Rochester, Monroe, N. Y.
Rochester Daily Advertiser
July 19, 1843

DIED

On Monday Evening, the 17th inst., William ATKINSON, an old and highly respectable inhabitant of this city aged 53 years.
His funeral will be attended from the Washington street Church, this afternoon, at half past 2 o'clock. His friends and the citizens generally are respectfully invited to attend.

In Parma, on the 14th instant, Mrs. Olive, wife of Albert J. GOODELL, after a protracted and most painful illness, aged 23 years.
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MARRIED

In Geneseo, on the 12th inst., by the Rev. S. S. BROWN of Lakeville, Mr. Henry STRONG, to Miss Adaline WYNN, of Lakeville.

At Mt. Morris, on the 4th inst., by John WIGHTMAN, Esq., Mr. John RECTOR, aged 67, to Miss Sarah THOMPSON, aged 15, all of Mt. Morris.
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CRUSHED TO DEATH A German named Philip MENTZ, was killed near Buffalo on Saturday evening while passing under a bridge on board of a canal boat.
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MURDER IN BUFFALO On Saturday evening, about 8 o'clock, some sailors discovered the body of a man in Buffalo Creek, with the feet floating near the surface of the water, the head being kept down by a heavy stone attached to his neck. A coroner's inquest was held over him, when the most conclusive evidence was adduced that the person must have come to his death by violence, which was the verdict of the jury. The deceased was a German, between 40 and 50 years of age. A stone weighing between 40 and 60 lbs., was attached to his neck. A ???? contusion was found on the left temple though not sufficient to fracture the scull. We learn from the Gazette, from which we gather the above, that a man was arrested on Sunday evening on suspicion of being the murderer, and lodged in jail.
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A CAUTION TO BOYS - DROWNED - The following, from the Buffalo Gazette of Monday, should prove an admonition to boys who are more disposed to play about water than to attend to their books and school and of indulging in their own preferences, than to heed the advise of their parents "On Friday last, as George, son of Nelson JAMES, was playing in a small boat on Buffalo Creek, he fell overboard and was drowned. The body was recovered the same evening. Within the last few months, Death has been a visitor in the family of Mr. JAMES he having in less than a year buried his wife and two daughters, and now his only son has been snatched from him. The little fellow was in his tenth year, and was very fond of being about the water much more so than of his book or school. His father had often warned him of the danger to which he was exposing himself, and endeavored to destroy his taste for such amusement; but finding that impossible, he had made his arrangements to take him to some friends in Connecticut, where he would be less exposed than here. They were to have set out on Saturday morning; but instead of that, his father had to perform the melancholy duty of following him to the grave!"   GjS


July 20, 1843

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT We learn by a passenger who came up in the South American yesterday morning, that when near Caldwell's Landing, a small boat containing three persons was run under and one of them, a young man aged about 20 years, was drowned. The men had anchored out in the stream for the purpose of fishing. The S. A. as soon as she observed the boat, backed water, but it was too late.-- One of the small boats was immediately lowered, and every possible exertion made by the officers of the boat to rescue the men from a watery grave; but they succeeded in saving the lives of only two of them. - Citizen
The person drowned as we learned from the N. Y. Herald of yesterday, was Robert FITZGERALD, only child of Edward F., of New York. He was crossing the river in a ferry boat, from Caldwell's Landing to Peekskill. The two men with him were ferrymen.
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CATHERINE GILMOUR The examination into the alleged insanity of this individual, was finished on Saturday afternoon. Doctors NELSON, HOSACK, and CHILDS, being examined, testified that the accused was of sane mind. The commissioner decided at once that she should be put upon her examination, which by consent of counsel was to have taken place on Saturday
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STOLEN GOODS Another depot of stolen goods has been discovered.
A few evenings since a man and his wife, by the name of LEE, were arrested on charge of stealing clothes from the yard of Mr. BURGOIN, on Washington street. On searching their dwelling on Atkinson street, a large quantity of goods was found, consisting of wearing apparel of every description, a considerable portion of which lies at the Police Office, in charge of officer KINGSBURY, awaiting owners. Person's having lost property would do well to call.
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HORRID ACCIDENT AND DEATH The Buffalo Gazette of Tuesday, says --"Yesterday afternoon, a young man, named Luther HODGE, who was a hand in the oakum picking establishment at Black Rock Dam, of Ch. HOWARD, Esq., was instantly killed while engaged in oiling the machinery. He was mangled in a terrible manner. the main artery of the neck being severed, his lower jaw broken, and his left arm tore off close to the body, and run through the machine. He was 18 years of age, and a sober and industrious young man."
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The Belmont (Penn.) Repository narrates the history of a miser named Michl. BAIRD, who hanged himself at his farm near York, because some clover seed for which he had been offered $12 per bushel, and which he had refused, brought only eleven dollars at Philadelphia, where he had sent it to be sold. He had amassed a fortune of four hundred thousand dollars, not one cent of which was ever invested. His strong boxes on being opened by his heirs, turned out two hundred and thirty thousand dollars in gold and silver. The Repository does not state how many boxes there were, but it is a tough story at the best.
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RAILROAD ACCIDENT A colored boy who foolishly laid himself down on the rail road track about eighteen miles from Cumberland, Md., and there fell asleep, was run over on Thursday last by the upward train of cars, and had one of his legs and an arm cut entirely off. It was apprehended that the wounds might prove fatal, although medical aid was promptly secured. No blame attaches to any one except to the boy's own carelessness. It was impossible for the Conductor to check the locomotive sooner than he did.
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FROM THE WESTERN MOUNTAINS The St. Louis papers contain accounts from the Far West. A party of 200 Sioux Indians had marched to fight the Pawnees; and another band of from 1500 to 2000 Sioux were soon to proceed against the Snake and Crow Indians. A war party of Kanzas Indians had attacked a party of Pawnees, and killed three of their number. Three Pawnees had escaped to Sir William Drummond STEWART's party, and were protected by them from their pursuers. The Oregon Company had advanced as far as the Big Blue all well, and getting along smoothly. The Company comprises 990 in all, having 121 wagons and 1,967 head of cattle.   GjS

July 21, 1843

RIOT AND DEATH AT KINGSTON

An Orange celebration took place at Kingston on Wednesday last, which resulted in a serious riot between the Orangemen and Catholics. One young man by the name of MORRISON was shot dead, and two others were seriously wounded. The Police were out, and a strong detachment of the 23d British Regiment were brought to the scene of action a number of arrests were made, and order at length restored Oswego Herald.
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DIED

In this city, on the evening of the 18th instant, Harriet Amanda, only child of Perry and Amanda BABCOCK, aged 9 months and 4 days. Funeral this morning (Friday) at 9 o'clock from the residence of P. BABCOCK, No 3 Summit street. The friends of the family, and of John H. BABCOCK, are invited to attend.
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In the city of Boston, July 11, 1843, Mr. Nathaniel EMMONS, aged 84, an uncle of Ebenezer WATTS, of this city. Mr. EMMONS was truly of the olden time, and has gone from his friends, having left a reputation, a greater legacy than estates or untold gains. He was book-keeper at the Union Bank, Boston, for more than half a century, having proved a faithful servant to his trusts

In Palmyra, on the 13th instant, Mr. John L. SANFORD, aged 72 years.

In Williamson, on the 9th inst., Mr. Wm. CRAGG.

In Batavia, on the 14th inst., Henry J. PLANT, of Waterloo, aged 47

At Baton Rouge, La., on the 21st June, Mr. Phineas FISHER, formerly a resident of Warsaw, aged 32.

At Victor, on the 16th inst., of influenza, John POWELL, aged about 45.

On the 16th inst., of consumption, Sarah, wife of Leforest BOUGHTON, aged 53?

In Canandaigua, on the 2d inst., Mrs. Mary BROCKLEBANK, widow of the late Samuel BROCKLEBANK, aged 71 years. The deceased was one of the first that emigrated to this county. She removed with her husband from the town of New London, N. H., in March, 1791. Their locomotive was an ox team and sled, their canal and steamboat, the wild Indian's bark canoe, and their point of destination, the vicinity of Canandaigua, then the emigrants at Oneida, and the inland creeks being swollen by the spring freshet. Mrs. BROCKLEBANK was left with the friendly Indians, at that place. While there, Mrs. B. obtained a knowledge of the Indian language, which was of much service to her in after life. She was here during the last treaty with the Indians in 1791. The Indians were encamped in this vicinity, to the number of 1400 warriors, and with their imposing numbers, they evinced a disposition to menace the inhabitants. Mrs. B. shared, to an eminent degree, the qualities of the heroine, and on the occasion above alluded to, this characteristic was brought into requisition. On one occasion, while many of these fierce warriors were in her house; one of their number drew his terrible knife, and threatened the life of her then youngest child, (now Mr. J. B. BROCKLEBANK,) if she did not furnish them with more milk from her dairy: and this after she had bestowed all. Mrs. B. seized a chair, and with a courage and energy, that rendered her weapon formidable, soon cleared the room of her dangerous guests.
Mrs. BROCKLEBANK's piety was unostentatious and genuine. While her name stands associated with the sublimity and grandeur of the primitive forest, with the ennobling enterprise and industry of the early settlers, and with all that is rapid and consummate in the improvements of Western new York; a memorial, purer, happier and more enduring than the sentiment of affection, of the storied muse, may furnish, is hers, she rests in hope. PASTOR
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HOW TO BE RICH

Nothing is more easy says Mr. PAULDING, than to grow rich. It is only to trust nobody, to befriend none; to get everything, and save all we get; to stint ourselves and everybody belonging to us; to be the friend of no man, and have no man for our friend; to heap interest upon interest, cent upon cent; to be mean, miserable and despised for some twenty or thirty years, and riches will come as sure as will disease and disappointment.
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A MISTAKE It has been published in many of the papers that the Hon. Nathaniel B. BORDEN, late member of Congress from Rhode Island, who was considered to be worth 75,000 on the morning before the fire at Fall River, was in the evening penniless. This proves to be a mistake, and although Mr. BORDEN is a great sufferer, yet he did not lose the whole of his property; his loss is estimated at $25,000 Hudson Gazette.
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BOY KILLED A fine boy about nine years of age, son of a laborer working on the new bridge at Tonawanda, was instantly killed at that place on Saturday last, in consequence of having been run over by the railroad cars. It seems that while the cars were stopped there the boy got up behind them, as the locomotive backed up preparatory to leaving, he fell off and was instantly crushed. Buff. Com. Adv.   GjS

July 22, 1843

MARRIED

In St. James Church, Batavia, on the 28th ult., by the Rev. James A. BOLLES, Mr. John V. D. VERPLANK, to Miss Sarah E. CARY.
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DIED

At Eagle Harbor, on the 27th ult., Mrs. Amanda GRISWOLD, aged 41 years.
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LATEST NEWS

FIRE About 1 o'clock last night a fire broke out, opposite the U. S. Hotel Buffalo street, which did some considerable damage before the flames were subdued. The fire originated in the grocery store of Mr. McCALL on the corner, and proceeded one door below the store of Mr. J. B. DEWY, destroying four small wooden buildings. A part of the property destroyed was insured how much we did not learn.
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THE MORMONS A gentleman who left the Mormon City at Nauvoo a few days since, informs the editor of the Cincinnati Chronicle that of the 15,000 persons who make up the population of Nauvoo, about one third are of various religious denominations. The arrest of their leader, Joe SMITH, had caused a great excitement, and he confirms the previous statement that two parties of armed Mormons had left the city for the rescue of SMITH while on his way to Springfield, Illinois. He adds that all the gun-powder at Nauvoo had been made into ball cartridges, and even the women had been actively engaged in casting balls, and making cartridges.
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DEATH OF A LUNATIC BY DROWNING

Last Saturday morning, a female named Margaret OLIVER, a native of this city, aged 26, confined in the Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell's Island, was discovered to be missing, and it was supposed she had escaped. Yesterday morning, her body was discovered afloat in the East River, and conveyed to the residence of her friends, on Seventy-first street, near the Third Avenue. The Coroner held an inquest, and as it was believed that she had eluded the vigilance of her guards and purposely thrown herself into the water, the verdict was in accordance with these facts. Tribune.  GjS

July 24, 1843

DEATH BY LIGHTNING

On Monday evening, a young man named William N. COLBURN, was killed by lightning at the house of Miss E. RINGER, about two miles north west of this village. He was sitting near the window, and his death was instantaneous. He was from Collin Centre, Erie county, and had just arrived and engaged work, which he was to commence the next day. It is said that he dreamed the night before that he was struck by lightning, and that he exhibited great uneasiness from the commencement of the storm, His brother, who was sitting near him, was ??????, but not severely injured. Geneva Adv.
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FATAL ACCIDENT This morning, about 10 o'clock, Francis PIER, aged 24, a native of Germany, foreman for Frederick DUNN, fell from the building 115 Twelfth street, on which he was employed, and instantly expired. He was at work on the third story scaffolding, which gave way, and he fell to the cellar. Com. Adv.
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DEATH BY DROWNING

A young man named Anthony FORD, aged some 18 years, was drowned in the canal basin below the locks, in this village on Friday evening last. He had gone in to bathe was observed by his companions to draw himself up as if in a cramp and sink to the bottom was taken out in the course of ten or fifteen minutes, but not soon enough to save his life. Preserving efforts at resuscitation were unavailable. He was an apprentice to the Tailoring Business with Mr. ? VALENTINE, and was a lad of more than ordinary worth and promise. His parents reside in Hamilton, Canada. Niagara Cour.   GjS

July 26, 1843

SHOT The Dubuque Transcript says: Henry L. MASSEY, of Poiosi, W. T., was accidentally shot a few days since. A boy was shooting birds, and Mr. M. passed within the range of his piece, and received the ball through his body just above the hips, and it passed completely through. Little hope was entertained of his recovery.
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ATTEMPT TO SHOOT THEIR STEP-FATHER An attempt was made last week in Georgetown, D. C., by two brothers, Wm., and James O'BRIAN, to shoot their step-father, Bernard O'BRIAN, in consequence of some dispute about property formerly belonging to their father. They were fully committed.
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DEATH FROM EATING POISON HEMLOCK Died suddenly at Troy, on Saturday evening last, James Theodore, son of Mr. Sylvester BARKER, about 4 years old, from eating poisonous hemlock. The fate of this lad should serve as a caution to others. Boys are much in the habit of getting this weed, and using the stalk, (it being fistular) for purposes of amusement.    GjS

July 27, 1843

DIED

In this city, July 18th, in the 27th year of her age, Miranda A., wife of Orris SCOFIELD, and only daughter of Roswell ATCHINSON, Esq., of Parma Centre.       GjS

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The Daily Democrat
Rochester, NY
July 27, 1843
page 2

MARRIED:
In this city, on the 25th inst, at St. Luke's Church, by the Rev. Dr. H S. Whitehouse, DAVID BUSH, Jr., Esq., of Shiawassee, Michigan, to Miss, SUSAN, daughter of Roswell Lockwood, Esq., of Brighton, N. Y.

In this city, on the 26th inst., by the Rev. C. Dewey, Mr. WILLIAM SHARP, to Miss ELIZA PERRY.      RH


July 28, 1843

FATAL ACCIDENT A colored man, known on the dock by the soubriquet of "Martin Van Buren," was killed yesterday at the freight depot of the Albany and Boston Railway. He was engaged whitewashing the interior of the building, and endeavored to pass from one side of the depot to the other on a rafter, on which he was at work; he lost his balance, fell on the stone floor, broke his neck and crushed his scull in a dreadful manner. He died immediately. Alb. Adv.
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SAD ACCIDENT Mr. George D. DANA, son of Geo. DANO, Esq., of Boston, and Mr. James D. COFFIN, who kept a fancy goods store on Washington street, in that city, were drowned on Monday afternoon, by the capsizing of the pleasure boat Brilliant, in Boston harbor.
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DROWNED Yesterday morning a young man named SKINNER, a clerk in the store of Mr. PE??BERTON, grocer, while bathing in the river, was seized, as is supposed, with cramp, when beyond his depth, and, thought a good swimmer, was drowned before assistance could be rendered. His age, we learn was about 20. His parents reside in Preble, Cortland county. Argus
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OBITUARY The Virginia papers announce the death of Gen. Daniel CRUGER, formerly of Bath, Steuben county, N. Y. The deceased was once somewhat celebrated in the political affairs of this state; and his success affords a striking commentary upon the advantages enjoyed by those in humble life under our liberal institutions, if they have talent and energy for pushing their fortunes, and climbing to fame and affluence. General CRUGER was in early life a common postrider, from Hudson and Catskill into the Susquehannah county carrying the mail weekly on horseback, and selling newspapers and almanacs, &c. Fired with ambition to do something more and better, he studied law in Bath, and came to the bar. Thence he was returned to the Legislature, and was the famous Speaker of the yet more famous Legislature of 1815-16, in which, under the direction of Mr. VAN BUREN, usurped the government of this state by means of the vote of Peter ALLEN. For a long time afterward, that body was known as "the Peter ALLEN Legislature." Gen CRUGER had a bad part to act, but he executed it with talent and no lack of energy. Several years afterwards he removed to Virginia, where he married a widow lady and an estate. He was of course a strong partisan, but withal an amiable man N. Y. Com. Adv.    GjS

The Daily Democrat
Rochester, NY
July 29, 1843
page 2

NOTICE:
    The Ladies of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, on the east side of the river, will hold a FAIR in the north wing of Centre Market, on Tuesday afternoon and evening, 1st of August next, where a variety of useful and fancy article will be offered for sale. The whole will be conducted in a manner worthy of patronage. The attention of the community is respectfully solicited.
    Committee of Arrangements - Mrs. Dorsey, Mrs. Jointer, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Johnson, Mrs. McDonald and Mrs. Gibbs.
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MARRIED:
In Lakeville, on the 16th inst., by the Rev. S. S. Brown, Mr. Jacob R. Spanburgh, to Miss Catharine Pulver, of that town.

In Geneseo, on the 20th inst., by the same, Mr. Stephen Heath, to Miss Sarah Chamberlin, late of Hudson, Ohio.

DIED:
In this city, on the morning of the 28th instant, Mrs. Clarissa Beach, wife of Raphael Beach, aged 43 years.
    The friends of the family and citizens generally, are invited to attend her funeral this afternoon, at 2 o'clock, at his residence No. 45 Frank street.

In Mt. Morris, July 12th, Ellen Elizabeth, only daughter of C.L. Ketchum, aged 1 year 9 month 12 days.

In Geneseo, on the 20th inst., Frances E., daughter of B. W. Woodruff, aged 2 years and 12 days.

At the house of her daughter in Moscow, on the 17th inst., Mrs. Charity Norton Buell, wife of Deacon Timothy Buell, of East Bloomfield, Ontario co., aged 84.    RH


July 31, 1843

MELANCHOLY Benning HANSCOM was killed instantly at Great Falls, on Friday last, by an accident which occurred while at work with a circular saw. He had split a small piece of timber, leaving one part of it upon the bench by the side of the saw, and was putting on another piece when the saw struck the piece upon the bench and drove it through his left breast into his heart, producing death instantly. Belknap N. H. Gaz.
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GEORGE MUNDAY the bare-headed philanthropist, leaves New York this afternoon for Saratoga, vin. Albany. George will easily be distinguished at the fashionable watering places, by his bare head, his long hair and unshaven beard. We are informed that he goes to administer a few wholesome admonitions to the votaries of pleasure at the gay summer resorts. Sun. He arrived here yesterday afternoon in the Troy. Alb. Adv.
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