the public generally – especially parents – at the Institute on Monday evening next, October 11th.  The session will continue ten days, and as there is ample room and every convenience at the Collegiate Institute building, all who can should avail themselves of this opportunity.  Rev. H. J. Fox, Principal of the Ashland Collegiate Institute, assisted by our worthy School Commissioners, Messrs. A. Reynolds and J. F. Ingersell, will, we guarantee, do all in their power to make the visit of those in attendance pleasant and agreeable. 

ENCOUNTER WITH A PORCUPINE – On Sunday night last, a large dog belonging to Samuel Miller, Esq., of this village, was heard to make a great noise, and howl as though in intense agony, which he continued to do for a long time.  No person happened to go to his relief and on Monday morning, it was discovered that they poor beast had encountered a porcupine and his mouth and throat were literally filled with quills.  Some of them were so tightly fixed in the roof of the dog’s mouth that the quills broke off in the attempt to extract them, while those in the lips had worked themselves nearly through, and had to be withdrawn with instruments.  When that dog again attacks a wild animal, he will probably examine its shell. 

LEXINGTON ARTILLERY PARADE AND BALL – A company parade of the Lexington Artillery will take place at Lexington Flats on Tuesday next, October 12th.  In the evening the annual Military Ball will be given at the house of Lucas Van Valkenburg, Esq.  Mr. Van V. has the name of giving good suppers and pleasant entertainment on such occasions, and we shall be disappointed if there is not a large attendance at the Ball on the 12th. – Preparations are being made for a grand time. 

A. M. OSBORN, Esq. – We are glad to learn that this gentleman has concluded to remain in Catskill, and that he has established himself at the office of R. W. Watson, Esq.  Mr. Osborn is a young man of fine abilities, and possesses unusual tack and talent in his profession.  We wish him a successful and lucrative professional life.

DIED – At Buffalo, on Saturday morning, October 2d., at 3 o’clock, of typhoid fever, FRANK D. WINANS, Esq. of Durham, in the 30th year of his age.  His remains were brought to the residence of his father, in East Durham, and interred on Sunday in the burying ground at Freehold.  A large concourse of friends and relatives were in attendance to pay the last tribute of respect to departed worth.

In the death of Mr. Winans, society is called to mourn the loss of one of its best members.  He had been a resident of Durham for many years, having studied law with the Hon. Lyman Tremaine, while that gentleman was a resident of Durham, and after his professional duties, while a member of the firm of Winans and Mattice, in which position he remained up to the time of his death.  He was well known throughout this county, as an eminent lawyer, and in that capacity was among the first in his profession.  He was possessed of a candid and sound judgment, and his straight-forward course through life won for him the admiration and esteem of all who knew him. – His loss will be deeply felt.  His cheerful face will no more be seen among us, and his well known voice now lies silent in death. – Mr. Winans was on a visit to his friends when death overtook him.  How true it is that “In the midst of life we are in death.”  Society deeply sympathizes with the widow of the deceased.  May God, in his wise providence, bear her up under this sad affliction.  Many friends mourn with the bereaved father in this trying hour and with the aged mother.  May God give her sufficient strength to overcome all troubles, and await patiently the time when parents and children shall meet in one unbroken family in the mansions above.  The last moments of Mr. Winans were peace, and he fell asleep in the full hope of a blessed immortality beyond the grave.

Farewell brother, thou hast left us
Faded from a world of pain;
But, how consoling is the promise,
“When we die, we live again.” 

Weep not friends – the Savior called him,
Murmur not, though e’er so hard;
Remember ‘tis our Maker tells us
“Be still and know that I am God.”

County papers please copy. 

The County Conventions

The Democratic County Convention was held, pursuant to notice, on Monday the 27th ult., at the house of J. H. Person, in Cairo. – Gen. William Salisbury was chosen President, Anthony Van Bergen, Esq., of Coxsackie, and Caleb Day, Esq., of Catskill, Vice Presidents, and A. Melvin Osborn, Henry Baker, and A. R. Macomber were appointed Secretaries. – The following nominations were made.

Sheriff – James Wilson, of Coxsackie
County Clerk – Josiah W. Baldwin, of Cairo
Assembly – Augustus R. Macomber, of Windham
Sup’t of Poor – John Thompson, of Lexington
Justice for Sessions – Abner Berry, of Ashland
Coroners – Able Brace, of Catskill; E. L. Ingersoll, of Hunter; C. K. Benham, of Prrattsville; A. H. Knapp, of Coxsackie

The Republican and American County Conventions met at Cairo, on Wednesday the 29th ult., the former at the house of S. S. Mulford and the latter at the house of J. H. Persons.  The Republicans organized by choice of the following officers:  Joshua Fiero, Jr., President, Dr. L. King, Wm. W. Edwards, J. B. Waldron, Wm. Dodd and Isaac Van Schaak, Vice Presidents; C. H. Porter and Andrew B. Houghtailing, Secretaries.  Committees of Conference were appointed by the Conventions – consisting of one delegate from each town to each Committee – in order to make up a union ticket.  After conference, the committees reported that they had agreed upon the following division as a basis of union.  -  The Americans to nominate a County Clerk, Member of Assembly, Justice for Sessions, and two Coroners; and the Republicans to nominate Sheriff, Superintendent of the Poor, and two Coroners – each nomination to be made by the respective Conventions.  The following ticker was nominated:

Sheriff – George L. France, of Catskill
County Clerk – J. At. Cooke, of Catskill
Assembly – E. E. Millegan, of Prattsville
County Superintendent – Edward Johnson, of Durham
Justice for Sessions – Joseph P. Hallock, of Greenville
Coroners – L. T. Calkins, of Coxsackie; P. L. Stanley, of Ashland; Thos. Fitch, of Prattsville, and Dr. Collier, of Athens

Durham Items

FIRE – At about eleven o’clock on Saturday morning our citizens were startled by the cry of fire and the ringing of the fire bells.  Smoke was seen issuing from the dwelling of Mr. Harmon Hitchcock, and the fire company was soon on the spot.  The fire originated from the chimney, and had probably been burning some time before it was discovered.  Through the energy of firemen and citizens, the adjoining buildings were saved as though by miracle - for they were at one time in imminent danger.  Had the flames spread, to them the loss would have been immense.  As it is, the loss will fall heavily upon Mr. Hitchcock – his dwelling, together with a large woodhouse, being entirely destroyed.  A large quantity of bedding was consumed in the house.  Part of the furniture was saved. – Loss on the buildings about $800.  No insurance.  Great credit is due the Fire Company and citizens, for the able and efficient manner in which they labored to save the adjoining property.

A beautiful little incident of childish sympathy is here worthy of notice.  A little daughter of Mr. Hitchcock had been unfortunate enough to lose all her clothing except what she wore.  Another little girl – a playmate – about ten years old, a daughter of Mr. J. S. Houghtailing our enterprising stage proprietor, on hearing of her little friend’s misfortune, ran to her father and said, “Pa, I want a dollar.”  “What do you want of a dollar?” he asked.  She immediately ran to the store, purchased a dress for her little neighbor, and presented it to her.  Surely God will spare the life of that girl.  Where can you point to another instance of such noble true-hearted generosity displayed in a child?

Mr. A. Overbaugh, our Tailor, cut and made a Coat last week for the State Fair.  It was a beautiful piece of workmanship, an reflects great credit on the maker.

 Lost

BETWEEN STAMFORD AND Moresville, Delaware Co., on the 19th of August, a steel-mixed Cloak, without lining, bound and trimmed with black orre Antique.  The finder will be liberally rewarded by leaving it at the Prattsville House, Prattsville, or at the hotel of S. M. Stevens in Stamford.

 A. J. CHURCHILL
Prattsville, Sept. 27, 1858

$110 A YEAR

WILL PAY FOR THE BOARD, TUITION, washing and lights of any lady or gentleman, pursuing the Common English branches, at the West Durham Seminary, at West Durham, Greene Co., N.Y.  With a new School building, and Boarding hall, it will offer new inducements to Parents and Guardians wishing a good School, and a quiet home in the country for their children.  For beauty of Scenery, health and morality, the situation is without a rival   Fall term will commence October 13th, 1858.  All bills payable one half in advance, the remainder at the close of each term.  Send for a circular.

Durham, September 8, 1858
Z. L. NEWELL, Principal

Notice

WHEREAS MY WIFE ANNA BRANDOW, of the town of Prattsville, has left my bed and board without just cause of provocation, and refuses to return thereto, this is to forbid all persons harboring or trusting her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting.
JOHN BRANDOW
Prattsvile, Sept. 27, 1858

LEGAL NOTICES

SUPREME COURT – GREENE COUNTY.  To Daniel T. Ruggles, defendant.  You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint of Charles H. Porter, plaintiff, which is filed with the clerk of said county of Greene, and to serve a copy of your answer on me at my office in the town of Ashland, Greene County, N. Y., within twenty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service.  And, if you fail to answer said complaint as hereby required, the plaintiff will take judgment against you for one hundred and three dollars and ninety-seven cents, with interest on ninety-three dollars and ninety-seven cents, from the 22d day of February, 1858, and interest on ten dollars from the 15th day of July, 1858, besides costs.                                           C.H. PORTER       Plaintiff in Person, Ashland, N. Y.

The complaint in the above entitled action was filed in the office of the clerk of the county of Greene, on the 30th day of August, 1858.   Dated September 1st, 1858.                                                                                          C. H. PORTER      Plaintiff in Person

 Notice to Creditors

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, IN PURSUANCE OF AN order of F. J. Fitch, Surrogate of the county of Greene, to all persons having claims against the estate of Abel Edmonds, deceased, late of the town of Ashland, to the county of Greene, that they are required to exhibit the same with the vouchers thereof to James S. Edmonds, administrator, at his residence in Windham Center on or before the 4th day of November, 1858.
JAMES S. EDMONDS, Administrator
Dated, April 28th, 1858

Notice to Creditors

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, IN PURSUANCE OF AN order of F. James Fitch, Surrogate of the County of Greene, to all persons who have claims against the estate of Harmon Camp, late of the town of Windham, in said County, deceased, that they are required to exhibit the same with the vouchers thereof, to Josephine A. Camp, Administratrix, and Christopher V. Barnett, administrator, at their respective places of residence, in said town of Windham, on or before the 18th day of December next, or in default thereof, their claims will be debarred and precluded from payment by said administrators, out of said estate. –
Dated, June 14, 1858
JOSEPHINE A. CAMP, Administratrix
CHIRSTOPHER V. BARNETT, Administrator

1858
STEAM TRANSPORTATION

New York and Catskill

FREIGHT & PASSENGER LINE

THROUGH without Landing and connecting with the Mail Stages West, the Catskill Steam Transportation Company will run the favorite steamer, CATSKILL, Capt. Wm. R. Lynes, the season of 1858 for freight or passengers as follows:  Leaving CATSKILL for New York on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 6 o’clock, P.M., and leaving NEW YORK for Catskill from foot of Franklin Street on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5 o’clock P. M., and Saturdays at 9 A. M.  The Steamer Catskill possesses accommodations for Passengers unsurpassed for elegance and comfort.  Her Saloon and State Rooms are not excelled by any Boat of the River.  Having been recently rebuilt and enlarged and also furnished with new boilers, she is all that can be desired for speed or safety.  Passengers by this boat can rely upon arriving in New York at an early hour and at Catskill in time to take the Stages West.

FARE $1   BERTHS FREE.  Breakfast will be furnished on the Boat to Passengers going West, if required.

THE CATSKILL STEAM TRANSPORTATION CO.
Catskill March 17, 1858


October 14, 1858

A Barn, belonging to Mr. Horace Winter, in East Jewett, containing a large amount of rye, oats, corn, &c., and a large quantity of hay, was entirely consumed by fire on Friday evening last.  Mr. W. had a “husking” on the premises at that time, and a candle had been placed against a post in the barn.  During the evening, a small splinter which projected above the candle was discovered to be on fire.  Efforts were immediately made to extinguish the flames, when the fire caught into the mow of hay and spread so rapidly that both building and contents were entirely destroyed.  There was no insurance on either the barn or its contents, and the loss falls heavily upon Mr. W., particularly so as he had just succeeded in gathering his fall crops.

ACCIDENT – An accident occurred to two brothers, Scott and Henry Lemily, of this village, near South Valley, Otsego County, on Monday, 4th inst.  The young men were o a tour giving exhibitions of a Panorama of the Bible, and were to exhibit on Monday evening, at South Valley.  On their way there, however, while going down a hill, some part of the harness broke and the wagon came upon the heels of their horse so suddenly the he took fright and ran away.  They were thrown from the wagon in such a manner that the wheels passed over them both, but they fortunately only received trifling bruises. – The wagon was badly broken, but no other serious evil resulted.

NEW FERRY BOAT – The new steam ferry boat “J. T. Waterman”, has commenced her regular trips, and now leaves Hudson and Athens every half hour alternately.

C. V. Barnett, our candidate for Representative of the eleventh Congressional District, whose name we place at the head of this column, is a gentleman entirely worthy the support of every elector of the counties of Greene and Ulster.  Never aspiring to political office, he was put in nomination at the urgent request of his friends to fill a station of great importance and for which his abilities and energy are in every respect competent.  Always found staunch and zealous in defending the right, never halting between two opinions, honest of purpose, a friend of the Union and a truly national man – such is our candidate as every one who knows him can testify; and such is the man that the people of this district will delight to honor in the coming campaign, independent of party cliques or prejudices.  These are our honest convictions, and we cordially recommend him to the consideration of the voters of the District.

George L. France for Sheriff

The people of Greene County have the names of two candidates for the office of Sheriff before them.  The first on put in nomination was James Wilson, of Coxsackie’s, after  pressing his claim for six years and battling with all parties for a nomination, and having been repeatedly thrust aside by the Conventions as an unworthy person for the office. – He has been a member of all existing political parties, within half a dozen years, and is now put up by his latest friends – while defeat stares them in the face at every turn.  Many of them are aware that he can never be elected, and inasmuch as they will, in such an event, have a competent and unswervingly faithful man to fill the office, they are spending their force in another place, and seem determined to show him that they know of no better way to rid themselves of his importunities than the course now being pursued.

The Examiner thus speaks of his merits:

“At times everything and nothing long, for years past Wilson has vibrated between different parties, according as they appeared to him strong or weak, for the obvious purpose of securing to himself the office of Sheriff.  A short time ago, a candidate before the Americans for the nomination, he deserted them and their cause when they refused to be dragooned into his service, and took place again in the Democratic party, because its strength promised better success.  Previous to this, from time immemorial, he has been a candidate for Sheriff at Democratic Conventions, his claims weighed, and adjudged signally insufficient.  For years and years a sturdy beggar for office without success, his denunciations fell harmless upon the head of the late John Adams, the “father of the Democracy of Greene” for repelling his preposterous aspirations.”

How is it with his opponent, George L. France.  His course has been marked by straightforward and honorable acts – true to his party – always friendly and upon pleasant and agreeable terms with his political opponents – and “last but not least”, one of the greatest thief-catchers and rogue detectors in the State; have his political brethren not reason to look upon him with pride, that they have such a man among them?

Voters are apt to look at the merits of a man, for the office now-a-days, before they cast their votes for one whom they do not know, simply because he belongs to a certain party.  We believe with the Examiner that “The time is past when trickery and deception – vacillation and faithlessness – are considered elements of public favor, - and a large body of independent electors prefer an honest opponent to a tricky friend.”

Let the electors remember that by everlastingly binding themselves hand and foot to clique and party – whether right or wrong – they will have constantly at headquarters a set of political tricksters who, while in office, look not to the welfare of their constituents, but sink everything else from their sight save the “spoils of office.”

Our Candidate for Clerk

Of our candidate for Clerk, J. Atwater Cooke, Esq., it is scarcely necessary for us to speak.  His merits are well known, and his claims are just.  He is a fixed fact with the people of Greene County, as surely so as his character is above and beyond the influence of reproach or personal attack.  The paper bullets of his opponents will work no injury to him.  All who have ever transacted a moment’s business with him, know him to be a gentleman of true genius, possessing those generous impulses which endear him in the hearts of all.

LARGE YIELD – Mr. Rufus Graham, of Jewett, raised in his garden during the past season, from two seeds, fourteen large sized citron melons, averaging 9 pounds each in weight, or an aggregate of 126 pounds.  The most distant melon from the root of the vine was twenty-one feet.  This is, perhaps, as large a yield as has ever been known in this section.  He also picked from one tomato plant, at the close of the season, and after using from the plant all that ripened during the season, a half bushel of tomatoes.

HOTEL CHANGE – J. S. Miller, Esq., formerly of Lexington, has purchased the hotel formerly owned and occupied by Mr. Jacob Craft, at South Durham.  Mr. Miller has an extensive acquaintance, which, together with his well known gentlemanly and agreeable manners, and his accomplishments in the way of entertaining travelers, will insure him a fine business, and make his house a pleasant resort for the traveling public. 

IMPROVEMENT – Albert Moulton, Esq., who recently purchased the hat shop, formerly occupied by Mr. Lyman Robinson, in Ashland, has been improving the property in various ways, and we are glad to learn is now doing a fine business.  The building has also undergone thorough repairs and been handsomely painted and now presents appearance of thrift and prosperity.

VEGETABLE CURIOSITIES – Mr. Hiram Dingman, of Conesville, Schoharie County, has sent to this office a sample of the Sugar Beets raised by him this season.  The specimen before us weighs ten pounds and a half.

Mr. Job Hubbard, also of Conesville, sends us a peach-blow potatoe which weighs two pounds two ounces, the largest we have seen this season. 

OLD MAGAZINES – We are indebted to Rev. J. B. Fish, of this town, for two bound volumes of the “Pennsylvania Magazine, or American Monthly Museum,” published and printed by R. Aitken, in Philadelphia, in 1775.  We shall make selections from these old time literary curiosities soon.

Our friend, Geo. L. France, is nominated for Sheriff of Greene county, by the Republicans and Americans. – Bloomville Mirror.

That’s so; and on the 3d or 4th day of November, you will hear that he has been elected by an old fashioned majority. 

SHOOTING MATCH – We are requested to say that a Shooting match will take place on Saturday, October 16th, at one o’clock, P. M., at the residence of Mr. Willisten Bishop, in North Settlement.

Mr. Lewis Little, an old and esteemed citizen of Hudson, committed suicide on the 2d inst., by cutting his throat with a razor, while under a temporary aberration of mind. 

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS 

Notice

WHEREAS MY WIFE, HENRIETTA Stevenson, of the town of Jewett, did on Tuesday, October 5th, 1858, leave my bed and board, without just cause of provocation, this is to forbid all persons harboring or trusting her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting.      

WILLIAM B. STEVENSON

Jewett, October 12th, 1858

Valuable Tavern Stand
WITH SEVEN ACRES OF LAND

FOR SALE

The SUBSCRIBER, BEING Desirous to remove to the west, offers his place for sale.  The Hotel is situated in the center of the village of CAIRO, and the land immediately adjoining.  The building is in first rate order, having been thoroughly fitted up within a few months.  Connected with it are commodious barns, wagon houses, stables, &c., and the hotel is now doing as lucrative a business as any place in the county.  For further particulars, apply to the subscriber on the premises.               
 JOHN H. PERSON
Cairo, Oct. 8th, 1858

Dissolution

THE COPARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE EXISTING Between the undersigned, under the name and style of BENHAM & WINFIELD, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.  The Books, accounts, notes, &c., of the said firm, are left in the hands of M. L. BENHAM, Esq., for collection.  And all demands against the said firm will be liquidated and paid by him, at the store formerly occupied by us.
CORNELIUS K. BENHAM
SIMON WINFIELD
Dated, Prattsville, Oct. 1, 1858

The business will be conducted by the undersigned at the old store, as formerly, where he will be happy to see his old friends and customers.           
SIMON WINFIELD
Dated, Oct. 1, 1858


October 21, 1858

WINDHAM CENTER, October 16 1858

 Rev. J. H. Champion was last week presented with a pair of beautiful bed quilts, see “Diamond star pattern,” by the ladies of East Kill; the other “Odd Fellow pattern,” by friends in the Bell neighborhood.  On each block of the latter was a card with the name and compliments of the doner.  We give those names below.

MR. & MRS.                               MISSES
John White                                 Charlotte M. Seeley
Joseph White                             Nancy Osborn
Chyles White                             Rebecca Chichester
Samuel White                            Mary Ferguson
Barnard Osborn                         Mary Percy
Philo Lake                                  Sally Percy
Consider Chichester                 Rhoda Showers
Luther Chichester                     Ellen Brainard
Lewis Howard                          Lucinda Langley
Jonathan Howard                     Phoebe Vermilyea
John Bagley                               Clarissa Hidecker
Cornelius Hidecker                 Ruth White
Reuben Hidecker                     Anthy White
Andrew Hidecker                    Lavinia White
Smith Seeley                             Lucy White
Peter Ferguson                         Jeannette White
Thomas Langley                      Mr. Henry White
Calvin Cowles                          Mr. Benjamin White
Julius Fairchild                         Mr. Fletcher Ferguson
                                                     Mr. Samuel Chichester
                                                     Mr. Henry Smith


October 28, 1858

ACCIDENT – It was rumored in this neighborhood last week that a man named Michael Hennegan, one of B. G. Mores’ teamsters, had accidentally fallen from his wagon, at South Durham, on Wednesday evening, and that the wheels had passed over his breast and head, wounding him in such a manner that it was thought death would ensue.  Mr. Hennegan did fall from his wagon at the time state; but, the wheels only gave him a few slight bruises, and he is now about as well as ever. 

THE LOST MAN – The old man who was advertised through the country as having been lost has been restored to his friends and family, who live near Elmira.

Gen. William Salisbury of Catskill and Alfred E. Greene, of Jewett, have been appointed Clerks in the Custom House at New York.

FIRE – ALMOST – A little boy belonging to Mr. Chauncey Burroughs, of this village, came very near causing a fire on Saturday last.  He was in a bed room alone, where he found some matches, with which he set fire to the window curtains and then stood gazing at the flames with intense delight.  No one but the child being in the room, the fire spread rapidly and a number of articles were burned.  It was some time before the little fellow would allow any one to enter the room, he having locked the door and pocketed the key.  After the door was opened, the fire was soon extinguished. – Coxsackie Union

Withdrawal of C. V. Barnett

Below will be found a Card from Dr. Barnett, withdrawing his name as a congressional candidate at the coming election, which will unquestionably cause no little regret among his many warm friends.  Nothing could afford us, personally, more pleasure than to continue his name at the head of our columns, and do every thing in our power to promote his election to the important office for which he had been put in nomination. – But a careful perusal of his Card, setting forth his reasons for declining to run, will, in our opinion, satisfy every reasonable person of the propriety of the course he has taken. – Any other course would prove positively ruinous to the great and important principles that the American party, in common with all other opposers of executive usurpation and tyranny hold so dearly at heart, by electing at this time another staunch supporter to Mr. Buchanan’s corrupt and dying administration. – With both candidates in the field, such a result was as certain to follow as that the brightness of noonday is to be followed by the darkness of night.  After carefully considering the above facts, and being fully satisfied that no other alternative was left, by which a result of such a serious nature might be avoided, and after ascertaining that the Americans and Republicans of Ulster could be substantially and harmoniously united upon Mr. Kenyon, Dr. Barnett felt it a matter of policy, as well as duty, to withdraw his name from the present canvass, thereby making Mr. Kenyon’s election not only possible, but sure.  The result of this transaction is set forth in the card giving rise to this article.  By Dr. Barnett’s withdrawal a generous and noble work has been done; every barrier has been broken down, and Ulster is prepared to adopt Mr. Kenyon on her straight American ticket, and come forward in one solid column and roll into Greene, according to the best and most reliable estimate, fifteen hundred majority in favor of Mr. Kenyon.

Now, Americans and Republicans of Greene, what is to be expected from you?  Is it not in your power by your united efforts, at least, to meet the united forces of Ulster with a well balanced account, thereby leaving the 1500 majority of Ulster as a lasting monument to the memory of a more than worthy deed?

Our American friends must bear in mind that in Mr. Kenyon no American principle will be lost.  The most substantial Americans of Ulster say that Mr. Kenyon has almost universally supported their ticket since the first organization of the American party.

Mr. Kenyon is in every way worthy the support of every elector of the county of Greene. 

To the American Electors of the Counties of Greene and Ulster         

It is with no ordinary feelings that I at this time deem it my duty to address my political friends of the 11th Congressional District, on a subject of such vital importance to every American citizen.  Neither are the conclusions to which I have arrived, been the result of any hasty deliberations on the part of myself or my most substantial and trustworthy American friends, by whose influence I now occupy such a responsible relation to the Americans of this Congressional District.

Nothing could afford me more pleasure than to bear the banner so generously placed in my hand, and by every laudable means in my power endeavor to bring this canvass to a favorable issue.  But, in looking over the situation of this district, we unfortunately find the opposers of the present Administration so divided as to render the defeat of both candidates entirely beyond a doubt, not only thereby again electing a minority Administration Representative from the 11th Congressional District, but positively exerting a prejudicial influence upon the important elections of 1860.  To contribute again to such a result, with a full knowledge of what must necessarily follow, would in my opinion require a greater sacrifice than all others that could under any circumstances be required at our hands.  It is when we find our next Congress organized, and with a steady hand holding the profligate and treacherous Buchanan policy firmly at bay, that we, like those who sacrifice all for our country’s rights, will then with pride and satisfaction point to the sacrifice we are about to make.        

In view of these facts, I am fully satisfied that it is my duty to withdraw my name from the present canvass, and in doing so I would cordially recommend to my friends the name of WILLIAM S. KENYON, feeling entirely satisfied that in him we shall find an uncompromising opposer of executive usurpation, and at the same time one in whose hands American principles will suffer no violence.

In taking leave of my American friends at this time, I would tender them my kindest thanks for their constant and untiring devotion to myself and the principles of the American party, trusting their good judgment will fully endorse the course I have been led to pursue.    C. V. BARNETT
Windham Center, October 17, 1858

FATAL ACCIDENT – Mr. Eastgate of Ellenville, Ulster County, was accidentally shot on Friday.  Mr. Eastgate and a gentleman named Shultz were riding in a one horse wagon, when the horse, becoming unmanageable, Mr. Eastgate either fell or was thrown from the wagon.  A double barreled gun, which was in the wagon, also fell out; and, as it struck the ground, both barrels were discharged and their contents, entering the side and hip of the unfortunate, man, inflicted such terrible wounds that death ensued.

MISCELLANEOUS

SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF GREENE.  Richard P. Gorsline against Marshall Preston and Ezekiel P. More.  Summons for relief.  To each of the above named defendants:  You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint of Richard P. Gorsline, plaintiff, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer on the subscribers at their office in the village of Catskill, Greene County, N. Y., within twenty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service.  And, if you fail to answer said complaint as hereby required, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in this complaint.         
KING & MATTOON
Plaintiff’s Attorneys, Catskill, N. Y.

The complaint in the above entitled action was filed in the office of the clerk of the county of Greene, at Catskill in said County on the 15th day of September, 1858.
KING  & MATTOON, Plaintiff’s Attorney

NEW ADVERTISMENTS

Notice

WHEREAS MY WIFE CAROLINE DOWNES, of the town of Lexington, has left my bed and board without just cause of provocation, and refuses to return thereto, this is to forbid all persons harboring or trusting her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting.
DAVID DOWNES


November 4, 1858

The Returns

At length the great political battle in the Empire State has been fought, and the partisans are in anxious solicitude as to the result. 

The returns received by telegraph up to twelve o’clock Wednesday night in Catskill, indicate the election of Morgan, the Republican candidate for Governor, with the balance of the Republican State ticket.  As nothing reliable can be obtained, however, in time for this issue of the Journal, we can only give such figures as have been received upon the following Congressional and County candidates:

                                               DEM.                                              UNION

Congress                    Elisha P. Strong                                 W. S. Kenyon
Sheriff                         James Wilson                                     G. L. France
Co. Clerk                    J. W. Baldwin                                     J. At. Cooke
Assembly                   A. R. Macomber                                E. E. Millegan
Supt. Poor                  John Thompson                                 Ed. Johnson
Session                       Abner Berry                                        J. P. Hallock
Coroners                    Abel Brace                                          T. T. Calkins
“                                  C. K. Benham                                     Thos. Fitch
“                                  E. L. Ingersoll                                     P. I. Stanley
“                                  A. H. Knapp                                       Henry Collier 

The following statements are the most reliable we can offer – and the figures annexed to each name represent the majorities

Athens – Kenyon, 78; France, 109; Cooke, 99
Ashland –
Strong, 84; Wilson, 11; Baldwin, 16, Macomber, 11
Cairo –
Strong, 9; France, 66; Cooke, 12; Millegan, 6
Catskill –
Kenyon, 23; France, 203; Cooke 249; Millegan, 40
Coxsackie –
Kenyon, 64; France, 63; Cooke, 42; Millegan, 99 in first district 95; Millegan, 22; Johnson, 208.
Greenville –
Kenyon, 3; France, 8; Cooke, 15
Halcott –
Strong, 71; Wilson, 31, Baldwin, 32; Macomber, 50; Thompson, 31; Berry, 37. Each Democratic candidate for Coroner received 71 votes, and the Union candidates each 34, except Calkins, who received 35 votes.
Hunter –
Strong, 103; Wilson, 74; Baldwin, 39; Macomber, 149; Thompson, 134; Berry, 128.  The majorities for the Democratic candidates for Coroners are as follows: - Brace, 128; Benham, 126, Ingersoll, 130; Knapp, 128.
Jewett –
Strong, 59, Wilson, 47; Baldwin, 56; Macomber, 39.
Lexington –
Strong, 266; Wilson, 241; Baldwin, 63; Macomber, 210; Thompson, 187.
Prattsville –
Strong, 26; France, 16; Baldwin, 20; Millegan, 35.
New Baltimore –
Strong, 66; Wilson, 57.
Durham –
Strong, 22; France; 28; Cooke, Baldwin, 66.
Windham –
Strong, 47; France, 20; Cooke, 21, Macomber, 173; Thompson, 18; Berry, 17.  The Democratic candidates for Coroners each have 15 majority.

Ulster gives Kenyon 596 majority.

These figures show the election of Kenyon for Representative in Congress, France for Sheriff, Cooke for County Clerk, and Macomber for Member of Assembly.  Johnson is undoubtedly elected Superintendent of Poor.

More Large Potatoes

Mr. M. L. Newcomb, of Ashland, left at this office, on Saturday last, a peach blow potatoe of enormous proportions.  It was raised on the farm of Mr. Jacob Haight, of South Durham, and takes down everything in the potato line we have yet seen.  It measures nineteen and three-quarter inches in circumference, and when dug weighted two pounds and eight ounces.  It is entirely solid, without sprouts or branches.  Can anyone in this section beat it?

Mr. L. Dunham, of Lexington, has, since the above was put in type, brought in a Pinkeye potatoe, which now weighs two pounds and nine ounces, and when dug weighted two pounds and eleven ounces.  We should not be surprised at yet receiving a three pounder before the potatoe season closes.

FIRE – A correspondent of the Bloomville Mirror, writing from Croton on the 26th ult., says:  Last Sunday morning, between two and three o’clock, Mr. Sylvanus Shepherd and family were aroused from their slumbers by the crackling of fire and found their house so far gone that all efforts to extinguish the flames were of no avail.  A nephew, niece and sister-in-law were sleeping in the chamber, and barely escaped in their night clothes.  Mr. S. saved 12 firkins of butter, which he took from the cellar.  Loss exceeds $1,000.  Origin of fire a mystery.

THE FLOUR TRADE – Alfred Peck, Esq., of Jewett, informs his townsmen and friends that he has made arrangements to supply them with material for the “staff of life”. – The Bartlett Mills brand is said to be one of the very best, and as Mr. Peck goes in for rapid sales and small profits, he will no doubt do a fine business in this branch of trade. – See advertisement. 

NEW STORE – D. W. Smith & Co., of Prattsville give notice, in our advertising columns, that they have opened the store formerly occupied by Mr. D. H. Pitcher.  M. S. Babcock, Esq., well known to the citizens of Prattsville as having once been with the late D. P. Cowles, is one of the firm.  Success to the new firm and their enterprise.

ROXBURY ACADEMY – This Institution is in a flourishing condition.  Parents who have committed their children to the care of its Principal, J. W. McLaury, Esq., highly commend it to those who are unacquainted with its benefits.  The winter term will commence on Wednesday, December 1st.  See notice in another column.

ASHLAND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE – The Winter term of this institution commenced yesterday, and we are glad to learn under the most favorable auspices and with flattering prospects for a larger number of students than at any time heretofore.

ROBBERY – The clothing works of James J. Brown, at Stamford, were broken open one night last week and cloth to the amount of $150 taken off.  No clue to the robbers has been obtained. – Mirror

BLACKSMITH WANTED – R. S. Blish, Esq., of Prattsville wants a good Blacksmith.  See notice in another column.


 November 18, 1858

Greene County Circuit Court

The November term of the Greene County Circuit Court, Judge Wm. B. Wright presiding, commenced its session in Catskill on Monday.  There were seventy cases on the calendar, among which are included the following:

Henry Johnson, vs. Uriah Griffin, Oct. 26th, 1857.  John Olney for plff., Olney & Osborn for deft.

Henry M. Judd, vs. John Robb, January 16th, 1858, E. Haight for plff., John Olney for deft.

Brandow Huggans, vs. Joseph Huggans, January 26th, 1858.  Olney & Osborn for plff., James B. Olney for deft.

William Woodvine, vs. Elisha Lord, Feb. 4th, 1858.  S. A. & C. C. Givens for plff., Olney & Osborn for deft.

Lucas E. Brandow, vs. Joseph Nichols, Feb. 9th, 1858.  S. A. & C. C. Givens for plff., James B. Olney for deft.

George A. Matthews, vs. Luman Jump, March 17, 1858.  Charles H. Porter for plff., John Olney for deft.

Abijah S. Osborn, vs. George W. Barlow, April 5, 1858.  S. P. Ives for plff., E. Haight for deft.

Zadock Pratt, vs. John I. Dewitt, April 28, 1858.  Olney & Osborn for plff., A. R. Macomber for deft.

Henry M. Judd, vs. Alexander Robb, July 1, 1858.  E. Haight for plff., John Olney for deft.

Edwin E. Millegan, et al., assignees &c., vs. Richard P. Gorsline and Franklin B. Lament, Sheriff, &c.  July 28th, 1848. S. A. & C. C. Givens for plffs., D. K. Olney for defts.

Thomas Brannaugh vs. Alden Ferris, Sept. 15th, 1858.  John Olney for plff, D. K. Olney, for deft.

Lauresten Smalling vs. Franklin B. Lament, Sheriff, &c., Sept. 20, 1858.  John Olney, for plff, S. A, & C. C. Givens for deft.

Isaac Barlow vs. William Howard, Sept. 30, 1858.  C. H. Porter for plff, John Olney for deft.

Addison P. Jones vs. Frederick Jump and Lawrence Winne, Oct. 28, 1858.  S. A. & C. C. Givens for plff, Olney & Osborn for defts.

Commissioners of excise of Greene Co. vs. Daniel C. Deyoe, Oct. 30, 1858.  S. P. Ives for plffs, John Olney for deft.  The same vs. Stephen Burgher.  D. K. Olney for plffs, King & Mattoon for deft.

Phylira Pitcher, adm’x &c., of D. H. Pitcher, dec’d. vs. James D. Plank, Oct. 14, 1858.  E. P. More for plff, James B. Olney for deft.

Anna Brandow vs. John Brandow, Nov. 5, 1858.  E. P. More for plff, James B Olney for deft.

Henry M. Judd vs. John Robb, Nov. 1858.  E. Haight for plff, John Olney for deft.

John Tompkins vs. Lawrence Winne, C. H. Porter for plff, John Olney for deft.

Richard P. Gorsline vs. Marshall Preston and Ezekiel P. More.  King & Mattoon for plff, D. K. Olney for defts.


Obituary

Died – In Ashland, Greene Co., N.Y., May 11th 1858, Mrs. ANN BARLOW, wife of Alanson Barlow, aged 70 years 6 months,

Died – Aug. 28, 1858, Mr. ALANSON BARLOW, father of Allen Barlow of Binghamton, aged 77 years 6 months.

The subjects of this notice, having been companions for more than half a century, in death are not divided.

Alanson Barlow belonged to a family whose members have done the State some service.  He was a nephew of Joel Barlow, of revolutionary memory, who deserves honorable mention among the statesmen and men of letters of that period.  His “Columbiad” is still the only American National Epic, the only example of a poet daring to celebrate in heroic verse contemporary of recent historic events.

As a politician, he ranked among the leading men of the organizing epoch of this Government.  He was the friend and coadjutor of Madison and Jefferson, to whose school of politics he belonged, or rather helped to found.  His death was occasioned by the fatigue of a forced journey to join Napoleon, in counsel at Wilna, in Poland.

In personal appearance, Alanson Barlow much resembled his uncle, judging by the portrait in the Cyclopedia of American Literature.  There was inherited also the diplomatist’s inflexibility of purpose, his profound reserve of manner and expression.

A man of more thought than speech, giving one the impression of a plain, solid cast of character, in keeping with his robust and iron frame.  A man whose word was a bond; trespassing a hair’s breadth upon no man’s rights, not wearing his heart upon his sleeve – a friendly but deep seated heart.  Though rarely expressing personal interest in spiritual truth, unless drawn to it by others, yet a manual of devotion was found, in many places – literally worn away, though it had been long in use.

Of his worthy consort, whom he survived about three months, it may be said that long ago she began to set her house in order for this event.  Her biography in its main features would be that of the early inhabitants of this region – a generation of energetic men and women, exchanging the refinement and culture of New England for lonely homes in this then wilderness.  They derived from their frugal and simple habits a hardiness of constitution, and elastic vigor of frame, a power of enduring the rigors and changes of this austere climate – nature’s compensations to the pioneers of civilization.

 In her temperament, Mrs. B., was remarkably vivacious and sprightly.  Her’s seemed that contented spirit which is above all price.  Her cheerfulness made others cheerful.  This harmless gayety removed alike from depressing gloom and from unbecoming levity, made her society very welcome, especially to those who felt the need of such enlivening influence.

I never knew a more unselfish person – or more devoted, more self-denying.  Herself was last.  Everything for those to whom her life was consecrated was done that could be within the circle of her means and power – done unhesitatingly, freely, without desire of  applause or of reward.  There is a lofty moral heroism in such a life, and when it closes, a rare example of patience and fidelity is withdrawn from our sight, but cannot be taken away from the memory or the heart.

They are gone.  The husband, the father, venerable judge – the friend, the wife, the mother, the Christian, have bowed to the common lot.  The stern fibers of the disturbed soil have knit together again above their place of rest.  Thus the links that bind us to the past are broken.  The outlook is toward the future and the future is eternity. 

NEW STORE IN ASHLAND – Messrs. Fox & More have established themselves at the old Brick Store, in the village of Ashland, and have opened an entirely new and beautiful stock of goods of every description for the winter trade.  Ashland has for some time needed a good store, and the location selected by the new firm is a good one.  We hope the citizens of Ashland will exhibit their appreciation of the enterprise in a good and substantial way – i.e., by purchasing their goods at home, instead of sending to Catskill for them.  The parties are both young men.  Mr. Fox is a resident of Ashland, and Mr. More has recently removed there from Roxbury. – See their advertisement in another column.

MISCELLANEOUS

Cows for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER WILL SELL AT Public Venue, on Saturday the 20th inst., at his residence in Ashland, his entire stock of DAIRY COWS, with the exception of 3 or 4 old cows and two-year-old heifers.  The cows to be sold are all young, and have been raised and reserved, or selected, for their milking and other good qualities.  Sale to commence at 12 o’clock.

Terms Cash, or approved endorsed notes            CURTIS PROUT
Ashland, Nov. 9th, 1858


December 2, 1858  

THE GOULDY TRAGEDY – Mrs. Gouldy, the step-mother, is convalescent.  Mr. Gouldy is also rapidly recovering.  The brain protrudes very slightly, but is daily going down.  Mr. G.’s side is still paralyzed, but as soon as his wounds are well the galvanic battery is to be applied.  Mr. G. retains his faculties in a wonderful degree.  He has not yet been made acquainted with the suicide of his son.  The girl Murphy’s wounds indicate speedy recovery.  Young Nathaniel is also convalescent.  His brother Charles is getting along slowly. 

HUNG HIMSELF – George Campbell, residing on the Hunter Turnpike, between the Hotel of Norman H. Gray and the village of Hunter, hung himself in his own house, on Tuesday, the 16th inst.  He had been drinking rather freely for several days.  He was a very quiet, peaceable, and industrious man.  He was an Irishman by birth, and leaves a wife and ten children to bewail his sad fate. – Recorder.


December 9, 1858

The Catskill House

By reference to another column, it will be seen that George L. France, Esq., Sheriff elect, has taken possession of the Catskill House in the village of Catskill, and is now ready for the reception of guests.  Mr. F.’s experience in this line will now make the house what it should be – a first class hotel and it will undoubtedly meet with the success which its enterprising proprietor deserves.  With an accomplished lady to superintend the interior and culinary departments, travelers will find a pleasant and comfortable home. 

COTILLION PARTY – J. S. Miller, Esq., of South Durham, gives notice in another column that a Cotillion Party will be held at his house in South Durham, on Friday evening, 24th inst., Christmas Eve.  Mr. Miller has but recently removed to South Durham, and on this his first attempt to make the acquaintance of the young people in that quarter, will be prepared to accommodate all who attend.  We hope lovers of dancing will show him that they know how to appreciate efforts to please, and we are confident that none will ever regret a few hours pleasantly spent in an agreeable bit of recreation.  Ford’s Band, of Lexington will be on hand to make the music. 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN – We are requested to state that a small trunk was left at the hotel of Mr. J. T. Huggins, in Prattsville, some two months since, probably through mistake.  The trunk has a card on one end, marked “Miss C. F. Hitchcock, Windham, Greene County, NY.” 

ANOTHER BARN BURNED – On the morning of Saturday, the 27th ult., says the Kingston Journal, the barn of Reuben D. Dubois, at the south end of East front street, was discovered to be on fire, and in very brief time, it was destroyed.  The building was used by Col. G. W. Pratt as a stable, who lost some harness, hay, &c.  His horses and carriage were saved.  One of the horses was burned about the head and fore legs, but not so badly as to do permanent injury.  The origin of the fire is unknown. 

SOCIAL BALL AT WESTKILL – Daniel C. Deyo, Esq., of Westkill, has issued tickets for a grand Social Ball to be held at his house, in Westkill, on Friday evening, December 31st, New Year’s Eve.  Mr. Deyo’s Ball-Room is the largest in the county, there being ample room for eighty persons, or forty couples to dance at one time.  The hotel is large, and every way calculated to accommodate a large number of visitors.  All who knew the proprietor are aware that he will spare no effort to make everything pass pleasantly and agreeably.  The music will be of the very best character, under the direction of Miss C. L. Chase, of Jewett Center, who will preside at the Piano, and be assisted by Pratt’s Band of Durham. 

A valuable horse belonging to Mr. J. T. Huggins of Prattsville, was found dead in the stable on Sunday night last.  It was one of a beautiful black four year old team recently brought from Canada by Mr. D. C. Deyo, probably the best matched team in Greene country.


December 16, 1858

Fire

At about two o’clock, Wednesday morning, December 15th, our citizens were awakened by the cry of fire, and the ringing of bells.  The two fire companies, with their engines, were soon on their way to the scene of conflagration, which was found to be the Wool Carding and Cloth Dressing Factory, occupied by Horace Lemily, Esq., one mile east of this village.

The firemen were too late to save the factory, but were the means of saving the adjoining Mill, and preventing the fire from spreading to the quantities of lumber in the neighborhood.

The factory building, with its contents, was entirely destroyed.  The loss on the stock will perhaps reach $1,000.  The building and machinery were owned by Mr. Harmon Camp, and the stock by Mr. Lemily.  The origin of the fire is unknown.  Application was made one week ago by Messrs. Camp and Lemily, jointly, for insurance on the building and contents to the amount of $1,450.  It is supposed that the policy is made out, but it has not yet been placed in the hands of the applicants.

As we are unable to advise only a portion of our readers of the accident through a part of our edition, we shall give full particulars next week. 

THOMAS W. GAY – This gentleman died at his residence in this place, on Sunday last, aged 60 years.  Mr. Gay was one of our best citizens, and was highly respected wherever he was known, as well he might be, for he was an intelligent, courteous, enterprising, large-hearted, whole-souled, generous man, and by his loss the whole community must sympathize with his family and immediate acquaintance in their bereavement – Coxsackie Union

WILD CAT KILLED – A Wild Cat was killed in a field in East Jewett on Sunday morning last, by an English terrier dog belonging to Mr. William Moon, of this town.  Ducks, Guinea Fowls, &c., had been missed on several occasions in the vicinity, and it is supposed that the Cat was on her way for more.  The “varmint” exhibited her ideas of the impudence of dogs generally by a rough squabble with the terrier in particular, which was witnessed by two or three gentlemen who had been attracted thither by the noise.  She practiced the usual game with her teeth and claws until her strength gave out.  She was about a year old, and measured three feet and one inch from the forward to the hindmost feet. 

SASH AND BLIND FACTORY – We call attention to the card of Mr. I. R. Chapman, of this town, who notifies his friends that he will make to order Sashes and Blinds of all descriptions.  Persons who are in need of any article in his line will do well to consult him before making purchases away from home, and sending orders to strangers.  We are assured that Mr. Chapman will do his work neatly, and in good serviceable shape, and at less cost than others who are manufacturing the same article in large places and who are under a much heavier expense.  Give him a trial, by all means. 

A MONSTER TURNIP – Chas. More, Esq., has raised the largest turnip we remember ever to have seen.  It is a Ruta Baga, weighs over eighteen pounds, and measures forty inches in circumference.  It was raised on the farm of Mr. More, one mile west of Prattsville.


 December 23, 1858:  Missing


December 31, 1858

Shooting Match

A Shooting Match will be held at the hotel of B. H. Waldron, Esq., in this village on Saturday morning, January 1st, 1859, commencing at ten o’clock.  Some valuable prizes are to be put up, and great sport is expected.  Clean up your shooting-irons, marksmen, and give the affair your particular attention. 

A valuable horse belonging to W. W. Pettit, Esq., of Lexington, died suddenly on Saturday last of some unknown disease.  The animal passed through Windham on Saturday, apparently in good sound condition, but died soon after reaching Lexington. 

Obituary

DIED – At the residence of his father, on Wednesday, the 8th inst., aged 18 years, 3 months and 3 days, THOMAS PUTNAM FARRINGTON, oldest son of Hon. Thomas Farrington, of this place.

In this death our community is called to mourn deeply, not only in sympathy for a much esteemed family plunged in deep affliction, but also for a heavy loss to itself.  The deceased was widely and favorably known among us, as a youth of rare intellectual endowments, and was generally beloved for his generous and noble qualities of heart.  Brought up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord, he was remarkably, in the Christian sense, --

“Integer vitae scelerisque purus.”

Little more than a twelvemonth ago, he left for the first time our village, and his paternal roof, to enter the Naval School at Annapolis.  Having completed his first year there, with credit to himself as a scholar, and with universal approbation as a faithful soldier of Jesus Christ amid peculiar temptations, he returned to his family, to close a brief, but bright career, with an eminently Christian death.  He died in the confidence of a certain faith, and the comfort of a reasonably religious and holy hope, testifying the sincerity of his repentance by patient suffering and the fullness of resignation, and being in perfect charity with all men.  Few have to realize to the same extent that he did, the Savior’s call at death to forsake all and follow him; but he was enabled to do all the things through Christ strengthening him.  Our consolation is, that our loss, through great, is his infinitely greater gain.  He has left his family and the community in which he grew up, the precious legacy of a good example and a blessed memory.  Many hearts have been melted together in Christian sympathy and love by his early and lamented death.  May it be greatly blessed to a spiritual good, especially to the young in our midst.

RUNAWAY – A team belonging to Mr. James Christian, of Ashland, while fastened to a post in front of Peck & Osborn’s store, in this village, on Saturday morning last, took fright, and breaking the halter, ran away.  They ran about fifty yards, and brought up against a tree, with no other damage than breaking the tongue of the sleigh, and a part of the harness. 

SUICIDE – A friend informs us that a man named Sydney Miller, a cabinet maker, residing in the village of Athens, hung himself in that village on Thursday morning last.

Mortgage Sale

WHEREAS Isaac C. Tiffney and Eleanor Tiffney his wife, of the town of Windham, in the country of Greene and State of New York, by indenture of mortgage, bearing date the sixteenth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fifty, to secure the payment of the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars with interest thereon, did mortgage unto Fowler Newton, of the same place, and to his heirs and assigns forever, all that certain piece or parcel of land lying, being and situate in the town of Windham aforesaid, and described as follows:  Bounded Southerly on the center of the highway leading from Windham to the town of Jewett, North and Westerly on lands owned by Jacob Dice and Obediah Every, Easterly on lands owned by the said Every and James Radcliff, containing twenty-one and one half acres of land be the same more or less, together with all and singular, the buildings, improvements, privileges,  hareditaments, and appurtenances, thereunto belonging, which said mortgage, with the power of sale therein contained, was duly recorded in the office of the Clerk of the county of Greene in book X of mortgages on page 160 and 161 on the 28th day of March one thousand eight hundred and fifty, and whereas default has been made in the payment of the moneys secured by said mortgage, according to the conditions thereof, and the amount claimed to be due thereon, at the time of the first publication of this notice, is two hundred and eighty-one dollars and twenty-one cents, and no suit or proceeding at law having been instituted for the recovery of said moneys, or any part thereof:  Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that by virtue of the power of sale in said mortgage contained, and in pursuance of the statues in such case made and provided, the said mortgaged premises will be sold at public auction, to the highest bidder, on the twenty-eighty day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-nine, at one o’clock in the afternoon of that day, at the Hotel known as the Windham Center House, kept by Benjamin H. Waldron, in the village of Windham Center in the town of Windham and county of Greene, and the said mortgage will be then and there foreclosed by such sale.           Dated December 18, 1858

FOWLER NEWTON, Mortgagee
SAMUEL P. IVES, Attorney


 Home            Table of Contents