Genealogical Gleanings from the
Windham Journal
1860

Transcribed by Mignon Matthews from microfilms of the original records, obtained by Sylvia Hasenkopf


January 3, 1860

BUSINESS CARDS
ASHLAND CENTER HOTEL

MRS. A .A. ALLEN, PROPRIETRESS,

Ashland, Greene County, New York


J. A. C. O’CONOR
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
130 Nassau St., New York, (Room 18,) within
one block of the Park and City Hall.


A. WEBSTER SHAFFER
CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR
Office with King & Mattoon, Catskill, N.Y.


GEORGE L. FRANCE
SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY
Office at the Catskill House, Catskill, N. Y
.


T. C. SMITH
DEPUTY SHERIFF AND JAILOR
Catskill, Greene Co., N. Y.


SAMUEL W. STIMPSON
DEPUTY SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY
Office at Windham Center 


JAMES McARDLE
DEPUTY SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY
Prattsville, N. Y.


O. L. CHITTENDEN
DEPUTY SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY
Durham, N. Y.


SAMUEL P. IVES
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW

Windham
Center, N. Y.


E. P. MORE
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Prattsville, Greene Co., N.Y.
Collecting done with promptness


A. MELVIN OSBORN
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Catskill, N.Y.  Offices with R. W. Watson 


F. JAMES FITCH
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Catskill, N. Y. Office one door west of the Catskill Bank


 J. A. & A. C. GRISWOLD
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW
Catskill, N. Y.
J. A. GRISWOLD                        A. C. GRISWOLD


KING  & MATTOON
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW
CATSKILL, N. Y.
Rufus H. King                                   Peter C. Mattoon


S. A. & C. GIVENS
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW
Opposite the Post Office, Main Street, Catskill, N. Y.


A. R. MACOMBER
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW

Windham
Center, N. Y.


J. HALLOCK
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Office with King & Mattoon, Catskill, Greene County, N. Y.


 CHARLES H. PORTER
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Ashland, Greene County, N. Y.


W. W. WETMORE
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON & OCCULIST
All diseases of the Eye both medical and surgical promptly attended to.  Residence and Office first door south of C. R. Willard’s Jewelry Store, upstairs, Main Street, Catskill, N. Y.


E. COLBURN
S U R G E O N    D E N T I S T
Windham, Greene County, N. Y.  All work warranted.


 MRS. E. SPENCER
IS NOW RECEIVING HER FALL AND WINTER GOODS
Windham, Greene County, N. Y.


W. F. SPENCER
DEALER IN CLOCKS, WATCHES AND JEWELRY
Windham, Greene County, N. Y.


MILTON S. VEDDER
SILVERSMITH AND JEWELER

AT SYLVESTER’S BAZAAAR, OPPOSITE THE CATSKILL BANK.
Repairing promptly attended to and Warranted.  Prices low.

Livery at the Catskill House


SASHES & BLINDS
SASHES AND BLINDS made to order

By L. R. CHAPMAN,
BIG HOLLOW, N. Y.


GILES H. PHELPS
HOUSE SIGN AND CARRIAGE PAINTER AND GILDER
Manorkill, Schoharie County, N. Y.


A. MARTIN, JR.
DEALER IN STOVES, NAILS, HARDWARE, CUTLERY
Agricultural and Mechanical Implements and tools, Iron, Steel, &c, &c.
Merchants supplied at New York prices.

Main Street
, Catskill, N. Y.


H. R. & Z. J. BROWN
Steam Marble Works

SCHOHARIE, N. Y.
Keep constantly on hand Monuments and Tombstones
of every description.


 JAMES McARDLE
Dealer in Ready Made Clothing

PRATTSVILLE, GREENE COUNTY, N. Y.
Clothes, Cashmeres and Vestings constantly on hand.  Cutting done
at short notice and all work warranted.  Terms moderate.


UNION HOTEL
H. HURD, PROPRIETOR
Oakhill, Greene County, N. Y. 


 LOUD & SMITH
Will be happy to see their friends at their house,
west end of Main Street, Catskill, N. Y.


GREENE COUNTY HOTEL
BY PECK AND GUNN

Corner
Church and Main Streets, Catskill, N. Y.
Pleasant accommodations for Travelers.


 J. FOLAND’S
H O T E L

74 Washington Avenue
, Albany, N. Y.

A Pleasant and Retired home for Travellers.


Masonic

The following officers of the Catskill Lodge of Masons, have been elected and appointed for the ensuing term:

J. H. Bagley, Jr., W. M.; C. C. Givens, S. W.; James Becker, J. W.; Rufus II. King, T.; Henry Mott, S.; A. M. Osborn, S.D.; J. M. Pierson, J.D.; Earl Van Dyck, Tyler; G. M. Foote and E. L. Ingersoll, M.C

At a Communication of Ark Lodge, No. 48, held at their Hall in Coxsackie, December 22d, 5859, the following Brethren were duly elected Officers for the ensuing year.

John G. Bedell, W. M.; Alexander Reed, S. W.; Charles F. Bouton, J.W.; Wm. H. Martin, Treasurer; William Cochran, Secretary; Peter Conine, S. D.; William W. Sager, J. D.; Stephen Brown and Ransom Cook, Stewards; Jacob G. Wilson, Tyler; Jacob C. Van Dyck, Orator.

At a regular communication of Oasis Lodge, No. 119, F. & A. M., held at their room in Prattsville, on Friday evening, December 23d, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year:  J. B. Gregory, W. M.; H. B. Montgomery, S. W.; C. Platner, J. W.; John Laraway, Treas.; J. B. Olney, Sec.; A. P. Myers, S. D; S. Crane, J. D.; A. E. Brand, Tyler.

At the annual meeting of Yankee Engine Company, No. 9, at the house of B. H. Waldron, on Monday, January 2d, the following officers were chosen for the ensuing year:

Foreman – B. Newbury
Assistant Foreman – O. Stedman
Engineer – G. W. Potter
Assist. Engineer – E. J. Story
Clerk – G. H. Tibbles
Treasurer – J. E. Matthews.

THE AMERICAN STAR – This is the title of the new sheet published in connection with the Star of Delaware, at Delhi.  It has been arranged in good taste, and is now a fine looking paper.  Devoted principally to tales and miscellaneous matter and published at $2 per annum.  Address Smythe & Co., Delhi, N.Y.

A. F. Beach, Esq., will continue to run his stages daily (Sundays excepted) for the present between this village and Catskill, leaving here at 12 o’clock.

Isaac Brandow, Esq., of this village, has sold out his stove store to Mr. E. J. Story of this village, and formerly of Coxsackie.

 MORSS & MILLEGAN 

FEEL CONSTRAINED TO SAY (WHAT THEIR EXCESSIVE MODESTY HAS hitherto prevented them from doing) to the inhabitants of the Mountain Towne in Greene County, that they have on hand and are weekly receiving the largest assortment of all kinds of Goods which are wanted in the county, that have ever been presented to the people.  Our limits prevent us from particularizing the half of kinds and qualities kept by us, so that a few must suffice.

IN GROCERIES

We have the whole line of Sugars sold.  In Molasses, we have Port Rice, New Orleans and Stuart’s Refined Syrups.  Soap and __________ by the box.  Vinegar by the barrel or less quantity.  Spices of all kinds.  The Saleratus which rises in a depressing time, and keeps up.  Flour by the barrel.  Meal, Rye, Flour and Feed.  Teas, a large assortment, varying in price from two shillings and sixpence to one dollar per pound.  Lorilliars’s Macaboy, Spottswood and Gents’ Rappee Snuffs, warranted to excite mildly but surely.

IN DRUGS AND MEDICINES

We have all the Patent Medicines known as staple and reliable, besides the regular Medicines used by all Physicians and of the best qualities.    95 percent Alcohol for mechanical purposes.  Opium by the pound or ounce.  Turkey Rhubarb, pure.  Adhesive Strapping for Physicians.  All kinds of Coloring substances used.  Indigo, Spanish Float, Cochineal, Madder, Redwood Cud Bar, Soda, Sal Soda, Cream of Tarter, Vitriol Copperas, Aloes and Alum.  Whale and Coal Oils, the best.

IN CROCKERY

We have full sets of Queensware, the latest styles now imported, in white and colors,  Soup and Turreen Dishes to match.  Glassware, an assortment.  Coal oil Lamps, Chimneys, Wicks and Shades.  An entire assortment of Common Ware used.

IN HARDWARE

Our assortment is complete.  Nails by the keg, at manufacturer’s prices.  Axes, Augurs, Hammers, Knives and Forks, Braces and Bits, assorted sizes.  Skates, strapped and plain.  Sleigh Bells, Tea Bells, Spoons, tea and table, in Silver, German Silver, Albata and Iron.  Rat, Mink, Fox and Rat traps, proof against the propagation of the entire species.  Grain Scoops, and Cast Steel Shovels, Shovels and Tongs, Chains, Steelyards, Saws, Hand and Web, Saw Strains.  Door Trimmings complete.  Pocket Knives, Scissors, Shears, Egg Dippers, Cards, Curry Combs, Spring Balances, Thermometers, Butts and Screws, &c., &c. 

IN THE DRY GOODS AND YANKEE NOTION DEPARTMENT

We acknowledge no equals as to quantity or qualities.  In Silks, we have a variety, such as Fancy, Black, DeChiens and Florences.  French Marinos, all wool and all colors. – Wool Flannels, white and colored.  Wool Wrappers and Drawers, Ladies and Gents’ Hose, Handkerchiefs, Gloves, Scarfs, (silk and wool.)  The bustle and the Hoop Skirt,  with variations INNUMERABLEPrints, ginghams, Muslin, (Bleached and unbleached,) Shirtings, white and colored.  Sheetings, a variety.  Yarns, cotton and woolens, white and colored.  Threads, warps, knitting, cottons (white and colored.)  Cambricks, Dimity, Thread Edgings and Insertions, Collars and Sleeves in sets. Velvets, Silks and Cotton.  Velvet trimmings.  Tidy Yarn all numbers.  Lady’s hoods and jackets, wool.   Wreathes, Ribbons, Bonnets, and Dress Trimmings.  Working Cotton, white and colored.  Worsted in all colors.  Broadcloths, Casslmeres, Sattinettes, Satins, farmers and silk. 

DOMESTIC GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION

Ladies’ Fancy Baskets, Recticules and Traveling Bags.  Mirrors of all kinds and sizes, Carpets.  Furs in sets, ladies’ and children’s.  Perfumery, Edrehl’s, Harrison’s, Balzaq’s, and Lubin’s best.  Hats and Caps, a large assortment.  Gents’ Fur and Astracan Collars.  Buffalo Robes and Horse Blankets.  Clothing, Coats, Vests and Pants, a varied assortment, for men and boys. 

IN BOOTS AND SHOES

We have a full assortment which appeals to the understanding of all alike, ladies, gents, boys, Misses and children.  Gents’ cow, hip and calf; single and double soled Boots.  Ladies’ Gaitors from  45 cents to 20 shillings.  Buskins.  Kid and Cloth Slippers.  Morocco Boots.  Misses’ and children’s Copper-toed Boots and Shoes.  Children and infants shoes in a large variety.  Ladies’, gents’, misses’ and children’s Rubbers. 

Trunks, Valises and Carpet Bags.  Clocks and Watches – A variety of Clocks in various styles, 50 hour, Iron Frame, in all styles, O. G. Frames and Marine Clocks.  Alarm do. Watches – Lepine and Lever, Gold and Silver, Brooms, Shaker and Wisp, Salt, Course and Fine.  Baskets all sizes.  Wall and Window Paper.  Whips, Bone,  Rattan and Rawhide, home made.  Bed cords, rope, clothes, chalk and stone lines, clock cords and fish lines.  Stove pipe, elbows and stove tubes.  Pork, white fish, mackerel, dry and pickled cod. 

A further enumeration is denied us in the limits of this paper, and we deem it unnecessary as we hope to have the pleasure of showing our goods to most of all wanting anything in our line and then close our case (as the lawyers say.)  Meanwhile, we rest and shall cheerfully acquiesce in the verdict.

GOODS TAKEN AND WANTED IN EXCHANGE FOR GOODS, AT HIGHER PRICES THAN MANY PAY.

Dried Fruits and Berries of all kinds.  Beans, Peas, Corn, Oats, Rye and Wheat.  Hides and Sheep Pelts.  Rags forever.  Butter, Lard, Honey and Beeswax.  (Present price of wax 30 cents per pound.)  Pork, Hams, Shoulders and Eggs.  Mustard Seed and Caraway.  Wool, Yarn and Flannel, Rag Carpet, Men’s wool Socks, Cotton do.  Fox, Mink, Muskrat and winter-killed Coon and Skunk Skins.  Clover and Timothy Seeds. 


NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

Attention!

THE Members of Engine Company No. 1, of Windham, are requested to meet at the hotel of B. H. Waldron, on Saturday evening, January 7th, at 7 o’clock, for the purpose of electing officers for the coming year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the meeting.  By order of

M. C. OSBORN, Foreman

Pay up and Save Cost

ALL PERSONS OWING US BY NOTE or Book account are respectfully requested to call and settle up on or before the 18th inst.  After that date, they will be left in the hands of an Attorney for collection as they must be settled.

FOX & JERALDS
Ashland, January 2, 1860

 

Fox & Jerald’s Column

1859
GREATEST

Trotting Match
of the season!
 

Flora Temple
NOT

BEATEN AT LAST!

THE GREATEST TROTTING
ever known in
Greene County
will be seen near the
Empire Store, Ashland
on and after

Monday, October 31st

ON THAT DAY
FOX & JERALDS

WILL OPEN A SPLENDID NEW STOCK OF FALL AND WINTER GOODS, AND ALL CREATION WILL BE TROTTING THITHER, FOR THE NEATEST GOODS AND THE BEST, AS WELL AS THE CHEAPEST

BARGAINS
ever dispensed in this section.  We don’t mean to make much fuss about it, but we have the Goods, and shall sell them.  Ready-pay or short-time
EXAMINE, COMPARE AND JUDGE.

Our Stock consists of
CHOICE STYLES OF

Dress goods,
in all their variety, to which we call especial attention.
Cloths, Silks, Prints, Delaines, Alapaccas, Cambrics, Lawns, Muslins, Merinoes, Vestings, Cassimeres, Checks,* Batis, Ticks, Linen, Denims, Sheetings,
Flannels, Shawls, Laces, Gloves, Hosiery, Ribbons, Trimmings, &c., &c., &c.

All the best styles and at prices that will suit the most fastidious.

Also, a well selected stock of Paper Hangings, Window Shades, Coal Oil Lamps, Stationery, Perfumery, Fancy Baskets,

TOGETHER WITH A LARGE STOCK OF
Yankee Notions
CROKERY, GLASSWARE,

And Looking Glasses.

Also just received, and
RECEIVING CONSTANTLY
,
A Large and Choice Stock of

BOOTS AND SHOES,
Hats & Caps,
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.

PATENT MEDICINES

We are now prepared to sell on the most favorable terms,

G R O C E R I E S
AND

P R O V I S I O N S

SUGARS, MOLASSES AND SYRUPS
Also, TEAS of the latest importations,
Coffee, Salt, Seeds, Fish, Soap, Candies,
FLOUR AND MEAL.

WE also keep constantly on hand, at the lowest cash prices,
WHITE LEAD, ZINC AND PAINTS, OILS – Linseed, raw and boiled, Lard, Lamp and Coal Oils.  Paints and Dye Stuffs, Putty, Window-Glass, Rosin, Tar, Chalk, &c.

Ausfen’s Kerosene Oil $1.25 per gallon.

WOODEN-WARE
A good assortment.
__

H A R D W A R E

Wrought and Cut Nails, Cast Steel and Iron Shovels and Spades, Rakes, Forks, Crowbars, Scythes and Scythe Schths, Table and Pocket Cutlery.

__

Come all you who can appreciate good Goods at fair prices and honest dealing, come to the Empire Store.

N. B.  -  By adopting the Ready-Pay System, we give our customers the percentage charged to cover expenses, old debts and losses unavoidable in doing a credit business.

Produce taken in exchange for Goods and the highest cash price allowed.

 FOX & JERALDS

Ashland, November 1, 1859


 R. P. Gorsline’s Column

Briliant Exhibition

FOR

1860                                                          1860

GRAND SCHEME!

__

Buy Cheap, 

AND SAVE MONEY!
__

R. P. Gorsline’s

DRY DOCK 

EMPORIUM

__

Come and See

THE

NEW GOODS.
__

Largest, Best, Newest,

Cheapest Stock in Town!

The Subscriber has just returned from New York with a large and well selected stock of

DRY GOODS

Surpassing in variety, beauty and extent, anything previously exhibited in Windham.

Dress Goods 

Of every variety and choisest styles to be found in the market.

Black and Fancy Dress Silks,

Valentias, All Wool DeLaines, Trimmings, Ribbons, Plaid Meinos, Shawls, Velvets, Gloves, &c., &c., &c.

In our stock of

CLOTHS

Can be found a good assortment of

BROADCLOTHS
CASSIMERES
SATINETTES
TWEEDS
JEANS
LADIES CLOTH
SILK & PLUSH
VESTINGS

Boots and Shoes

FOR THE MILLION.

__

CARPETS,

All Wool, Tapestry, Ingrain and Common.
Also Mats, &c. &c., &c.

READY MADE CLOTHING

A FULL ASSORTMENT IN EVERY DESCRIPTION.

__

Groceries and Provisions

Teas, Coffees, Sugars, Hams, Pork, Fish, Flour, Meal, Salt, &c.,

By the Wholesale,

Flour by the Load         Salt by the Load

These goods are all

Fresh and New.

And will be sold at prices which will defy competition; as I am bound not to be undersold.

Remember the Dry Dock Store, and call and examine the Goods.  No charge fo showing.

                                                                                    R. P. Gorsline


 Store for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER OFFERS FOR SALE the building formerly occupied by Matthews & Hunt, as a store in the village of Windham Center.  It is fitted up for a Store but may be used for any other purpose.  It is in a good location for business and will be sold low.  Also, the small building adjoining now occupied by M. A. Merchant as a Tin Shop.  For particulars, enquire of H. H. Hunt, Middletown, Orange County, N. Y., or to the subscriber,      
L. S. HUNT
Windham Center, Jan. 2, 1860

Notice

ALL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE subscriber, either by note or book account, will please call and settle immediately.  All business done by him hereafter will be on the ready pay or cash system.  He will work cheap, for cash, and use as good stock and do as good work as can be produced for the same amount of money.  Call and See.  Heel plates at both ends, if required.

HERVEY BUSHNELL
Ashland, January 2, 1860

Notice

KEROSENE OIL – We have taken the agency for Austen’s Kerosene Oil.  This Oil has for a long time been before the public and for cleanliness, purity and brilliancy of light, surpasses all others.  We shall offer it to the public at the uniform price of $1.35 per gallon through the winter.  Also, a full supply of Coal, Oil Lamps, Wicks, Shades, &c., are constantly on hand.

FOX & JERALDS, Empire Store

LICENSE TO SELL

WINES &c.

R. P. GORSLINE, having taken a license to sell Wines and Spirituous Liquors, by the small measure, has now on hand some of the finest old Port, old Sherry and old Malaga wines to be found in market, dark and pale Olard, French Brandy, Cherry Brandy, Cider Brandy, Holland Glo, Rum and alcohol, &c.  Turner’s Forrest, Wise bitters, Blackberry Brandy and Raspberry Brandy in bottles for medicinal use.

Windham, July 23d, 1859                                                                  R. P. GORSLINE 


 DRUGS AND MEDICINES

INGERSOLL & DEWEY

Having opened a drug Store in the Village of Catskill, in the building lately occupied by J. H. VanGorden as a Grocery Store, respectfully invite the attention of the public to their stock.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES,

            PAINTS AND OILS,

                        PUTTY, TURPENTINE, CAMPHENE,

                                    BURNING FLUID,

                                                LINSEED OIL, RAW AND BOILED

                                                            SPERIT, ELEPHANT AND LAMP OIL

                                                                        AT WHOLESALE & RETAIL 

Dye Woods and Dye-Stuffs, Pure Liquors, Brandies and Wines for Medicinal purposes; also Toilet and Shaving Soaps; Tobacco, Cigars, &c., kept constantly on hand.

We invite the attention of the Profession and the public to our stock, and feel confident that the freshness of our articles and their genuineness will commend them to their favor.  A full stock of the

Patent or Proprietary Medicines 

of the day constantly on hand.  Orders for any article in our branch of business will be filled promptly, and at the lowest market prices.  Desiring to sell GOOD ARTICLES at a fair advance from wholesale prices ad soliciting a share of publ8c patronage, we shall endeavor to satisfy all who may favor us with a call.

Attention given to Physicians’ orders and prescriptions at all hours of the day or night.

E. L. INGERSOLL,
D. B. DEWEY

Catskill, June 6th, 1859


BARGAINS!  BARGAINS! 

Empire Store in full Bloom for the Fall Campaign

 THIS IS A PROGRESSIVE AGE AND I AM BOUND TO KEEP UP, IF NOT IN ADVANCE OF THE TIMES. 

I HAVE MADE EXTENSIVE ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE FALL TRADE. 

II shall be able to exhibit at my Store all the new and popular styles of  

Dress Goods, Trimmings, Shawls, &c. 

as soon as they appear in the great Metropolis.  As my interesting trade demands it, I have now on hand the greatest variety of

DRY GOODS, CARPETS, OIL, CLOTHS, CROCKERY, GLASS WARE, LOOKING GLASSES, &c. 

to be found at any other store in Greene County.  With all due respect for the Moyntain Merchants, still!  I am constrained to say to all, it will do you good to come to this MAMMOTH STORE and take a look at the extensive stock.  We show our Goods with pleasure and if we do not satisfy you in Style and Price, we will not urge you to purchase.

COME THEN, ONE AND ALL,

 TO THE EMPIRE STORE

JOSHUA FIERO, JR.

Catskill, August 15, 1859


 T. D. TRAPHAGAN

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MAKER,

Windham Center, Greene County, N.Y.


 T A I L O R I N G !

THE SUBSCRIBER WOULD RESPECTFULLY inform the citizens of Windham Center, Ashland, Lexington, Jewett, Hunter &c. that he has recently established himself in the village of Windham Center adjoining the store of R. P. Goreline, where he is prepared to cut and make up garments of every description in the neatest and most fashionable style, and at prices which cannot fail to please the most fastidious.  All persons who favor him with their patronage and rely upon having their wants attended to promptly.  Particular attention will be paid to the Cutting Department and it will be his endeavor to give entire satisfaction.

IRA CALKINS

Windham Center, June 8th, 1859


 Wagon For Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER HAS FOR SALE AN extra well made LUMER WAGON, thimble skeins, painted and finished in good style, which will be sold very cheap.

                                                                                                            E. J. PARSONS

Union Society, December 20, 1859


Cutter for Sale

THE Subscriber has a first rate CUTTER for which he has no use and will sell cheap.

                                                                                                            G. H. DOTY

Windham Center, Dec. 5, 1859


Lumber for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER WOULD RESPECTFULLY inform all Builders and Dealers in Lumber that he will keep on hand, and for sale, all kinds of first quality SPRUCE AND BASSWOOD SIDING and FLOOR BOARDS at the store of JAMES LOUGHRAN, Esq., in Hensonville, town of Windham.  Buyers will best consult their own interests by calling and examining the stock.

                                                                                    ALEXANDER ROBB

Hensonville, December 5, 1859


 ATHENS AND HUDSON

NEW  STEAM  FERRY

1859                                        1859

The new and swift steam ferry boat 

J. T. WATERMAN 

WILL continue our regular trips between Hudson and Athens during the season of 1859, leaving either side at Intervals of half an hour throughout the day. 

TO DROVERS AND CATTLE DEALERS 

The special attention of Drovers and Cattle Dealers invited to our facilities for the transportation of Stock, and for their safe passage over the track of the Hudson River Railroad – advantages possessed in a far greater degree by this Ferry than by any other in this vicinity. 

Rates of Ferriage as low as any other Ferry on the River.

March 15th, 1859                                                        MORTON & EDMONDS 


 CATSKILL HOUSE 

THE UNDERSIGNED RESPECTFULLY announces to his friends, and the traveling public, generally, that this spacious and well located house has recently received many important improvements, and now possesses all the essentials which go to make a good hotel.  The tables will be supplied with the best the market affords, the terms will be moderate, and every possible attention will be paid to the comfort of guests.

The stables connected with the hotel are in the care of an efficient hostler, and persons leaving horses in his charge may rely upon their being well taken care of.

                                                                                                GEORGE L. FRANCE 


General Fire and Marine

INSURANCE AGENCY
__

Albany Insurance Company

Incorporated in 1811, Charter Extended in 1828 and 1851

OFFICE No. 56 State Street, Albany.

Farm Houses, Brick, Stone or Wood detached will be insured for three years for $1 per $100.

TEUNIS VAN VECHTEN, Pres.

GERRIT Y. LANSING, Vice Pres,

STEPHEN GROENBEECK, Secretary

CHAS. CORNWALL, Agent
__

Manhattan Fire Insurance Company of the City of New York

Capital $250,000

Wm. PLATT PALMER, President

A. J. SMITH, Secretary

                                                                        CHAS. CORNWALL, Agent

Catskill, 1857


 January 10, 1860

Windham Town Insurance Co.

At the annual meeting of the Farmers’ and Villagers’ Fire Insurance Association of this town, held at the hotel of B. H. Waldron on the 3d instant, Messrs. N. P. Cowles, Albert Chase, Stephen Steele, Merritt Osborn, Pearl Lewis, Moses B. Austin, and S. P. Ives, were elected as a Board of Directors for the ensuring year.  The Secretary made his annual report which shows the association to be in good standing, with $75,000 of property, insured, and no losses during the last year.

A union is proposed between the citizens of Ashland and Windham to form the two towns into one company; and, in order to get an expression of the feeling of the members, the following resolution was offered:

Resolved:  That the Directors of this Company are hereby authorized to meet a Committee of any number of persons from this town of Ashland, to take into consideration the propriety of uniting both towns into one Company, and to take such measures as are necessary for uniting into one Company, if thought expedient.

The resolution passed the meeting unanimously.

The officers for the ensuing year are N. P. Cowles, President; Merritt Osborn, Vice President; S. P. Ives, Secretary. 

WILD CAT KILLED – A wild cat was killed at Butts’ hotel, at the top of the mountain, on the Windham turnpike, on Friday last, by Mr. Isaac Butts.  The animal had made inroads upon the hennery of Mr. Butts, and on Friday morning finding several dead chickens, or their remains, strewed around his barn, and the tracks of a strange animal visible, a search was instituted, when “the varmint” was discovered under the barn.  Isaac procured his gun and laid the beast out.  He measured five feet from the ends of his fore to the ends of his hind feet, when at full length, and weighed eighteen and a half pounds.


January 17, 1860  

Teeth!               Teeth!               Teeth!

Alfred W. Doty

D E N T I S T

WOULD RESPECTFULLY INFORM HIS FRIENDS

and patrons that he may be found at home the

First Half of Every Month

The balance of time will be spent as the interest of the business may require.  He continues to perform all dental operations with the utmost care and in a substantial and workmanlike manner – causing the least possible pain – and at the most reasonable prices.  He is doing 25%, better work than is customary for old established prices on 12 months credit; or, for ready pay and READY PAY ONLY at a discount of 20%.   Necessitous or merciful operations when required in the night and on the Sabbath at double price.  Deserving and charitable ones at all times GRATIS.  To accommodate all classes and circumstances, he makes every possible variety and priced artificial work from $.60 per tooth to $6.00 or more each.  Full upper or under sets from $5.00 to $75 or more.  Fillings from $.25 to $5.00 each according to the cost of the materials used and the amount of work laid out.  All of which for charming, life like beauty, comfort, utility and durability (prices &c considered) will vie with any other work of this kind made far or near.  All the known anesthetic agents and substitutes for mitigating pain used as required.

Priced specimens of his work may be seen at his office, first door south east of the bridge.

Windham Center, Greene County, NY

                                                                        ALFRED W. DOTY


 LOCKWOOD & INGERSOLLS’ 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Flour, Groceries, Provisions, 

BOOTS AND SHOES 

Head of Main Street, Catskill, N. Y.

Also, Boots and Shoes, ready made and made to order at the old Mahaffy Stand, centre of Main Street.

LOCKWOOD                                             JOHN F. INGERSOLL                            N. D. INGERSOLL


SAD BEREAVEMENT – W are informed by a friend that on Thursday or Friday last one of the children of Mr. Dwight S. Marsh, formerly of Prattsville, but lately a resident of Gouldsboro, Luzerne County, Penn., was taken suddenly ill with a fit, from the effects of which it soon died.  Mr. Marsh was soon after taken in the same manner and also died.  Another child was attacked, which the mother remained to watch over while some friends brought the remains of Mr. Marsh and his child to Prattsville for interment.  These particulars are hastily gleaned, but we believe are correct.


 Miscellaneous

 Notice

ALL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE subscriber, either by note or book account, will please call and settle immediately.  All business done by him hereafter will be on the ready pay or cash system.  He will work cheap, for cash, and use as good stock and do as good work as can be produced for the same amount of money.  Call and see.  Heel plates at both ends, if required.

HERVEY BUSHNELL
Ashland, January 2, 1860


 Pay up and Save Cost

ALL PERSONS OWING US BY NOTE or Book account are respectfully requested to call and settle up on or before the 18th Inst.  After that date, they will be left in the hands of an Attorney for collection, as they must be settled.

FOX & JERALDS
Ashland, January 2, 1860


 Store for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER OFFERS FOR SALE the building formerly occupied by Matthews & Hunt, as a store in the village of Windham Center.  It is fitted up for a Store but may be used for any other purpose.  It is in a good location for business and will be sold low.  Also, the small building adjoining now occupied by M. A. Merchant as a Tin Shop.  For particulars, enquire of H. H. Hunt, Middletown, Orange County, N. Y., or to the subscriber,                                                                                 

L. S. HUNT
Windham Center, Jan. 2, 1860


For Sale

THE SUBSRIBER OFFERS for sale the premises owned by him, situated in Woodland, Ulster County, about 2 ½ miles from the plank road.  The place contains about six acres of land and has on it a

WOODEN-WARE FACTORY,

twenty-four by forty feet, and two stories in height besides basement.  There is a good and durable water power of fourteen feet head and the dam can be easily kept in repair.  The factory has two run of wheels, and can be easily converted to any use the purchaser desires.  One cross cut Saw and gearing and one slitter Saw, arbor and gearing, will be sold with the place.  Adjacent to the factory is a wooden building sixteen by thirty-six feet, which is used as a steam shop and store house.  There are also two substantial DWELLING HOUSES on the premises which will be sold with the above.  The buildings are all nearly new.  The place is situated about a quarter of a mile from Beach & Woodruff’s upper Saw Mill.

If not disposed of before the 1st day of April next, possession cannot be given until one year from that time.

Terms made easy.  For further particulars, enquire of DARIUS RIDER, Woodland, Ulster County or of the subscriber at Windham Center, Greene County.

PHILETUS JOHNSON


Carriage and Sleigh Repository

W. H. NORTON WOULD RESPECTFULLY inform the citizens of Durham and surrounding towns that he has added to his business a Repository, for the sale of

FANCY CARRIAGES AND SLEIGHS

which for Elegance and Durablity, together with the extreme low prices, will defy competition in either Albany Schoharie, or the great Metropolis.  Those wishing to purchase will do well to call and examine.

N. B. All Kinds of Wheelwright work done up without delay.

                                                                                                            W. H. NORTON

Durham Village, December 15th, 1859


HORSE OWNERS, ATTENTION!

THE SUBSCRIBER RETURNS his sincere thanks to those who have so liberally patronized him heretofore, and takes occasion to inform them that his efforts shall be continued to please all who favor him with their patronage hereafter.  He continues to manufacture every variety of

PLEASURE AND DRAFT HARNESS,

of the best materials, in the latest and most approved styles and the work warranted to be durable and to give entire satisfaction.

CARRIAGE TRIMMING,

in all its branches, promptly attended to, and the work warranted.  A handsome assortment of

Trunks, Valises and Whips

always on hand, and at prices which must please.  Repairing promptly attended to at all times.

CHARLES STEDMAN
Windham center, Sept. 29, 1859


January 17, 1860

A fire occurred in the village of Walton, Delaware County, on Sunday morning, January 15th, by which the large blacksmith shop of Messrs. Johnson & Hall was totally consumed.  The origin of the fire is unknown.  Loss about $700.  No insurance. 

Mr. John West, of this village, advertises his property for sale.  The mill is one of the best in the county; and, while we regret to lose Mr. West as a citizen, we hope he will receive for his effects their full value. 

Ichabod Cook, Esq., of the town of Ashland, has a young cow with six teats.  There are no deformed ones among them, being all of the usual size, and properly situated at regular distances from each other. 

A Mr. Newcomb, formerly of Prattsville or Gilboa, who went west about six years ago, and afterwards bought property in Texas, started recently to remove his family to the latter place, but died while on his way there.  He was a brother of Reed Newcomb, Esq., of Prattsville. 

A note for $400 was presented at the Catskill Bank, recently, by Silas Hunt, of Greenville, on which was a forged endorsement of the name of Alexander N. Bentley, of Greenville.  The Cashier detected the forgery and Mr. Hunt was, after examination, committed to jail to await trial. 

MARRIED – In Catskill, on the 16th instant, by George P. Barber, Esq., Mr. R. A. Democrat to Miss D. Herald, all of Catskill.
It is hoped by the friends of the parties that the union will be a happy one. 

Mr. J. S. Presto, of Prattsville, we learn, has sold his hotel to a gentleman named Rockefeller of the same place.


 NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

 For Sale or Exchange

THE SUBSCRIBER OFFERS for sale or to exchange the property owned and occupied by him in the village of Windham Center, Greene County, N.Y., consisting of a

DWELLING HOUSE,
barn, and all necessary out buildings, with two acres or more of LAND.  Also a
GRIST MILL,

in good repair and in good running order, which is doing a fine business.

The above described property will be sold low or will be exchanged for a FARM.  For further particulars, inquire of the subscriber on the premises.

JOHN WEST
Windham Center, January 20, 1860


January 31, 1860

An infant child of David Haviland of Athens, died in its mother’s arms whilst the parents were riding one evening last week, most probably from suffocation. 

On Sunday evening, the 22d inst., at about six o’clock, the dwelling house of Ephraim P. Myer, occupied by his son Francis, at Plattekill, in the town of Saugerties, took fire, and with its contents was entirely destroyed.  Loss about $700.  No insurance.


February 7, 1860  

BUSINESS CARDS

ASHLAND CENTER HOTEL
M R S. A. M. A L L E N, P R O P R I A T R E S S
,
Ashland, Greene County, New York

--------------------------------------------------

J. A. O. O’CONOR
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
130 Nassau St., New York, (Room 18) with
in one block of the Park and City Hall.

------------------------------------------------------

A. WEBSTER SHAFFER
C I V I L   E N G I N E E R   A N D   S U R V E Y O R
Office with Kind and Mattoon, Catskill, NY

-----------------------------------------------------------

GEORGE L. FRANCE,
SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY,

Office at the Catskill House, Catskill, NY

----------------------------------------------------------

T. C. SMITH
DEPUTY SHERIFF AND JAILOR,
Catskill, Greene Co., NY

----------------------------------------------------------------------

SAMUEL W. STIMPSON
DEPUTY SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY,
Office at Windham Center

--------------------------------------------------------

JAMES McARDLE
DEPUTY SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY,
Prattsville, NY

--------------------------------------------------------

O. L. CHITTENDEN
DEPUTY SHERIFF OF GREENE COUNTY,
Durham, NY

----------------------------------------------------------

CHARLES H. PORTER
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Ashland, Greene County, NY

----------------------------------------------

SAMUEL P. IVES
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Windham Center, NY

--------------------------------------------

E. P. MORE
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Prattsville, Greene Co., NY Collecting done with promptness.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. MELVIN OSBORN,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Catskill, NY Office with R. W. Watson

----------------------------------------------------------

J. A. & A. C. GRISWOLD
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW

Catskill, NY

J. A. GRISWOLD               A. C. GRISWOLD
------------------------------------------------------------

KING & MATTOON
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
CATSKILL, NY

Rufus H. King                 Peleg C. Mattoon

--------------------------------------------------------------

S. A. & C. C. GIVENS
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW,
Opposite the Post Office, Main Street, Catskill, NY

----------------------------------------------------------------

A. R. MACOMBER
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Windham Center, NY

-----------------------------------------------------------------

J. HALLOCK
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Office with King & Mattoon, Catskill, Greene Co., NY

------------------------------------------------------------

W. W. WETMORE,
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON & OCCULIST,
All diseases of the Eye, both medical and surgical promptly
attended to. Residence and Office first door south of C. S.
Willard’s Jewelry Store, upstairs, Main Street,
Catskill, NY

------------------------------------------------------------------------

E. COLBURN,
SURGEON DENTIST
Windham, Greene County, NY All work warranted.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

MRS. E. SPENCER,
IS NOW RECEIVING HER FALL AND WINTER
GOODS at her Millinery Store, in Windham Center.

---------------------------------------------------------------

MILTON S. VEDDER
SILVERSMITH AND JEWELER,

AT SYLVESTER’S BAZAAR, OPPOSITE THE CATSKILL BANK.

Repairing promptly attended to and Warranted. Prices low.
Livery at the Catskill House.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

SASHES & BLINDS
SASHES & BLINDS
made to order by
L. R. CHAPMAN
Big Hollow, NY

--------------------------------------------------------------------

GILES H. PHELPS
HOUSE, SIGN AND CARRIAGE PAINTER AND GILDER
Manorkill, Schoharie Co., NY

---------------------------------------------------------------------

A, MARTIN, JR.
DEALER IN STOVES, NAILS, HARDWARD, CUTLERY
Agricultural and Mechanical Implements and Tools, Iron, Steel, &c, &c.
Merchants supplied at New York prices. Main Street, Catskill, NY

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

H. R. & Z. J. BROWN
Steam Marble Works,

Schoharie, NY
Keep constantly on hand Monuments and Tombstones of every description.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

JAMES McARDLE
Dealer in Ready Made Clothing
,
PRATTSVILLE, GREENE COUNTY, NY

CLOTHES, Cashmeres and Vestings constantly on hand,
Cutting done at short notice and all work warranted. Terms moderate.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UNION HOTEL
H. HURD, PROPRIEOR,
Catskill, Greene County, NY

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

LOUD & SMITH
Will be happy to see their friends at their house, west end of
Main Street, Catskill, NY.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Greene County Hotel,
BY PECK & GUNN
Corner Church and Main Sts., Catskill, NY

Pleasant Accommodations for Travelers.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

J. FOLAND’S
HOTEL

74 Washington Avenue, Albany, N. Y.

A Pleasant and Retired Home for Travelers.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

LOCKWOOD & INGERSOLLS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN

Flour, Groceries, Provisions

BOOTS AND SHOES
Head of Main Street, Catskill N. Y.
Also, Boots and Shoes, ready made and
made to order at the old Mahaffy Stand,
centre of Main Street

S. LOCKWOOD, JOHN INGERSOLL, E.D. INGERSOLL

-------------------------------------------------------------------------


February 14, 1860

BUSINESS CHANGES IN JEWETT - Mr. Levi S. Bailey, of Jewett, recently sold one of his places in that town to Mr. Samuel Osborn and will hereafter reside in the house lately occupied by Mr. E.N. Avery. Mr. Samuel Osborn sold his farm to Mr. Ransom Osborn of Ashland, who will take possession about the first of April.

John Peck, Esq., has also sold his farm to Mr. Justus Morss, of West Durham, and will soon remove to a farm in the town of Catskill, on the Hunter Road, near Palenville, which he lately purchased of his son.

NOTE: I don’t know of a Justus Morss in West Durham, where my Moss/Morse family came from; but, there is a Justin Morse on the Moss family tree and he did live in West Durham. His descendents were later found in Jewett Heights. I went to school with two of them. (Mignon)

Mr. A. B. Coe has sold his farm to Mr. Samuel Bloodgood, of Hensonville, and is to reside temporarily in the house formerly occupied by Ezra Pratt, Esq., at Jewett Heights. 

Hon. Chas A. Ingersoll, of New Haven, died at his residence on Wednesday evening last. He was the father of Hon. Colin M. Ingersoll, son-in-law of Hon. Zadock Pratt.

A young man named George Henry Couse, aged 15 years, was killed January 31st at Davenport, by the rolling of a log upon his body.

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

Notice

ALL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE subscriber, either by note or book account, are reuested to call and settle the same by or before the 1st day of March next. All accounts not settled by that time will be placed in proper hands for collection. Be wise and save costs.

SAMUEL MILLER
Windham Center, Feb. 6th, 1860

Spruce Lumber for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER WOULD STATE TO builders and others that they will keep constantly on hand an assortment of Spruce Siding and Flooring, of the first quality, planed in the very best manner and ready for use at their factory in the village of Hunter. Dealers in Lumber are invited to examine our stock. BALDWIN & CO.

Hunter, Feb. 13, 1860

Vendue

THE SUBSCRIBER WILL OFFER FOR sale at public Vendue, at his residence in the town of Jewett on Thursday, March 1, 1860, at 10 o’clock, A.M. the following property, viz;

Nine Cows; one Bull, two years old; two Yearlings; a quantity of Hay, Grain, Dairy Utensils, Farming Utensils, Wagons, Harnesses and many other articles too numerous to mention.

TERMS - All sums under $5, Cash; sums over $5, one year’s credit with approved notes.

ANDREW B. COE
Jewett Greene County, Feb. 13th, 1860

Vendue

THE SUBSCRIBER, HAVING SOLD HIS farm will offer for sale, at Public Auction, at his residence in Jewett, on Wednesday, February 29th, 1860, the following property viz;

Twelve Cows; one pair of Devonshire red working Cattle, five years old; some young stock; 12 to 15 tons of Hay; a variety of Farming Utensils, &c. Sale to commence at 10 o’clock, A.M.

TERMS - All sums under $5, Cash; all sums over $5, eight months credit, with good approved notes with interest.

LEVI S. BAILEY
Jewett, February 14, 1860

PROPERTY FOR SALE

For Sale or Exchange

THE SUBSCRIBER OFFERS for sale or to exchange the property owned and occupied by him in the village of Windham Center, Greene County, NY, consisting of a DWELLING HOUSE, Barn and all necessary out buildings, with two acres or more of LAND. Also a GRIST MILL in good repair and in good running condition, which is doing a fine business.

The above described property will be sold low or will be exchanged for a FARM. For further particulars, inquire of the subscriber on the premises.

JOHN WEST
Windham Center, January 20, 1860.

For Sale

THE SUBSCRIER OFFERS for sale the premises owned by him, situated in Woodland, Ulster County, about 2 ½ miles from the plank road. The place contains about six acres of land and has on it a WOODEN-WARE FACTORY, twenty-four by forty feet, and two stories in height, besides basement. There is a good and durable water power of fourteen feet head and the dam can be easily kept in repair. The factory has two run of wheels and can be easily converted to any use the purchaser desires. One cross cut Saw and gearing and one slitter Saw, arbor and gearing will be sold with the place. Adjacent to the factory is a wooden building, sixteen by thirty-six feet, which is used as a steam shop and store house. There are also two substantial DWELLING HOUSES on the premises which will be sold with the above. These buildings are all nearly new. The place is situated about a quarter of a mile from Beach & Woodworth’s upper Saw Mill.

Terms made easy. For further particulars, enquire of DARIUS RIDER, Woodland, Ulster County or of the subscriber at Windham Center, Greene County. PHILETUS JOHNSON


February 21, 1860

ASHLAND, February 20, 1860

FRIEND STEELE - A daughter of Mr. Mattice, of this town, aged about 14 years, made an attempt and nearly succeeded, in taking her life by cutting her throat on Saturday last. She cut it crosswise, nearly severing the windpipe and then up and down from the chin, intending to finish the job, but probably in ignorance of the location of the jugular veins, left them untouched. Her life is despaired of. No particular cause is assigned for the act.

Yours, &c. J.D.

COMMUNICATIONS

Lines to Katie in Heaven

Composed by a friend to the memory of Katie M. Cole, only child of Austin and Olodyne Cole, who died December7th, 1859, aged 11 months.

Alas! Thou are gone - the weary soul,
That struggled in thy mortal coil,
Has left dull earth, where only roll
The waves of sadness, care and pain.

O! Yes an angel dwelt on earth,
Alas, you found that it was true,
That death prefers a shining mark,
To one that is of duller hue.

Oh! You prized your little darling,
And you loved her, Oh! Far too well;
God saw she was your idol here,
He took her home with Him to dwell.

Too good, too pure to dwell below,
Too mild, too gentle here to stay;
Some angel whispered in her ear,
Sweet Katie dear, Oh, come away.

Her spirit was for earth too pure,
For this cold world, too bright, too fair;
Her Father called her to the sky,
‘Twas his decree that she should die.

Yet, little Katie speaks to thee
From out her angel home on high:
Father, Mother, weep not for me,
For I am happy in the sky.

But, strive to love and serve the One
Who took your darling from your home,
That when He calls thee, you may be
Prepared to come and dwell with me.

Rest, loved one, rest asleep that sleep
Which knows no waking hour on earth,
In slumber deep, beneath the sod,
Await the call to holy birth.

Yet, though still hard it is to part,
There is to you a promise given,
If you but rightly keep your hearts,
To meet your darling one in heaven.

Then fare thee well, Oh! Cherished one,
The God of Heaven wills it so;
‘Twas He that gave, to Him thou’rt gone,
Again farewell, adieu@ adieu@

WALLACE
Lexington, Feb. 15, 1860

ALMOST A CONFLAGRATION - One of the employees in the comb and button factory of J. F. Mathews & Co., in this village, discovered a fire in the roof of that building, near the chimney about noon on Saturday. 

The house formerly occupied by N. P. Cowles, Esq., adjoining his store in this village, was removed on Friday afternoon last to a lot adjoining the Episcopal church. 

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

The Last Call

ALL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE subscribers are requested to make payment of the same by or before the 20th day of March, 1860, as all claims not settled by that time will positively be placed in the hands of the proper authorities for collection.

BRYAN & THOMAS
Windham Center, February 20th, 1860

New Jewelry Store

THE SUBSCRIBER IS OFFERING his thanks to his friends for the liberal patronage he has received since his establishment in Windham, and would announce to them that he has removed from the rooms of Dr. E. Colburn to the store formerly occupied by W. F. Spencer, Esq., where he will keep at all times a general assortment of WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY.

He will also attend promptly to the repairing of Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and Musical Instruments.

TRUMAN JOHNSON
Windham Center, February 21st 1860


February 28, 1860

GOOD HUNTING - Aaron Robben, Esq., of Oak Hill, started out on the hills last Tuesday on a little hunting expedition, taking with him his three hounds, and returned in about two hours with two foxes. He very nearly succeeded in getting the third one. Aaron’s some on a hunt, and what game comes within reach of this gun is sure to “drap.”

Circuit Court

The February term of the Circuit Court for this county, which commenced its Session on Monday of last week, was adjourned on Saturday afternoon last. But few cases on the calendar were tried. Some fifteen cases were referred. The only cases of interest in this action tried were as follows:

The People vs. Andrew Shahan, Clark Wilkinson and John C. Rivers indicted for the murder of Robert Decker, during an affray at a Circus in Coxsackie in July last. The Jury found Shahan guilty of manslaughter in the 3d degree, and Judge Hogeboom sentenced him to three years and six months’ imprisonment in the State Prison at Sing Sing. Clark Wilkinson plead guilty to the same charge, and received the same sentence. Rivers was discharged by the Court.

John Sears (colored,) indicted for petit larceny, second offence, was found guilty and sentenced to two years and six months at Sing Sing.

A negro from Prattsville, named Hillecus, indicted for assault and battery, plead guilty, and was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment and hard labor at the county jail.

The case of Aurilla Robbins against William Robbins for divorce was decided in favor of the Plaintiff.

The Miss Mattice of Ashland, spoken of last week by correspondent, as having attempted to commit suicide by cutting her throat, died from the effects of her wounds on Wednesday last. The burial took place on Thursday. Rev. Henry J. Fox preached the funeral sermon.

It is rumored (but with how much truth we are not prepared to say,) that Cyrus Smith Esq., of Prattsville has rented his Hotel to Messrs. Brandow & Stryker.

In the marriage notice of Jacob Tile last week, a mistake occurred. The letter T was used in the place of Z. It should have read Jacob Zile.

E. T. Peck, Esq., of Durham, has sold out his interest in the store of Peck & More to Mr. W. D. More. The new firm will be styled L. P. & W. D. More. The arrangement is to take effect on Thursday, March 1st.

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

Two Wagons for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER OFFERS TWO Wagons for Sale. One of them is a three seated two-horse Spring Wagon and the other a light one-horse Buggy. Both were made by Mr. T. D. Traphagan, at Windham, are well built, are entirely new and will be sold cheap. Call at the shop of the subscriber, near the hotel of Col. Steele, and look at them.

THOMAS E. HAM
Windham, February 27th, 1860

Farm for Sale

THE SUBSCRIBER OFFERS ONE OF his farms for sale. It contains 103 ACRES OF LAND and is situated within one and a half miles of Windham Center. It is well fenced, (principally stone wall) wooded and watered, and there are on the premises all necessary out buildings, in good repair. It has a good orchard of grafted fruit. Ten Cows, one yoke of oxen and a number of young Cattle will also be sold with the farm if wanted. Terms of payment made easy, and possession given the first of April next. For particulars, enquire on the premises of

JOHN WHITE
Windham, February 27th, 1860


March 6, 1860

POST OFFICE CHANGE - S. R. Potter, Esq., has been appointed Postmaster at Cooksburgh, Albany County, in the place of V. Fiero. Mr. Potter will make an able and efficient officer, and without a doubt the citizens of that vicinity will appreciate the fact.

FIRE - At about 9 o’clock on Monday night of last week, fire was discovered issuing from a house occupied by Mr. William Crandall in Big Hollow. Mr. Crandall’s wife and four children were asleep in the building at the time, and had the fire not been discovered and promptly extinguished by some friends who were on their way home from singing school, all would have undoubtedly perished in the flames. The fire originated in some ashes having been carelessly thrown in one corner of an adjoining shed or wood room.

HORSE RUNAWAY - A horse belonging to Mr. S. E. Renolds, of this town, became frightened, while standing near the Grist Mill, in this village, on Thursday last, and ran away. He continued through Mill Street to the turnpike thence down until he was turned from the road opposite B. H. Waldron’s hotel. He passed the hay scales there and caught the wagon to which he was attached between a post and a tree and left it. The horse was soon after stopped. Damages were slight.

Z. Wilcox, Esq., of the town of Hunter, has sold his farm to Frederick Beach, Esq., of Hunter village. Mr. Leverett Conine, formerly of Ashland, is to work it.

Mr. Thomas Day, of this town, it is stated, has sold his hotel, and farm of one hundred acres of land belonging to it, to Mr. Peter Jacobs, of Prattsville.

We are much indebted to Theodore Peck, Esq., of Yreka, Siskeyuo Co., California for a package of late and interesting California papers.

We are informed that Col. Zadock Pratt, of Prattsvile, who has recently been making a tour through Cuba, California, &c., has taken it into his head to learn something about the overland mail route, and is now on his way home “across lots.” He is expected home soon.

The Musical Convention held at Roxbury, Delaware County, last week, under the direction of O. Porter, Esq., of this village, was largely attended nearly one hundred members being present. The proceedings were received too late for this week.

We are happy to learn that our esteemed friend, Rev. Edward Straton, late of Ashland, is pleasantly situated at Greenport, L. I., where he has a fine church and bright prospects of usefulness in his profession.

The firm of Peck & Osborn of this village has been dissolved - Mr. Peck having disposed of his interest in the store to Mr. Osborn who we learn, will continue the business alone.

We learn that Mr. W. F. Spencer, formerly of this village, has purchased the hotel kept by Mr. Geo. W. Childs, in Jefferson, and will take possession on the 25th inst.

Mr. David Hopson bought a farm recently of Mr. Russell J. Jones, of Big Hollow, and soon after sold it to Mr. Frederick North.

Rev. J. B. Fish, of Big Hollow, a few days since sold one of his farms to Mr. William T. McGlashen of the same place.

Our Durham Letter

Durham, March 2, 1860

FRIEND STEELE - The past week has been one of sadness in this section. Death has been in our midst. Our citizens were startled last Tuesday afternoon in the very sudden death of Mrs. A. N. Reed, wife of John Reed, Esq. Mrs. Reed had been in usual good health. On Tuesday morning, she arose as well as usual, to all appearance, and while busy with her domestic duties about half past nine o’clock, she was seized with an apoplectic fit and in the short space of five hours, she was a corpse. This sad bereavement falls heavily upon the bereaved husband and society deeply mourns this dispensation of Divine Providence. The funeral was attended on Thursday at the Presbyterian church in Durham. A large concourse of friends and relatives were in attendance, and a very beautiful discourse was delivered by Rev. E. L. Boing. The remains were taken to Catskill for interment.

In the midst of this solemn thought, the doleful sound of the funeral knell was heard from Oak Hill, telling to us plainly another of our number had fallen. It was soon ascertained to be one of the old inhabitants, Mr. Burrell Peck. Mr. Peck died very suddenly. True it is, “we know not what a day may bring forth.” The funeral of Mr. Peck was attended on Friday at the M. E. church in Oak Hill. The house was crowded, and a very impressive discourse was delivered by Rev. Mr. Smith of Cornwallsville. Thus has passed away one of our best citizens, “respected in life, lamented in death.” I here add a short notice handed to me by a friend.

DIED - On the 28th of February, 1860, at his residence, near Oak Hill, Greene County, BURWELL PECK, aged 75 years.

The deceased was one of the pioneer tanners of Greene and Schoharie Counties, having with his brothers, engaged in the business in the year 1800 in the town of Durham, where were tanned the first Spanish hides in Greene County. They removed to the Village of Oak Hill in 1803, conducting the tanning, currying, harness and shoemaking business up to 1814, when Burwell removed to Strykersville, Schoharie county, where he erected the largest tannery then in the State. This he disposed of in the year 1832, and removed near Oak Hill, where he has since resided.

With these sad accounts, I will close for the present.

Yours, &c, PHOENIX

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS

Dissolution

THE COPARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE existing under the name and firm of PECK & OSBORN is this day dissolved by mutual consent, H. P. Peck having disposed of his interest in the Store to M. . Osborn, who will continue the business at the same place. PECK & OSBORN

Windham Center, March 1, 1860

All persons indebted to said firm of Peck & Osborn, either by note or book account, are requested to make immediate payment. PECK & OSBORN

Windham Center, March 1, 1860

Notice to those Indebted

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO ALL persons indebted to ISAAC BRANDOW, either by Note or Book account, are requested to call and settle the same immediately.

Windham Center, March 5th, 1860 ISAAC BRANDOW


March 13, 1860

RETURN OF COL. Z. PRATT - We announced last week that Col. Pratt was on his way home overland from California, and was expected soon. He arrived at Prattsville on Tuesday last, and though he has gone through a severe trial for a man of his age, he looks as hale and hearty as at any previous time in his life. He allows that “if he had not been made of leather and brought up among the hemlocks, he could have scarcely endured the hardships incident to a quick trip by the overland mail route from San Francisco to the Mississippi River.” During this journey, he was in one of the mail coaches of the line for twenty-one successive days and nights, and at no time out of them for more than half an hour at once. While he was in California, he saw almost every one who once resided in this section. Among them he mentions, Messrs. R. K. Berry, Danforth Frayer, Huron Blinn, Howard Robinson, George Hoagland, Arland Humphrey, and many others whose names we cannot now call to mind. When we have more space we shall give our readers his views of the country and scenery by the great overland route.

Our Durham Letter

DURHAM - March 9, 1860

FRIEND STEELE - as usual, you find me on hand, and that, too, without copying matter from other papers. You noticed a short time since the dissolution of the firm of Peck & More. I learn that Mr. Peck will remain among our good people for the present. The new firm of L. P. & W. D. More are already making extensive arrangements for the spring trade. They intend in a few days to fill their store with a large stock of new goods and a greater variety than is usually kept in a country store. As both gentlemen are well known in this section as honorable and upright men, meeting mankind on the level and dealing on the square, we have no doubt but success will attend them. A few days since, the Examiner spoke of the new firm of S. P. & W. D. More, in Durham. I would merely state we have no such firm doing business here. A writer from Durham, under the nom de plume of “Birdseye,” in the last issue, seems to think the Durham letters are copied in the Examiner; well, vot of it, nobody kilt. The Journal arrives three days in advance every time consequently, as Birdseye says, second tables are never as good as the first, and as a general thing have a lean supply.

The annual meeting of the First Presbyterian Society of Durham, for the sale of slips and other business pertaining to the society, was held in the church, Durham Village, last Monday. A large number were in attendance. The sale of slips amounted to $665, some seats remaining unsold, but will all be taken, which will increase the sum to over $700. This society, but a short time since, purchased a parsonage for their minister. The House is a very neat and commodious one, with a large garden attached also a fine orchard of grafted fruit. The grounds are beautifully laid out, and adorned with shrubbery and choice flowers - making it a very desirable residence. At the meeting referred to, the Trustees of the above society reported church and all church property free of debt. This certainly speaks well for Durham. Much credit is due to the officers and members of said society, for their liberal efforts in so good a cause. I understand the church is to be thoroughly cleaned and newly painted this spring, which will add greatly to the beauty of the edifice. This is brought about by a spirit of union; for where union is, strength is there also.

As town meeting is approaching, politicians are already on the move. As a matter of course, every one has his friends and for aught I know every one has his enemies. Rather singular, ain’t it? But it tis so as the boy said, and it can’t be no tisser. Several names are spoken of for Supervisor. Daniel Jones, Esq., L. P. More, Esq. and the present Supervisor, are among the prominent ones with the Republicans. All of them are good and reliable men. I have heard of no name mentioned among the Democrats, as yet; but, without a doubt they will select a candidate as good as the best, and all right on the goose. Go it, gentlemen, square trotting this spring, for the Major says “as goes Durham, so goes the State.” The last man out wins.

As Spring is upon us, trade begins to start up in our sister village of Oak Hill. The Furnaces are making preparation for an increase of trade and from present indication, they will have a thriving spring business. Surely nothing will please the good citizens of that quiet little village better.

I am glad to meet the face of that good natured soul again and happy to know he has returned safe and sound. Why, the lower end of the village don’t look natural when J----s is absent. Now, don’t do so again, but when you leave home so suddenly, let us know about it and it will save a great deal of uneasiness.

Blue birds and robins have made their appearances among us already and their sweet and melodious music seems to put new life in us, poor mortal critters. The singing of the birds at the opening of Spring, reminds me forcibly of the poet when he penned the following beautiful and soul stirring lines.

“Little robin red breast, he sat upon a rail,
Wiggle, wiggle went his head; waggle waggle went his tail.”

But, I must bring matters to a close. I will only add that we are to have a regular horse auction in Durham Village on Saturday, March 17th. This is something new in these parts. Messrs. King and Humphrey have just returned from the North, with a splendid stock of animals of the horse kind. In fact, any man can be suited if he wants a good horse, but if he wants a broken down plug, I would advise him to look elsewhere. Those wanting good horses, at reasonable prices, as a matter of course, will attend. I understand a large lot of harness single an double and a number of spring wagons, will be sold. Go it, gentlemen, regular New York Tatersals. Durham is some pumpkins. Look out in a short time for the Albany and Susquehanna Railroad and a connecting link fro Schoharie to Catskill.

ERRATTA - We are requested to state that an error occurred in the JOURNAL of February 21st, in announcing the marriage of Mr. Jacob Zile to Miss Joan Purinton, of Durham. The notice was received in the letter from our Durham correspondent, who was undoubtedly misinformed, as we are confident he would not intentionally send for publication such an item unless he believed it true. We, however, make the correction with pleasure and insert the notice enclosed by our friend, viz:

NOT married at the residence of the bride’s parents in Durham, on the 9th ult., by the Rev. Mr. Hough, or any other person, Mr. Jacob Zile to Miss Joan Purinton.

We are informed that Mr. E. B. Dodge of Freehold, has rented or bought the store formerly occupied by Mr. F. Jump, in the village of Ashland, and expects to open it for business soon. Mr. Dodge will remove his family to Ashland.

The body of a negro man named Van Horn, was found on the river shore, just above Catskill on Friday last. He jumped from the steamer Hendrick Hudson last Fall. Coroner’s verdict, “accidental drowning.”


March 20, 1860

Communications

Our Durham Letter

DURHAM, March 17, 1860

FRIEND STEELE - In looking over the last number of the Journal, I was somewhat surprised to see the marriage of Jacob Zile contradicted. I called on Mr. Zile immediately, to ascertain the truth of the matter. The parties are married. I was misinformed as regards the place and that’s a very simple thing to take up and send to a printer. Besides, it was a source of mortification to the parties, who are highly respected; and, I think was not using the printer exactly right. The notice should have read, married on the 9th of February, at the parsonage, Greenville, by Rev. Mr. Hough, Mr. Jacob Zile to Miss Joan Purinton, all of Durham. All the mistake that brought out the contradiction was simply in regard to where the ceremony took place. Not at the bride’s parents, but at the parsonage in Greenville. But the contradiction led many to believe they were not married. However, I hope now whoever the person is who is so particular in every point, that hereafter the matter will be at rest, and the parties be allowed to enjoy the honeymoon with none to molest or make afraid.

I learn that James H. Welch, Esq., merchant tailor, of Oak Hill, is about closing his business and removing from that place. His removal will leave a vacancy that will not easily be filled. I am not informed as yet where Mr. Welch intends to locate. But, wherever he goes, he carries with him the best wishes of the citizens of Durham and Oak Hill for his welfare and prosperity.

Speaking of Oak Hill, the inhabitants of that place have at last found what they have long desired - that is a market. Mr. D. Etheridge has opened a market, for the sale of meats, fish and vegetables in their season and, in fact, a variety everything. Over those monstrous loaves of bread from Mattice’s Middleburgh, which make the women grunt to handle them. Go it, Dan, your enterprise is a good one and your children will rise up and call you blessed.

Having some urgent business on hand, I will be brief this week but promise more in my next.

Yours, &c., PHOENIX

We rode through the towns of Jewett and Hunter last week and noticed a few changes here and there for the better. Among the improvements in the eastern part of Jewett is a beautiful dwelling lately erected by Mr. Abner Woodworth. Its prominent position and neat and tasty appearance make it one of the finest buildings in the town.

WARNING - Whereas, Charles Mundore, a colored man, has my name on a paper purporting to be a subscription to raise funds for the public to purchase a school house in Prattsville for the people of color to worship in, therefore I take this public way of saying that I have no sympathy with the proposed project and desire that no one should give to him because it is urged that my name is there. Wm. Hall

Prattsville, March 20tth , 1860

ACCIDENT - We learn that Mr. John Campbell, of West Durham, met with an accident on Sunday the 11th instant, while driving around his horse and carriage to put them under a shed after his company had alighted at the church. A wheel ran off the carriage at which his horse took fright and ran furiously, throwing Mr. Campbell out on the frozen ground and dragging him some distance. At length the horse got away from him and cleared himself from the wagon but was soon caught uninjured. Mr. Campbell, luckily, escaped with only few bruises. His carriage, however, was badly broken.

Hon. M. Sanford, the Catskill Democrat learns, is about taking up his permanent residence in that place and has already purchased a lot and contracted for the creation of a mansion thereon.

In the announcement of Col. Pratt’s return, which we published last week, the name of Mr. Danforth K. Frayer, of Prattville was erroneously published. Mr. Frayer returned from California some time since.

A Mr. Humphrey of Conesville, has purchased the tavern stand formerly occupied by Henry Kinsley, Esq., deceased, in the village of Ashland, and will open it soon as a public house.

RESCUED FROM DROWNING - A little son of Nathan G. Osborn, Esq., of this village, aged about three years, while playing on the bank of the creek on Saturday last, accidentally fell into the water and was carried down by the current some distance. By the merest chance, however, Mr. Osborn saw him in time to prevent death. Some five minutes elapsed after the child was rescued before any signs of life were visible.


March 27, 1860

FATAL ACCIDENT AT SHOKAN - We learn from the Ulster Democrat that on Saturday last, as Benjamin Traphagen was standing on the stoop of Mr. Cross’ store at Shokan, leaning upon the muzzle of a loaded gun and engaged in conversation, the butt of the gun slipped upon the floor and passing over the edge of the stoop, the hammer ignited the cap and the load went off and was lodged in Mr. Traphagen’s body. He clasped his hand over the wound and staggered into the store saying, “I am a dead man!” The blood soon began to flow out of his mouthy. His wife arrived just in time to see him die, which was only about two hours after the accident. He leaves a wife and three children. His age was about 35.

The village of Oak Hill on Wednesday last came very near being the scene of a disastrous conflagration. It appears that the Japan oven, in the furnace of Cherritree & Pierce, exploded carrying everything before it and setting fire to the furnace. The noise of the explosion was heard distinctly all over the village and resembled very much the report of a cannon. The workmen were gone to dinner, which was a very fortunate circumstance, for had any person been near the oven at the time of the explosion, it would have resulted in the loss of life. The fire at one time seemed almost determined to baffle the attempt of subduing it, but the citizens of the village worked with all the energy and resolution needed in such cases, and finally saved the buildings from the destroying element. The little fire engine of oak Hill did good execution and many say was the only means that saved the building. If this be so, much credit should be given to our young friend Aaron Thorpe for putting the machine in working order. When will our citizens make up their minds to procure a good fire engine? Let the matter be looked to without delay. We need two good engines - one for Durham and one for Oak Hill. Let there be meetings called immediately, for a matter so important should not be neglected.

Next week, I will give you some changes and some other matters which I hope will be interesting to the readers.

Yours, &c., PHOENIX


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