IN THEIR HONOR

WORLD WAR I SERVICEMEN

TOWN OF MANLIUS

Part I of II

Submitted by Kathy Crowell

* * *

Town of Manlius

Residents at the time of their decease

Pvt. Eric L. Coan -- Manlius -- died from wounds received in the Battle of Duck Valley, France -- 10/19/1918

Pvt. Jay E. Cross -- Eagle Village -- died of wounds received from a 3/19/1918 bomb explosion in France -- 3/20/1918

Pvt. Waite Alfred Cross -- Eagle Village -- killed in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, France -- 10/6/1918

Lieut. Clarence Ashley Dennis -- Fayetteville -- killed in action in the Battle of Belleau Woods, France -- 6/8/1918. (See also St. John's. Summer resident.)

Pvt. Patrick Hallissy -- Minoa memorial gold star

Pvt. Glen A. Moore -- Minoa -- died of influenza at Pelham Bay, N.Y. -- 10/4/1918

Sgt. Harold B. Perry -- Fayetteville -- died of pneumonia in France -- 11/22/1918

Pvt. Charles Skinner -- Fayetteville -- died of spinal meningitis at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S.C. -- 1/2/1918

Pvt. Floyd Stanard -- Fayetteville -- died of influenza in Syracuse, N.Y. -- 10/2/1918

Pvt. Henry R. Tyler -- Eagle Village -- killed in action at Chateau-Thierry, France -- 7/1/1918

Pvt. Archie Leroy Van Patten -- Manlius -- killed in action in France -- 8/20/1918

* * *

Town of Manlius

Former Residents

(Not St. John's School)

Corp. George D. Ainslie -- Killed in action during the battle of Duck Alley, France -- 9/29/1918.

Pvt. Luther C. Connell -- Killed in action in France -- 10/3/1918.

* * *

Town of Manlius

Former Residents

St. John's School

St. John's School Monument to former cadets and instructors who served during World War I. The monument is located at the Manlius-Pebble Hill School, Jamesville Rd., Jamesville, N.Y. The section fronting Jamesville Rd. is dedicated to those who died during the War.

A Tribute to the men of Saint John's

who in the spirit of Loyalty

served their country in the

World War : 1914 * 1918 : and

in loving memory of those inscribed below who

made the supreme sacrifice

Pvt. 1st Cl. Robert C. Blee 31st Engineers

Corp. Alexander da Silva 107th Infantry

Lieut. Clarence A. Dennis, D.S.C. 6th Reg. Marines *see town of Manlius

Capt. Charles D. Harris, D. S. C. 6th Engineers

Capt. Gifford D. Horton 98th Squadron, R.F.C.

Lieut. Lyle G. Hubbard Air Service

Pvt. Harold T. Lay 106th Infantry

Pvt. Harold L. Lindsay London Scottish

Pvt. Edward L. Lycett Air Service

Pvt. Benjamin Q. Mastin 303rd Engineers

Fly'g Cad't J. Lawrence McKeever Air Service

Sgt. Lester W. Ogilvie 112th Infantry

Pvt. Leonard Osborn Infantry

Lieut. David B. Page 56th Engineers

Lieut. George S. Shepard 18th Infantry

Pvt. Henry W. Suhr Q.M.C.

Ensign Francis W. Thompson U.S.N.

Pvt. Kenneth G. West 107th F.A.

Corp. Homer Wheaton, D.S.C. 101st Infantry

Corp. J. McVickar Whitney Tank Corps

Erected 1922

* * *

Distinguished Service Cross: Robert L. Denig, Clarence A. Dennis,

Homer J. Wheaton

Distinguished Flying Cross: Frank Lucien Hale

Croix de Guerre: Robert L. Denig, Lewis R. Sherwood, Samuel L. Shober, Jr.

British War Cross: Frank M. Mitchell

French Legion of Honor: Daniel Bender

* * *

The following list is as complete to date as possible. It is restricted to those who were residents or were former residents of the town of Manlius to Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, but does include those men who served in the student corps and military reserves. While it is true that other World War I servicemen moved into the town after this date, they are not part of this collection. St. John's students and instructors who were at the school prior to War's end, and who participated in the War, are included because they resided in the town of Manlius while attending the school.

It is clear that as early as 1918 the Board of Supervisors of Onondaga Co. already lacked sufficient information to make war records correct. While the town of Manlius may be given credit for some servicemen, some resided outside of the town boundary, but their post office address was either Fayetteville or Manlius. Where this occurs, or where there are questions regarding source reliability, the name is preceded by a question mark. If you know a missing name, find incorrect data or want to add information, please contact me so that this record can be as accurate as possible. Compiled by Kathy Crowell, 1997. E-mail: LCrow10101@aol.com. Snail mail: Manlius Historical Society, 109 Pleasant St., Manlius, NY 13104.

* * *

Abston, Dunbar. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ackerman, Roswell Edward. Fayetteville. "Roswell Ackerman, son of George Ackerman of this village (Fayetteville), has enlisted in the ground service of the Aviation Corps and left Tuesday for a training camp in Texas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. Harry Ackerman, deceased is survived by one sister, Mrs. Golden Jennings of New York and two brothers, William of Syracuse, and "R. Edward, who is in the Flying Corps at Fort Worth, Tex.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918.

Ackerman, Warren. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Acne, Henry R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army

Adams, Carroll S. Manlius. Teacher, Fayette St., Rural Directory of Onondaga County, 1917; "Carroll Adams, eldest son of Mrs. Nellie Adams, who enlisted in the United States Marines, left Monday with the Syracuse contingent for Paris Island," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/25/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "In a letter to his mother, Mrs. Nellie Adams, Private Carrol Adams states that he is still in France, with no prospect of a speedy return. He is studying the French language in his spare time," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/7/1919. "Carroll Adams, an enlisted U. S. Marine, who has lately served with the army of occupation in Germany, arrived at the home of his mother, Mrs. Nellie Adams, Tuesday evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/15/1919. "John Hale of the U. S. Marine Corps was given a welcome home reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Wetmore Thursday evening, which was attended by two other returned overseas men, Carrol Adams and Albert Mawson," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery Aug. 28, 1921, b. 1896, d. 1921, ae. 25; fa. Rev. William H.; mo. Nellie Strong.

Ainslie, George D. "Corp. George D. Ainslee, a former Manlius boy, Company C, 108th Infantry, was killed in action, during the battle of Duck Alley, September 29th, according to a letter received by his father, Thomas Ainslee of Taberg. His brother, Tracy Ainslee, was wounded in the same action. Sergt. William Ridings, a boyhood playmate, wrote the letter, in which he stated that Corporal Ainslee was first shot with a sniper's bullet and later blown to pieces by a high explosive shell," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. "The 108th Infantry, Twenty-seventh division which includes many Manlius boys, has won the most coveted honor on the field of battle. Major General O'Ryan has cited the entire regiment for the 'exceptional valor of officers and men.' Following the main battle of Duck Valley on September 29th-October 2d, when the Hindenburg line was pierced for the first time, the 108th infantry returned to the line October 14th and again on October 17th. It was withdrawn from action October 21st and so far as can be learned it has been in no engagement since that time. The men of the Twenty-seventh division of the American army, who are coming home soon and who include the former Syracuse units of the National Guard, have received, through their commander, a letter of praise from Field Marshal Haig for the brave manner in which they shattered the Hindenburg line Sep. 29," The Fayetteville Bulletin, November 29, 1918. Kirkville Cemetery, 1897-1918, Corp. Co. A(?), 108 Inf.

Ainslie, Tracy. "Bugler Tracy Ainslee, son of Thomas Ainslee of Syracuse, formerly of Manlius, is reported missing in one of the recently military engagements in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. "Corp. George D. Ainslee, a former Manlius boy, Company C, 108th Infantry, was killed in action, during the battle of Duck Alley, September 29th, according to a letter received by his father, Thomas Ainslee of Taberg. His brother, Tracy Ainslee, was wounded in the same action. " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. "The 108th Infantry, Twenty-seventh division which includes many Manlius boys, has won the most coveted honor on the field of battle. Major General O'Ryan has cited the entire regiment for the 'exceptional valor of officers and men.' Following the main battle of Duck Valley on September 29th-October 2d, when the Hindenburg line was pierced for the first time, the 108th infantry returned to the line October 14th and again on October 17th. It was withdrawn from action October 21st and so far as can be learned it has been in no engagement since that time. The men of the Twenty-seventh division of the American army, who are coming home soon and who include the former Syracuse units of the National Guard, have received, through their commander, a letter of praise from Field Marshal Haig for the brave manner in which they shattered the Hindenburg line Sep. 29," The Fayetteville Bulletin, November 29, 1918. Kirkville Cemetery listing, b. 1893.

Alexander, Harold J. Manlius. "Harold Alexander has enlisted in the U. S. army and left Syracuse today for Fort Slocum," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Stationed at Paris Island, North Carolina, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Res. 116 Academy St., 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery Oct. 4, 1960, ae. 59.

Alger, M. P. St. John's School cadet. Later North Bend, OR resident. Captain at Philippine Constabulary when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. Name not on World War I monument at Manlius-Pebble Hill School, Jamesville Rd., Jamesville, N.Y.

Allen, Alfred. Fayetteville. "Alfred Allen has returned from Yale S. A. T. C. camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Allen, Leonard S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Allen, Wharton. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Allen, William S. Fayetteville. "Signed up July 24, 1918 at Solvay, N.Y., his local address at the time being (vol. 2) Fayetteville, N.Y., R.F.D. #2. He was inducted into service at Camp Dix and served as a private in the 41st Infantry, 153rd Depot Brigade. Discharge as a Private was received at Camp Dix November 1918," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Alling, John W., 2nd. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Ames, Frederick W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Anderson, Sparling Bernadotte. St. John's School cadet, graduate class of 1917. U. S. Marine Corps. From Ottumwa, Iowa, known as "Hick." "Appointed Second Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps," The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 17. "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. The other cadets who have been recommended by General Verbeck at the request of the government are: ...Sparling Anderson of Ottumwa, Ia... Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917.

Argen, Joseph. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Armstrong, Donald. Fayetteville. "Walter W. Cheney, jr., of Manlius and Donald Armstrong and Charles R. Skinner of this village (Fayetteville), were among the members of Troop D who were mustered back into federal service at the State Armory in Syracuse Sunday night. The Troop is now mobilized and awaiting orders for guard duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/6/1917. "Sergeant Donald Armstrong, Corporal W. W. Cheney, jr., and Charles R. Skinner left Thursday with Troop D for Peekskill where the Troop has been assigned to work in guarding a certain section of the Catskills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "Sergeant Donald Armstrong has passed the required examination for commissioned officers and has won a commission as first lieutenant in cavalry. As soon as he receives his commission he will be discharged from the troop," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/20/1917. "Captain Merwin Armstrong who is with the Officers' Reserve Corps at Madison Barracks and Sergeant Donald Armstrong of Peekskill are home for the week-end," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Sergeant Donald Armstrong of Troop D, is home from Peekskill on a furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Merwin Armstrong, Captain of Engineers in the Officers' Reserve Corps and Sergeant Donald Armstrong of Troop D, stationed at Peekskill, are spending a short furlough at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Donald Armstrong, Camp Wadsworth..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Sergeant, Co. D, 104th Machine Gun Battalion (as of 1/4/1918). "Sergeant Donald Armstrong of the 104th Machine Gun Battalion is one of the three sergeants from Onondaga county to be selected as eligible to attend the Spartanburg Reserve Officers' Training Camp. Sergeant Armstrong, who is a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong, will likely win a commission within the next few months," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "Sergeant Donald Armstrong of Camp Wadsworth was a guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong over Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Charles O'Brien, Ernest Hotaling and Wilbur Mason have been transferred to Newport News, embarkation point for southern camps and it is believed that Lieut. Donald Armstrong sailed from that port last Thursday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Lieut. Donald Armstrong was on one of the transports in the convoy carrying the 27th Division which was attacked by submarines a few weeks ago. After launching three torpedoes without success the submarines were driven away by the destroyers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Captain Merwin Armstrong arrived Thursday at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong, after having arrived in New York Monday on the Rotterdam and having received his discharge Tuesday in Washington. His return from overseas was hurried by a cablegram announcing the critical illness of his father. Lieutenant Donald Armstrong is expected to arrive in New York in a few days. All red tape was cut by sympathy officers to allow the boys a speedy return," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919. "Lieutenant Donald Armstrong wired his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong, Thursday from Newport News announcing his safe arrival at that port from overseas. He is expected to arrive home today or tomorrow," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/7/1919. "Lieut. Donald Armstrong returned to Camp Upton Saturday evening, after having been called home by the funeral of his father, A. T. Armstrong," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/21/1919. "Lieutenant Donald M. Armstrong who received his discharge from service last Friday has been elected president of the A. T. Armstrong Insurance Company to succeed his father, the late A. T. Armstrong, and will continue the policies which his father had followed ever since the business was started twelve years ago. Collin Armstrong, an older son of the firm's founder, has been elected vice-president...Donald Armstrong returned recently from France where he served as first lieutenant of Company B, 104th Machine Gun Battalion, taking part in all the noted battles that marked the close of the war," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/14/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Armstrong, Hamilton. Fayetteville. "Hamilton Armstrong, who was home from the Virginia Military Institute last week, has entered the Plattsburg reserve officers' training camp, " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Hamilton Armstrong of the Virginia Military Institute is home from Plattsburg where he has been at the officers' training camp the past month," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. A half a dozen Fayetteville boys expect to enter the Student Army Training Corps at Syracuse University. Those who have made application to enter the corps are ...Hamilton Armstrong...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. "Hamilton Armstrong, Ira Ellis, Francis Sutter, Hugh Carey and Thomas Kinsella have been discharged from the student officers' training corps at Syracuse University which demobilized Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Armstrong, Harry. St. John's School, former instructor.

Armstrong, Merwin. Fayetteville. Civil engineer, Genesee St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., N.Y., 1917. "Merwin Armstrong, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong, who has had charge of levee construction work in Tennessee is now at Madison Barracks having received a commission as captain in the Engineers' Corps as a result of recent examination," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Captain Merwin Armstrong who is with the Officers' Reserve Corps at Madison Barracks and Sergeant Donald Armstrong of Peekskill are home for the week-end," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "The Engineer Corps to which Merwin Armstrong was assigned at Madison Barracks, has been transferred to Washington," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. "Merwin Armstrong, Captain of Engineers in the Officers' Reserve Corps and Sergeant Donald Armstrong of Troop D, stationed at Peekskill, are spending a short furlough at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Capt. Merwin Armstrong, Eng., Corps, Camp Meade, Md...." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Captain, Co. D, 105th Engineer Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "Captain Merwin Armstrong of the 105th Engineers is spending a few days at his home before leaving for the front," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "Captain Merwin Armstrong, son of Chairman A. T. Armstrong of County Board No. 2, addressed the assembled 'selects' at the Court House headquarters Tuesday before they entrained for Camp Dix. Captain Armstrong who is of the One Hundred and Fifth Engineers, told the young men that every chance for promotion lies before them if they behave and show interest in their work. He told them that the longer they stay in service the better they will like it," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong returned Monday from New York where they went on Friday to bid farewell to their son, Captain Merwin Armstrong before he went overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong have received word that their son Captain Merwin Armstrong of the Engineers' Corps has arrived safely overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Captain Merwin Armstrong arrived Thursday at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Armstrong, after having arrived in New York Monday on the Rotterdam and having received his discharge Tuesday in Washington. His return from overseas was hurried by a cablegram announcing the critical illness of his father. Lieutenant Donald Armstrong is expected to arrive in New York in a few days. All red tape was cut by sympathy officers to allow the boys a speedy return," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919. "Presbyterian-Baptist news, Fayetteville: "...The feature of the evening was the after supper address of Captain Merwin Armstrong, who spoke of his experiences in France. We all heard Captain Armstrong's straightforward modest address with great pleasure. From Captain Armstrong's address one would not suspect that he himself had played a distinguished part in France. Some of Mr. Armstrong's friends, however, happen to know that we all have reason to be proud of the work he did there," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/7/1919. "Captain Merwin Armstrong gave an interesting account of his experiences in France Tuesday night at the meeting of Fayetteville lodge, F. & A. M., The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/14/1919. "Capt. Merwin Armstrong of Fayetteville and Lieutenant Guido Verbeck of Manlius have been named by Lieutenant Col. John B. Tuck as members of the organized post in the county," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Arnold, William E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ashley, Edward M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Atkinson, Benjamin W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Atwood, Kimball C., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Auchampau, Harold. Kirkville. Air inspector, R2, 30 acres, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., N.Y., 1917. To go to Camp Devens, MA 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918.

Ayers, Edwin White. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1914, known as "Bo," from Washington, N.C.

Babcock, Robert Simeon. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Bab," from Chicago, IL. U. S. Navy. "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. The other cadets who have been recommended by General Verbeck at the request of the government are: ...Robert S. Babcock of Chicago, Ill... Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917.

Bacon, Fred Francis. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1909, known as "Freddie," from Syracuse, N.Y.

Baer, John Francis. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1916, known as "Jack," from Oriskany, N.Y.

Bailey, Benjamin Mart. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Col. Benjamin Mart Bailey 2nd Division was cited in reports of the 52nd French Division," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 27. "Eight months on front in France. In battles Maisey, Apr. 13th; Chateau-Thierry, June 3rd; Belleau Woods, June 6th and 7th; Bouresches, June 8th and 9th; Vaux, July 1st; Soissons, July 18th to 25th, "The Wind Mill, December 1918, p. 15.

Bailey, Claude L. Manlius. "Signed up August 26, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at the time being Manlius, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Gordon, Ga., serving as a Private in Co. 19, 153rd Depot Brigade. Discharge as a mechanic was received February 3, 1919 at Camp Dix. present address is 515 S. Warren Street," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Balcom, Samuel B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

Ball, John S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ballantyne, Dr. Reginald M. Manlius. "Lieutenant R. M. Ballantyne, Corporal W. W. Cheney and several new members of the Seneca Club were tendered a reception at the club rooms Monday evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne of this village (Manlius) expects to enter the medical corps of the U. S. Army. He took the required examinations a few weeks ago and is now expecting his commission which will give him rank of a lieutenant or captain with chance for promotion. He is preparing to move to Syracuse on July 1 where he will store his goods and where Mrs. Ballantyne will make her home with her parents for the present. Having seen less than a year's military service, Dr. Ballantyne served in four companies the past year while on the Texan border. When the New York militia was called to the colors last June Dr. Ballantyne was a first lieutenant in the Medical Corps of the First Field Artillery, attached to Battery A of Syracuse. When the New Yorkers left for the border he was informed that because of some technicality he must remain in New York State. Assignment to the battery's depot unit was suggested. This did not fit in with Dr. Ballantyne's plans. He wanted active service and active service he must have. So he quietly filed his resignation, which in due course was accepted. Shortly afterward Capt. Chester King of Troop D, First Cavalry, swore in Private Reginald Ballantyne. At McCallen, Tex., there was a dearth of medical officers and after several months Private Ballantyne was transferred to the Fourth New York Ambulance Company and inside of a month Dr. Ballantyne was again wearing the gold and black hatcord of a commissioned officer. From the ambulance company he went to the Fourth Heavy Artillery of Buffalo and it was with the latter's outfit he returned to Buffalo. A short time ago he was transferred back to the Ambulance Corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/1/1917. "Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne has received orders to report to the Medical corps training camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, between June 18 and 20. At present Dr. Ballantyne is surgeon with rank of lieutenant in the Fourth Ambulance Corps but hopes soon to receive a better appointment. The doctor's varied military duty has proven disastrous for a wide practice which he had built during his comparatively short stay in Manlius, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917. "Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne received notice today of his appointment to the medical corps of the regular army and to report to the state expansion camp in Syracuse to be mustered into the service. Dr. Ballantyne had been expecting to be ordered to the training camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, to await a commission in the army but the new order waves going to the training camp for his commission," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. "Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne of Manlius, now first lieutenant of the Fourth Ambulance Company, Syracuse, has been appointed military instructor for the second medical corps camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, Ind., where he will remain for some time," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. "A daughter was born to Lieut. and Mrs. R. M. Ballantyne of Manlius, who are now at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C., according to a message received by relatives in Syracuse Saturday, " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Lieut. Reginald M. Ballantyne, formerly of Manlius, has become First Lieutenant of Ambulance Company 105, One Hundred and Second Sanitary Train, at Camp Wadsworth," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "First Lieut. Reginald M. Ballantyne of Manlius, 105th Ambulance Company, has received notification that he had been promoted to the rank of captain and assigned to the same company at Camp Wardsworth," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "Capt. R. M. Ballantyne, M. C., formerly of this village has arrived overseas with Ambulance Co. No. 105, of the 102nd Sanitary Train," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "According to letters received in Syracuse, members of the One Hundred and Fifth Ambulance Company, which includes Captain Reginald Ballantyne of Manlius escaped death by a matter of minutes when a time mine left by the retreating Germans blew up a railroad crossing on the day the Syracusans moved back from the front to a rest camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. "Raymond D. Balsley writes of his safety in France and of meeting Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne and Frank Battle, Jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "A number of Manlius soldiers arrived in New York this week from overseas with the 27th Division. These include Captain Reginald Ballantyne of the 105th Ambulance company, Q. M. Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle of the 102d Ammunition Train and Private Coburn Goodfellow of Company C. The men are all now at Camp Merritt and will come home after the big parade of the 27th Division in New York on March 22. The 105th Ambulance Company of the 102d Sanitary Train saw much service, even though it did not get right behind the big guns. It stayed at Brest most of the time, loading wounded soldiers onto transports...From Brest the company went to Rosel and was there just five days within sound of the guns when the kaiser quit. Then the men went to a rest camp at Corbie. The town had been all 'shot up.' No civilians were left in it, and the place which had a population of perhaps 30,000 was as vacant as a garret. The ambulance company and the other men sent there had it all to themselves. The 102 Ammunition Train, after training all summer near Bordeaux was sent to the front September 1. They got into battle about four miles from Verdun and kept the guns supplied until the armistice was signed. They ploughed over all kinds of roads day and night. They were in the St. Mihiel drive and in the great battle of Dun-Sur-Meuse on Nov. 1-3. The Ammunition Train was in many of the hottest campaigns, but the nearest it came to a casualty was when a 'freight car' shell demolished a truck in which a driver, a helper and five passengers were riding," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919. "Captain Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne who was in town last week, says he will resume his interrupted medical practice in Manlius providing he can obtain rooms for office and home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/25/1919. "Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne, who recently returned from duty overseas, has leased a part of the Loomis house in Seneca street and expects soon to re-open his Manlius office," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/9/1919. "By an order received at the armory Tuesday the commanding officer of the National Guard in New York State has given Capt. Reginald Ballantyne the power to organize an ambulance company to take the place of Company T of the Third Infantry, N. Y. G., which is demobilized by the same order. Capt. Ballantyne will start a campaign for recruits immediately. Company T was formed as a replacement company when the old Fourth Ambulance Company was ordered into Federal service in 1917. Many of the old members who returned from France after being made the One Hundred and Fourth Ambulance Company," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/18/1919. "At the meeting of the local post of the American Legion Friday night Dr. Reginald Ballantyne was elected a delegate to the County meeting. So far only thirty-three returned soldiers have joined the Manlius Post. Although some sixty are eligible for membership. The mission of the post is entirely to benefit its members and their country and the officers are wondering why more are not taking interest in it. Meetings are held every other Friday night," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. 403 Seneca St., 1927 Manlius Directory.

Balsley, Raymond. Manlius. Mail clerk, Moulter St., Manlius, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., N.Y., 1917. "Raymond Balsley, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Balsley of Manlius, a New York mail clerk, has enlisted in the French Mail Service with rank of second lieutenant, for a term of five years. France's full quota of mail clerks is 3,500 and that of Germany 2,500," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/13/1917. "Ray Balsley, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Balsley has enlisted in the Signal Corps and left Wednesday for the training camp at Leavenworth, Kas.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918. "First Class Private, Raymond G. (?) Balsley, field signal battalion service, Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass., younger son of Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Balsley, spent a part of a sixty-hour furlough at home Saturday and Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Balsley and children, Vernon and Dorothy of North Syracuse joined their brother during his stay in town, which probably preludes a call overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Balsley have been notified of the safe arrival of their son, Raymond G. (?) Balsley, overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Raymond D. (?) Balsley writes of his safety in France and of meeting Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne and Frank Battle, Jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Private Raymond Daniel Balsley of the Signal Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Balsley, is expected to reach home at any time, having sent word of his arrival at Camp Mills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919. "Raymond G. Balsley, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Balsley, has received his discharge from military service and is spending some time with his parents before resuming his duties in Civil Service. Private Balsley was a member of the Fifth Corps and was in active service in the Argonne and St. Mihiel offensives, from August 27, until the signing of the armistice," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/20/1919. 107 North St., R. R. mail clerk, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Barber, Albert C. Manlius. Reported as having enlisted in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917.

Barden, Claude L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. Graduate class of 1917, known as "Pop," from Agawam, Miss, The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 18.

Barker, Frederick A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps. Major in U. S. Marines, France when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Barnaba, Vito Nicola. Fayetteville. "Signed up July 24, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at the time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Camp Dix, serving as a Private with Battery C, 334 Field Artillery also 4th Co. 152nd Depot Brigade. He saw foreign service from August 25, 1918 to February 22, 1919. Discharge as a Private was received March 8, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Barnum, Howard F. Manlius. Shipping clerk, Pleasant St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Howard Barnum enlisted Friday in the munitions depot unit and left at once for the arsenal at Rock Island, Ill., where he will act as inspector of munitions until assigned to overseas duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. "Howard Barnum, who is now in the ordnance Service at the U.S. Arsenal at Rock Island, Ill., expects to leave with an overseas contingent in a few weeks. When he gets somewhere in France he will be established in an American arsenal some twenty miles behind the firing lines," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "Howard Barnum writes Manlius friends that he has been transferred from the Rock Island Arsenal to Ft. Dodge, Ia., for intensive training preparatory to going overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/15/1918. "Howard Barnum, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. Barnum, of Manlius is now on his way overseas, according to advices received by his family," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Barnum received word this morning announcing the safe arrival of their son, Howard F. Barnum, overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Private Howard Barnum, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Barnum, has been promoted to Sergeant in the U. S. army of occupation in Germany," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, 1891-1936, buried Oct. 17, 1936, ae. 45-18.

Barroll, Joseph R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Barrows, Raymond E. Fayetteville. "Signed up April 2, 1918 at Manlius, N.Y., his address at the time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into service serving as a Private with Co. F 311th Infantry. Discharge as a Corporal was received January 20, 1919 at Camp Dix," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Bartholomew, William V. H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bartlett, Frederick H. "Major Frederick H. Bartlett of New York, U. S. A. Medical Corps visited his brother, Dr. D. F. Bartlett Thursday. Major Bartlett reports at Camp Jackson, S. C. next Thursday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. Former Fayetteville resident.

Battle, Anthony. Fayetteville. "...on Thursday Anthony Battle enlisted in the army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/18/1917.

Battle, Frank Howard, Jr. Manlius. Wholesale fruit dealer, Fayette St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Frank Battle, Leonard Kantak and Carl Shafer have enlisted in the munition supply corps and expect soon to be employed as chauffeurs on trucks hauling munitions from the railroads to the trenches in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Frank Battle...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex and son of Fayetteville are making their home with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Battle during the absence of Frank Battle, Jr., who is serving in the army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/21/1917. "Frank Battle is home from Camp Wadsworth on an eighteen-days furlough. He has gained over ten pounds in weight and speaks highly of food and sanitary arrangements of camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917. "The...picture of Private Frank H. Battle jr., Company C, Motor Truck Section, 102nd Ammunition Train, Camp Wadsworth, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Battle, was taken on his return from an automobile truck trip through muddy roads, during which time he was 60 hours without sleep. Private Battle reports good food, good treatment and a desire to do his bit over-seas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Frank Battle received a telegram Wednesday from their son, Frank, that he had just arrived at Camp Stewart and was expecting to go overseas in a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "According to a letter received Monday from Leonard Kantak, it is likely that he and Frank Battle, who are both Manlius boys, are just now watching for periscopes. The letter follows: An Atlantic Port, May 29, Dear Editor: Having a few moments to spare I thought I would let you and the people of Manlius know that Frank Battle and I are still on this side of the big pond," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Raymond D. Balsley writes of his safety in France and of meeting Dr. Reginald M. Ballantyne and Frank Battle, Jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Frank Battle have received word from their son, Frank Battle, Jr. that he is still in France, in good health and looks forward to an early return to the States," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Private Wilbur Mason writes Fayetteville friends from Viserny, France that things do not look very encouraging for his early return. A few days before the letter was written he says he saw Sergeant Chester W. Madison, Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle while they were on their way to port of embarkation for their homeward trip," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "A number of Manlius soldiers arrived in New York this week from overseas with the 27th Division. These include Captain Reginald Ballantyne of the 105th Ambulance company, Q. M. Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle of the 102d Ammunition Train and Private Coburn Goodfellow of Company C. The men are all now at Camp Merritt and will come home after the big parade of the 27th Division in New York on March 22. The 105th Ambulance Company of the 102d Sanitary Train saw much service, even though it did not get right behind the big guns. It stayed at Brest most of the time, loading wounded soldiers onto transports...From Brest the company went to Rosel and was there just five days within sound of the guns when the kaiser quit. Then the men went to a rest camp at Corbie. The town had been all 'shot up.' No civilians were left in it, and the place which had a population of perhaps 30,000 was as vacant as a garret. The ambulance company and the other men sent there had it all to themselves. The 102 Ammunition Train, after training all summer near Bordeaux was sent to the front September 1. They got into battle about four miles from Verdun and kept the guns supplied until the armistice was signed. They ploughed over all kinds of roads day and night. They were in the St. Mihiel drive and in the great battle of Dun-Sur-Meuse on Nov. 1-3. The Ammunition Train was in many of the hottest campaigns, but the nearest it came to a casualty was when a 'freight car' shell demolished a truck in which a driver, a helper and five passengers were riding," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919. 201 Fayette St., mgr. Socony Station, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, b. 1894, d. 1954; buried Sep. 14, 1954, ae. 59-11-12.

Baum, Paul Jarvis. Fayetteville. "Paul Baum of Syracuse, a former resident of Fayetteville, who saw service on the border with Troop D, left Syracuse Thursday with the last contingent for Fort Slocum, " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag; enlisted in the Heavy Artillery at Fort Slocum, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Paul Baum is home from the officers' training camp at Camp Zachary Taylor on a ten-day furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Sergeant Paul Jarvis Baum, who has been home on a ten-day furlough returned Sunday to Camp McClellan, Alabama, where he is attached to Battery F, 35th Field Artillery. Sergeant Baum expects soon to be released from service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Paul Baum, who was recently discharged from service at Camp Taylor, Ky., has accepted a position with the Perpetual Tire company of Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Bauter, Chester. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bemus, William M., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bender, Daniel William. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Dan" and "Nippa," from Jersey City, N.J. U. S. Marine Corps. "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. The other cadets who have been recommended by General Verbeck at the request of the government are: ...Dan Bender of Jersey City, N.J. Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "It is understood that Lieut. Daniel Bender, 66th Co., 5th Regiment U. S. Marine Corps, was recommended for the French Legion of Honor," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 27. Legion of Honor, The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

Benedict, Claude B. Fayetteville. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Peter Wein and Claude Benedict were home from Camp Dix for the Fourth," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. "Claude Benedict was home from Camp Dix the past week, returning Wednesday, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. "Claude Benedict has been released from service and returned Wednesday from Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. "Ray Hayes, former conductor on the Suburban, of Camp Gordon, Georgia, and Claude Benedict of Camp Dix, N. J. have both received their discharge and are now spending a few days in Washington before returning home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. General store, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, buried Mar. 15, 1981, ae. 91.

Benedict, Douglas. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bennett, Joseph Campbell. St. John's School cadet. Graduate, class of 1917. Known as "Hoe," and "Cracker." From Brunswick, Ga. "Appointed Second Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps," The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 19. "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. The other cadets who have been recommended by General Verbeck at the request of the government are: Joseph C. Bennett of Brunswick, Ga...Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917.

Benton, Ernest Whipley. St. John's School. "Ernest Whipley Benton, Ordnance Sergeant at the Manlius Schools, was married Saturday to Miss Nellie May Lovell of Syracuse...Mr. Benton belongs to the regular army in which he ranks as sergeant and he has been ordnance office at the Manlius schools since summer. He has known his sweetheart during the greater part of his stay in this section and when the war was declared, he decided to get married right away. The bridegroom has been in every country of the globe except Egypt and has served under many noted commanders, among them General Funston. He has been quartered at the Jefferson barracks in Missouri, at the Praesidio, in San Francisco, in Manila and other parts of the Philippine Islands, in Havana and in China where he served as one of the guards to the American ambassador during the Boxer uprising. He spent part of one year in Alaska," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917.

Berendsohn, Siegmund. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Bernard, Tony. Minoa. "Signed up August 2, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Minoa, N.Y., P.O. Box 249. He was inducted into service at (Vol. 2) Camp Upton, serving as a Private, Co. C 4th Dev. Battalion. Discharge as a Private was received December 6, 1918 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Bernard, Vincent. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bevens, Frederick P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Biddle, John C., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1909, known as "Mike," from Fountain Springs, PA.

Biddle, Robert McReynolds. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1909, from Fountain Springs, PA.

Billington, Myron F. Kirkville or Chittenango. "He signed up Oct. 22, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address being Kirkville, N.Y. (Vol. 1) or Chittenango, N.Y. (Orig.). He was inducted into the Army serving as a Private with the 7th Co., 153rd Depot Brigade. He was discharged as a private, Dec. 15, 1918 at Camp Dix," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Birdseye, Mortimer Buell. Fayetteville. "The wedding of Miss Mabel Florence Sherwood and Mortimer Buell Birdseye took place Saturday evening at the residence of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sherwood in Clinton st.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917. "Alfred L. Coe has returned from Fort Niagara where he has been undergoing tentative training but failed in admission to the officers' class. He reports M. B. Birdseye and Claude Carey two Fayetteville boys in the camp looking fine and enjoying their work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/12/1917. "Captain Mortimer B. Birdseye will be the speaker at the meeting of the Presbyterian Brotherhood this evening telling of his experiences at the training camp at Fort Niagara," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Mortimer B. Birdseye of this village was one of the four from this county to receive captains' commissions at Fort Niagara last week. He was assigned to Camp Upton, Yaphank, L. I. Mr. Birdseye, who resigned his position at assistant manager in the Fairbanks store in Syracuse to follow his country's call, is a son of the late Colonel Mortimer B. Birdseye, who was known as one of Onondaga's bravest fighters during the Civil War. Captain Birdseye, who is now at his home here will report at Camp Upton two weeks from today," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Capt. Mortimer B. Birdseye, Camp Upton, Yaphank..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. At the November 30th meeting (of the Fayetteville Red Cross), "Captain M. B. Birdseye gave an outline of the work of the officers' training Camp at Fort Niagara," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917. Captain, Camp Upton (as of 1/4/1918). "Captain Mortimer Birdseye of this village, has been recently transferred from Camp Yaphank, Long Island, to cavalry service at Fort Ethan Allan, Vt., "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Captain Mortimer B. Birdseye of Fort Ethan Allen is spending a few days at his home before leaving for the front," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "Mrs. Mortimer Birdseye has returned from Fort Ethan Allen and will spend the winter with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sherwood. Captain Birdseye has been transferred to Oklahoma," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918. "A son, Mortimer B. Birdseye Jr., was born to Captain and Mrs. Mortimer B. Birdseye April 4, at the Onondaga hospital, Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/11/1919. "Captain Mortimer B. Birdseye is home from Fort Sill, Oklahoma, on a few days' furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/16/1919. "Captain Mortimer B. Birdseye returned Monday to Camp Taylor, Louisville, after spending the week with his family," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919."Capt. M. B. Birdseye has returned to Washington, D. C. after spending a few days in town," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1919. "Lieut. Mortimer B. Birdseye, Mrs. Birdseye and small son, accompanied by Miss Fannie Ecker expect to leave about the first of October for Washington, D.C. where they will spend the winter, Lieutenant Birdseye having received the appointment to an important position in that city," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/5/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Bishop, Ralph. Manlius. Listed in the service, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Bishop, George J. "Mrs. Hazel Frances Bishop, formerly Miss Hazel Boardman has sued her husband, George J. Bishop, for separation on the ground of cruel and inhuman treatment. Bishop has gone to 'Florida where he is serving as a musician at the Naval Aviation station at Pensacola...in 1916...both were making their home at Suburban Park...when the papers were served on the husband, he entreated his lawyer to try and bring about a reconciliation between his wife and himself but the negotiations were not successful and Bishop enlisted in the aviation corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. Former town of Manlius resident.

Blackmore, Norman L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Blanchard, Wallace. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bland, John B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Blee, Robert Crawford. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. 31st Engineers. Private. Dispatch rider, died of accident, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Blodgett, Harley. Manlius. "Private Harley A. Blodgett, 305th and 306th Infantry, returned to Camp Upton,...after spending a ten-day furlough at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arba Blodgett," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918.

Blume, Rev. Melville S. "Rev. Melville S. Blume, former Kirkville pastor, has addressed a lengthy letter to the members of the local branch of the Red Cross at Camp Wadsworth, S. C. where he is serving with the Fifty-first Pioneer Infantry. Rev. Mr. Blume describes life in the army, which he evidently likes, and has high praise for the Red Cross Workers he has met in various places," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

Blumer, Karl. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "lst Sergeant Blumer, who for the past six months has been in the Tank Service, has returned to school," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26.

Boeheim, Charles Edward. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Post Graduate, class of 1907, known as "Beau."

Borden, Howard C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Boshart, Charles R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bowe, Charles Stuart. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1907, known as "Scunque."

Bowers, Randolph T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bowling, George C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bowman, Charles S. Manlius. "Sixty-two drafted men left Syracuse last night as the first contingent of the new draft army at Camp Dix, Wrightstown, N. J. Among those to go from this district are Charles S. Bowman of Manlius and William E. Costello of Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. "Charles Bowman, the only Manlius boy to go to Camp Dix with the first contingent of drafted men from this county is reported ill at the camp hospital. Mr. Bowman was manager of the Post Exchange at St. John's school for the past year," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Charles Bowman, former Post Exchange manager, was at St. John's school a few days last week while on furlough home from Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "Charles S. Bowman of Syracuse has been appointed supply sergeant, Company 40, 153d Depot Brigade at Camp Dix. Sergeant Bowman was in charge of the Post Exchange at the Manlius Schools when he was called in the first draft contingent. For eight months he was with Company G, 310 infantry and expected to go overseas, but was disappointed by a transfer to the Depot Brigade to receive new men. He was assistant instructor of the automatic rifle for a time and then was sent to the liaison school. Later he was placed in charge of the liaison, signal section of the company. He was made first class private on March 24th. He qualified as instructor in boxing, bayonet work and grenade throwing," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

Bowman, Robert W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Boyle, Bert A. Manlius. Laborer, Smith St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., N.Y., 1917. Denied exemption or discharge by The County Exemption Board for District No. 2, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917. "Pearl L. Bajus and Bert Boyle, who appealed to the District Board for exemption have been certified to the local exemption board as eligible for draft," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917. "The following from County District No. 2 left yesterday for Camp Dix...Bert Boyle, Manlius..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. 123 Smith St., fireman, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Bracken, John. Manlius. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

Bradley, Frederick I. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "The majority of the men who attended the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg last summer and received their commissions, have been mustered out of the service. Lieuts. Girton, Jones, G. M., Bradley, F., and Schouten who attended this camp are back at school now, and it is expected that Lieut. Lightfoot will be back before Easter," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26.

Bradley, Harold F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bradley, Mark Monserrat. Student at St. John's School, Manlius. Class of 1916, known as "Brad," from Rochester, NY. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. "F Co., 309th Infantry, 78 Division," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 23. "Capt. Mark Bradley '16, who has been overseas has left the service and is back with us again. Capt. Bradley is Athletic Director and is coaching the basketball team," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26.

Brady, James E. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. Name also appears in Home Front news, 8/17/1917. "Local address at time of assignment, Minoa, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Breck, George W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Brennan, Lennox Clark. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1914, known as "Len," from Brooklyn, N.Y.

Brennan, York W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bretz, Ludlow Earle. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1914, known as "Lem," from Dobbs Ferry, NY.

Bricka, Charles L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Brinckerhoff, Elbert V. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Bristol, Floyd R. Kirkville. "Among those from this section who went to Camp Syracuse Tuesday for special and limited service were David W. Kennel, Manlius; Floyd R. Bristol, Minoa (should be Kirkville); Herbert H. Lade and Frank D. Huntley, Kirkville; Herbert W. Coakley, Fayetteville...(and) Phillip A. Clark, Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. "Signed up 9/17/1918 Syracuse, local address Kirkville. Inducted at Camp Hancock, GA, Pvt., 17th Ordnance Co., U.S. Guards. Discharged Pvt. 3/14/1919 at Camp Morgan," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and original Forms, 1936.

Brooks, John B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Major, Commandant Flying School, Wichita, KS when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "Major John B. Brooks, one of St. John's 'old boys,' 'dropped in,' on the school Monday and enjoyed a short visit with General Verbeck. The arrival of the airplane at the school startled not only the cadets at the school but the citizens of the village, many of whom took occasion at once to visit the school...Major Brooks, accompanied by Lieut. Carl T. Potts, came here from Babylon, L. I. flying field, having left that place at 8:15 a.m. and arriving here at 3:45. They stopped at Middletown and Binghamton, and their actual flying time for the trip was five minutes short of four hours. Major Brooks is now stationed at Henry J. Damm field, to which he was transferred from Scott field, Illinois, where he was field commander," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

Brown, Charles M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Brown, Chester W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Brown, Decato. Kirkville. "Signed up August 1, 1918 at Kirkville, N.Y., his local address being 935 S. State (Orig.-Vol. 2) Kirkville, N.Y. (Vol. 1). He was inducted into service at Camp Upton, serving as a private with 153rd Depot Brigade, Co. #20. He served overseas from September 15, 1918 to July 1919. Discharge as a First Class Private was received July 14, 1919 at Camp Upton.

Brown, James S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Brown, Joseph F. Manlius. To go to Camp Devens, MA. 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

Brown, Wiser. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

?Buggle, Patrick. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

Bull, Charles M., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bullard, Fred J. Manlius. "Private Frederick J. Bullard, who was wounded on April 1 while fighting in France, writes his mother under date of May 7 that he met with more misfortunate having been a gas victim, but that he has now recovered. He is in company of the "Fighting Ninth' regulars," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "F. J. Bullard has received a letter from his son Fred Bullard stating that he is in a base hospital in France with his arm badly shattered by shrapnel. He does not expect to ever be able to use it again," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Sergeant Fred Bullard Jr. writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred J. Bullard of this village, that he arrived two weeks ago at the Debarkation Hospital at the Grand Central Palace in New York city after having been with the Fighting Ninth in France for a year and a half. His right elbow was shattered by shrapnel when the Hindenburg line was broken on October 30 but aside from that he says he is in good health. He hopes to return to Manlius in a few days. A photo, which he sends shows a number of decorations won in the many battles in which he took part. A year ago he was badly gassed, in June he was injured when a motorcycle was shot from under him while he was carrying messages and in August he was wounded during the Argonne forest drive. His regiment was one of the Rainbow Division and was in the thickest of the fighting, its losses being very heavy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/14/1919. "Sergeant Frederick J. Bullard has purchased the interest of L. W. Bullard in the market formerly conducted by Bullard Bro's. and the firm will hereafter be known as F. J. Bullard & Son. Sergeant Bullard, who has been home on a furlough left Tuesday for the U. S. Hospital at Lakewood where he will be fitted with a silver band for his shattered elbow before being given his final discharge which he expects in a few days. It was feared at first that the bones of the elbow were so badly shattered that amputation would be necessary but his arm is now improved so that he can hold articles in his hand but cannot bend his elbow," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/25/1919. "Bullard & Son's Market. Best Meats at Lowest Price Motto of New Firm. Western beef exclusively. All steaks, 33c.; Chuck steak, 28c.;' Stewing Beef, 28c.; Corned Beef, 20 and 25c. Selling for cash we do not have to charge you a part of somebody else's bad account," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/25/1919. 147 W. Seneca, Meat Market, 1927 Manlius Directory. He "was a sergeant in the Ninth Infantry, Second Division shock troops, in World War I and was awarded the Purple Heart decoration with double oak leaf clusters for having been wounded in action three times. He also won a victory medal with five bars and five stripes, denoting service in five major actions, and the French Fourraguerre," Bottrell scrapbook, n.d.

Bunce, Chester B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Bunn, Henry W. St. John's School, former instructor.

Buntin, Shannon. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Burdett, Paul. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Burdick, Earle L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "lst Lt. Wounded in action September 28th," 1918. The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

Burke, Henry L. Kirkville. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

Burke, James. North Manlius. "James Burke, who enlisted a year ago, has been discharged from the service on account of illness. He arrived here from Fort Bayard Hospital, New Mexico, a week ago and is now employed on the Adams farm North Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

Burke, John J. Minoa. "Signed up 5/10/1918 at Solvay, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y. Inducted at Ft. Slocum, Pvt. Co. B, 348 machine Gun Battalion also the 38th Machine Gun Battalion. Discharged as a private 2/1/1919 at Camp Dix," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Burke, Lee. North Manlius. "Lee Burke of North Manlius, formerly employed in the Y. M. C. A. here, left for Camp Dix today with an Onondaga county contingent.

Burnham, William P. St. John's School, former instructor. "Brig. Gen. William P. Burham, U. S. A., recently promoted from the grade of colonel, was the first and one of the most popular United States army instructors sent to the Manlius schools. He was then a first lieutenant and was greatly admired by the students," 8/17/1917.

Burns, Henry F. "Henry F. Burns, a former Fayetteville boy is spending a few days in town at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luke Burns on Orchard street (Fayetteville). Mr. Burns is an army Y. M. C. A. Secretary, having entered that branch of the service September first, 1917. He served in Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, as Building Secretary...from Sept. 1 until April 1st, when he assumed charge of the Y. M. C. A. work at the Artillery Range, West point, Ky. Mr. Burns made his present trip East in charge of a troop train," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. "Henry F. Burns of Fort Dodge, Ia., is a guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther Burns. Mr. Burns, who is secretary of the Y. M. C. A. at Fort Dodge has recently returned from camp in Virginia where he has been engaged in 'Y' work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/20/1919.

Busch, Clarence Francis. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1907, known as "Ma."

Butler, Walter. Fayetteville. Laborer, Pleasant St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag; Camp Dix, The Fayetteville Recorder, 8/9/1918. "Walter F. Butler, who returned two weeks ago from service overseas, and Mrs. Florence Bertha Scott, both of this village (Fayetteville), were married at the Methodist parsonage at Manlius Wednesday night by Rev. E. W. Williams," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/14/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Butler, William R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Butts, Hubert Wilcox. Manlius; St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Hubert W. Butts has returned to New York Military Academy at Cornwall-on-Hudson where he is principal of the junior department, after spending Thanksgiving week with his parents at The Pines," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917. "Sergeant Willard Butts of Camp Dix and Hubert W. Butts late instructor at the Cornwall Military school are at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Butts. Both will return Saturday. Hubert Butts is going to the officers' training camp at Petersburg, Va.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. "Hubert Butts...who is now an instructor in the New York Military Academy at Cornwall-on-Hudson is one of the men accepted (to the Third Officers Training camp, Camp Lee, Petersburg Va.,), The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. "Captain Hubert W. Butts has lately arrived at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Butts from Camp Lee, Va. Having undergone a long and severe illness at the Base Hospital, he has received an honorable discharge from the United States Army by reason of physical disability. He will leave in a short time for the mountains for a rest and recuperation," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. "Hubert Butts, who was recently honorably discharged from the service on account of physical disability, has been appointed to a position on the faculty of St. John's School. He also has charge of the Six-Footers at the Wheeler cottage. There are over twenty cadets quartered at the cottage, all of whom are over six-feet tall," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918. Name appears as a silver star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Captain Hubert Butts is recovering from his recent illness at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Butts," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. "Hubert Wilcox Butts, physical instructor at St. John's School, died Monday of pneumonia at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Butts south of the village. Mr. Butts was taken ill with pleurisy a few weeks ago and his health somewhat undermined by previous illness in army camp, his powers of resistance were not sufficient to ward off the attack of pneumonia which followed. Mr. Butts was born at Omaha, Nebraska, October 7, 1894. His early education was at Andover, Mass., and later at St. John's, where he graduated with honor in 1915. In the fall of the same year he entered Colgate and joined Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. When the spirit of the war overtook him he was teaching at the New York Military Academy on the Hudson, but felt that he wanted to do more than that so he entered the Third Officers Training Camp at Camp Lee, Va. Here he made a fine start in the artillery, but the work and exposure were too much for him and he became seriously ill, spending some fourteen weeks in the hospital. Finally he was discharged, but not cured. His health never returned. A serious internal trouble remained and caused him endless pain. Notwithstanding this his genial disposition made him popular with the cadets and faculty at St. John's. Besides his parents, he is survived by a brother, Lieut. Willard W. Butts and a sister, Winifred L. Butts. The funeral was held at his late home Thursday afternoon with full military honors by the cadets of St. John's School," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/11/1919. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. 1894-1919, buried Apr. 7, 1919, ae. 24-6-0. O.C.T. Bat. 2, Camp Lee, Va.

Butts, Willard Wilcox. Manlius. "Willard Butts has resigned his position as superintendent of the Merrell-Soule Co. factory at Gainesville, to go into the new draft army. Previous to receiving his call which required his presence at Warsaw, Tuesday Mr. Butts has been spending a few weeks at home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. Geo. F. Butts have received a letter from their son, Willard, who went with the first contingent of drafted men to Camp Dix in which he describes life in detail at the large cantonment: Yesterday and today surely have been busy days for us. You see we have had only 35 in this Battery so far--sort of a skeleton for those to come. We expected 109 more late last night, but they were delayed and did not arrive until today. I am now doing Mess Sergeant work, so we had extra work getting ready to feed them all. The mess sergeant job is only temporary, they say. They've put in a regular army mess sergeant to get me started right, with the idea that he won't stay long, and that I can break in some one else later. I started this letter last night, but was interrupted by the captain, who wanted me to do some typewriting for him. After that it was bed time. About one o'clock this morning the sentinel who guards the guns outside our barracks hollered 'Corporal of the guard! fire! We all woke up and found one of the barracks, the fifth from ours, all afire. We got dressed but were ordered not to leave the barracks. We could see it quite plainly, and soon heard two fire trucks thunder by. In just half an hour it was all out, and no other buildings were burned. The first bunch of us to arrive here moved upstairs yesterday. There are now 140 of us sleeping in one enormous room. There are over 50 windows, and a high roof with ventilator open the whole length. You can get a little idea of what they look like from the pictures in the paper I'm mailing. This also gives you some idea of how the barracks look from without. You can't get any conception, however, of the magnitude of the whole thing. The camp is 3 miles square and there are ten thousand men here now erecting and finishing buildings. That camp by the (Syracuse) fair grounds looks like a pygmy beside this. We have electric lights, wooden barracks of course, excellent toilet arrangements except that the showers are not yet connected with the hot water. We eat at mess tables built in the mess hall with benches also built in. They're much like the ordinary picnic tables. We can get laundry done very reasonably through a Trenton concern. Trenton is a city of 130,000 people, only 18 miles away. We never have cream or butter, fresh milk or eggs. I like them all but I can exist without them. Condensed milk, reconstituted is our milk diet. Just the same, we fare very well, and I really enjoy the meals. In fact I like the whole thing immensely, and while we have no privacy and no luxuries which we don't buy, we're comfortable and well treated, and don't need any one's pity. I never saw a better satisfied bunch of men. It's much like school or college. We have Wednesday and Saturday p. m. off, as well as all day Sunday. Then there's football practice week days. The Y. M. C. A. has a hut near here and there are frequent entertainments there. They surely do a wonderful lot for the soldiers. When you consider that we get board, lodging and all our clothes besides our pay, $30.00 for privates, it isn't so very bad for the average man although it seems small to some of us. Here is a typical days menu: Breakfast--Oatmeal and milk, Beef stew, (sometimes bacon), bread, coffee. Dinner--Soup, pot roast of beef, boiled or mashed potatoes, tomatoes, or corn or macaroni, pudding of some kind, bread, water. Supper--Steak, German fried potatoes, stewed prunes or peaches or apple sauce, bread, coffee. There's never a choice, but we aim to vary the menu as much as possible, having fritters and syrup occasionally. Friday I took the Ford and scoured around the country for green vegetables. Landed some cabbage and arranged for some sweet potatoes which I secured yesterday and which the boys enjoyed today. Willard Butts, Battery D, 307 Field Artillery," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/12/1917. "Following the news of the promotion of E. Duane Sherwood to sergeant comes the news of the speedy promotion of Willard Butts to a similar position. Sergeant Butts resigned his position as superintendent in one of the Merrell-Soule plants in Wyoming county to go to Camp Dix with the first contingent of drafted men. In less than six weeks after he arrived there he received his promotion. He is in Battery D, 307th Field Artillery, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917. "Sergeant Willard Butts of Camp Dix and Hubert W. Butts late instructor at the Cornwall Military school are at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Butts. Both will return Saturday. Hubert Butts is going to the officers' training camp at Petersburg, Va.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. "Sergeant Willard Wilcox Butts, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. George Butts of the Pines, is the only man thus far from his battery to be honored with an appointment to the Third Officers' Training camp at Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. George F. Butts have received news from their son, Willard Wilcox Butts, that he has been commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Engineering Corps and will soon go overseas with a new tank unit," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/8/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Geo. F. Butts received a cable Wednesday from their son, Sergeant Willard Butts, announcing his safe arrival in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Second Lieutenant Willard Butts, who is with the Engineers' Corps in France, writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Butts: Friday evening we are to have an impromptu entertainment with college songs, etc. We also are making arrangements to form a baseball team. Ford cars are numerous and they run better here than at home because the roads are better and they do not shake to pieces so soon. Pleasure cars are forbidden. I am well, happy and comfortable in every way," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "Lieut. Willard Butts arrived at the home of his parents yesterday having been sent here from England as tank instructor for a camp at Gettysburg. Lieut. Butts has had experience in driving both French and English tanks in France and England where he has spent several months in the training camps. He thinks the tank service the most interesting of anything in the army. Food conditions, he says, are very bad in England but somewhat better in France. On his return trip Lieutenant Butts had an exciting experience when the vessel he was on, President Lincoln, was torpedoed and sunk, 25 lives being lost. He was in a life boat several hours before being picked up by a destroyer," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. "Lieutenant Willard Butts, tank instructor at Camp Tobyhanna, is expected home for the week-end," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Lieutenant Willard Butts arrived home Wednesday from Camp Polk, Raleigh, N. C., having been granted his discharge. Lieutenant Butts, after taking a course in tank work in England, was sent back to this country as instructor and has since been instructor in night tank work, Camp Polk being the only night and day tank camp in the country," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Willard Butts, Dennison Richburg, Horace Ellis and Earl Steltzner, all recently returned from army service, were tended an informal reception in the Presbyterian parish house Monday evening. Talks were given by Rev. Frederick Perkins of the Manlius Schools and the returned soldiers. Ice cream and cake were served by the women of the society," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/10/1919. "Lieutenant Willard Butts left Wednesday for Bethlehem, Pa., where he has a position as superintendent of the Graphite Sand Co. plant," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919. "Hubert Wilcox Butts, physical instructor at St. John's School, died Monday of pneumonia at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George F. Butts south of the village....Besides his parents, he is survived by a brother, Lieut. Willard W. Butts and a sister, Winifred L. Butts" The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/11/1919.

?Cahill, James. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

Caldwell, Ethan L. Manlius. Draftsman, North St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "As several of the (Manlius) Band members are likely soon to leave in the craft it is very doubtful if the concerts will be continued the entire summer. The conductor, Ethan Caldwell, expects soon to be ordered in special work as draughtsman, having passed the physical examination Wednesday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Leon Palmeter, formerly conductor of the Ohio State Band of fifty pieces, now an employee of the Syracuse Journal, has succeeded Ethan Caldwell as conductor of Manlius Band. Mr. Caldwell who has worked hard to bring the band up to its present high state of efficiency has been drafted for special work by the war department. He leaves Monday for Fort Slocum where he will be duly enlisted and afterward sent to Washington where he will enter the engineers' corps. For several years past he has been filling a position as draughtsman in the office of the Solvay Process company. He is a young man of exceptional ability in both musical and engineering lines," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. "Ethan Caldwell, a former resident of Manlius and for several years instructor of Manlius band, writes that he has been transferred from Fort Slocum to Bridgeport, Conn., where he is engaged as draughtsman on government work in the plant of the Locomobile company. He expects to be transferred to Washington the first of next month," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. Ethan Caldwell, who has recently transferred into the army engineering corps has been appointed inspector of small arms practice and has been assigned to duty at Point ..., Ohio. Mr. Caldwell has been acting as inspector at the Locomotive plant at Bridgeport, Conn., The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. "Ethan L. Caldwell, well-known Manlius boy, and former conductor of Manlius band, who served with the Ordnance Department during the war, is now engaged in construction work in the Texas oil fields. In a letter to The Eagle, he writes: 'As you probably know I am located here as a construction engineer with The Texas Oil Company. They are doing a great deal of new construction work at the refinery here. The plant now covers 5,000 acres and is still growing. The pay around here is nearly double what it is in Syracuse and living conditions about the same...My construction experience at Solvay (Process) and also in the army is what landed this job for me,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1919. "Ethan L. Caldwell, a former Manlius boy, now a construction engineer in the Texas oil fields, writes friends here that he refused an appointment last week as assistant superintendent at the War and Navy buildings at a salary of $2,000 a year," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/5/1919.

Call, Frank R. Manlius. Polisher, R1, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Four Manlius boys this week answered their country's call and enlisted in the army at the Syracuse recruiting office. They are Frank Call, Henry Tyler, Jay Cross, and Asher Mills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917. "Asher Mills, Jay Cross, Henry Tyler and Frank Call, who are in training at the fair grounds spent Sunday with their parents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Frank Call..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "According to last news from Frank Call and William Estes both were at the front and expecting to go in the trenches any day," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. John Call have received news from their son, Frank, that he has successfully taken part in a trench engagement, and expects to return after a brief rest. Private Call also reports the safety of Private Henry Tyler. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "News of the safety of their son, Frank Call, located in France, has been received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Call," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Frank Call, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Call, who has been in the Army of Occupation in Germany, is on his way home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/25/1919. "Frank Call, who recently returned from France, attended the Cortland Fair last week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919.

Camp, Thomas J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain, Infantry, Camp Dodge, IA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/19/1918.

Campbell, Arthur B. Fayetteville. "Arthur B. Campbell, who recently enlisted in the Marines, has been assigned to the marine band at Pelham Bay, N. Y., and will leave for that place next week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

Capron, Louis B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Card, Hubert Van Wagenen. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1908, known as "Peedy."

Carey, Claude J. Fayetteville. "Claude J. Carey of this village (Fayetteville) has received an appointment to the second officers' training camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. "Claude J. Carey left Wednesday for the second officers' training camp at Fort Niagara," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917. "Alfred L. Coe has returned from Fort Niagara where he has been undergoing tentative training but failed in admission to the officers' class. He reports M. B. Birdseye and Claude Carey two Fayetteville boys in the camp looking fine and enjoying their work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/12/1917.

Carey, George J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Carey, Hugh. Fayetteville. A half a dozen Fayetteville boys expect to enter the Student Army Training Corps at Syracuse University. Those who have made application to enter the corps are...Hugh Carey...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20, 1918. "Hamilton Armstrong, Ira Ellis, Francis Sutter, Hugh Carey and Thomas Kinsella have been discharged from the student officers' training corps at Syracuse University which demobilized Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Carhart, Ernest J. Minoa. To go to Camp Devens, MA 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "the safe arrival in France of Private Ernest Carhart and Charles J. Kerins," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918. "News has been received from the front this week of the gassing of two Fayetteville boys, private Walter Voight, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Voight and private Edward Kelley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kelley. According to a letter written to Mr. and Mrs. Voight by a hospital nurse young Voight is unable to see to write and fears are entertained that he may lose his eyesight. News has been received that Ernest Carhart, son of Highway Superintendent and Mrs. Henry Carhart of Minoa, was also a gas victim," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918. "Private Ernest Carhart, son of Town Highway Superintendent and Mrs. Carhart of Minoa, has been wounded in action according to the casualty list published last week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Carmack, Prescott. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Carner, Harry L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Carothers, Robert M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Caryl, Charles. Fayetteville. "Charles Caryl, who recently enlisted in the Naval Reserves, has received orders to leave Monday for Pelham Bay training station," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. "Charles Caryl of this village who has been with the navy for four months, spent the holidays with his mother on Clinton St.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. "Charles Caryl, of this village (Fayetteville), who has been at the Naval Reserve cooking school at Bensonhurst, L.I., sailed Sunday from New York for Brest where he will be transferred to the war zone for duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919. "Charles Karyl, of the U. S. transport Leviathan, has been spending a seven-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Karl Karyl," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/2/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Resident of Manlius, 1927 Manlius Directory. Confiscated in a U. S. port, the German ship, Vaterland, was renamed the Leviathan by President Wilson. It was the largest ship afloat.

Case, Ronald A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cathers, Ralph. Manlius. At Camp Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Chace, Stanley Taylor. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1909, known as "Stan," from Buffalo, NY.

Chafee, John Sharpe. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1914, known as "John," from Providence, RI.

Chamberlin, Dwight R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Chamberlain, F. V. S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Major, infantry, San Diego, CA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Chandler, Theodore E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Chapin, Frank K. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Major, Signal Corps, France when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Chapman, Arthur B. St. John's School, former instructor.

Chapman, Fred A. Kirkville. Denied exemption or discharge by The County Exemption Board for District No. 2, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917. "The following from County District N. 2 left yesterday for Camp Dix...Fred A. Chapman, Kirkville..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. "Signed up November 22, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Kirkville, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Camp Dix, serving as a Private with co. A, 303 ammunition Train. He served overseas from May 26, 1918 to May 19, 1919, taking part in the battles of St. Mihiel and Argonne. Discharge as a Wagoner was received May 28, 1919 at Camp Dix," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Chappell, George D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Chase, Kendrick E. Manlius. "Kendrick E. Chase, who is in Co. C, at Camp Holabird, Baltimore, expects to sail overseas in a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

Cheney, John Pierce. Manlius; St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "John P. Cheney has enlisted in the United States Aviation Corps and expects an early call to service, " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918. "John P. Cheney, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Cheney, Sr., left Monday for the officers reserve training camp at Camp Meade, Md., where he will train in the aviation section of the signal corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. "John P. Cheney of Camp Meade, Md., is spending a week's furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Cheney, Sr. Mr. Cheney, who is in the officers' training camp, expects soon to go to the camp at Louisville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "J. P. Cheney, who has been transferred from Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky. to Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C., was home from today until Saturday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. 103 Academy. Mfgr., 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. b. 18 Apr 1886, d. 30 Apr. 1958, cremated Waterville, N.Y., buried May 3, 1958, ae. 72. N.Y. 2d-lew, F.O.

Cheney, Walter W., Jr. Manlius; St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Walter W. Cheney, jr., of Manlius and Donald Armstrong and Charles R. Skinner of this village (Fayetteville), were among the members of Troop D who were mustered back into federal service at the State Armory in Syracuse Sunday night. The Troop is now mobilized and awaiting orders for guard duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/6/1917. "Sergeant Donald Armstrong, Corporal W. W. Cheney, jr., and Charles R. Skinner left Thursday with Troop D for Peekskill where the Troop has been assigned to work in guarding a certain section of the Catskills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "Lieutenant R. M. Ballantyne, Corporal W. W. Cheney and several new members of the Seneca Club were tendered a reception at the club rooms Monday evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "With a half a dozen other married troopers Corporal Walter W. Cheney, Jr. was released from service with Troop D at Peekskill last week. Mr. Cheney returned Friday to Manlius, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/11/1917. "Walter W. Cheney, Jr., who served as sergeant with Troop D on the Mexican border, expects to leave September 1 for the Plattsburg training camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. "Walter W. Cheney, Jr...left Wednesday night for Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky. Mr. Cheney is a graduate of St. John's and served as sergeant in Troop D on the Mexican border. He is a trustee of the village and president of the local branch of the Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/30/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "W. W. Cheney, jr., who is at officers' training camp at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky, writes Manlius friends that he expects to receive his discharge and return to Manlius in less than a week," The Manlius Eagle, 11/21/1918. "Walter W. Cheney, jr., returned today from the officers' training at Camp Zachary Taylor having been granted an honorable discharge this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. "Walter W. Cheney, jr. will head the Citizens' village ticket to be voted on at the coming election. He has served the past two years as trustee and has proved himself an active and efficient member..."The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/7/1919. E. Seneca, Iron Mfgr., 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. b. 1887, d. 1931, buried Nov. 30, 1931, ae. 43-11-25, fa. Walter W., mo. Della L.

Chilson, Bert S. "Bert S. Chilson, a former well-known photographer of this village, writes friends here this week that he is now in the U. S. Commissary department, Ellis Island," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. 213 Fayette, garage man, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, 1880-1959, buried May 23, 1959, ae. 78, h/o Edna A. Abel.. Former Fayetteville resident when entering service; later returned to Manlius.

Chrestian, Francis E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Christian, Alvin. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Christopher, Raymond C. Fayetteville. "Signed up 4/1/1918 address being Fayetteville. Inducted as a Pvt, Co. C, 1st Battalion, U.S. Guards. Discharged 1/10/1919 at Camp Dix.

Church, Schuyler. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Churchill, Laurence S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Major, Signal Corps, France when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Clancy, James. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Clapp, Raymond A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

?Clark, John C. "Signed up January 2, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being 243 Brownell Street, Manlius, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Camp Hancock, serving as a Private with Detachment #4-A.S.A.P. Buffalo, N.Y. Discharge as a Sergeant was received March 31, 1919 at Buffalo, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936. Manlius does not have a Brownell St.

Clark, Leland B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Clark, Philip A. Minoa. "Among those from this section who went to Camp Syracuse Tuesday for special and limited service were ...Phillip A. Clark, Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918.

Clark, R. Philip. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Clarke, Fred J. "Fred J. Clarke of Syracuse, a former Manlius boy, has enlisted in the navy and leaves this week for Newport, R.I., "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918.

Clarke, George W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Claussen, W. Von S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Clay, Ernest R. Fayetteville. To go 2/23/1918 to Camp Devens, MA. "...sweater, pair wristlets and two pairs socks were also given to Ernest Clay and Walter Voit, Camp Devens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Clear, Francis. Merchant, Seneca St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Francis Clear of Syracuse, formerly of Manlius, is now on his way across the big pond, having sailed from port a week ago Friday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918.

Cleveland, Merrill H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Cleveland, Stafford. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1906, Post Graduate, 1907, known as "Staff."

Cline, Joe H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Clinton, Spencer, Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Coakley, Herbert W. Fayetteville. "Herbert Coakley, who recently enlisted in the ordnance department, has received a commission as first lieutenant as result of examinations recently taken. Mr. Coakley stood fifth highest out of 106 candidates who took the examinations at the same time. He has been assigned as inspector in the Wolverine Brass Foundry in Detroit where airplane parts are being made," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Herbert Coakley, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Coakley of this village (Fayetteville), who has been engaged in government work at Grand Rapids, Mich., arrived Tuesday at Camp Syracuse under orders of the local draft board," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. "Among those from this section who went to Camp Syracuse Tuesday for special and limited service were...Herbert W. Coakley, Fayetteville..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918.

"Cards have been received here announcing the marriage of Major Herbert W. Coakley, formerly of this village (Fayetteville) and Mrs. Doris McNerney of Chicago which occurred in that city Jan. 18. Mr. and Mrs. Coakley will be at home to their friends after February 15th at the Hotel Claridge, New York, the groom being stationed at a New Jersey camp from which he expects soon to be discharged. Mrs. McNerney is well known as a model for some of the leading pictorial artists," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Fayetteville listing, b. 1892.

Coakley, William M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Coan, Eric L. Manlius. "Eric Coan has enlisted in Company C, Syracuse unit of the National Guard," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "Private Coan of Company C, New York infantry, stationed near Weedsport, was home on a 24-hour furlough Friday, the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Royal Coan," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are:...Eric Coan..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Eric Coan of Company C, Camp Wadsworth, arrived Tuesday on a brief furlough at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Royal Coan. He will return Monday to camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Eric Coan, who spent last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Royal Coan, returned Monday to Spartanburg. Private Coan speaks highly of the way the boys are being cared for in camp and says he enjoys a soldier's life. On Saturday evening Mr. and Mrs. Coan gave their son a surprise party, thirty-four of his former associates being present and on Sunday evening Miss Velma Adsit gave a dinner in his honor," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Royal Coan received a telegram Sunday from the war department saying that their son, Private Eric Coan died Oct. 19 from wounds received in the battle of Duck Valley. Private Coan was a member of Company C, 108th Infantry, which was composed of Syracuse National guardsmen. The company was nearly wiped out on the morning of Oct. 17 when it fell into an ambush of machine guns. Young Coan was the first Manlius boy to enlist in 1917, enlisting on April 6 in the Syracuse unit of the National Guard. He went to Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, in August where he was in training until May when he went overseas. Private Coan wrote his last letter home under date of Oct. 8. In this he stated that he was then in rest camp after participating in the action of Sept. 29 when the Huns began to fall before the sledge hammer blows of the Americans. He visited his parents last spring and was much entertained by his friends and former schoolmaters. Private Coan is the fourth Manlius boy to make the supreme sacrifice, the others being Henry Tyler, Jay Cross and Archie Van Patten," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/21/1918. "The 108th Infantry, Twenty-seventh division which includes many Manlius boys, has won the most coveted honor on the field of battle. Major General O'Ryan has cited the entire regiment for the 'exceptional valor of officers and men.' Citations also have been issued to the 105th Infantry, the 107th and the 104th and 108th Machine Gun Battalions. Following the main battle of Duck Valley on September 29th-October 2d, when the Hindenburg line was pierced for the first time, the 108th infantry returned to the line October 14th and again on October 17th. It was withdrawn from action October 21st and so far as can be learned it has been in no engagement since that time. The men of the Twenty-seventh division of the American army, who are coming home soon and who include the former Syracuse units of the National Guard, have received, through their commander, a letter of praise from Field Marshal Haig for the brave manner in which they shattered the Hindenburg line Sep. 29," The Fayetteville Bulletin, November 29, 1918. "Rev. Kenneth B. Wells, a former pastor of the Presbyterian church (Manlius) delivered a very impressive and effective sermon at the church Sunday evening at the memorial service of Private Eric L. Coan, Co. C, 108th Infantry, who died for his country in France, October 19, 1918, during the Duck Valley drive. The church was filled to the doors with relatives and friends who had come to do homage to the brave young man. The Modern Woodmen and Royal Neighbors, of which he was a member, attended in a body...The national colors were very much in evidence, the pulpit being draped with the American flag on which hung the picture of the one who had paid the supreme sacrifice. Several pleasing numbers were rendered by the choir. Among them the following hymn, which was written and dedicated to him: (not printed), "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919. "Mr. and Mrs. Royal Coan were notified this week that the body of their son, Private Eric Coan, who died in France, had arrived in New York and would be shipped to Manlius in a few days. The return of the body was brought about throughout he request of Mr. Coan," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/7/1921. Buried in Christ Church Cemetery, Manlius, d. 19 Oct 1918 ae 21-1.

Cobb, Raymond. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cochen, Leonard C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cockshaw, Herbert. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Coe, Alfred Lynn. Fayetteville. Civil engineer, Elm St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Alfred L. Coe has returned from Fort Niagara where he has been undergoing tentative training but failed in admission to the officers' class. He reports M. B. Birdseye and Claude Carey two Fayetteville boys in the camp looking fine and enjoying their work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/12/1917. Buffalo Technical Training. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal, Fayetteville church service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Private Lynn Coe who Hs training at the Buffalo technical school, is home on a few day's furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/30/1918. "Private Lynn Coe returned Sunday from Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. having been given an honorable discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Alfred Coe returned home this week from Camp Zachary Taylor, having been granted an honorable discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Coggins, M. Carl. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cohn, Melvin H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Coit, Richmond T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Colburn, Ralph H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cole, Ralph A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Collender, Benjamin F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Colley, Dwight T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Collin (Collier)?, David C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Lieut. D. C. Collier of the Air Service, accompanied by his wife, visited the school for a few days. We all noted with pleasure that 'Dave' had quite a few more medals than when he left St. John's," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26. Name appears as Collin on the St. John's war memorial.

Colton, Ernest. Fayetteville. Professor, Clinton St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Ernest Colton, who has been teaching at Amsterdam, is now at Camp Meade, having recently been reclassified and inducted into service as an engineer," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag; Camp Meade, Technical, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

Colwell, John C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Colwell, Kent. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Combs, Earl. Manlius. "Earl Combs of the U. S. navy, is enjoying a short furlough at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Combs," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. At Camp Ingham, Mass., The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. "Earl Combs, U. S. N., is spending a seven-day furlough at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Winfield S. Combs," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. 101 Cherry, painter and decorator, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Conant, Herbert Searles. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1914, known as "Herb," and "Bull," from Troy, NY.

Conkling, George Phillip. Minoa. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y. Local address at the time was Minoa," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Connell, Luther C. "Luther C. Connell, Company I, Twenty-third Infantry, was killed in action in France October 3d, according to information received in Syracuse. He is a boyhood resident of Manlius, his father, the late Rev. Calvin L. Connell, being pastor of the M. E. church of this village (Manlius) about ten years ago," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/21/1918.

Conrad, Paul. "Paul Conrad, a former Manlius boy was married Nov. 7 to Miss Helen Ford of Newport, N.Y., Mr. Conrad is connected with Y. M. C. A. work in the U. S. army camp at Allentown, Pa. Mrs. Conrad is a teacher in the Fort Plain high school, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917.

Cool, Willard G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cooper, Ivan J. Manlius. "Manlius draft registrants who changed to Class 1 in the recent reclassification include Dennison Richburg, Ivan Cooper, John Millis and Edward Tuttle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. "Mrs. Ivan Cooper, who has been stopping with relatives in New York, during her husband's stay at Camp Dix and Gettysburg...Private Cooper expects to be mustered out of service at Camp Dix within the coming week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Smith St., motorman, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Cooper, Martin James. Kirkville. "Signed up December 14, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Kirkville, N.Y. (Vol. 1). He was inducted into the service at the Receiving Ship, New York, serving as a 3rd class Fireman. He served overseas from December 14, 1917 to August 14, 1919. Discharge as a 2nd class Fireman was received August 14, 1919 at New York City. He died December 17, 1921," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Cordts, John N. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Costello, James Joseph. Fayetteville. To go to Camp Devens, MA 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918.

Costello, William E. Minoa. "Sixty-two drafted men left Syracuse last night as the first contingent of the new draft army at Camp Dix, Wrightstown, N. J. Among those to go from this district are Charles S. Bowman of Manlius and William E. Costello of Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. "Corporal William Costello of Camp Dix spent New Year's with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. Costello," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "Michael Costello,, night section foreman, was found dead in the New York Central yards...Monday morning by his son, George Costello, yardmaster....Besides the son George, he leaves a widow, four other sons, John Costello of Rochester, William Costello, now stationed at Camp Dix, New Jersey, James Costello, a railroad employee; three daughters, Katherine, Frances and Margaret Costello," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Sergeant William Costello, who has been at home for ten days has returned to Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. Buried in St. Mary's Cemetery, Minoa, 7/6/1896-10/2/1962. According to Noel Hotchkiss' History of Minoa, Costello "was a native of Clyde and lived in Minoa most of his life. He was a Trustee of St. Mary's Church for 27 years, and Mayor of the Village of Minoa for 36 years...he died in October 1962 after suffering a heart attack." Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Cowan, Hugh E. Kirkville. "signed up July 14, 1917 at Manlius, N.Y., his local address at that time being Kirkville, N.Y. He was inducted into serve at Syracuse, N.Y., serving as a Private with Co. B., 23rd Infantry. He was gassed June 24, 1918 at Belleau Woods and wounded September 12, 1918 at St. Mihiel. Discharge as a private was received September 22, 1918 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Cowell, John Charles. St. John's School cadet. Lieutenant, infantry regular Army.

Cox, George H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cox, Thomas R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain in Engineer Bureau, Washington, D.C. when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/19/1918.

Cram, John, Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

Crampton, William Henry. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1914, known as "Bill," from Detroit, MI.

Crane, Jonathan Frederick. St. John's School cadet. Commissioned to Reserve Officers Training Camp, Madison Barracks, N.Y. "Cadet Jonathan Frederick Crane, leader of St. John's band and editor of the school paper, The Wind Mill, today received notice of his appointment as chief master of arms, in the navy and left at once for the navy yard. Cadet Crane was one of the students recommended for commissions in the army and navy by General Verbeck, by request of Secretary of War Baker," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917. "Duckfoot" Crane who was Capt. of Co. 'D' in 1917 is now Chief Master at Arms in the Naval Intelligence and is stationed at Baltimore, Md. During his three years at St. John's, Duck was probably the most popular boy that the school has ever seen. He entered into all the school activities with great zeal and enthusiasm. He was Editor-in-Chief of the Wind Mill in 1917, and that year needless to say the Windmill was a great success. He has been spending his furlough with us at the school," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 23.

Crawford, Lawrence C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Crawford, Wallace W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain, Cavalry, Camp Wilson, TX when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin," 4/19/1918.

Crittenden, John. St. John's School cadet. "Local address at time of assignment, Manlius School, Manlius, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Crosby, Henry Wood. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Jap." U. S. Navy.

Cross, Edward S. Fayetteville/Kirkville. "...Edward Cross of the Cross farm has been ordered to report at Syracuse Nov. 22 to entrain with the third continent for Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917. "The following from County District N. 2 left yesterday for Camp Dix... Edward S. Cross, Fayetteville....Edward Ryan of Skaneateles was made captain of the men from this district and Edward S. Cross of Fayetteville lieutenant," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Edward Cross, Camp Dix..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "We lost about half of our company who were transferred to the 82nd division, Camp Gordon, Ga., on November 2nd. Yesterday, however, we (at Camp Dix) received forty-three men from the last draft contingent. Among them was E. S. Cross whose home is near Kirkville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917. Marine, Brooklyn Navy Yards (as of 1/4/1918). "Howard Cross has received word that his brother, Edward Cross, has arrived safely overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Cross, Jay E. Eagle Village. "Four Manlius boys this week answered their country's call and enlisted in the army at the Syracuse recruiting office. They are Frank Call, Henry Tyler, Jay Cross, and Asher Mills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: Jae Cross..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. At Syracuse, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "News was received Wednesday by Mrs. Martha Cross, widow of Samuel Cross of Eagle Village, of the death of her son, Jay, who was in the Ambulance Corps, Ninth Infantry (?) and who died as a result of accident," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. Name appears as a gold star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "A military funeral for Private Jay Cross, 19, whose remains arrived Tuesday from France will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Methodist church (Manlius). Rev. E. W. Williams officiating. Archie Van Patten Post, American Legion, will conduct the ritual service and fire a salute with taps at the grave. Private Cross was driving a truck of the wagon supply company with the Ninth Infantry in France on March 19, 1918 (?), when he was struck by a piece of an exploding bomb and died a few hours later in the hospital. He was a son of Mrs. Martha Cross of Fayetteville his father being the late Samuel Cross of Eagle Village. Besides his mother he is survived by one sister, Ruth," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/25/1921. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. b. 28 Feb. 1898, Manlius, N.Y., d. 20 May 1918 (?), ae. 20 yrs., 3 mo., buried Mar. 28, 1921, Wagoner, Sup W. 16 Inf. (?), fa. Samuel, mo. Martha.

Cross, Waite Alfred. Eagle Village. "Mr. and Mrs. Waite Cross have moved into the Sutherland house in Washington street (Manlius)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917. "Waite Cross is erecting a new bungalow on ground joining his father's home, A. B. Cross (Eagle Village)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/21/1917. "Floyd Muckey, Walter M. Hyatt and Waite Cross are the only Manlius boys who leave with second contingent of drafted men Friday for Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Waite Cross who is in training at Camp Dix is at the home of his father, A. B. Cross on a four-day furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917. "Waite A. Cross of the 310th Infantry at Camp Dix is home in Eagle Village, having been granted a furlough on account of the illness of his wife," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917. "Waite Cross has been home for a few days from Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "Private Waite A. Cross, R. D. carrier, writes his father, Alfred B. Cross that he is in thick of the fight in France but so far he is unscathed by Hun bullets and is enjoying good health. Private Cross whose home is at Eagle Village was substitute carrier on his father's route for ten years before leaving in the draft," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "R. F. D. mail carrier, Alfred B. Cross, received official word Friday, from the War Department of the death in France, of his only son, private Waite Alfred Cross, Company C, 18th Infantry. Private Cross was the third soldier from Eagle Village to make the supreme sacrifice, Henry Tyler and Jay Cross having fallen in action during the summer. Private Cross left for Camp Dix with the 1917 September contingent of drafted men from District No. 2, Onondaga County, and was home on a furlough over last New Years, going overseas January 20, 1918, where he saw active service in a number of engagements. His last letter home was written September 28, and was addressed by an unknown hand and mailed October 10, four days after his death, which occurred October 6. In the letter he stated he was on the firing line and in good health. Mr. Cross has written the commanding officer of the regiment for further details, which he hopes to receive soon. The young soldier was born in Eagle Village, where he had always made his home, 22 years ago, and was universally known and liked by all who knew him, especially by the patrons of mail routes No. 2, 3, and 3, on all of which he had served as substitute carrier for more than 10 years. A gold star will be added to the Manlius village, the high school and the M. E. church service flags, in memory of the departed friend and comrade. Rev. E. W. Williams will conduct a memorial service in his honor at the Manlius M. E. church at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, January 5. The male quartet of the Chittenango M. E. church will assist in the service. The nearest surviving relative besides the father, A. B. Cross, are his widow, Mrs. Minnie Cross of Liverpool, and three sisters: Mrs. Ina Hosmer, Mrs. Minnie Chappell and Miss Mary Cross, all of Eagle Village," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Mrs. Waite Cross left (Eagle Village) Sunday for Liverpool where she will make her home with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pritz," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "The Manlius Methodist Episcopal church was crowded to the doors Sunday morning with friends and relatives of private Waite A. Cross of Eagle Village, who made the supreme sacrifice Oct. 6 (1918)...a gold star was added to the service flags of the church and Sunday school," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/10/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. "A double funeral for Private Waite A. Cross and Private Henry R. Tyler was held Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church. Rev. E. W. Williams conducted the service at the church and Archie Van Patten Post of the American legion the military services at the grave. Private Cross was buried in the Manlius cemetery (?) while the remains of Private Tyler were taken to Fayetteville after the first service. The church was filled with friends of the young soldiers and their families who came to pay last tribute....Private Cross is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Cross; and three sisters, Mrs. Ida M. Hosmer, Mrs. Minnie C. Chappel and Miss Mary Cross. He was killed October 6, 1918, during the Meuse-Argonne offensive, while serving with Company C, 18th Infantry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/16/1921. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, "Co. 18th Inf. Killed in action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive Oct 6, 1918, ae. 24."

Cross, William P. Fayetteville. "Corporal William P. Cross, U. S. Marines, stationed at Brooklyn barracks is spending a few days here with his father, having been called here by the death of his mother," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Crowe, Dr. Lester P. Manlius. Veterinarian, Moulter St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Dr. Lester P. Crowe has enlisted in the regular U. S. Army as a veterinary surgeon. Dr. Crowe will have the rank and pay of second Lieutenant, and expects to see early service in France, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/1/1917. "Mrs. John Mason of (400 Roberts Ave.) Syracuse has issued invitations for the marriage of their youngest daughter, Mary Elizabeth, to Dr. Lester P. Crowe of this village (Manlius)...After their return from their wedding trip Dr. and Mrs. Crowe will make their home in this village," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "J. Crowe and Miss Margaret Crowe of Lafayette are at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Lester P. Crowe on the Fayetteville road," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/22/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Dr. Lester P. Crowe of Camp Meade, Virginia, arrived home today for a short furlough. He expects to go overseas the first of the month," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. In the honor list recently published giving the names of those represented by stars on the (Manlius) village service flag the name of Dr. L. P. Crowe of Manlius was inadvertently omitted," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918. Blue star. "Lieut. Lester P. Crowe has arrived safely overseas, according to word received by his wife," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. "Mrs. Lester P. Crowe has just received word from her husband, Lieut. L. P. Crowe, that he has sailed from St. Nazaire, France, where he has been instructor in Veterinary Science for the past six months. He expects to be in the States about May 15 and will then resume his veterinary practice in Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/2/1919. "Dr. Lester P. Crowe and Private Fred Klock, both of whom recently returned from overseas, and Sergeant Walter LaGrange who has been in various camps in the motor transport service, all received their discharges last week and have returned to their homes in Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/16/1919. "Dr. Lester P. Crowe, Veterinarian recently returned from army service overseas, has resumed practice at Manlius, N. Y. Phone 33-J, Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919. 409 Fayette St., veterinary, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Crumb, J. Mott. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cummings, A. W., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cunningham, Arthur N. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Cunningham, Newton. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Curtiss, Dr. Charles Erwin. Manlius. Physician, Pleasant St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Dr. Charles E. Curtiss of this village has received his commission as a lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps, as a result of examinations taken several weeks ago. Dr. Curtiss specializes in diseases of the ear and throat and has offices both in this village and in the University block in the city (Syracuse). Yesterday he received notice to hold himself in readiness to leave for camp on twenty four hours notice," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "The funeral services of Alonzo Curtiss, 77, father of Dr. C. E. Curtiss was held Sunday at the Manlius M. E. church...the remains were taken to Mexico (N.Y.), his former home, where burial was made, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/27/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Bell gave a family dinner at their home in Moulter street Sunday for Dr. C. E. Curtiss, who is awaiting a call to the army medical corps, having already received his commission as a lieutenant in that branch of the service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. "Dr. Charles E. Curtiss, who some time ago received a commission as first lieutenant in the Medical Corps, has been officially ordered to report for army service during the coming week and expects to be stationed in a Georgia training camp," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918. "Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Curtiss are ill with the influenza at their home in Pleasant street. Dr. Curtiss has been ordered to report for medical service in the army the last of the week, but it is not likely that he will be able to go. A petition signed by leading citizens, asking that the Doctor be exempted from military duty, and allowed to continue his home practice, which includes the medical oversight of the Manlius Schools, has been sent to the war department," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. "Dr. C. E. Curtiss left today for Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, where he will enter the Medical Corps with rank of lieutenant. Manlius citizens, who now feel keenly the dearth of physicians, are hoping that he will soon be returned as a petition from citizens and a letter from Col. Melzar C. Richards, U. S. A., of St. John's School, to the commandant of the camp asking for his return to Manlius has preceded Dr. Curtiss to the camp. Dr. Curtiss is attending physician at St. Johns, now an officers training camp, and 300 embryo officers are depending on him to maintain their health and it is believed Col. Richards' letter will be given consideration," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Dr. Charles E. Curtiss writes from Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, that he was started in with strenuous physical training the day after his arrival last week. His many patients in town will be disappointed to learn that there is no hope of his being allowed to return to Manlius until after the war. Supervisor W. C. Hunt, whose name headed one of the petitions asking for the doctor's return is in receipt of a letter from Major B. W. Ayars, Sanitary Corps, U. S. A., who states that he is directed by the Surgeon General to say that the exigencies are such that it will be impossible to release Dr. Curtiss. If Manlius is seriously in need of another physician he advises that a request be sent to the American Medical Association, Chicago who will make effort to send a physician over draft age," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. "Lieut. C. E. Curtiss of the Medical Corps has been transferred from Fort Oglethorpe to Camp Meade, Maryland. He writes Manlius friends that he is not certain as yet whether he will be sent overseas or not," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. Lieutenant C. E. Curtiss, who has been spending a ten-day furlough at his home in Pleasant street, will return tomorrow to Camp Greene, N. C. He expects to receive his discharge in a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "On account of the epidemic of colds St. John's School closed Wednesday for the holiday vacation, one week earlier than was planned. The school had a remarkable escape from the influenza and General Verbeck, decided that perhaps closing at this time might prevent further developments. Dr. C. E. Curtiss who has been in daily attendance while home from camp says that he has failed to find any serious symptoms of influenza among the different cases of colds, but he considers these colds infectious," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Lieutenant C. E. Curtiss returned today to Camp Greene, N. C. after spending a two-weeks' furlough in town. He was accompanied by Mrs. Curtiss, who expects to remain near camp until the doctor receives his discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Dr. C. E. Curtiss has received an honorable discharge from the United States army at Camp Greene and is with his wife, who is ill in New York," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/24/1919. 213 Pleasant St., doctor, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. 1878-1957, buried Feb. 19, 1957, ae. 77.

Cushee, Collis B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Cutts, Richard M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps. Lt. Col., Pacific Fleet, Marine Officer when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918

da Silva, Alexander. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Corporal 107th Infantry, killed in action or died of wounds, The Haversack, 1919, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Daggett, Carroll (Carl). Fayetteville. "Thomas Kelley and Carl Daggett of this village (Fayetteville) enlisted Saturday at the army recruiting station in Syracuse and are now at the expansion camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/14/1917. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Carroll Daggett, bugler, Inft., Camp Green, N. C...." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Carrol Daggett and Thomas Kelley are home from Camp Wadsworth over New Year's," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. Bugler, Co. D, 310th Infantry (as of 1/4/1918). "Corp. Carl Daggett of the Thirtieth Regiment returned Tuesday to Camp Merritt after spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Daggett," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. In France as of 5/3/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin. "Carl Daggett returned home Wednesday after having served eighteen months overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 309 Chapel St., Fayetteville, meatcutter, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Daggett, Donald. Fayetteville. Electrician, Aviation Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "Donald Daggett returned Thursday from overseas where he served with the 78th Division and is now at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Daggett," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/6/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Daiku, Herbert G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Daniels, Ambrose Nathan. Butcher, R2, 99 acres, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Ambrose Daniels leave Friday for Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Private Ambrose N. Daniels of the Provisional Recruit Battalion, Camp Dix, was home on twelve hour furlough Sunday. A large number of his friends were here to greet him and were sorry he could not stay longer," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. "About seventy-five assembled at Colonial Hall Christmas eve to greet private Ambrose N. Daniels of Camp Dix, who was home on a furlough. Games and dancing were the amusements of the evening, after which lunch was served. His friends presented him with a purse of twenty-five dollars," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels have received word from their son, Private Ambrose N. Daniels, that he arrived in France safe, and that he enjoyed the voyage very much," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels of Kirkville have received a letter from their son, private Ambrose J. Daniels, of the Fourth Provisional Recruit Battalion, Second Company, A. E. F., telling of his safe arrival at one of the training camps somewhere in France. He writes that the weather is like summer there, and he is enjoying the best of health. He is attending school three nights a week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. Mrs. A. J. Daniels has received many pretty presents from her son, Ambrose, who has been in France several months," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels, and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Fiel have received word that their sons, Henry Daniels and LeRoy Fiel are on their way overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "First Class Private Henry Daniels of Mycenae has received an honorable discharge from the United States army and re-entered the employ of S. Cheney & Son. His brother, First Class Private Ambrose Daniels, is still in France, where he is in school learning the French language," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/28/1919. "Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels have received word that their son Ambrose has arrived at Camp Mills, New York," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/14/1919. "A Welcome Home Reception was held on R. W. Ford's lawn Saturday evening in honor of Ambrose Daniels and John Meagher, Jr., who have just returned from overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/18/1919. "Ambrose Daniels has accepted a position at the Precision Castings company at Fayetteville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/1/1919. "Signed up September 28, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y. His address at the time being Manlius, N.Y. (V-1) or 249 Burdick Ave., Syracuse, N.Y. (V-2 & Orig.) He was inducted into service at Camp Dix serving as a private with Hdqr. Troop-1st Division, A.E.F. He served overseas from January 24, 1918 to June 29, 1919. Discharge as a private 1c, received July 7th, 1919 at Mitchell Field," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Daniels, Henry W., Jr. Mycenae. To leave 5/26/1918 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "A farewell reception for Henry Daniels and a welcoming reception for his bride were given by Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels last night at their home at Mycenae. Mr. Daniels, who leaves Sunday with the draft quota, was married Tuesday night to Miss Nellie Tallman of Oneida, the ceremony being performed in that city. Mr. Daniels met Miss Tallman while employed in S. Cheney & Son's Oneida foundry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1918. "A reception was held at Colonial Hall last Thursday evening for Henry Daniels and LeRoy Field (Fiel), who went to Camp Dix last Saturday. The Red Cross chapter of Chittenango presented each one with a kit and two pair of stockings. Their neighbors and friends also remembered them with a purse of money," Mycenae news, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Private Henry Daniels of Camp Dix was at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels, last week. He refutes the story of his marriage that was published on the eve of his departure for camp several weeks ago . He says that he told the story as a joke," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Private Henry Daniels of Camp Dix was home on a five-day furlough last week," The Fayetteville Recorder, 7/27/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels, and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Fiel have received word that their sons, Henry Daniels and LeRoy Fiel are on their way overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "First Class Private Henry Daniels of Mycenae has received an honorable discharge from the United States army and re-entered the employ of S. Cheney & Son. His brother, First Class Private Ambrose Daniels, is still in France, where he is in school learning the French language," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/28/1919. "Signed up May 25, 1918 at Fayetteville, N.Y. His address at the time being Manlius, N.Y. (V-1) Fayetteville, N.Y., RFD #1 (V-2 & Orig.). He was inducted into service at Camp Dix serving as a Private with Battery A. - 335th Field Artillery. He served overseas from July 13, 1918 to March 15, 1919. Discharge as a Private, 1st class, was received March 20, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936. Possibly the same as Henry H. Daniels, above.

Davey, Edward H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Davis, George A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Davy, Frederick B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Day, Clarence M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Deardorff, Merle H. St. John's School, former instructor.

Delong, Clifford W. Manlius. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are:...Clifford DeLong," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "A marriage license was issued Wednesday in Syracuse to Clifford W. Delong, a Manlius soldier, and Hannah Glanert of that city," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917. "Company C of Syracuse, the roster of which includes Clifford Delong of Manlius and Walter Meagher of Kirkville, left yesterday for New York for regimental mobilization," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. "Private Clifford Delong, who has been in the hospital at Camp Wadsworth for several weeks for an operation on his leg, is home for a few days. When accepted in the army the examining physician told him that the lameness in his leg resulting from an old injury would soon be overcome by the expert camp surgeons but the operation has not proven successful," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918. "Corporal Clifford W. DeLong has returned home from Fort McPherson, Atlanta, Ga., after having been honorably discharged from service. He has accepted a position with his former employer, D. S. Hunt at Pebble Hill Stock Farm, Orville (Dewitt, N.Y.)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919. Cottage Hotel, E. Seneca St., lineman, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Denig, Robert L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps. Awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. "Another St. John's man to receive this medal is Maj. Robert L. Denig of the Marine Corps, commanding at that time, the First Battalion of the 9th Infantry. Major Denig was also recommended for the Croix de Guerre," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 27. "...today...Major Robert L. Denig, of the famous Fifth Marines, (was) decorated with the Distinguished Service Cross in the presence of all Marines at the (Philadelphia) Navy Yard. When a soldier wins the right to wear that bit of ribbon over his heart, ranks are eliminated and he stands in the place of honor with the general as his regiment passes in review...Major Denig was awarded the highest field honor of the American army for his heroism at Blanc Mont Ridge, in the Champagne. Although severely wounded, he refused to leave the field until his command had accomplished its mission, the cleaning out of a woods filled with enemy machine guns and snipers. Other honors were won by the gallant major. He was more than once commended by superior officers and recommended for the Croix de Guerre," The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, March 13, 1919; also The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, pp. 28-29.

Denison, Duane. "Duane Denison, a graduate of Manlius high school and son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Denison of Eastwood, has enlisted in the United States army and is now stationed at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas. Mr. Denison has been employed in the offices of the Joint Pole Committee at Los Angeles, Cal., for the past four years," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918.

Dennis, Clarence Ashley. Fayetteville (also New York City). St. John's School cadet. Graduate class of 1917 from Hackensack, N.J. Known as "Mike" and as "Denny." "Appointed Second Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps," The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 23. "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. The other cadets who have been recommended by General Verbeck at the request of the government are: ...Clarence Ashley Dennis of New York City...Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Lieut. Clarence A. Dennis, mentioned in Saturday's casualty report as having been killed in action June 7th (?), was for six years a student at St. John's school and was well known in both Manlius and Fayetteville. He was captain of the Manlius unit composed of young men of the village who were given drill at St. John's two years ago. His mother lived in Fayetteville during the time he was at St. John's. He graduated one year ago and, being less than 21 years old at the time, was refused a commission in the United States army. He had proven such an excellent student, however, that General Verbeck used his good offices to get the boy a commission in the United States Marine corps. Lieutenant Dennis was not quite 22 years old at the time of his death on the battlefield in France and was said to be the youngest commissioned officer in the marines. He was an honor student at Manlius. A younger brother was a student at Manlius up to a year ago when he was taken ill with infantile paralysis. The family's home is in Hackensack, N.J. The young lieutenant's mother died two years ago, the survivors being his father, W. H. Dennis; two brothers, Harvey of Hackensack and Whitney Dennis of Dryden, N.Y., and two sisters, Miss Ida Dennis and Mrs. Fred James, both of Hackensack. Their Fayetteville home is known as Hawthorne Lodge. The sisters recently wrote to friends that they intended to pass the summer here," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity (Trinity church, Fayetteville). As it is near All Saints' Day it will be a memorial to the faithful departed, especially Private Chas. Skinner and Lieut. Clarence Dennis," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. "Lieut. Clarence A. Dennis, U. S. Marine Corps, killed in action at Bouresches, June 8, 1918. "Lieutenant, 80th Company, 6th Regiment, Marine Corps, Chateau-Thierry, killed in action. Distinguished Service Cross, The Haversack, 1919, Manlius, NY, p. 103. "After graduating with high honors from the Marine Officers' Training School at the Corps Concentration Camp, Quantico, Va., Lieutenant Dennis was one of the officers who were especially assigned to duty with the 6th Marines. His ability obtained for him an assignment with an organization which was then famous for its personnel, and which has since made history which shall live forever. He reported for duty with the regiment on Aug. 20, 1917 and was assigned to the 80th Company. He came to France with his company, and continued on duty with it until the 2nd of February, 1918, when he was selected to take a special course at the First Army Corps School. He completed the course successfully and rejoined his company. He was present with the company when on June 1st, 1918, the forces took up the offensive against the enemy and turned his theretofore advancing and victorious columns in a direction unexpected by their leader. Lieutenant Dennis was there, also many other Americans. All had but a single thought--the destruction of the 'Destroyer.' Our artillery roared like thousands of lions turned loose, carrying messages of death and destruction to the enemy; our machine-gunners did their deadly work; our riflemen and also grenade throwers pushed forward carrying with them death and destruction to whatever opposed them. Many enemy prisoners were taken, many were slain in battle, but there on that spot, where such deeds were performed was first fanned into existence a spark which shall grow day by day until it finally results in universal human brotherhood of all the people of the earth--there was the beginning of the end of the war. Lieutenant Dennis was then in command of the 4th platoon of his company. He did his work well, a good soldier--both officer and companion to his men (a rare quality.) He has been mentioned in general orders, the highest honor which can be paid to a soldier, especially there were so many who so loyally defended the cause of country. Lieutenant Dennis lived an exemplary life, was well liked by all, especially by those of his platoon who best knew him. I wish that we could bring him back to you," from an officer of his regiment published in The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, pp. 11-12. "Lieutenant Clarence A. Dennis, Company G, was killed in the capture of Bouresches...after having displayed marked courage in leading his men through an artillery and machine gun fire and having kept his firing line supplied with ammunition. It is indeed a pleasure to write you that your son so conspicuously distinguished himself in action, and it must be a source of great pride for you to know that he performed his duty to the end in such a fearless and able manner. Sincerely yours, George Barnett, Major-General, Commandant," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 12. "Gold medals were given the families of those who died in the service (at Fayetteville's Welcome Home Day, October 4, 1919). These were Charles Skinner, Harold Perry, Floyd Stanard and Clarence Dennis. " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/10/1919. "W. H. Dennis of New York has written Irving D. Perry, chairman of Fayetteville's Welcome Home Day, the following letter thanking the people of Fayetteville for the gold medal sent him: I am in receipt of a service medal given by the people of Fayetteville, in memory of my son. Will you be kind enough to thank them on behalf of his family and express my gratitude. Perhaps it will be interesting to his friends to know that Lieutenant Dennis fought for eight days in Belleau Wood and that he was cited for extraordinary heroism by his immediate Commanding General and that General Pershing cited him for gallantry in action, and that he was commended with seven others in 'General Orders' for the gallant defense in holding the firing line against superior forces, estimated to be forty thousand of the enemy against eight thousand of the Marines. General Pershing also conferred upon him the Distinguished Service Cross and in this instance the citation reads as follows: 'Killed in action at Chateau-Thierry June 8th, 1918, he gave the supreme proof of that extraordinary heroism that will serve as an example to hitherto untried troops' and another citation by the Commanding officer of the Sixth Regiment of the Marines reads: 'Second Lieutenant Clarence A. Dennis, Company G, was killed in the capture of Bouresches on June 8th, after having displayed marked courage in leading his platoon through an artillery and machine gun fire and kept his firing line supplied with ammunition.' In other words in eight days he served his country in those fateful woods, he received commendation from the higher officers every other day. He reported for a new assignment to his Major the morning of the eighth of June, 1918, and he was ordered to rejoin his platoon. He bid his Major good-bye and said to him 'Today, I will be killed' and with this thought in his mind he joined his platoon which formed the third wave of his Company, and at five o'clock in the afternoon and for the third time that day, the Company dug in on the edge of a ravine in the wood, and Lieutenant Dennis walked along the line to see that each man had dug deep enough against the barrage that followed and upon his return he went to the first platoon to see if they had an extra supply of water that he could give to the men of his platoon. He then returned to his dugout which was at the foot of a tree and was not sufficiently deep to afford protection and he took the shovel from his Sergeant, told Sergeant Poppin (?) to get into his dug out and he, Dennis, would finish digging his own among the roots of the tree, and it was while thus engaged that the first shell of the barrage struck directly behind him and mortally wounded him. Sergeant Poppin (?) went to his aid and asked him if he was badly hit and Lieutenant Dennis replied "Only a concussion, Poppin, (?) get me out of this.' The Captain called to know who was hit, and when it was announced it was Mr. Dennis, the men of his platoon left their dug outs and gathered about their dying leader. The Captain seeing their danger ordered them back into their dugouts, to which, the men turned a deaf ear. The second shell wounded eight and killed another lieutenant standing by, and as the shell was heard to approach, Sergeant Poppin (?) prostrated himself over the body of Lieutenant Dennis; another private laid beside him and when they saw that he had passed away, they laid his mute form beside a rock and not until then did they obey their Captain to see shelter. Lieutenant Dennis lies buried in the Marine Cemetery containing twenty-five hundred other heroes on the north side of Belleau Wood. Some day the Government will bring the body of my son back and it will be interred in the little cemetery beside his mother. My son had many friends in Fayetteville and it was his intention to make that village his home when he left the service of the Marine Corps. Again thanking you and the people of Fayetteville for the beautiful medal you have sent, I beg to remain, Yours very sincerely W. H. Dennis," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/17/1919. "Lieutenant Clarence A. Dennis Post was the official name selected by Fayetteville members of the American Legion for the name of their new post at the regular semi-monthly meeting which was held Tuesday night at the Village Inn. The official number of the post will be 369. It was felt that it was fitting that Lieut. Dennis' name should be taken as he was the only boy from the village to lose his life in battle, and that it was in the first real test of manhood of the American force against the Germans. The regular meeting nights of the post are the first and third Thursday nights of the month. Quite a few new faces were noted among the members, and it is the wish of all the members of the Legion that every man who saw service in the army, navy or marine corps during the time of the world war, should become a member. The aim of the Legion is to keep the United States 100 per cent American. American for Americans, each and all, 100 per cent Americans, no Bolsheviks, no Anarchists, nor other creeds are the main principles of the Legion," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/24/1919. "Final tribute with full military honors was paid to Lieut. Clarence A. Dennis, who was killed at Bouresches, France, June 8, 1918 while serving with the Sixth Marines, Sunday afternoon. The Rev. E. B. Grimshaw read the Episcopalian service. More than 500 persons, including his father, William H. Dennis, former professor in the University of New York, and his two brothers and two sisters, who came from New Jersey, attended the services. The services were conducted by the Fayetteville post of the American Legion, which was named in honor of the former officer and the Archie Van Patten Post of Manlius. More than a score of graduates from St. John's School attended the services in a body under the direction of General William Verbeck and Lieut.-Col. Guido F. Verbeck. A firing squad was composed of students of St. John's and a bugler sounded taps as the flag-draped casket was lowered to its final resting place beside his mother, who died in 1916. The bearers were Charles O'Brien, Charles Goodfellow, Ernest Hotaling, Henry Sherwood, Ernest Leech and Harold Kain while the guard of honor consisted of Roy Devore, Walter Prentiss, John Kenney, Thomas Daggett and George Williams. After the services Mr. Dennis, father of Lieutenant Dennis, met with the Legion members at the post rooms and presented the post with a set of silk colors. Sergeant Poulin (?) who was with Lieutenant Dennis when he was killed, gave a brief but graphic description of the battle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/9/1921. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, "9/14/1896-6/8/1918, Battle of Belleau Woods."

Dewey, Albert. Manlius. At Camp Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Dickson, John Dawson. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. "In battle of Argonne Forest was the only officer in company who survived," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15. "lst Lt. Assistant Judge Advocate of the 28th Division, Penn. National Guard. Now in France. Over the top four times. In the battle of Argonne Forest was the only officer in company who survived," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 24. "Traveron, France, February 26, 1919, to General William Verbeck, Manlius Schools, Manlius, New York. My dear General:--...I noted also a reference to my being in the Argonne. It might perhaps be of some interest to you to know just what happened to me after leaving Madison Barracks. I first was assigned to the 78th Division at Camp Dix. Within a week 250 officers were attached to the 28th Division at Camp Hancock, Ga. The Division arrived in France on the 14th day of May, 1918. At this time I had a platoon in Company I. We trained with the British for about a month and were in Reserve near Ypres. Toward the end of June we were hastily loaded on trains and hustled through Paris to a Reserve position near Chateau-Thierry. As it afterwards developed this was a massing of forces by Foch in anticipation of the German drive. On the night of July 3rd, we came in under our first shell fire and from then on until the 11th day of November our Division was out of the shelled zones for only ten days, and these days were consumed in moving from one sector to another. On July 14th our men first came in contact with the Germans south of Reims where the Boche attempted to cross the Marne. The world of course knows what happened. From this date on we raced overland on the heels of the enemy and finally reached his great defensive position on the heights between the Vesle and Aisne. After some very nasty fighting on the Vesle (where Ogilvie was killed) wherein the Boche attempted several counter attacks with the intent to put an end to the continued advance of the doughboys, we were relieved on the 8th day of September, 1919. Naturally everyone was looking forward for a relief but in four days we were blissfully lying in support of the French in the Argonne. During the Marne-Vesle Offensive I was made Battalion Adjutant, and as the Battalion has now become the chief tactical unit the duties of Adjutant were most laborious. Our battalion had lost the Intelligence Officer, Sergt. Major and Clerk and all duties were added to mine. For ten days straight, while on the Vesle, I gave a telephonic report every hour to the Chief of Staff of the activities of our troops and those of the enemy. This work which he would not allow to be delegated and I can assure you that despite my perfectly good military education received at St. John's, I softly and at times loudly cursed said Chief of Staff. On the 26th of September our Regiment led the attack of the 56th Brigade through the Argonne, and for fourteen days and nights we were engaged in the worst sort of fighting imaginable. Our sector of advance lay through the thick woods on the left bank of the Aisne. The Boche had held this position during the entire war and it was defended as only the Boche, with his innumerable machine guns, can build up defensive position. We were relieved by the 82nd Division near Grandpre after advancing over sixteen kilometers and through a position which the French claimed could not be penetrated. In plain English it was Hell. I was one of two officers left in my Battalion. We had five different Regimental Commanders during this engagement and when we finished the Regiment was in command of a Captain and two of the Battalions commanded by First Lieutenants. At the jump off we had over 3800 men and when relieved there were seven officers and 462 men. When relieved this time we of course had visions of rest billets but we were again disappointed. We received our replacements two days after leaving the Argonne and within three days after that had relieved the 37th Division in the Woevre Sector north of Toul. Here my Battalion remained continuously on the front line for 28 days and I had the great pleasure of sending out the order to cease firing at 11 o'clock on the 11th day of November. During our stay on the line in this sector the position of Operations Officer was created and since then I have been carrying on with that work. It is most interesting and fascinating work, entailing the preparation of all orders and the supervision, more or less of their execution. The burning question now is, of course, when do we get home. A. G. H. Q. Memo. A. E. F. of February 21st states that our Division is scheduled to sail for a home port in May, and this is one memorandum which I hope proves true. My great desire is to visit St. John's upon my return. General, why not make a real big blow out of the Old Boys Association gathering in New York and make an especial effort to get all those who served in France to attend. Respectfully yours, John D. Dickson, 1st Lt., 112th Inf., The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, pp. 29-30.

Doble, Kendall D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Dodge, Henry W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Dorrance, Dr. George M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Major, Med. R. C., Camp Dix when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Dorrance, John Gordon. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1908, known as "John." "Lieutenant. Was booked for Tuscania, but because of delayed orders, did not reach embarkation in time," The Wind Mill, December 1918, p. 15. (The Tuscania was torpedoed.)

Doster, Chase. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Dougherty, Harry R. St. John's School, former instructor.

Dougherty, John A. Kirkville. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., local address Kirkville. No other information," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Douglas, Garrett D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

?Dowd, W. E. St. John's School cadet. Captain, U. S. shipbuilding forces when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. Name does not appear on the St. John's monument, Manlius-Pebble Hill School, Jamesville Rd., Jamesville, N.Y.

?Doyle, Frank J. Kirkville. "Signed up December 15, 1917 at Syracuse, New York, his address at the time being Kirkville, New York (V-1) 502 Gifford St. (V-2 & Orig.) Syracuse, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Camp Upton serving as a private with Battery F - 70th Coast Artillery, 12th Co., 152nd Depot Brigade. Discharge received March 8, 1919 at Camp Upton.

Doyle, James Lewis. Manlius. "J. Lewis Doyle, a son of Dr. J. W. Doyle, who was with his regiment on the Mexican border all last summer, is a sergeant in the Twenty-second Regiment, New York Engineers, which military unit Colonel Cornelius Vanderbilt last week reported to Governor Whitman was the first New York National Guard organization to report its ranks at full war strength," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/15/1917. "Dr. J. W. Doyle left last week for Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, where his son, Lewis is ill with pneumonia in the army hospital," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. "First Lieutenant J. Lewis Doyle, son of Dr. J. W. Doyle, is covering from a long illness at Camp Wadsworth base hospital. When trouble with Mexico broke out he quit his position as civil engineer with the Public Service Commission, First District and enlisted in the Twenty-second Engineers. He went to the border with the regiment, now designated the One Hundred and Second Engineers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. "Lewis Doyle, who was a patient in the hospital at Camp Wadsworth for several months, is spending a furlough of four weeks at the home of his father, Dr. J. W. Doyle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Lieutenant James Lewis Doyle, 102d engineers, has been honorably discharged from the army and is spending a few days with his father, Dr. J. W. Doyle in Manlius, before resuming his work with the public service commission in New York," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919.

Drennan, J. Frank. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Dudley, Victor. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Dudney, Carlton. Fayetteville. "Carlton Dudney, 19, brother of Mrs. W. M. Gage, is the first Fayetteville boy to enlist for service in the war with Germany. Young Dudney, who has been working for the Precision company, enlisted in the Navy in Syracuse and left last night for the Newport training station," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/6/1917. "Carleton Dudney signalman on the transport Mt. Vernon, formerly the German vessel, Princess Cecile, was a guest of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Gage the first of the week while on a seven day furlough. Young Dudney has made five trips across with the transport, the boat taking over 3,000 to 5,000 soldiers each time. Four trips were to a French port and one to an English port. He says he has never yet caught sight of a submarine, although a cruiser in his convoy at one time fired several times at what was supposed to be one. Secretary Baker was on the cruiser which sighted the alleged submarine. The weather he says has been fine nearly all the time and when in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream it is like summer. Dudney enlisted a year ago and he finds no fault with the way Uncle Sam treats his sailor boys," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918.

Dulay, Pedro D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1906.

Dunham, John S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Dunham, William G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Durston, Gilbert Haven. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1907, known as "Gibby." First Lieutenant. "Second Lieut. Harry Cranston Durston, aviation corps, is a brother of First Lieut. Gilbert Durston," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918.

Durston, Harry Cranston. Manlius. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Major H. C. Durston has enlisted in the aviation corps of the army and is expecting immediate assignment to duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "Major Harry C. Durston of St. John's school successfully passed the examination for entrance to the aviation corps, ground service, in Syracuse Tuesday and has been assigned to the School of Aeronautics of the University of Ohio at Columbus where he will take a course preparatory for examination for commission as adjutant. Mr. Durston has been connected with the management at St. John's school for several years, doing the work of adjutant. He is a man of pleasant personality and has done much for the success of the school," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918. "Major Harry C. Durston of St. John's school was presented with a wrist watch by the Manlius Whist Club at the meeting Tuesday night with W. L. Scoville and Miss Gertrude Hewes. Major Durston leaves today for Columbus, Ohio, to enter the aviation service of the army. He passed the preliminary examination in Syracuse a few weeks ago and will enter the School of Aeronautics of the University of the State of Ohio to qualify for the position of adjutant," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/8/1918. "Major Harry C. Durston of St. John's school who has been fitting himself for Adjutant in the aviation section of the signal corps at the School of Aeronautics at Columbus, O., has been transferred to Camp Greene, N. C., "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Second Lieut. Harry Cranston Durston, aviation corps, is a brother of First Lieut. Gilbert Durston. He is at present stationed with the personnel division of the director of military aeronautics, Washington, D. C. He is also a graduate of the Manlius Schools, and was associated with General Verbeck in the management of the schools for nearly twenty years before he entered the national service after America entered the war. He very much desired to see overseas service and made a great effort to reach the other side. However, his ability as a military instructor was such that he was recalled from the field for duty at Washington," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Lieutenant Harry C. Durston returned Sunday from Washington where he was released last week after a year's service in the aviation branch of the signal corps. After completing a course in aeronautics at the State University at Columbus, O., Lieutenant Durston was transferred from camp to camp until he was sent to Washington where he has been on duty for the past several months in the personnel department of the director of military aeronautics," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/7/1919. "Lieutenant H. C. Durston of the Air Service has returned after being in the service for exactly one year and will now resume his duties as Adjutant of the school. He entered a training camp at Columbus, Ohio, last February and received his commission in April," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26. Adjutant, The Manlius School, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Eaker, Arthur T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Easterly, George F. Fayetteville. "Signed up February 22, 1918 at Auburn, N.Y., his local address at the time being Fayetteville, N.Y. (Vol. 2-Orig.) 4216 S. Salina St. (Vol. 1) Syracuse, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Camp Upton, serving as a Private with the 3rd Provisional Co., 32nd Engineers. He served overseas from June 30, 1918 to May 8, 1919 with the American Expeditionary Forces. Discharge as a Private was received May 19, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Eaton, Lewis Hayden. Fayetteville. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Louis Eaton, Med. Corps, France..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "The gifts for the Fayetteville soldiers and sailors were sent away last Friday and should reach them by Christmas as only one went to France, that being sent to Private Lewis Eaton," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. 149th M. G. Bat. Med. Corps, France (as of 1/4/1918). "Mr. and Mrs. William N. Eaton (now) of Jamesville have received news that their son, Lewis H. Eaton, who is in the hospital corps in France has been slightly wounded," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Private Lewis H. Eaton, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Eaton (now) of Jamesville has written from the base hospital in France where he is now on duty that he has received the cigarettes sent by the Fayetteville citizens. He is feeling fine and greatly enjoys the home kind of smokes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Lewis Eaton who served as dentist's assistant with the Rainbow Division, returned from overseas this week and is now at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Eaton," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Ecker, Lewis. Fayetteville. "Dr. Lewis Ecker, of Washington, a former Fayetteville boy, who was commissioned a year ago as captain in the medical corps, has recently been ordered to Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. for three months' training," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Dr. Lewis Ecker of Washington, a former Fayetteville boy and brother of Mrs. Irving Perry, has recently been promoted from captain to major. Dr. Ecker, who is a lung specialist, is now stationed at Camp Oglethorpe, Ga., " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. "Major Lewis Ecker of Fort Oglethorpe, was in town Wednesday, having been called here by the serious illness of his aunt, Mrs. Augusta Eaton," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/2/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Edgar, Campbell D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Edgar, Herbert. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Edmonds, Walter R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Edwards, George, Jr. Fayetteville. Farm, R2, 69 acres, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. To go to Fort Dix 4/29/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag; Camp Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Private George Edwards, Jr., is home from the Maryland proving ground on a short furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Edwards, Robert S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Eldredge, Frank R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Eldridge, C. L. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Elliott, George E. Manlius. "Signed up August 4, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Manlius, N.Y. (Vol. 2-Orig.) 360 Seymour St. (Vol. 1) Syracuse, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Syracuse, N.Y., serving as a Bugler with Co. C., 108th Infantry. He served overseas from May 10, 1918 to March 6, 1919, taking part in the battles at the Hindenburg Line, St. Souplet and E. Pappenridge. Discharge as a Bugler was received March 31, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Ellis, Horace E. Manlius. "Three members of the Manlius Training unit, Corporal John Millis, Ross Van Doozer and Horace Ellis enlisted Monday in the regular army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "John Millis and Ross Van Doozer, who enlisted in the army last week, left Fort Slocum Wednesday for the Mexican border. Horace Ellis remained at Fort Slocum where he has a position as barber," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/20/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Horace Ellis..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Private Horace E. Ellis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Shepard, who has been sixteen months in the Canal Zone, has been sent to the Officers' Training School at Camp Hancock Georgia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Lieut. Horace Ellis returned Wednesday from the officers' training camp at Camp Hancock, having received an honorable discharge after being given a commission as second lieutenant. Lieutenant Ellis enlisted two years ago and served in Panama until August, when he was sent to the officers' training camp where his previous machine gun training quickly won him his stripes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. "Willard Butts, Dennison Richburg, Horace Ellis and Earl Steltzner, all recently returned from army service, were tended an informal reception in the Presbyterian parish house Monday evening. Talks were given by Rev. Frederick Perkins of the Manlius Schools and the returned soldiers. Ice cream and cake were served by the women of the society," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/10/1919. "Lieut. Horace Ellis, who recently returned from camp, received telegraph orders Wednesday from the War Department to leave for the Reserved Officers' Training Camp, Los Angeles, Calif., during the month of June," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/9/1919.

Ellis, Ira. Fayetteville. A half a dozen Fayetteville boys expect to enter the Student Army Training Corps at Syracuse University. Those who have made application to enter the corps are...Ira Ellis...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20, 1918. "Hamilton Armstrong, Ira Ellis, Francis Sutter, Hugh Carey and Thomas Kinsella have been discharged from the student officers' training corps at Syracuse University which demobilized Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Ellison, Norman, Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ellison, Richard. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Emery, Hervey Ross. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Class of 1914, known as "Deacon" and "Doctor," from Bucksport, ME.

Emmerich, Franz J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Enders, Carl. Manlius. "Carl Enders is at the home of his parents on a ten-day furlough while Mrs. Enders is undergoing treatment at a Syracuse hospital," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. Name should be listed as a blue star on the Manlius service flag; not cited in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

Enders, John. Manlius. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

Enders, Ludwig. Manlius. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

Este, J. Dickinson. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Estes, Willard L. Manlius. "Private Willard Estes of Company H, 50th Infantry, spent Tuesday with his sister, Mrs. Willard Wilcox," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917. In France, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "According to last news from Frank Call and William Estes both were at the front and expecting to go in the trenches any day," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "Mrs. Robert Wilcox is in receipt of a letter from her brother, Willard L. Estes of Co. H, 23d Infantry, who is now in France, stating that he has been promoted to corporal. The winter, he says, is all over and the weather is now fine. He says the boys are well cared for and he advises Manlius boys to 'come on over,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. "William Estes, a brother of Mrs. W. T. Wilcox of this village, writes Manlius friends that he is in the hospital as the result of wearing a leaky gas mask during a gas attack. He has been at the front with the Twenty Third Regiment for over four months. For 40 days he was in the front line trenches without rest. He says in the letter that he will doubtless be back at the front by the time the letter is received," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Private William Estes, who is with the famous Rainbow division composed of the 9th and 23d infantry, Marines and other units, who has probably seen as much fighting as any of the Manlius boys on the front, has sent his sister, Mrs. Willard T. Wilcox, some postage stamps which he found on a Hun who he killed. He says the Hun will not need them where he is now because the stamps would burn. At the time the letter was written Estes was resting behind the lines after over a month in the trenches. He says the Germans are not going to get him, for they've tried in every way and he has come out of every night without a scratch except for the time he was gassed. When the Huns find it is the Americans in front of them they frequently hold up their hands and come over without fighting. He has a German helmet and several other trophies," The Fayetteville Bulletin 8/23/1918. "William Estes, who is serving in the 23d infantry, writes from France to his sister, Mrs. W. T. Wilcox, that he has recently been promoted from corporal to sergeant," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mrs. Willard T. Wilcox received a letter this week from her brother, Sergeant Willard Estes, together with some German paper money and a shoulder strap taken from a Hun. Sergeant Wilcox writes: I received a letter from you some time ago but have not had time to answer it before. Now that I have time will drop you a line to let you know I am all right yet. I am also sending you some German money and a shoulder strap that I got from a Hun the last time I was over the top. Well, old boy, I have been over the top eight times up until now. I was slightly wounded the last time but didn't have to go to the hospital and I am all right now. I don't think the war will last much longer for the Germans are going back just as fast as they can and we are after them. It's hard work for they are good runners. They are going so fast we have to use field glasses to keep track of them. Well, I am a Sergeant now and have been for some time. Some good for me, don't you think so? Sergeant Willard L. Estes, Co. H, 23rd U. S. Infantry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. "A. E. F., France. December 15, 1918. Dear Mother:--This being Sunday and the ban on censorship being lifted somewhat, and believing you would like to know a little about my experiences in this country, I will try and connect up a few facts that I think will pass the censor in a storm form to the best of my ability, but remember, mother, that my ability as a novelist is limited, so therefor don't expect any Harold Bill Wright stuff, but just a few facts sent from a soldier boy to his mother in order to try and please her and show I have done my best for Uncle Sam in the great war for freedom and Humanity and God, having seen fit to let me be one of the survivors of that awful struggle, I know that my next duty and greatest obligation is to my mother. On Sept. 7, 1918, the U. S. S. Huron sailed down the Hudson on its way from Hoboken to the sea and the Syracuse brigade had started its advance guard on its way to distant France, where eventually it was to enter the awful conflict. We were aboard the Huron 14 days and the journey was a delightful trip, the submarines failing to get a line on us. At the end of 14 days we docked in the harbor at St. Nazaire, and on Sept. 21 landed once more and set our feet on solid ground. When we had a good meal and our packs were loaded on the trucks we marched out of town about four kilometers and went into a rest camp. We remained in this camp and drilled for 10 days, when again we were loaded on a French train, and believe me they are some train; you could put the whole train in one of our famous American superheating mallet compounds locomotive's fire box and still have plenty of room for fire, but anyway we entrained and after two days and nights in that French box-car we were unloaded at a little town of Bourmount, which is about 60 miles from Verdun, and on a nice, clear, quiet day at drill we could hear the roar of the cannon. We remained in camp at Bourmount and enduring many hardships, drilling and maneuvering all winter, but gaining strength and knowledge. When later we were put to the test we more than proved the equal of the Huns. In fact, we put them to rout every time they came in contact with that famous battle scarred but still same old 'Syracuse Brigade.' Right after dinner on the 14th of March, 1918, we entrained again and started on the memorable trip to those awful trenches. On the 15th day of March we detrained at Dugney, a little town about two kilometers from Verdun, and after a 12-kilometer hike we billeted at Genicourt and rest for two days, during which time our officers went to the front and reconnoitered the sector that we were to take over. It was the first sector, and for the first time we staged our nerves and wits and fighting power against that of the brutal Boche. On the night of March 17, the Boche celebrated St. Patrick's day by putting over a raiding party in a place where the two front lines were only separated by a distance of 45 yards. They were detected by one of our snipers who reported to our officers and a rocket went up as a signal for a barrage. After an interval of eight seconds the signal was answered both by our artillery and our machine guns and for the first time my regiment met and drove the Boches back in disorder. It was a night long to be remembered by the men of that regiment who participated in that hour's first fight. After that everything went well and it was while in that sector that my regiment put over the first all-American raid to be staged in the war. It was the raid that went down in the history of the Syracuse Brigade as the event which first turned No Man's Land into 'Our Land.' never since have we lost control of it, although at times it was heavily contested, and many poor Americans laid down their lives in defending that land. On or about May 1st, and approximately a month and a half in trench warfare, we were withdrawn and again entrained and rushed nearly across France, and finally landed in a little town by the name of Chaumony la Ville, and were stationed there in reserve for the British on the Somme front. Everything went well, although still under artillery fire, until May 30th. We got up and rubbed some of the sleep from our eyes. Looking down the road we could see the road literally lined with French trucks. Our curiosity became much aroused, but it was quickly satisfied for after eating a hurried breakfast we were given a sandwich and told it would be our dinner and then were swiftly loaded on those trucks and started out across France once more, not knowing where we were going. About noon we passed through the outskirts of Paris and taking a mail road on which signs told us would take us to Meaux and farther if need be. Shortly after passing Paris refugees began passing. Some of them had few of their worldly belongings, but most of them had very little. Women and children were crying and the men had a look of hopelessness on their face, but they continued on their weary way, having no home and no place to go but just hopelessly wandering, waiting for some countryman to take them in. One sight I will never forget was a poor old woman who had walked till she could walk no more and she was sitting by the roadside with her shoes off, her feet bleeding and tears running down her cheeks. She was a poor hopeless and utterly disheartened woman. I looked at the faces of the boys in the truck with me. They all had solemn looks on their faces, and I heard more than one of them curse below their breath, and swear that if they were ever given a chance they would get revenge on the Huns for at least one of those poor homeless refugees. No doubt many a Hun met his doom at the hands of Yanks, and in the Yank's heart he was saying, 'Take that in exchange for what you did to that poor old French mother.' The stream of refugees kept filing by and we continued on our way, hungry, tired and dusty. That night about 11 o'clock the trucks stopped and we were ordered to unload. The roads were crowded with traffic, and we unloaded amidst a hail of shrapnel and machine gun bullets. We immediately formed into combat formation. Details were sent for ammunition and soon we were equipped with 300 rounds of rifle ammunition to each man, and a pouch full of grenades. On that memorable night never to be forgotten by men of the second division, we were hurled into battle against the onrushing Huns, who were then on a march towards Paris. They hurled their masses against those determined Yanks in vain, only to be driven back in disorder. Time and time again the Huns were stopped by Americans in the greatest battle ever fought by the Americans in France. We were the only American division there. The battle was the second battle of the Marne, better known by the Americans at the battle of Chateau-Thierry. In that battle our division was actually engaged against three divisions of Prussian guards. It was again proven to the world that Americans had yet their first time to give way in battle or suffer defeat. It was during this awful battle that the Syracuse Brigade was named the Saviors of Paris, and the Marines earned the title of the Green Devils. Both the Marines, the 9th and 23rd infantry, ever afterwards was called by the Huns the 'Devil Dogs.' It was also at this battle that we were named shock troops, the first American division to be thus named. Pershing in one of his speeches said, 'I sincerely wish that I had a few more divisions like the Second.' On June 24th I was gassed in this same fight and was able to get a 15-day rest in the American hospital. My division still remained and after 30 days of awful fighting was relieved by an eastern division of prize American troops. At 4:36 on the morning of July 18th, they went over the top, and started Foch's great offensive which turned the German's triumph and forward march into a disastrous defeat. From that day until the day the armistice was signed the Allies continued to push the Huns back to their own borders. I got back to my company just in time for this battle. The second division was actually engaged in the Soisson drive for two days, during which time they advanced a distance of 15 kilometers, capturing 3,500 prisoners, of which 675 were officers. They also captured eleven batteries of artillery, composed of both heavy and light, and over 100 machine guns, besides numerous other weapons and supplies, and liberated from the Huns yoke four towns of which the most important was Verzy. The German resistance here was obstinate but American courage finally won the day. Our troops marched through and passed the town at 3 o'clock. My battalion of the 23rd Infantry, supported by the first battalion, was held up just to the left of Verzy by intense machine gun fire; the Algerians were also held up on our right. My battalion called for reinforcements and the first battalion advanced and the two battalions combined forces. We were just getting into shape when the Boche launched a counter attack in a valley directly in our front, advancing on us in mass formation, seemingly resolved to wipe us off the earth. We lay down and said a short prayer, and patiently awaited for the attack. Those Huns kept on coming when suddenly a yell arose from the Americans. On looking we saw those French tanks coming up the Valley. The Germans on seeing them retreated back to their own lines. The day was saved by that same old French spirit that availed at Verdun when the password was, 'They shall not pass,' and thousands of Germans retreated across the great river while trying to get out of that valley. After this we fell back about 200 yards and reorganized. At 6 P. M. we started to advance on the town of Verzy. That town was of great importance to the Boche as they had many munition plants there, and were ordered to hold them at all cost, but the Americans pushed on. In the streets of the town was fought one of the hardest fights ever staged in war in the history of the world. German machine guns spit death from the windows of every house, and the German artillery seemed to be resolved to wipe the town and all that was in it out of this world; but two can play at the same game, and American rifles and bayonets charged those machine guns and with grenades as their last resort finally cleared the town of Boches, who had made life there a hell ever since the war started in 1914. The fight raged until 7:30 P. M., but again as always we showed those Huns that they bit off more than they could chew when they refused to listen to President Wilson, the greatest man the world has ever produced. We at last acquired the town and went on and consolidated our position about a kilometer beyond. On July 20 we were relieved by the French, and after hiking 75 kilometers in two days and nights, we took over a sector of trenches at Nancy, holding that for about 17 days, after which we journeyed on again for three nights, resting finally at our jumping off place for the St. Mihiel drive. On the morning of Sept. 12th, after two hours' artillery preparation we again scaled the top and started in pursuit of the retreating Huns. Our objective was a distance of 18 kilometers, and we were allotted a space of time amounting to 48 hours to gain this objective, but we advanced and gained it by 11 A. M. the first day, beating our schedule some 40 hours. After taking our objective, we went over and took the Marines, and held the front allotted to two brigades. The Marines arrived and took over their own front 24 hours later, but at that they were eager to go ahead. It was in this battle that we advanced on enemy artillery firing point blank at us, the man pulling the lanyard being plainly in sight, but here again the Americans charged with bayonets and the Huns were forced to retire, leaving us in possession of many prisoners and numerous pieces of artillery. In his drive, for the first time, the French fought with us, fighting under an American head. Our leader was personally in command and to him and his men can be given the credit of liberating from the Huns ten Lorraine cities and towns and 150 square miles which had been held by the Boche since he defeated the French in the War of 1870. We were relieved by another American division and retired to have a rest in the woods about 30 kilometers to the rear. We were promised a long rest, probably all winter, but fate played against us because the British were fighting day and night to capture St. Quentin, but could not because the strong point on the Champagne front, known as the Blanc Mont ridge, in the Argonne forest, controlled St. Quentin on the right flank. The British, therefore, dared not advance and explore their flanks to the fires of this dangerous fort. General Foch again took a hand in the game and made up his mind to capture this fort and make it possible for the British to take St. Quentin. So with this in mind he launched six different attacks with French divisions, but all failed. Being at his wits end he called on General Pershing for the 2nd Division. Pershing refused, offering Foch any other two divisions he wanted, but Foch's reply was, 'You have no two divisions that can equal the second. Mr. Pershing, therefore I demand the second.' So on the morning of Oct. 3rd we scaled the top again. The 9th Infantry went over on the right with the 23rd Infantry in support and the 5th Marines went over on our left with the 6th marines in support and with the famous yell which never yet failed to put fear in the heart of the Huns, the second division started out to add another victory to its already crowded list. Our first objective was the famous Hindenberg line, a distance of nine kilometers, and we were there at the foot of that awful fort at 10:30 A. M. gaining our first objective in four hours. At 4 o'clock we again took up the advance, the 23rd Infantry passing through the 9th Infantry and taking over the front line. We had advanced beyond the range of our artillery and so all attacks from then on had to be fought with infantry alone. But nevertheless we started advancing. About one kilometer, we were held up by an enemy artillery barrage and machine guns combined. Another yell and charge resulted, and once more we captured the artillery that was shooting at us and also some of the machine guns, killing many Boches and losing many of our own men. At 6 o'clock we halted for the night and dug in. We were under heavy artillery fire all night and at break of day the Huns came at us with a counter attack which we repelled after which we fell back and reorganized. At 2 A. M. on the 4th we attacked again without success. The French on our right and Marines on our left were about three kilometers to our rear, leaving our flank exposed to the enemy artillery and machine gun fire, causing us many losses. We stuck, however, and imagine our joy when on the night of the 3rd day, which was Oct. 6th, we found out that the French and Marines by hard fighting had at last advanced and established on our right and left, making our flanks once more secure. At this time I was second in command of our company and I was recommended for a commission and also for a D. S. C. We had five more attacks during this battle but were unable to advance farther. The Huns were certainly determined to hold us there, but we held our own, repulsing several counter attacks. On the morning of Oct. 10th, after seven days of awful fighting, during which time the ground of that famous battlefield became strewn with dead bodies, the intermingling of life blood of Huns and Yanks. Again we avenged, a few at least, of the barbarous acts committed by those Huns. The division that relieved us being fresh and full fighting strength made one furious attack and succeeded in driving the enemy out of his strongpoint and over the hill into an open and level country. At this time the cavalry came into action and drove the retreating enemy back toward his border a distance of 30 kilometers in two days. The next day St. Quentin fell to the British. We had accomplished our purpose. The English advanced with his flanks secure. We had removed the menace from his flanks and the Huns were double defeated. After this I was sent to the I. C. S. at La Valbonne (Ain) (Aix?) France, and therefore was not present on the 11th of November when the armistice was signed, but my division was one of the eight American divisions to be on the firing line at the time when hostilities ceased. The Second Division is now one of the divisions of the army of occupation, but don't misconstrue the meaning of this letter. I do not mean to run down other divisions or to make mine better than others. It is as good as any and that is all that I can say. All Americans are good fighters for the cause of Liberty and Humanity and for old Glory, the emblem we all love dearly. Sgt. Willard L. Estes. 23rd U. S. Infantry, A. E. F., France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919. "Sergeant Willard Estes returned last week from overseas, having received his discharge earlier than his comrades in the Rainbow Division on account of being in an officers' training camp at the time the armistice was signed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919. "Sergeant Willard Estes, 28, of Manlius, who recently returned from overseas, enlisted in the Coast Artillery at the Syracuse recruiting station and left Thursday for Fort Banks, Mass. Estes was slightly wounded by a shell fragment at Soissons July 18, 1918, and was shot through the arm with a machine gun bullet in the Argonne, Oct. 6. When Estes left his company, which was a unit of the Twenty-Third Infantry, after being wounded in October only three men were still in service of the original outfit which left the training camp at the State Fair grounds in the fall of 1917. He had the remarkable good luck in going through four battles with his original company without a serious injury, being wounded on the sixth day of its fifth engagement. This was at Mt. Blanc in the Argonne. He was at Verdun from March to May, 1918, and from there went to Chateau-Thierry, where he was in the heavy fighting from May 30 to July 10. Hundreds of men in the Second Division were killed, wounded and gassed in this engagement. On July 18, the division went into line at Soissons and there he received a slight wound from a shell fragment which was not serious enough to necessitate his evacuation to a hospital. After three days there the unit went to St. Mihiel on Sept. 12 and was in Pershing's offensive for 48 hours. It was in the Argonne Oct. 1 to 10. Sergt. Estes likes the army or he wouldn't re-enlist, he said, but he was induced to try it again by a new ruling which says that any discharged non-commissioned officer who desires to re-enlist has the option of choosing his branch of the service. He can also choose the place where he would like to serve. The army pays his expenses to any place within a radius of 1,000 miles," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/30/1919. "Sergeant Willard Estes, U. S. A., returned Sunday to Fort Banks, Boston, Mass., after a five-days' furlough spent at his home on the Fayetteville road," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, d. 7 Nov. 1936, ae. 45-8-11.

Evans, Francis D. Manlius. "Francis Evans has enlisted in the Coast Defense Corps and is now awaiting orders," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/14/1917. "Francis Evans left Saturday for the training camp at Spartanburg with others who enlisted at Fort Ontario, Oswego, for Coast Defense service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "In a letter received from Francis D. Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Evans, chief electrician in the U. S. Coast Guard now stationed at Marathon, Florida, he says the weather can not be beaten but the mosquitoes are large and fierce. He has been stationed at Miami, Florida, nearly all winter, one of the most exclusive southern resorts for millionaires. He says they have been highly entertained by these people. Evans has served both in the army and navy before this enlistment, having circled the globe with the Atlantic fleet in 1908 under Rear Admiral "Bob" Evans and later in the signal corps. The present coast guard work he is employed in consists in erecting wireless stations along the Florida coast line and on the north shore of Cuba traveling between these points by submarine and making headquarters on the Florida Keys. The submarine is also employed in watching alien vessels," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Evans have received a box of five dozen limes, which were grown on land purchased by their son, Francis D. Evans of the United States Coast Guard Service at Marathon, Florida, where he has been stationed for some time. Private Evans has a bungalow on his property, and is now conducting a small store, which enterprise he considers quite a financial success," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. 136 Washington St., 1927 Manlius Directory.

Evans, Harold Brown. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1907; Post Graduate, 1908, known as "Goggie," and "Perky." U. S. Army.

Evans, Maurice Edward J. Manlius. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1907, known as "Diddy." U. S. Army. "Dr. Maurice E. J. Evans a veterinary in the East Division of the U. S. A., who has been making a western trip of inspection, spent the week-end at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Evans," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. "Maurice Edward Evans, former veterinary inspector of animals in the army and recently commissioned a lieutenant Veterinary corps has been ordered to report to General Mann commanding the Rainbow division "The first to France Corps." Lieutenant Evans has had leave for past 10 days at home and ...for Garden City, Long Island Wednesday to join General Mann," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/14/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Evans have received a letter from their son, Dr. Maurice E. Evans, first lieutenant in the veterinary corps, announcing his safe arrival in France. Dr. Evans is a graduate of St. John's school and of the Cornell veterinary college," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Lieut. Maurice E. J. Evans, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Evans is now traveling through northern France, purchasing horses for the French government. He is at present where not a word of English is spoken and, in a recent letter to his sister, Mrs. C. C. Carr of Syracuse, he describes himself as the most lonesome and homesick American in France. The parts of the country not visited by the Huns are pictured as being of unusual beauty, but desolation has followed the track of the invader. In his opinion two years will see the Huns so far beyond the Rhine that they will not soon be heard from," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Dr. Maurice S. Evans, U. S. A., was the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Evans, the fore part of the week, having returned last week from overseas. He left Thursday for the Mexican border where he is ordered to report Sept. 4. Dr. Evans has served six years in the army and hopes to secure his discharge soon after he reaches Texas. He has visited nearly every country in Europe in the past two years while engaged in buying horses for the army. In Spain alone he purchased 3,300 animals and he also made big purchases in Germany, France and Belgium. He was in Italy at the time Orlando left the peace table and with other soldiers, also on leave, he was ordered out by the American consul. For the last three months he has been touring the British Isles at the expense of the government while awaiting passage home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. 136 Washington St., veterinary, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Fayetteville, b. 1888 d. 1933.

Fanning, Adelbert C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Fargo, Howard. Fayetteville. "Howard Fargo...will leave Monday for Camp Jackson, S. C., "The Fayetteville Bulletin," 9/6/1918. "Homer Fargo returned Wednesday from Camp Jackson, having been given his discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Farnham, Willis C. Manlius. Washington St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. Member of the Manlius Volunteer Training Corps. "Willis Farnham, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Farnham, enlisted at the army recruiting station in Syracuse this week and left Wednesday for Fort Slocum," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/4/1917. Coast Artillery Corps, Regular Army, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/4/1917. "Bradley C. Farnham, 79, a Civil War veteran...died at the home of his son, Arthur C. Farnham, Washington street, Manlius...Mr. Farnham was born in Clare County, Michigan in 1838, but spent the greater portion of his life in Otisco, N.Y. Beside his widow, he is survived by two sons Osborne of Vernon Center, and Curtis of Cortland; daughter Eva, of Clare county, Mich., children of his first wife; a son by his second wife, Arthur C. Farnham of Manlius; and several grandchildren...One of his grandsons, Willis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Farnham has joined the U. S. Coast Artillery and is now at Fort Totten," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Willis C. Farnham, who a few weeks ago enlisted in the Coast Artillery, was awarded a diploma as a member of the graduating class (of Manlius High School), to which he belonged previous to enlistment," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Willis Farnham..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Private Willis Farnham has returned to Fort Adams after a four days' furlough at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Farnham," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/3/1917. "Willis C. Farnham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Farnham, writes the following letter to Manlius friends of on life in army: Newport, R. I., Aug. 4, 1917. Three months ago today, I was 'Sworn In' to the service of the United States at Fort Slocum. Since that time I have learned a great deal about humanity and army life. On May 2, I left Syracuse and started with twenty fellow volunteers for Ft. Slocum. The recruiting officer at Syracuse furnished each man with a ticket for Wehawken, and 21 cents for coffee. These few coppers were to furnish each person with three meals and in New York at that. We arrived at Wehawken at 5:45 a. m., and ferried to New York. As the boat, 'General Stanley' did not leave until 3 p. m. a half a dozen of us spent our spare moments wandering about the city. The ride from New York to Fort Slocum was extremely cold. At 6 p. m. we arrived at the Island, half frozen and equally as hungry. We were marched to the mess hall where we filled up with plenty of plain food. The food at Slocum was decidedly different than that which we were used to, and I might add far from as desirable. After mess, we were each requested to take a cold water bath, and it sure was cold. Then, in our quarters an expert pianist furnished us with plenty of rag and opera music. We were all up at 4 a.m. on the morning of the 4th and ready for what ever came our way; and we received our share before the day was over. First we were given a physical examination and then our teeth were examined. Those who passed the physical test, were then inoculated for typhoid fever also vaccinated. The doctors were none too gentle with their patients and worked very quickly. We were lined up and requested to remove all clothing to the waist line. One man painted a spot on the right arm with iodine and another cleansed the left. We kept moving and as we passed one of the doctors, 2,000,000 live typhoid germs were injected into the right arm, and the next one vaccinated the left arm. Some of the fellows fell unconscious from the effects of the 'knock' as it is commonly called. After this we were given tents to sleep in, drew blankets and our first clothing. Our clothing allotment consisted of one soldier's kit, which contained toothbrush, paste, razor, shoe brush, polish, and a 'house wife' or a small roll containing scissors, thread, pins, needles and buttons. We also drew 4 suits of light underwear, 6 pair of socks, two suits of khaki, one pair of leggins, two woolen shirts, a campaign hat, and one pair of shoes. As soon as we were sworn in, we were commanded to change clothing, which we did. Our old clothes, we could throw away, send home or sell, as we so desired. Some threw them aside, others sold $25 and $30 suits for $2. None brought over $3.50. I sent mine back to dear old Manlius. The boys from Syracuse were all split up and assigned to different companies. I was assigned to the 2nd Co. Coast Artillery. Each tent sheltered ten men, and the fellows in the tent with me were all fine chaps. After six days of rainy weather and nights which lacked sufficient heat to furnish one with a comfortable nights rest, the Coast Artillery Corps was assigned to Fort Totten, Long Island, 11 miles from New York. At noon, May 11, we arrived at Totten. We were greeted with a very fine meal, and the fellows were all frightened, not expecting to find such fine treatment. The officers at Slocum were very harsh and inconsiderable while at Totten, they were very friendly, kind, and agreeable. We were placed in tents and under quarantine for 20 days after our arrival. On May 31 we were mustered into the 2nd Co., regulars. Just my luck to be one of the very first to do guard duty. I was given a post nearly one-half mile long. It was long enough so that I covered it but three times in two hours. Each company at Fort Totten takes its turn at guard and there were six companies on duty, two being on special duty, such as dismounting of arms and doing work about the post. Eighteen men, three corporals and two sergeants are required for each guard. This number of men is divided into what is called 'reliefs.' There are three reliefs, each relief doing duty for two hours, and then a rest of four hours. On holidays and Sundays, the guard is extra long, being 30 instead of 24 hours. While on my post, at one time, I saw three hydroplanes, several motor launches, three ocean liners, a racing boat, a steam train, electric train and numerous sail boats. It was a very pretty scene. We were drilled very strenuously in infantry drill. Every soldier has to learn infantry drill, no matter to what branch he may belong. Our day's work started at 6 a.m., when first call for reveille was blown. At 7 we had mess; 8:30 drill until 11:15; mess again at 12 and 1:30 return to drill until 4:15. 5:00 was mess call again, and 5:45 first all for retreat, 6:00 assemblys for retreat. Then we had the evening for ourselves, which was generally spent playing ball. At 9 p.m. all lights and talking were cut out, and at 11:00 p.m. everyone was supposed to be in bed. June 1, we entered the barracks and we were pleased to leave the extremely uncomfortable tent cots. As soon as we entered the barracks, we began artillery drill. This was drill handling the 12-inch long mortar guns. These guns throw a shell of 1,045 pounds 13.7 of a mile. The firing is very severe on the ear drums. I was near the pit when two guns were fired at once and it was four hours later before I could again hear distinctly. Three of the so-called recruits were picked out and told to drill in the range tower - thanks to my high school education and especially in mathematics I was one of them. This came to good use in finding the range elevation, azimuth, and amount of powder used. It is a very responsible work and one little mistake in the tower may throw the whole pit, or where the guns are fired off and the shell is bound to miss the target. It was but a short time before I was told to learn to operate what is called the elevation box but commonly called the 'mystery box' because nearly everyone who has anything to do with it gets set back to the pits where the dirty and heavy work is doe. The range tower boys are nicknamed the 'khaki boys' by those who are in the pits because they do not have to wear the overalls. The boys in the tower have become efficient enough so that they can find the range. It was my duty to find the elevation, the amount of power and the speed and this could be done in as low as three seconds. The pits are very fast, also, the boys being able to sponge the cannon, after lowering it to a horizontal position, load powder in behind the projectile, close and lock the breach, insert the priming powder, elevate the gun, set the range scale and fire in as quick as 17 seconds. Each of the 11 men on a gun has his own duty to execute and believe me, there is no loafing. Fifteen days ago we left Totten headed for France. I was on pass that evening and was in New York city. When I returned at midnight, my possessions were gone, and the whole company was at work. By 9:30 a.m., the following day, we had loaded the boat and left the rest of the boys, and a group of weeping wives at the dock. At noon, we arrived at New York and here we boarded the train and left for Newport R.I. There were twelve cars filled with boys in olive drab who made the trip. Fort Adams is not nearly as pretty or pleasant as Fort Totten and Newport lacks a lot of coming up to New York. At the present time, all soldiers here are on restriction because of diphtheria in Newport, a town one mile away by water and three miles by land. We have been waiting patiently to leave for the front for the last two weeks, but no one seems to know when we are to go. At present, the large battleship is floating in the harbor, and there must be a reason for its appearance. There are about 7,000 men here now, some from nearly every state in the Union. A train load from California arrived nearly two weeks ago. When we arrive at France, we are to man three ten-inch rifles, mounted on huge steel flat cars. These cars are to be as small moveable forts and are to protect the coast of France. I was very lucky to be one of those who were assigned to the Railroad Coast Artillery. Very sincerely yours, Willis C. Farnham. Battery 'G;' 7th Regt. C. A. Brigade, American Expeditionary Forces," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Farnham have received a letter from their son, Willis Farnham of the Coast Artillery, announcing that he sailed Saturday from some port for 'somewhere in France,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917. "With the Regulars in France, March 1, 1918. Dearest Parents: Did March come in like a lion back in the States? The principal reason for my inquiry is that today, the first few flakes of snow have fallen since last of December. That may sound rather peculiar to you but the climate is one of the beauties of this battle crushed country. Until the past week, it has been warm enough so that we opened the doors and windows of our barracks and left the fires out nearly every day. It has rained but seldom and though no dust filled the air, still the weather condition and the climate reminds me of April weather in Central New York. And now that we had about decided that all of the winter had gone and left us to face the 'Spring Activities,' which are held every year in this country, down comes more snow--something seldom seen here. Do not get the impression by that statement that I am in Southern France. Not so! I'm sorry I cannot explain just where I am located, but I will say, that I can hear the big guns, not far from Verdun, sending forth their death carrying missiles. When I came to this camp last September, I passed through the Cemetery of Marne. It was quite a sight to see hundreds of graves bearing the French flag, and nearly as many with merely a cross at the head. Each one of these graves contain from 6 to 20 bodies. Those without a flag decoration were Boches. According to newspaper reports and those almost sacred things called letters, the people back home are depriving themselves of many luxuries and yes, I guess many necessities. But thank your heavenly stars that you do not suffer as the French. It is very seldom that we see an able-bodied Frenchman in civilian dress. The women and even young girls in their teens man the garbage carts, tend all railroad crossings, work in the fields as any man would, and even tend public stations in cities. Think if it! What would our friends and relatives think if they had such disagreeable work to do? I'm not sure the American woman would do as much for the United States--at this time. Of course after they were forced to undergo a few war time hardships perhaps they would do as nobly. I pray they never see that day. So some of the fellows do not find the comforts of home, in this man's war you say. Well, what do they expect? Really, I don't believe that some of the young men in the states realize that this war means so much to them. Of course there are many who are, to use the well-known slang phrase, 'yellow,' but I can't see where there is any manhood if a person will hold back and shirk from fighting for and protecting his country, his parents and his friends. If it is because of the hardships which they undergo in the service, that has caused them to hide. I fear they have been misinformed. For example, I will write of my treatment since taking the oath of allegiance, May 4, 1917 at Fort Slocum. First at Fort Totten, Long Island. There we had excellent food, quarters, amusements and accommodations. We were given passes from 6 p.m. to 7 a.m. whenever we asked for them and week-end passes from 1 p.m. Saturday until 8 a.m. Monday. We had movies three times a week and all the accommodations of the Y.M.C.A. At Fort Adams, R.I. There we were allowed out every night until 11:30 p.m. and for those who did not care to go to Newport, Providence or Fall River, the Y.M.C.A. had movies three times a week, free admission, and some kind of vaudeville entertainment on three of the remaining four nights. Here also, our feed was fine and though we slept on cots in tents, why still we were as happy a bunch as ever gathered. In France. Here, we have barracks to sleep in, as good food as while in the states though not served as classy, and all kinds of amusements by the Y.M.C.A. Some people may scorn the Y.M.C.A., but let me tell you, they are doing a great deal for the soldiers and you're not wasting a cent you may donate to the 'Y'. We have movies three nights a week--Vitagraph Films--and the Y has furnished the boys with musical instruments so that my friend Bondy the violinist, of whom I have often written before, has organized an orchestra which will rival that at the Empire. No, for my part, I'm being treated much better than I anticipated last May. I am among a Regiment of Old Timers. Many of them served in the Spanish American and still more in the Philippines. For all our being recruits, we have no difficulty with our comrades and get along fine. They treat us the same as if we had been with them since '98. I am contented here, even though I miss my friends and my comfortable home. I have gained weight since I joined the army and never felt better in my life. I really enjoy this life, and if I did not desire a more complete education, I would stay with it for some time to come. Your son, Willis C. Farnham. Battery G, 52nd Art., C. A. C., Am.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "Willis Farnham, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Farnham, has been promoted to First Class Sergeant Quartermasters' Department, U. S. A., and is now stationed at Troy, France, 12 miles from Paris," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Farnham of Washington street, are daily expecting the arrival of their son, Willis, who has been stationed in France for some time, and who is slated for an early return," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Supply Sergeant, Willis Farnham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Farnham of Washington street, has sent from France a German officer's helmet, with the wearer's name attached; two vases and a cigar holder, which are on display in the window of J. Donohue's barber shop. Sergeant Farnham has been assigned to the U. S. army of occupation in Germany," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/7/1919. "Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Farnham of Manlius last week received the following letter from their son, Sergeant Willis C. Farnham, who is with the Coast Artillery in France: Mailly C. Camp, France. Since Wednesday, when I last wrote to you, I have seen a little bit of what was once the battlefield. Last Friday, three other Sergeants and myself, enjoyed the use of a Dodge Sedan and its chauffeur from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. We left here at 7:30, or at least about then and drove to Chalons which is only 21 miles from here, getting there before 9:00. From there we went to Reims. The ride was very interesting between Chalons and Reims, because it still shows the stubborn resistance offered the Boche by the Poilus (French). The ground is just filled with trenches and barb wire entanglements. Hundreds of trees are broken off as the result of being hit, and we passed through many towns where not a building still stood. One cannot imagine the sight nor picture it to himself until he has really seen it. Dead horses are still along the roads. And Reims! In that whole city, which, before the war was about the size of Utica, I failed to find a building that wasn't ruined. We took several pictures of the Cathedral, and went to the Mayor of the city, obtained a pass and was shown through the great cathedral. The janitor who, by the way, never left the building during the entire bombardment, but lived in the cellar, could speak a very little English, and he explained as best he could, while our little knowledge of French helped out once in a while. Most of the altars of the Kings and Bishops have been removed to Paris, and the famous 'Rose Window' is safely stored in Paris. However, the building is a terrible wreck. He said that 280 shells hit it in one day. When you first see it, it appears to be rather small but when you get in it, you see that the pillars alone are about 6 feet in diameter. The French substituted a painting for the famous Rose window, on paper, and the Boche, only two kilometers away, fired at it until they supposed it ruined, not knowing it was a paper target. The cathedral was started in 1211 and finished in 1429. I have a couple of pieces of glass, which was part of a window, put in 1227. From Reims we went to Fismes, where the Americans had their hard scrap. Then to Soissons and Chateau-Thierry. Both of these battle scarred towns were beauties before the Boche spoiled them. From Chateau-Thierry we went to Belleau Woods, which is the place where the American Marines and the 7th Infantry had such a hard time. Here (these woods are but a short distance from Chateau-Thierry) we found hundreds of American graves, and although the battle took place in July still, German bodies are yet to be buried. We saw a boot sticking out of the ground, so one of the fellows kicked it. It was solid, and by using a stick, we soon found it was part of a decayed German's equipment. Just a couple of inches of dirt covered the body. It's no place for a weak hearted woman who is subject to drams, believe me. We drove back to Sezanne, and ate with French Majors at the best hotel in the city. Yesterday it was such a fine day, that five of us went for a walk and held a little pistol practice. I'm not an expert, but if a Boche ever got within range of my 'gat' it wouldn't be safe for him to remain there very long--in warm times. After smashing a few bottles and puncturing a few signs we went on to a little town where, with the aid of Eric Jacobsen's knowledge of French, (Eric is a pal of mine and Sgt. lst Class) we purchased two dozen eggs for $1.83, very cheap for here at this time of the year. The five of us came back to 'Jokes' shack and after visiting the American bakery, which is here, we had 24 eggs for 5 of us, and a dozen real rolls, a dozen real doughnuts, and coffee. I had to get cooking material from the Y. M. C. A. and also had to cook the eggs. Joe Creed, one of my best friends said that the only reason he didn't recommend me as cook for the company was because I drew more than a cook does already (cook $44.00). Gee but maybe those eggs didn't taste good! Sergeant 1st Class Willis C. Farnham, Railway Artillery Supply Depot, Finance Branch, A. P. O. 707, Amex. forces," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. 304 Smith St., P. O. clerk, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, buried June 5, 1984, ae. 86.

Farrar, DeForrest. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Fast, Frederick P. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Fearn, Irving K. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Feland, Logan. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps. "Advices have been received from Washington of the promotion of Colonel Logan Feland, of the famous Fifth Regiment of Marines, to the rank of brigadier-general. It was Colonel Feland who commanded the 'First to Fight' sea soldiers of the Fifth Regiment from the time they landed in France, in June, 1917, until the final shots were fired on the day of the armistice. In announcing the promotion, Secretary Daniels paid high tribute to the commander of the famous regiment, which with the Sixth Regiment of marines, had made such an enviable record of accomplishment throughout the war. Brigadier-General Feland will fill the vacancy in the Marine Corps caused by the voluntary retirement of Brigadier-General James Mahoney several days ago, after forty years of active service," New York paper cited in The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 27.

Fengar, H. Clay. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Ferguson, Glenn. Fayetteville. Papermaker, Mill St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Glenn Ferguson enlisted Monday in the U. S. marines and left at once for the marine barracks at Port Royal, S.C.," The Fayetteville Bulletin 7/27/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Glenn Ferguson, Marines, U. S. S. Hancock..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Marine, U.S.S. Hancock (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Ferguson, Henry. Manlius. At San Antonio, Texas, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

?Ferris, Louis Harvey. Fayetteville. "Signed up May 10, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being 802 S. West St., Syracuse, N.Y. (V-1), Fayetteville, N.Y.,-Syracuse (V-2). He was inducted into service at Newport, R.I. serving as Apprentice Seaman on U.S. Ship New Jersey. Discharge as a 2nd class Seaman received August 13, 1919 at Bay Ridge, New York," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Fiel, Leroy. Mycenae. Drafted, to go 5/26 to training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "A reception was held at Colonial Hall last Thursday evening for Henry Daniels and LeRoy Field, who went to Camp Dix last Saturday. The Red Cross chapter of Chittenango presented each one with a kit and two pair of stockings. Their neighbors and friends also remembered them with a purse of money," Mycenae news, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Private LeRoy Field of Camp Dix spent the Fourth with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Fiel," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daniels and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Fiel have received word that their sons, Henry Daniels and LeRoy Field are on their way overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fiel have received word that their son, Roy, has returned from overseas and is in New York," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919.

Field, Edwin. Manlius. "Local address Manlius. Served with the infantry," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Field, Stephen F. Manlius. To go to Camp Devens, 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Signed up February 23, 1918 at Manlius, New York (V-1) or Syracuse, N.Y. (V-2). His local address at the time being Manlius, N.Y. (V-1), Fabius, R.F.D. #1, (V-2 & Orig.). He was inducted into service at Camp Devens serving as a private with Co. H. 308th Infantry. He served overseas from April 21, 1918 to April 19, 1919 taking part in battles of Baccarat, Vesle Sector, Meuse-Argonne. He was gassed August 17, 1919. Discharge as a 1st class Private received May 9, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Finney, Henry. Minoa. "Mrs. Iressa McIntosh and daughter Ethel of Syracuse and Mrs. John Remlinger and children spent Friday evening with Private H. Finney at his home preparatory to his leaving Syracuse for Camp Dix," Minoa news, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/21/1917. "Henry Finney, who has been at home on a ten day's visit, returned Monday to Camp Merritt, N. J.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917. "Private Henry Finney of Camp Merritt, N.J., is home for the holidays," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. "Henry Finney, who has been home on a furlough has returned to Camp Merritt, N.J.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "Henry Finney of Camp Merritt is home on a ten day's furlough on account of the illness of his mother, Mrs. A. C. Finney," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Private Henry Finney of Camp Merritt is ill in a Hoboken hospital. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Finney, visited him there this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. Henry Finney, who has been at Camp Merritt for a year, has been honorably discharged from the service on account of ill health," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Mentioned as a returning soldier in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. "He signed up July 21, 1917 at Syracuse, his local address being Minoa, N.Y. (Vol. 1) or 99 Homer Ave., Cortland, N.Y. (Vol. 2 and Orig.). He was inducted into the Army, serving as a Private, with Co. D, 49th Infantry, Machine Gun Unit. He received his discharge July 22, 1918, at Base Hospital, New York," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Fisher, George H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "1st Lt., 31st F. A. 11th Division (Lafayette Division) Camp Meade, Md. Has had eight months service in France--two months active service on Lorraine Front with 5th Division. Returned to U. S. on Sept. 2, 1918, and assigned as above to train officers and men for overseas duty," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 26.

Fitch, Francis E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Fleegel, Edward. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Flegel (sic), Edward E. Signed up October 18, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at that time being Kirkville, N.Y., (V-1) or Minoa, N.Y. (V-2 also Orig.). He was inducted into service at Columbus, Ohio, serving as a Private with the 7th Regiment, Coast Artillery. Discharge as a Private received December 13, 1918 at Ft. Dupont, Delaware," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Fowler, Raymond P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Frank, Leon A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Frankenberger, Bertram. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain in Hawaii when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Frasier, Robert. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

Freeman, Francis P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Freeman, R. V. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Freeman, Robert R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Washington when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

French, Aaron. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Fuller, Loton. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Fulmer, Francis. Manlius. Machinist, Pleasant St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Francis Fulmer of this village (Manlius) and Fred Lowe of Fayetteville left today for Potsdam where they have been ordered by the local draft board for training at the Polytechnic Institute for special army service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

Gable, Philip L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Gaffney, Mason C. "First Lt. Mason C. Gaffney, 47, a native of Manlius, died yesterday of a heart attack while waiting to purchase a railroad ticket in Rochester, where he was attached to the Rochester ordnance district, the AP reported. He was the son of Rev. Matthew Gaffney, pastor of Trinity Presbyterian church in Manlius about 40 years ago, and Mrs. Gaffney. The family left there when he was a young boy, according to residents. Lt. Gaffney served with the navy in world war 1," The Post-Standard, 5/9/1944.

Gale, Dr. William. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Camp Devens, Ayer, MA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Gallagher, Daniel P. "Daniel Gallagher of Syracuse, a former Manlius boy, has enlisted in the quartermaster's department of the regular army and expects to be assigned to duty about July 1," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/1/1917. "Daniel P. Gallagher, a former Manlius boy, was last week promoted from private to Corporal in Battery A, 104th Field Artillery," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Corporal Daniel P. Gallagher a former Manlius boy, has notified his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Gallagher of Syracuse, of his safe arrival overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918.

Galleazi, Nicholai. Minoa. "....ordered to report ready for entrainment at the Court House Headquarters on Tuesday morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. Name is spelled Nicholas Galleazi with address of 212 E. 1st St., East Syracuse with sign up on 4/3/1918 and discharge on 7/9/1919 in History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Gallup, Perry Mozart. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1906; Post Graduate, 1907, known as "Peg." U. S. Army.

Gardiner, James L. M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Garlock, Harold O. J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Gaudio, Leonard (Gouido, Lenardo). Manlius. At Fort Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. 128 W. Seneca St., molder, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried June 16, 1970, ae. 81.

Gaugel, Arthur J. Fayetteville. "Six Fayetteville boys expect to leave Syracuse next Thursday for the cantonment at Camp Dix, near Wrightstown, N.J. to be trained for the battle against German autocracy. The men now called represent 45 per cent of the quota under the first call. Five per cent of the quota went forward a few weeks ago and are assisting to put the camp in readiness for the men who leave next week. The Fayetteville boys who have received cards notifying them that they have been certified by this district board and to hold themselves in readiness to leave on twenty-fours' notice, are Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Jacob Hullar, Jr., and Arthur Hughson," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/21/1917. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "J. C. Hullar, Walter Prentice and Arthur Gaugel, Fayetteville boys who went with the second contingent of drafted men to Camp Dix, have been transferred to a cantonment in Georgia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Arthur Gaugel, Camp Gordon," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. 40th Bat., 10th Field Artillery (as of 1/4/1918). "Sergeant Arthur Gaugel, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Gaugel, is one of three sergeants from his company admitted to the officers' reserve training camp at Camp Gordon, Atlanta," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "Arthur Gaugel was home from Camp Gordon, Ga., on a four-day furlough the first part of the week. He has completed a course in the officers training camp which entitles him to a commission as Second Lieutenant," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "J. Arthur Gaugel, who has been home on a ten days furlough from Camp Gordon, left Wednesday for Lockport where he will visit his brother, Dr. D. Paul Gaugel, before returning to camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. Arthur J. Gaugel of this village was one of the graduates of the Camp Gordon officers training camp this week, receiving a certificate which entitles him to a commission as second lieutenant when a vacancy occurs," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Lieut. Arthur Gaugel who recently graduated from the officers' training camp has been transferred from Camp Gordon, Ga., to Camp Jackson, S. C.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Lieutenant Arthur Gaugel of this village writes friends here that he has been successful in passing an examination for aerial observer and has been transferred from Camp Jackson, S. C. to Fort Sill, Okla., for training," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. "Lieutenant Arthur Gaugel, who has been home on a leave of absence, left last night for Camp Selfridge, Mich.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Lieutenant Arthur Gaugel returned Tuesday to the officers' training camp at Mt. Clemens, Mich.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Gaugel, Paul. Fayetteville. "Dr. Paul Gaugel, of Lockport, who holds a commission as lieutenant in the dental corps, was a guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Gaugel this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1917. Dr., Dental Reserve Corps (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Gaugel, Ward J. Fayetteville. "Ward Gaugel, who has been voluntarily inducted into service, expects to leave Saturday for Durham College, N. H.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "...Ward Gaugel will leave (Monday) for Durham College, N.H., for special training in army service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. "Ward Gaugel is home from the vocational training school at Durham College, Durham, N. H., The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Fayetteville, b. 1897 d. 1951.

Gay, George Stevens. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1907; Post Graduate 1908; 1909, known as "Misery" and "Jay," from Attica, NY. U. S. Army. Major at Camp Lewis, WA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Gee, Ralph K. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Geer, Joseph White. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Joe," from NY, NY. U. S. Army.

Gessman, Joseph. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Signed up June 28, 1917 at Newport, R.I., his local address at the time being 223 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, New York. He was inducted into service at Newport serving as a 2nd class Fireman on the U.S.S. comfort. He served overseas from April 9, 1918 to June 1919 crossing several times doing Convoy duty. Discharge as a 2nd class Quartermaster, received August 12, 1919 at Pittsburgh, Pa.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Gibbs, Ernest. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Gibbs, Howard E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Gifford, Benedict. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1908, known as "Bennie." U. S. Army.

Gill, Austin D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Gill, Charles O. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy. Lt. Commander, U. S. S. Seattle when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Girton, William E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "The majority of the men who attended the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg last summer and received their commissions, have been mustered out of the service. Lieuts. Girton, Jones, G. M., Bradley, F., and Schouten who attended this camp are back at school now, and it is expected that Lieut. Lightfoot will be back before Easter," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26.

Gleason, J. Philip. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Goldsmith, Elsworth. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Goodell, Wesley. Kirkville. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y.,, local address being Kirkville," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Goodell, Wilber W. Kirkville. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y.,, local address being Kirkville," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Goodfellow, Charles Adams. Fayetteville. Denied exemption or discharge by the County Exemption Board for District No. 2, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917. "Charles Goodfellow and Warren Smith of this village (Fayetteville) were among the selectives from this village sent with a contingent of 21 from this district Wednesday to Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918. Red Cross outfits consisting of sweater, socks and wristlets were furnished to Warren Smith and Chas. Goodfellow of Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Charles Goodfellow is home from Camp Hancock, Md., having been granted his discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. 103 Mechanic St., Fayetteville, contractor, 1927 Fayetteville Directory. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, d. 12/14/1969, ae. 78. "Signed up October 23, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Syracuse, N.Y. serving as a Private with Depot Brigade at Camp Wheeler. Discharge as a private received December 23, 1919 at Camp Dix," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Goodfellow, Coburn Ernest. Manlius. "Coburn Goodfellow has enlisted in Company C, National Guard," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Coburn Goodfellow..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Coburn Goodfellow is a private in Company C, located at Spartanburg. Mrs. (Bert) Goodfellow has received (from him) a box containing several fine specimens of cotton plants, some of which is just ready for picking, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/12/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow have received a service flag with two stars furnished by the county. Mr. and Mrs. Goodfellow are the only parents in this community who have two sons in the service, both boys, Edwin and Coburn, now being stationed at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, where the latter is ill in the army hospital, suffering from heart disease," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. "Coburn Goodfellow, private in the 107th Regiment at Camp Wadsworth, writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, that he is now out of the hospital where he has been ill since New years. Like all the other boys he says he still has a cold. He has been transferred to the 107th Regiment, sometimes called the Millionaires' Regiment because of the large number of rich New Yorkers in it. The mud is so deep he says the jitneys are unable to run between the camp and Spartanburg and the boys have to work to town. The letter which was written Jan. 17 says that no snow had been seen there up to that time," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/15/1918. "Edwin B. Goodfellow, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, Manlius has been promoted to quartermaster in charge of field bakery, 101 artillery, Camp Wadsworth. His brother, Private Coburn Goodfellow 108th Infantry, is again confined to the Spartanburg Base hospital suffering from an attack of heart disease," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918. Priv. Goodfellow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, is now at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C. and is expecting shortly to go overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Private Goodfellow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, is now at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C., and is expecting shortly to go overseas. His regiment is known as the 'Millionaire's Regiment,' owing to the fact that there are so many rich men's sons from New York in it," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow received a cablegram early in the week announcing the safe arrival of their youngest son, Coburn Goodfellow, in France. Private Goodfellow belongs to Company C, Captain Harry Farmer, Syracuse, commander," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Coburn Goodfellow, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, who is on the Western front, writes that he has already been in the trenches four times and has come out each time without a scratch. His older brother Edwin is in an army bake shop. The two brothers have not met since their arrival in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow have received word that their son has been wounded in France and is now in hospital," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. "A letter received this week by Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow from their youngest son, Coburn, states that he is still a patient in the Base hospital, No. 37, Dratford Kent, England, where he is undergoing treatment for injuries received while going over the top on September 29. While he is recovering from these wounds, he was taken ill with influenza. He speaks highly of the care and nursing which our boys receive over there, and says that anyone who is working for the Red Cross, either in America, England or France is sure doing their bit. Soon after his removal to this hospital he was told that he was to have a visitor from Manlius, and was much surprised and delighted to find his caller to be his former friend and pastor, Rev. Charles R. Vickery, who is stationed about ten miles from Dratford. This was the first Manlius man Private Goodfellow had seen since his arrival over there," The Manlius Eagle, 11/21/1918. "The 108th Infantry, Twenty-seventh division which includes many Manlius boys, has won the most coveted honor on the field of battle. Major General O'Ryan has cited the entire regiment for the 'exceptional valor of officers and men.' Citations also have been issued to the 105th Infantry, the 107th and the 104th and 108th Machine Gun Battalions. Following the main battle of Duck Valley on September 29th-October 2d, when the Hindenburg line was pierced for the first time, the 108th infantry returned to the line October 14th and again on October 17th. It was withdrawn from action October 21st and so far as can be learned it has been in no engagement since that time. The men of the Twenty-seventh division of the American army, who are coming home soon and who include the former Syracuse units of the National Guard, have received, through their commander, a letter of praise from Field Marshal Haig for the brave manner in which they shattered the Hindenburg line Sep. 29," The Fayetteville Bulletin, November 29, 1918.

"Corporal Fred W. Miehls of Niagara Falls, a comrade of Private Coburn Goodfellow, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, now a patient in Base Hospital No. 37, Kent, England, and Private Georgia of New York, were entertained at supper at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Goodfellow last Wednesday evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919. "Miss Helen Goodfellow has received a letter from her younger brother, Coburn, who has been in a hospital for some time, that his arm which suffered a German bullet wound, is now troubling him again," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "A number of Manlius soldiers arrived in New York this week from overseas with the 27th Division. These include Captain Reginald Ballantyne of the 105th Ambulance company, Q. M. Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle of the 102d Ammunition Train and Private Coburn Goodfellow of Company C. The men are all now at Camp Merritt and will come home after the big parade of the 27th Division in New York on March 22. The 105th Ambulance Company of the 102d Sanitary Train saw much service, even though it did not get right behind the big guns. It stayed at Brest most of the time, loading wounded soldiers onto transports...From Brest the company went to Rosel and was there just five days within sound of the guns when the kaiser quit. Then the men went to a rest camp at Corbie. The town had been all 'shot up.' No civilians were left in it, and the place which had a population of perhaps 30,000 was as vacant as a garret. The ambulance company and the other men sent there had it all to themselves. The 102 Ammunition Train, after training all summer near Bordeaux was sent to the front September 1. They got into battle about four miles from Verdun and kept the guns supplied until the armistice was signed. They ploughed over all kinds of roads day and night. They were in the St. Mihiel drive and in the great battle of Dun-Sur-Meuse on Nov. 1-3. The Ammunition Train was in many of the hottest campaigns, but the nearest it came to a casualty was when a 'freight car' shell demolished a truck in which a driver, a helper and five passengers were riding," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919. "First Class Private Coburn Goodfellow of company C, 27th Infantry, U. S. A. returned to Camp Merritt Wednesday forenoon after a three-day furlough, which was spent at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow. Private Goodfellow is the possessor of a number of interesting souvenirs which were displayed at the two social gatherings, which were given in his honor at the family home Monday and Tuesday evenings. About sixty friends and associates of the returned soldier welcomed him back to the social life of the community," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/21/1919. "Private Coburn E. Goodfellow, Company C, 108th Infantry, received an honorable discharge at Camp Upton Monday and has returned to his home in Manlius. Private Goodfellow who was inducted into service in Syracuse May 24, 1917 helped break the Hindenburg line, under Captain Harry H. Farmer of Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/4/1919. Manlius St., machinist, 1927 Fayetteville Directory. Buried Pompey Hill Cemetery, d. 1935. "Signed up August 4, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Manlius, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Syracuse, N.Y. serving as a Private with Co. C, 108th Infantry. He served overseas from May 10, 1918 to March 6, 1919 taking part in battle at Hindenburg Lines. He was wounded September 29, 1918. Discharge as a Private received March 31, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Goodfellow, Edwin. Manlius. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Edwin Goodfellow..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Mrs. Bert Goodfellow visited her son, Edwin Goodfellow, at the Officers Training camp, Plattsburg, the last of the week. The men at camp left for Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, South Carolina, Wednesday. Mr. Goodfellow is a member of Battery A," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/12/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow have received a service flag with two stars furnished by the county. Mr. and Mrs. Goodfellow are the only parents in this community who have two sons in the service, both boys, Edwin and Coburn, now being stationed at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, where the latter is ill in the army hospital, suffering from heart disease," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. "Edwin B. Goodfellow, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, Manlius has been promoted to quartermaster in charge of field bakery, 101 artillery, Camp Wadsworth. His brother, Private Coburn Goodfellow 108th Infantry, is again confined to the Spartanburg Base hospital suffering from an attack of heart disease," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow have received word that their eldest son, Edwin, who belongs to the 27th Field Bakery sailed overseas Sunday, June 29," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1918. "Coburn Goodfellow, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow, who is on the Western front, writes that he has already been in the trenches four times and has come out each time without a scratch. His older brother Edwin is in an army bake shop. The two brothers have not met since their arrival in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mrs. Bert Goodfellow has received word from her eldest son, private Edwin Goodfellow, that he is seriously considering a six-months' stay in Siberia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/30/1919. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Goodfellow have received word from their son, Edwin Goodfellow, that he expects to arrive home from overseas about June 20," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919.

Goodfellow, Harry James. Fayetteville. "Harry J. Goodfellow has accepted a position as clerk in the office of county auditor at a salary of $900 commencing his duties on Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917. "Harry Goodfellow has resigned his position in the office of County Auditor to accept a position as secretary in the army recruiting office in Syracuse." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. Stenographer, Recruiting Service, Syracuse (as of 1/4/1918). "Harry Goodfellow who is on duty at the Syracuse recruiting office, has been promoted to corporal, "The Fayetteville Bulletin," 4/19/1918. Corporal Harry Goodfellow of the Syracuse recruiting office has been designated to attend the officers training camp at Camp Johnston, Fla. to prepare for a commission in the quartermaster's department," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Sergt. Harry Goodfellow is home from Fort Slocum for a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 109 Center St., Fayetteville, postmaster, 1927 Fayetteville Directory. "Signed up December 14, 197 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Syracuse, N.Y. serving as a Private with Co. C., 63rd Infantry. Discharge as a Corporal received September 30, 1919 at Ft. Ontario, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Goodfellow, Jasper. Fayetteville. "Jasper Goodfellow of the battleship Oklahoma spent Monday with relatives in town," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1918. Name appears as a star on the Methodist Episcopal Fayetteville church service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/91918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Goodfellow, William. Fayetteville. "William Goodfellow left yesterday for Philadelphia where he has a position in the navy yard," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. "William Goodfellow is home from the Philadelphia navy yard on a 29-day furlough. He says where he found a force of less than a thousand men a year ago there are now over 2,000 and ships are being built with wonderful system," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

Gooley, James. Fayetteville. "Private Charles O'Brien writes from France that he has just met the first Fayetteville boy he has seen since he landed in that country several months ago. While at mess one day he heard some one call 'Hello, Chuck' and looking up he saw James Gooley, formerly of the Palmer farm marching through the camp. Jumping from the mess table he marched alongside Gooley to the railroad station and swapped news about the 'folks back home,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918.

Goslowski, John. Minoa. "John Gosloski of the coast artillery who has been home on a five days' furlough, returned Monday to Fort Hamilton," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "John Golosky is home from Fort Hamilton on a ten days' furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Graham, George W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Granger, Edward R. Manlius. St. John's School. U. S. Army. "Lieutenant Edward R. Granger, commandant at St. John's school the past year, left Wednesday night for Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky...the school is established for training officers for the field artillery, and commissions as first lieutenants in the field artillery for the regular army are given those successful in passing the tests after two months' instruction...The call to report for active military training comes to Commandant Granger after nine years at the Manlius School. He was graduated there in 1912. Following graduation he taught three or four years, and since 1917 has acted as commandant," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag (name misspelled as T. R.), in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "First Lieut. Edward R. Granger, Battery A, recognized as one of the best artillery instruction officers in the National Guard, has been obliged to resign his commission because of disability. Lieutenant Granger is one of the military instructors at Manlius Schools. As one of the officers of the battery, he worked hard with Capt. Guido F. Verbeck to build up the artillery unit to a point of efficiency that earned for it special recognition during the Mexican border service. Lieutenant Granger was disapproved when the battery was ordered to the border last summer because of a heart derangement. Not satisfied to accept this decision as final, Lieutenant Granger accompanied his command to the border and was again marked for disability discharge. Because of his disability as an instructor he was detached from the battery and detailed as an instructor with the regular army artillery at Brownsville and remained at the border during the time that the guardsmen were there. All this time he hoped that the condition of his heart would improve, but as it did not he had to resign, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/20/1919. "A son has been born to Captain and Mrs. Edward Granger. Captain Granger is now engaged in Boy Scout work at Baton Rouge, La.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/30/1919.

Green, Burton C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Green, Willard M. St. John's school cadet. 2nd Lt., S. A. T. C. Rochester University, Rifle Instructor and Commander of Co. 'A'. Won the battalion color," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 24. U. S. Army.

Greenfield, Bradford. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Greenhouse, Max. St. John's School, former instructor.

Greenwald, Robert Clark. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Greeny," from Detroit, MI. U. S. Navy.

?Greiner, Edmund A. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Signed up April 1, 1918 at Syracuse, New York, his local address at that time being East Syracuse, New York. He was inducted into service at Camp Dix serving as a Private with 311th Machine Gun, 78th Division. He served overseas from May 2, 1918 to May 10, 1919 taking part in battles of St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Grand Pre. Discharged May 30, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936. (East Syracuse is in the town of Dewitt).

Greiner, George Edward. Kirkville. "Signed up September 28, 1917 at Syracuse, New York, his local address at that time being Kirkville, New York. He was inducted into service at Camp Dix serving as a private with 10th Battalion, 157 Depot Brigade. Discharge as a private received August 14, 1918 at Fort McPherson, Ga.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Greisinger, John J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Griffin, Philip Van R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Griffis, Elliot. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Grimes, William Middleton. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as "Nig" and "Ben," from Washington, D.C. U. S. Army.

Grogan, George M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Guitner, Harold W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hadley, Paul Albert. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Had" and "P.A." from Syracuse, NY. U. S. Marine Corps.

Haines, Charles Stevens. Minoa. "....ordered to report ready for entrainment at the Court House Headquarters on Tuesday morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918.

Hale, Frank Lucien. Fayetteville. Foreman bds, R2, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Private, F. Lucian Hale of the Fourth New York Ambulance Company, has gone to Hammondsport, where he will take up aviation preparatory to taking the examinations for a commission in Uncle Sam's Flying Corps. Mr. Hale, best known to his wide circle of friends as 'Buddy,' had his first taste of the life as a birdman while on the Mexican Border with the ambulance company. Making the trip to San Antonio at the time of the First New York Cavalry-Third Texas Infantry football game, he was extended an invitation by an aviator to accompany him on a flight. Mr. Hale accepted, and since has been an enthusiastic booster of the aerial corps. He had at first planned to take the examination for a commission in the Officers' Reserve Corps, but later determined that he preferred being a real soldier to a reservist. Mr. Hale is in the employ of the Solvay Process Company," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/20/1917. "Anxious to get to the front, F. Lucien Hale, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Hale, couldn't wait until the United State Aviation Corps could be ordered to France, he went to Toronto Thursday and enlisted as a cadet in the Royal Flying Corps. Young Hale had been in the New York National Guard for nearly four years and was on the Texas border eight months. While there he was detailed as chauffeur for the officers at headquarters. At San Antonio, Tex., he made a trip with Miss Katherine Stinson in her flying machine and as a result of that trip he decided to enter the United States service as an aviator. He said he would much prefer to be in the United States service, but as the states are now allied with the British it is all for the same cause. He will be in training at the University of Toronto and at the aviation training camp until August, when he will sail for England. After graduating from the Fayetteville high school Mr. Hale joined Troop D, First Cavalry, and was detailed to the medical branch. When the Fourth Ambulance Corps was organized he was transferred and went with it to Texas. He has become a British subject by reason of the fact that he has joined the Royal Flying Corps, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917. "Mrs. Frank H. Hale and son, Theodore, have returned from a brief visit with Lucien Hale at Camp Borden, Ontario," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. "F. Lucien Hale, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Hale, who enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps at Toronto late in June, has been signally honored in having been selected from 200 cadets in the corps as the one best qualified to give an exhibition of aerial stunts before the Duke of Devonshire. Hale performed so satisfactorily that, after the exhibition, the Duke requested that the young man be brought to him, shook hands, congratulated him on his performance and introduced him to members of his staff. A report received Tuesday from Camp Borden, where the flight was made, states that Hale set a record it will be difficult for any of the cadets to excel. After ascending to an altitude of 4,500 feet he executed eight successive loops, two 'stalls and tail slides,' and 'vertical banks.' Hale has so far perfected himself in ordinary flying and transmission of wireless from aeroplanes that this week he has been transferred to the aerial gunnery class. As soon as he becomes proficient at this phase of modern warfare he will be officially pronounced fit for active service and will be granted a ten days' furlough, when he will visit his home at Fayetteville. He is expected in about a month," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. "Lt. Lucien Hale, who enlisted in the Royal Flying corps at Toronto, Canada, in June, is the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Hale," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Frank Lucian Hale, another Fayetteville boy who is now in the Royal Flying Corps at Toronto, Canada, has been denied exemption by the appeal board and will have to come back and fly under his native colors," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917. "Following the practice being adopted by other churches, the Men's Club of Trinity church (Fayetteville) has presented the church with a service flag having three stars for three members of the parish now in the service--Charles Skinner, Lucian Hale and Jacob Hullar, Jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917. "Lieut. Lucien Hale is now acting as instructor at the new winter Canadian aviation camp on the Mexican border which was established last week. Mr. Hale was notified through error that he was certified for service in this country but later it was found that the exemption board had misplaced his exemption papers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Lucien Hale, Canadian Aviation Corps..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "The following unique letter was written by Lieutenant Lucien Hale of Fayetteville while instructing a cadet in handling a machine in the air near Fort Worth, Texas: In the air around Camp Everyman, Friday P. M. Dear Ones: I thought it would be quite romantic to write you all a letter from the air. I just signaled to the cadet in front to take control of the machine. He is a new man so I have to watch him a bit. This is a wonderful day, we are only a thousand feet high now but it is so clear that I can see Dallas very plain, about forty-five miles from here. We are now going over the outskirts of Fort Worth. Have climbed another 1000 ft. and the aneroid reads 2000 ft. now. It is quite bumpy and the cadet is having a terrible time trying to keep the machine right side up and straight. I have to grab it every little while and straighten it for him. The country looks like a great map from here, absolutely flat. I haven't any helmet on and I can hardly hear myself think on account of the engine. Another machine is coming straight for us about 2 miles away. I don't suppose the cadet sees it so guess I'll have to turn for him. Going over the village of Joshana now, it sure looks very small. We are at 4,500 ft. We are following a railroad and just passed a train which looked about an inch long. The cadet is getting fairly good now so I guess I will go down and practice landings with him. Will write you again sometime. Love to all, Lucien," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1917. Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Hale received news Wednesday that their son, Lieut. F. Lucien Hale, instructor in the Royal Flying Corps at Camp Everyman, Tex., was injured when the engine of his airplane went dead and his machine crashed to the ground. Lieut. Hale was testing a new machine, as is his custom before allowing members of his class to use it, when at a height of only two or three hundred feet the engine refused to work and he was obliged to volplane to the ground. The distance was so short that he had no chance to make the usual safe spiral descent and, but for the fact that the machine struck a telegraph wire which broke its downward momentum young Hale would probably been fatally injured. As it was, the letter states that he was badly cut on the face and hands and otherwise bruised. The airplane, a $6,000 machine, was totally wrecked. Lieut. Hale is conceded a daring but careful aviator and he has previously had narrow escapes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918. "Lieutenant F. Lucian Hale, instructor in the Royal Flying Corps at Camp Everyman, Tex., is home on a two-weeks' furlough upon the expiration of which he will sail for France with the other members of the corps who have been training in Texas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Lieut. Lucien Hale of the Royal Flying Corps sailed the first of the week for 'over there,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "Because he brought down three German airplanes in a single-handed encounter with several enemy aircraft, during which his machine was riddled and nearly incapacitated by Hun bullets, Lieut. Lucien F. Hale of Fayetteville of the British Royal Air Service, has been recommended for the distinguished flying cross. In a letter to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Hale, Lieutenant Hale described the aerial conflict parts of which follow: Friday afternoon I was patrolling up and down the line alone at 1,000 feet. As I turned and flew north I observed a formation of our bombing machines coming from the west. I also saw a formation of Hun machines above them. Just before the bombers crossed the lines the Huns attacked them. The bombers seemed to be getting the worst of it, so, like the brave man that I am not, I opened my throttle and went to their assistance. I picked out one Hun and attacked him and shot him down. His machine broke to bits in the air. Just then I heard the rat-tat-tat of a machine gun and saw the tracer bullets flying by me. I instantly pulled my machine up into a climbing turn and did a half roll and came down on the fellow who just before that had been shooting at me. I held my fire until I nearly rammed him and then let him have a burst from both of my guns. He turned over a couple of times, then went down in flames. Again I heard machine guns in back of me. I looked back and I guess all of the eight remaining Huns were on my trail shooting at me. I knew it would be folly for me to try to fight the whole bunch, so down I went in a spin into the clouds which were three or four thousand feet below me and about the same distance from the ground. There was a strong west wind blowing and I knew that I must have drifted back over the Hun lines quite a distance. When I got down into the clouds I pulled out of the spin and found myself going due east by my compass. I didn't have any idea where I was by that time, so I went down under the clouds to see. As it happened I came out directly over Cambria, which at that time was five or six miles back of the Hun lines. I immediately turned and started west again. Again I heard a machine gun, and turning, I saw a Hun below and behind me. Evidently he had followed me down, knowing that I would have to come out of the clouds to get my bearings. I turned and dived at him with both guns firing. Missed him, so zoomed up and half rolled and dived at him again. This time I got him cold at point blank range and let him have it. He went down like a brick and burst into flames when he crashed. That was three Huns to my credit in one fight and since then all of them have been confirmed. But my troubles were not yet over. The minute the Hun Archie batteries saw their machine go down, they started shooting everything imaginable from the ground at me. So up I went into the clouds and they just filled the clouds with Archies. I could hear the 'Boof-Wang' as it burst all around me. However, I tried to keep my machine going straight west, but couldn't manage it very well and the first thing I knew my compass was again pointing due east. So down I went again where I was and to my utter despair found myself still over Cambria, and again Archie started at me. Well I did that three times and each time I came down I found myself over Cambria. The Archies and flaming onions were getting uncomfortably close by this time and also my engine started missing and spitting at a great rate. So down I went and started contour chasing back to our line making a target for every machine gun for miles around. Three or four times I suddenly came upon a bunch of Huns in a group. Down I'd go on them with both guns. I did that all the way back--that is, until my ammunition was exhausted. Finally, after what I thought were hours (in fact they were minutes), I crossed our lines and managed to stagger safely back to the airdome. You should have seen my machine. The main spars of three wings were shot through; three holes in my radiator caused the water to run out and engine to heat up and run irregularly. My control wires were shot through so that they were held by one strand of the cable wire. However, with a new engine, three new wings, control wires replaced and various other things repaired, my machine is ready for the next show. The best part of the whole affair is: the bombers whom I assisted came back and made a report of the whole affair and said that I had actually saved their formation, because the minute I appeared on the scene all the Huns left the bombers and came at me. I put in my report and later the bombers' report came in confirming mine. The C. O. saw it and the general heard about it and recommended me for a D. F. C. (Distinguished Flying Cross). Don't know whether I'll get it or not, but can you imagine me going up to Buckingham Palace and having the king pin this medal on my breast. I have been out here just six weeks and I now have eleven Huns to my credit," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918. "The memorial service last Sunday was largely attended. Two gold stars were placed on the service flag. The blue star represents Lieut. Lucian F. Hale of the Royal Flying Corps, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. "Lieut. Lucian Hale writes his parents from France that he is hoping to be home by January 1 but is not certain when he can leave. He was given a three-weeks' rest period just before the big drive and it is not believed that he participated in it. At last reports he had twelve Hun planes to his credit," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Under date of Nov. 17 Lieutenant Lucien Hale writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Hale, that he has been released from duty and is now touring the devastated portion of France in his airplane with which he has won so many victories. He has the word Syracuse painted on the side of the machine. He believes that there is a great future for aviation and has made application for a captaincy in the Royal Flying Corps. In case his application is granted he expects to remain in France for several months at least," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Lieut. Lucien Hale, Fayetteville aviator and member of the British Royal Flying Corps, whose deeds of valor abroad have contributed much to the history of American fliers who cast their lot with the allied nations, may continue duty in Russia, Egypt or Germany. In a letter to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale, under date of Jan. 5, he says: 'I have a hunch that I will be leaving France very soon. They may let me go home and again they may send me to Germany, Russia or Egypt. If I have to go anywhere besides home I hope they send me to Egypt, where it is warm. If I go down there, it will be for the purpose of flying Handley-Paige machines with mail, etc., all over Egypt and India. I would like to spend a month or two in all these places. I think I'll try to wangle it some way. I'll probably have to fly four or five more machines in England before I leave for good. It is great fun. When I get a particularly good machine, I go over the channel low down and frolic about all the steamers,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/14/1919. "According to records just made public by a member of the Royal Flying Corps who has just returned to this country Lieut. Lucien Hale of this village broke the record for accuracy in firing 500 rounds of ammunition while putting his plane through battle stunts at the Central Flying School in England where he was an instructor in flying. Lieutenant Hale wrote his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Hale of the record he had made last September but asked them not to make it public owing to the rules of the Corps regarding secrecy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/7/1919. "On account of the illness of his mother, Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Royal Flying Corps, has applied for his discharge from the British Army and is expected to reach his home in Fayetteville in a few weeks. Lieut. Hale is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Hale, and served on the Mexican border as a private in the Fourth Ambulance Corps. He has about 12 German planes to his credit and is perhaps one of the best American airmen with the British forces. He was at Cologne, Germany, ready to start with his squadron for India when the news of his mother's illness reached him, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/27/1919. "Private funeral services for Mrs. Frank H. Hale, prominent charity worker of Onondaga county were held Wednesday afternoon at her late home "The Maples," just west of the village...Two cablegrams have been dispatched to Lieutenant Hale, who is now in England. They were sent while Mrs. Hale was in a serious condition. A third was sent Monday and it is expected will bring Lieutenant Hale to this country. A cablegram was received from England July 4th in which Lieutenant Hale said that he expected to arrive home in August," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/18/1919. "Captain F. Lucien Hale, who won signal honors with the Royal Flying Corps of the British army overseas, arrived home Wednesday night after having been released from service Tuesday at Montreal. Captain Hale arrived at Montreal Tuesday on the Megantic and was met by his father, Frank H. Hale, his brother Theodore, his sister, Mrs. George G. Gregory and Mr. Gregory and motored with them Wednesday to Fayetteville. During his visit to the United States the Prince of Wales will officially present the Distinguished Flying Cross to Capt. Hale, who is one of several Americans to be so honored by royalty in his native land. Two years ago Captain Hale entered the British service, after first being rejected for the American aviation service. He trained at the Toronto and Deseronto fields in Canada, served as an instructor in Texas and then went overseas. Further training in England was followed by battle front duty, and when he stepped from his plane for the last time after service on the western front and in Germany he had credit of flying 1,200 hours. There were several high lights in Captain Hale's career which won him the prized decoration and rank of captain when he was released from service, although today is the official date of his discharge. He claimed fifteen German machines and was officially credited with twelve. He broke all records for accuracy in aerial gunnery, diving down and shooting at a ground target, the silhouette of an airplane, while in the Central Flying School in England. This record with the machine gun was 187 bullseyes in 1,000 shots. He received credit of bringing down three German planes in one day in action near Cambria, in the big drive in which tanks first appeared. He was shot down six times out of control, and yet managed to make a safe landing, being called by his comrades as the bearer of a charmed life. 'I'm a fatalist' said Captain Hale yesterday, and I guess that helped me in a pinch. The most narrow escape I ever had in my flying career was when two flying wires were shot off. That was at the height of 18,000 feet and a Hun swooped down out of the sun and got me before I saw him. I fell 15,000 feet in a spin before I got the machine under control. They thought I was a goner and did not follow me down or they would have got me easily as my machine limped slowly over the lines. The other times I was shot down I was just as lucky.' American aggressiveness has not left pleasant feelings behind in England, Captain Hale said in commenting on Anglo-American relations. The British, he said, seem equally divided on the question of the league of nations. Captain Hale did all his fighting in the same machine, the one with 'Syracuse' painted on it. When he brought it to England for the last time it crashed. The aviator said it would have been junked, as hardly an original part was left. In one battle nearly all the instruments were shot away and it was a miracle he was not hit, as many bullets struck within a few feet of him," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/26/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. "The Men's Club of Trinity church was entertained at Mr. Frank H. Hale's home on last Tuesday evening, with an account by Lucien Hale late Captain in the English flying service, of his thrilling experiences and career as an aviator. Captain Hale illustrated his anecdotes with a large collection of souvenirs, trophies and photographs," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/24/1919. "The Prince of Wales will pay a signal honor to a Fayetteville boy Saturday when he will pin a Distinguished Flying Cross on the breast of Captain Lucien Hale. The ceremony will take place on the H. M. S. Renown as it lays at anchor in the North River. Captain Hale won the cross as a lieutenant in the Royal Flying corps, when he protected a bombing squad from German air attack and without assistance crippled and sent to the ground three of the German machines. He was forced to land in his machine and made the ground 300 yards within his own lines. Although Captain Hale already has the cross in his possession, he has been summoned to present himself on the ship at 9 a.m. Saturday so the Prince can pin it on him. The notification came in the form of a letter from Capt. D. S. Wallace of the general staff for the British army. Captain Hale is directed to appear at the investiture unaccompanied and to wear uniform if it is still in his possession. However, it is said that military dress is optional. He is directed to arrive at the 83d street landing, North river, just off Riverside drive, at 8 a.m. Saturday and there he will meet an officer of the British military attaché's staff. Enclosed in the letter was an identification card. Captain Hale entered the service and received instructions at Toronto, Canada, in June, 1917. Later he went to the Canadian flying field at Fort Worth, Texas, where he acted as instructor for several months. One hundred cadets graduated under him. At Fort Worth, Captain Hale had the reputation of being one of the greatest flyers who was stationed there. He was sent to France in April, 1918, and during his service there officially had twelve German planes to his credit. He returned to this country with an honorable discharge in September of this year," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/21/1919. "Capt. F. Lucien Hale, who is to be decorated in New York this week by the Prince of Wales for his daring exploits in the war as a member of the British Flying Corps, is to be New York agent for the Curtiss Airplane Corporation. He will demonstrate and sell planes in this territory for the company, and will be assisted by a number of fliers he is to recruit. As a part of the proposed plans he will establish a school for flying at Fayetteville, where aviators for pleasure and commercial planes will be trained. At the same time Onondaga lake is to be used for the development of flying boats," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/21/1919. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, 1895-6/7/1944, ae. 48-10-1.

Hale, John J., Jr. Manlius. "John Hale, second son of Mrs. Cora Hale of Manlius, who has enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, and who leaves with a Syracuse delegation on Friday, was tended a farewell reception...by the young men and women members of I. W. Bender's and Mrs. James Tuttle's classes from the M.E. Sunday School (Manlius). Refreshments were served and the honor guest was presented with a fine khaki toilet case," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. "John Hale, second son of Mrs. Cora Hale of Manlius, who recently enlisted in the United States Marines, left Saturday for Paris Island, North Carolina. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Leon Hale has enlisted in the navy and left Wednesday for Paris Island, S.C. An older brother, John is now with the U. S. navy, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/7/1919. "John Hale, an enlisted Marine who served in France, is now expected home soon by his mother, Mrs. Cora Hale," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/15/1919. "John Hale of the U. S. Marine Corps was given a welcome home reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Wetmore Thursday evening, which was attended by two other returned overseas men, Carroll Adams and Albert Mawson," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. 110 Smith St., machinist, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, buried June 27, 1985, ae. 89.

Hall, Gardiner H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hall, J. Nelson. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Hall, Warren K. Kirkville. "Signed up July 12, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Kirkville, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Syracuse, N.Y. serving as a Private with Co. E, 23rd Infantry. He served overseas from September 20, 1917 to June 19, 1919 taking part in battle at Chateau Thierry, and others. Discharge as a private received May 12, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Hall, William W., Jr. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Shrimp" and "Skinny," from Malden, MA. U. S. Army.

Hallenbeck, Eston H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hallissy, Patrick. Minoa. Name appears with a gold star on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. Died in the War.

Hand, Charles. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, d. 3/20/1939, ae. 50.

Hand, Homer. Fayetteville. "George Hand has received a letter from his brother, Homer Hand, announcing that he is now located at one of the U. S. repair shops south of Paris. While working in a shop at Metuchen Mr. Hand volunteered for duty overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, d. 9/25/1934, ae. 37.

Hannan, Wendell H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Hanson, Joseph M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hanson, Leland S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Harden, Harry A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Harmon, Rochford S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Harper, Kenneth M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Harrigan, Daniel. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Harris, Charles Dashiel. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain, 6th Engineers, killed in action or died of wounds, The Haversack, 1919, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Harris, Charles L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Harrison, Edward R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hastings, John H., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Hawley, Alexander. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hawley, Chester C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hayes, Raymond W. Manlius. "....ordered to report ready for entrainment at the Court House Headquarters on Tuesday morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Ray Hayes, former conductor on the Suburban, of Camp Gordon, Georgia, and Claude Benedict of Camp Dix, N. J. have both received their discharge and are now spending a few days in Washington before returning home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919.

Hazeltine, Charles B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Major in Signal Corps, Camp McClelland, AL when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Hearn, Murray D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Heffron, Warner K. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Henderson, Dudley. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Herben, Stephen, Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Herrick, Hayden K. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Herrick, Walstein B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Herring, Harry T. St. John's School, former instructor.

Herringshaw, George. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Fort Bliss, TX when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Hill, George S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hills, Paul W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hills, Robert P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

?Hinds, Harold. "Harold Hinds, who is in training at New Haven, Conn., visited friends in town Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/25/1918. Possible former resident.

Hinshaw, Carl W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hislop, John H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hitchcock, F. T., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hoag, Floyd W. Manlius. "As several of the (Manlius) Band members are likely soon to leave in the craft it is very doubtful if the concerts will be continued the entire summer. The conductor, Ethan Caldwell, expects soon to be ordered in special work as draughtsman, having passed the physical examination Wednesday. Floyd Hoag, drum player, and Harry Thompson, clarinet player, expect to leave in the next draft. William P. Coats, trombone player leaves next week for Ohio. Charles Wright, a former trombone player, is already in the service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Floyd Hoag, who was recently placed in Class 1 by the local draft board, has been ordered to report at Jacksonville, Fla., for clerical duty in the Quartermasters' Department on July 15, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Floyd W. Hoag is home from Camp Jackson, Fla., on a ten-day furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Floyd Hoag, who recently returned from Camp Joseph E. Johnston, Florida, has accepted a position with the law firm of Miller & Matterson in Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/7/1919. 117 Smith St., lawyer, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery, buried Jan. 10, 1959, ae. 65.

Hoag, Russell Alonzo. Fayetteville. "Signed up October 2, 1918 at Syracuse, New York, his local address at the time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Syracuse, New York (Syracuse University) serving as a private with Co. B., Students Army Training Corps - Infantry," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Hollander, Sumner R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Holmes, Frank E. "A former Manlius boy who has lately been employed on the Buffalo Evening News, is one of the Buffalo contingent of drafted men to leave for camp this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. In army training, according to the obituary of brother Horace Holmes, age 30, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. In France, according to funeral coverage of brother Harvey Holmes, age 32, 10/25/1918.

Holmes, Leslie. Manlius. At Fort Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. In army training, according to the obituary of brother Horace Holmes, age 30, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. In France, according to funeral news of brother Harvey Holmes, age 32, 10/25/1918.

Honors, James E. Fayetteville. "His local address at the time of assignment was Skaneateles Falls, N.Y. (V-1) or Fayetteville, N.Y. (V-2). He was inducted into service at Camp Dix serving as a Corporal with Co. C., 308th Machine Gun Unit. Discharge was received May 16, 1919," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Horton, Gifford D. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies. Captain, flight commander, British air service, reported missing after being cited for bravery, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Captain, 98th Air Squadron, British Air Service (missing in action), either killed in action or died of wounds, The Haversack, 1919, Manlius, NY, p. 103. "Clifford D. Horton was a cadet at Saint John's during the years 1910-1912. (From the "Gazette and Bulletin of Williamsport, Pa). Clifford D. Horton, of New York city, formerly of Williamsport, while in an aeroplane fight recently with a German flyer, was seen to fall behind the German lines, and nothing definite concerning his fate has been learned. Yesterday's 'New York Times' told the story: Captain Gifford D. Horton, a flight commander of the British air service and formerly of New York city, was officially reported missing yesterday through a letter sent by Major H. MacD. O'Malley, commanding the 98th Air Squadron of the British forces in France. Major O'Malley stated that Captain Horton, encountering enemy planes, was observed to fall behind the German lines, but that nothing definite had been learned concerning his fate. Captain Horton got his training in Canada, and was soon promoted from the rank of Second Lieutenant to a Captaincy for his gallantry. In a recent letter to friends he wrote: 'Three of us were attacked by eighteen enemy triplanes and three Albatross scouts, and when the twenty-one dived at us we couldn't run even had we wished to. So we turned and fought them. We brought down two Huns in flames, and all got back safely. One of the observers, however, was shot through the foot and our planes were simply riddled with holes. The entire 98th Air Squadron, of which Captain Horton was a member, was cited on April 18th for bravery. The citation named the squadron the 'Never Failing,' " The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 14.

Hotaling, Ernest. Fayetteville. Laborer, South St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. Denied exemption or discharge by The County Exemption Board of District No. 2, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917. To go to Fort Dix, April 29, 1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "News from Fayetteville soldier boys indicates that they are all on their way 'over there'. Charles O'Brien, Ernest Hotaling and Wilbur Mason have been transferred to Newport News, embarkation point for southern camps and it is believed that Lieut. Donald Armstrong sailed from that port last Thursday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Ernest Hotaling of Fayetteville, who recently returned from overseas with the army of occupation, has returned to his former position at the Stokes garage," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/8/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 205 Thompson St., Fayetteville, machinist, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Hubbard, Lyle G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Lieutenant, Air Service, died of disease, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Hubinger, James E., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hughson, Arthur T. Fayetteville. Farmer, Mechanic St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Six Fayetteville boys expect to leave Syracuse next Thursday for the cantonment at Camp Dix, near Wrightstown, N.J. to be trained for the battle against German autocracy. The men now called represent 45 per cent of the quota under the first call. Five per cent of the quota went forward a few weeks ago and are assisting to put the camp in readiness for the men who leave next week. The Fayetteville boys who have received cards notifying them that they have been certified by this district board and to hold themselves in readiness to leave on twenty-fours' notice, are Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Jacob Hullar, Jr., and Arthur Hughson," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/21/1917. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression. The arrangements for the farewell were made by Henry Straub and Chester R. Eaton. Some $50 was raised for the supper and as nearly all expenses were donated. Mr. Straub gave nearly $30 to W. M. Jones, Red Cross treasurer, to be used for a celebration when the next contingent goes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Arthur Hughson of the 308th Machine Gun battalion at Camp Dix, was home over Sunday" The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Arthur Hughson, Mach. Gun Batl., Camp Dix..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Arthur Hughson and Will Keefe were home from Fort Dix over Christmas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. Co. C., 308 Battalion (as of 1/4/1918). "Arthur Hughson, who is stationed at Camp Dix, is spending a few days with his mother, Mrs. John O' Dell. "Private Arthur Hughson of Camp Dix is home for a few days. He has fully recovered from a severe illness and has been unable to do but little drilling since," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Private Arthur Hughson returned Wednesday to Camp Dix after spending a six day furlough at his home here," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears as a star on the Methodist Episcopal, Fayetteville church service flag; at Fort Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Elmer J. Houghson, 32, died Saturday morning of pneumonia at the home of his mother, Mrs. John O'Dell of Fayetteville. He is survived by his widow, a daughter, Nellie, and son, Alfred; six sisters, Mrs. Frank Smith, Mrs. Nettie Smith and Mrs. Minnie Hopkins of Fayetteville, Mrs. Allie Pease and Mrs. Hattie Johnson of Cortland and Mrs. Pearl Niles of Syracuse and three brothers, Arthur of Camp Dix, Roy of Syracuse and Leon of Fayetteville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. "Arthur Hughson is home on a few days furlough on account of the death of his brother (Elmer)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. "Arthur Hughson is home from Camp Dix, having been given his honorable discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Arthur Hughson, who has lately returned from Camp Dix and Miss Mary Jane Burdick of Norwich were married on Thursday night of last week at the home of the groom's mother by Rev. H. Clay Poland. Private Hughson met Miss Burdick while at camp and their acquaintance proved lasting. They will make their home in this village (Fayetteville), The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. "Arthur Hughson has moved from the Hatch House (Fayetteville) to a farm near East Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/16/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, d. 4/4/1944, ae. 51.

Hullar, Jacob C., Jr. Fayetteville. Chauffeur, Genesee St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Six Fayetteville boys expect to leave Syracuse next Thursday for the cantonment at Camp Dix, near Wrightstown, N.J. to be trained for the battle against German autocracy. The men now called represent 45 per cent of the quota under the first call. Five per cent of the quota went forward a few weeks ago and are assisting to put the camp in readiness for the men who leave next week. The Fayetteville boys who have received cards notifying them that they have been certified by this district board and to hold themselves in readiness to leave on twenty-fours' notice, are Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Jacob Hullar, Jr., and Arthur Hughson," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/21/1917. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression. The arrangements for the farewell were made by Henry Straub and Chester R. Eaton. Some $50 was raised for the supper and as nearly all expenses were donated. Mr. Straub gave nearly $30 to W. M. Jones, Red Cross treasurer, to be used for a celebration when the next contingent goes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "J. C. Hullar, Walter Prentice and Arthur Gaugel, Fayetteville boys who went with the second contingent of drafted men to Camp Dix, have been transferred to a cantonment in Georgia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917. "J. C. Hullar left Wednesday to visit his son at Camp Dix before the latter's transfer to Georgia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917. "Following the practice being adopted by other churches, the Men's Club of Trinity church (Fayetteville) has presented the church with a service flag having three stars for three members of the parish now in the service--Charles Skinner, Lucian Hale and Jacob Hullar, Jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917.

"News has been received from Camp Dix that Jacob Hullar, Jr., and William Keefe have been appointed corporals," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Jacob Hullar, Depot Brigade, Camp Gordon..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Buglar, 10th ___, 157th Depot Bat. (as of 1/4/1918). "Jacob Hullar, Jr., is expected home from Camp Gordon having been granted a discharge for physical disability. Owing to flat feet he was unable to stand the long hikes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, January 1/11/1918. "J. C. Hullar returned Saturday from Camp Gordon, Ga., having been given an honorable discharge on account of physical disability," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918. "Jacob Hullar, Jr., who went to Camp Syracuse a week ago for special service left Monday for Camp Meade, Md.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Jacob Hullar, Sr., has received word from Camp Meade that his son, Jacob Hullar, Jr., is improving after a severe attack of pneumonia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. "Private Jacob Hullar, jr., was home from Camp Meade, Md., the past week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/22/1918. "Private Jacob Hullar, jr., returned Saturday from Camp Meade where he has served several months in the Quartermaster's Corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 419 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville, merchant, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Humbert, John Horace. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Jack" and "Sam," from Madison, NJ. U. S. Army. Captain in France when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Hunter, James T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

?Huntley, Frank D. Kirkville. "Among those from this section who went to Camp Syracuse Tuesday for special and limited service were David W. Kennel, Manlius; Floyd R. Bristol, Minoa; Herbert H. Lade and Frank D. Huntley, Kirkville; Herbert W. Coakley, Fayetteville...(and) Phillip A. Clark, Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. "Signed up September 18, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Kirkville, N.Y. (V-1) or East Syracuse (V-2 & Orig.) He was inducted into service at Syracuse, N.Y. serving as a Private with Co. A., 428th Labor Battalion. Discharge as a Private received June 12, 1919 at Camp Merritt, N.J.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Husler, Edward G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Huston, Arthur T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hutchings, Richard H., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Hyatt, Walter H. Manlius. At Fort Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30, 1917. "Floyd Muckey, Walter M. Hyatt and Waite Cross are the only Manlius boys who leave with second contingent of drafted men Friday for Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Walter LaGrange and Walter Hyatt have been inducted into the army for special service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Private Walter Hyatt is home from Camp Lee, Virginia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918.

Ingison, Clayton. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Inoick (Ineick), Edward. Kirkville. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

Ivie, J. Kenyon. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jackson, Robert F. St. John's School, former instructor. "The entire Corps wishes to extend its heartiest congratulations to Major R. F. Jackson, who has just received his commission as Major in the Ordnance Department of the National Army. He will probably be called before this issue is printed. Everyone is very sorry to see him leave St. Johns, where he has been stationed since last September as professor of Military Science and Tactics," The Windmill, April 1918, p. 5.

Jacobs, Walter F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

James, J. Frederick. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jamison, Forrest. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Janeway, Vanzandt. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jencks, Charles David. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "High Jinx," from Pawtucket, RI. U. S. Army.

Jenkins, Lawrence E. St. John's School, former instructor. "Lawrence E. Jenkins, an instructor in St. John's School, and former student in the New York State College of Forestry, has received a commission of second lieutenant. Lieutenant Jenkins took a special course of training in the personnel school of Plattsburg and has been ordered to Annapolis, Md., as personnel adjutant," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Lieut. Jenkins who received his commission at the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg last summer, has returned to school as an instructor," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 23.

Jenne, Francis M. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Jenne, William Mc K. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Jennings, George W., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jennings, Paul B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jewett, Edgar B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jewett, Richmond. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Johnson, John N. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Johnson, Laurence Andrew. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Graduate class of 1917. From Norwich, N.Y., known as "Larry." Best All-round Athlete Trophy, '17. "At St. John's graduation, "the Cornell-Manlius trophy went to Lawrence A. Johnson of New York, now stationed at Madison Barracks," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. "Two boys from St. John's school Larry Johnson and Bruce Petit, have been wounded in France, according to an unconfirmed report. Johnson is known as the greatest basketball star ever turned out at the military school. A year ago he was commissioned a first lieutenant and when last heard from was attached to the One Hundred and Fifty-third Infantry Regiment," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. Co. F, 309th Infantry, 78 Division, The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 23. "Lieut. 'Larry' Johnson, who received his commission at Madison Barracks and has been stationed at Camp Dix, spent a day at the school. We all remember Larry as the best basketball player that ever set foot in the Dodge Gymnasium," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 24.

Johnston, Samuel R., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Lieutenant. At Sedan (France) on the 11th of November," The Wind Mill, December 1918, p. 15.

Jones, C. Milton. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Jones, Daniel. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

?Jones, David C. Manlius. At Camp Wadsworth, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Signed up June 5, 1919 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Canastota, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Syracuse, N.Y. serving as a private with Co. C., 108th Infantry. He served overseas from May 10, 1918 to March 6, 1919 taking part in battles at Hindenburg Line, etc. Discharge as a private received March 31, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Jones, George M., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "The majority of the men who attended the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg last summer and received their commissions, have been mustered out of the service. Lieuts. Girton, Jones, G. M., Bradley, F., and Schouten who attended this camp are back at school now, and it is expected that Lieut. Lightfoot will be back before Easter," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26.

Jones, Gordon M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jones, James. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jones, Marshall J. H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Jones, Dr. O. P. "Dr. O. P. Jones, who recently left Manlius to open a veterinary office in Sherburne, has been assigned to duty in the army and Mrs. Jones will return to Manlius to reside during his absence," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917.

Jones, Parker. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Joy, Jesse. Fayetteville. "Private Jesse Joy has received his discharge at Camp McClellan and is at the home of his sister, Mrs. Claude Edwards," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/21/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Joyce, Fred C. Manlius. In France, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Joyce, Rev. Francis. "Rev. Francis P. Joyce a former Fayetteville boy, now chaplain of the Seventh Field Artillery, United States army, is now a member of the staff of Major-General John F. Pershing, commander of the American expeditionary forces in France. In a brief letter just received by his sister, Mrs. William M. Oley of Jamesville, Chaplain Joyce makes a modest announcement of the new distinction that is to be added to the many others that have come to him since he entered the army thirteen years ago. He took up his new duties at the headquarters of the commanding general in France October 1. As chaplain of the Seventh Field Artillery Father Joyce who is well known in Fayetteville, where he was born and received his early education, was stationed on the Mexican border while the trouble between that country and the United States was at its most acute stages and accompanied General Pershing's punitive expedition on the trail of Villa. He received his appointment as chaplain from president Roosevelt and was attached to the Tenth Cavalry. Just prior to his last service at the border with the Seventh Field Artillery he was detailed to duty at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. When Huerta the deposed dictator of Mexico was on his death bed at El Paso, where he had been arrested by the United States authorities on a charge of conspiracy, he summoned Father Joyce, who was with his regiment in the border city. The American army chaplain gave religious consolation to the aged Mexican fighter and administered the last rites of the dying soldier. Father Joyce was educated in the public schools of Fayetteville and Syracuse. He attended Ottawa University, St. Charles College in Maryland and finally St. Bernard's Seminary, Rochester. There he was ordained by the late Bishop Bernard J. McQuaid. Father Joyce was with the American troops in the Philippines before he was assigned to Fort Leavenworth, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917.

Joynt, Fred H. Manlius. "Fred Joints, who made his home with Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Norton, enlisting a few years ago for service in the Philippines, writes from France, that he has been promoted to major," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Franklin St., laborer, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Jullo, John. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Kain, Harold. Fayetteville. "Harold Kean from training ship Newport, New York harbor is home for the holidays," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. Student Merchant Marine (as of 1/4/1918). "Harold Kain, who is in training in Newport for the Merchant Marine, is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Kain," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. Name appears as Kane on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. John Kain have received word that their son Harold, who is in the Marines, has arrived safely overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/22/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 110 Mechanic St., salesman, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Kantak, Leonard. Manlius. Chauffeur, R2, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Frank Battle, Leonard Kantak and Carl Shafer have enlisted in the munition supply corps and expect soon to be employed as chauffeurs on trucks hauling munitions from the railroads to the trenches in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Leonard Kantak..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Leonard Kantak of Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C., is enjoying a furlough of ten days at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Kantak," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. "Private Leonard Kantak is home from Camp Wadsworth for a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "According to a letter received Monday from Leonard Kantak, it is likely that he and Frank Battle, who are both Manlius boys, are just now watching for periscopes. The letter follows: An Atlantic Port, May 29, Dear Editor: Having a few moments to spare I thought I would let you and the people of Manlius know that Frank Battle and I are still on this side of the big pond. In the best of health, and enjoying the life in the army very much, even if we do have to work rather hard at times, but that is to be expected and we have no kick coming. We left Camp Wadsworth, May 18, and arrived here the following afternoon. We do not expect to stay here for a very long while, for this is a port of embarkation. The troops are kept here only until they have all of their equipment, and then shipped overseas. We have been issued every thing that is necessary, so no doubt by the time that you get this letter we will be on our way, thank goodness, for we have been in the service a long time and as yet, we have not seen a thing that looks like a German, with the exception of myself. This is a dandy camp where we have all the necessities of life at hand, whereas at Wadsworth, it was a case of getting along as best we could, for as you know, we are living in tents all of the time, so we appreciate the barracks that we have got to live in now. Everything is kept as clean as possible, all through the camp, but when we came here it was in terrible condition, for the troops that left it certainly left all of their rubbish in heaps, so it was a case of we fellows cleaning it up. I am attached to Headquarters, and have got charge of the Commissary Department, for the Motor section of the Ammunition Train. I have to see to it that all of the companies are kept in supplies, such as food, ice, coal, etc. Of course it gets rather tiresome at times, but then it is a case of putting up with it for the time being. The job pays $44 per month and 'found' so that is not so bad as it might be. Sincerely, Supply Sergeant Leonard Kantak," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "In a letter to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Kantak, Sergeant Leonard Kantak says that what he needs most 'over there' is the Manlius Eagle and chocolate bars. 'Even if it is old when I get it, it's going to look darn good to me, so try to send it every week,' he writes of the paper. 'We can't buy chocolate here,' is about the only complaint he makes of the country aside from the flies. 'I can't see what in the world the Germans keep on fighting for, since they do not stand the least bit of a show now.' 'The Yanks sure are ripping them up the back,' his letter continues. 'If you only knew the number of men that are being landed in France every week you would be awfully surprised. The general opinion over here is that the war will be over in three months.' Sergeant Kantak sailed for France more than two months ago, and his parents had not heard from him until Monday, when all in a bunch came three letters. 'This is an awfully quaint place,' he writes, 'everything is so old fashioned, especially the way people dress, just like one sees in pictures. 'Yesterday when we sat down in a cafe a chicken came in and began to get its own dinner from the crumbs on the floor. It certainly looked funny. 'But if all France is like the country around here I don't blame the people for fighting for it,' and he pays a compliment to Pompey by asserting that the country around their camp is 'very like Pompey, only far more pretty, and instead of having fences around every lot they have hedges.' He regrets that it is becoming necessary to use the hedges for fuel, 'which is becoming very scarce.' He wrote of the noise made by the big guns they have in camp. 'France is a dandy country, but I shan't be sorry when the war is over and we are all coming back. For, while I'm enjoying myself, give me the U. S. A. There if a fellow wants to go out for a little time he can do so without walking five miles to get there,' one of his letters stated," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "France, July 26, 1918. Dear Mr. Bennett: Having a few moments to spare I thought I would drop you a few lines. We have been here just about a month. We left the States about the middle of June and had one dandy trip all the way over, with the exception of the last couple of days, and then, it was quite rough. It took quite a while to come over, for a couple of the ships in the convoy were not very fast, so the rest of us had to slow down in order that we would not lose them, but none of the boys seemed to mind the least. The gun crew of our ship got one sub the first day out. The boys sure did do some yelling when one well-placed shot hit it. That was the only excitement we had all the way over with the exception of getting a little seasick, and believe me that is exciting, for I went through it, and so am a pretty good judge. We landed in one of the most beautiful harbors in France and it certainly was a wonderful sight when we were about three miles from shore. It was impossible for the ship to land at the dock, for the water is too shallow for very large boats to enter, so we had to transfer to small lighters, and dock that way. It seemed good to set foot on land again, for we were on board ship just two weeks, so you can just about imagine how good it seemed to have some real honest to goodness dirt under your feet. After docking, we had to walk four miles to a rest camp where we stayed for four days. All we did there was just hike around; for it was tiresome on board ship for such a long time. That camp and surrounding country was the most beautiful I have ever seen. It was simply wonderful. I am sorry that I do not possess the ability to describe it, for it is beyond me. The people used us fine, but one thing they know how to do and that is to charge the price for anything. They have got it over stores in Manlius like a tent. After four days of complete rest, we left for this camp by tram cars, but it was one awful ride for if we did go fast, the cars were so light that they certainly would have left the tracks. It took us about thirty six hours to make the trip, and it was the longest I have ever put in, in all my life. We were in luck for we rode in regular passenger cars while most of the boys were in freights. It was one grand and glorious ride all the way down. I will never complain about the Syracuse & Suburban again for Suburban cars are Pullmans compared with the roads in this part of the world. We alighted from the train about 8 p.m., four long and dreary miles from camp. Gee I thought I would never make it, for I was as tired before starting out and then having to walk that distance with a heavy pack, oh boy, some life, I'll say so. We arrived at our barracks about 10 p. m. so we made up our bunks and rolled in for the night. We were rather surprised (pleasantly too) to find barracks for we were under the impression that we would have to sleep in tents again. This camp is not situated badly at all, for we are in walking distance of several small towns, so we get around quite a bit. These small towns are all right, but they are so dawgone dead. Gee, it is impossible to have any kind of a time in one of them. Give me the U. S. A. every time. Enough for this time, but will write again soon, and for goodness sake, if you know anyone who wants to write tell them to do so for letters are a life saver for us fellows over here and a letter is worth its weight in gold. Give my regards to the folks. Supply Sergt., Leonard Kantak, Hdqts. M. B. 102nd Ammunition Train Amex Force, Via N. Y.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Private Wilbur Mason writes Fayetteville friends from Viserny, France that things do not look very encouraging for his early return. A few days before the letter was written he says he saw Sergeant Chester W. Madison, Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle while they were on their way to port of embarkation for their homeward trip," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "A number of Manlius soldiers arrived in New York this week from overseas with the 27th Division. These include Captain Reginald Ballantyne of the 105th Ambulance company, Q. M. Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle of the 102d Ammunition Train and Private Coburn Goodfellow of Company C. The men are all now at Camp Merritt and will come home after the big parade of the 27th Division in New York on March 22. The 105th Ambulance Company of the 102d Sanitary Train saw much service, even though it did not get right behind the big guns. It stayed at Brest most of the time, loading wounded soldiers onto transports...From Brest the company went to Rosel and was there just five days within sound of the guns when the kaiser quit. Then the men went to a rest camp at Corbie. The town had been all 'shot up.' No civilians were left in it, and the place which had a population of perhaps 30,000 was as vacant as a garret. The ambulance company and the other men sent there had it all to themselves. The 102 ammunition Train, after training all summer near Bordeaux was sent to the front September 1. They got into battle about four miles from Verdun and kept the guns supplied until the armistice was signed. They ploughed over all kinds of roads day and night. They were in the St. Mihiel drive and in the great battle of Dun-Sur-Meuse on Nov. 1-3. The Ammunition Train was in many of the hottest campaigns, but the nearest it came to a casualty was when a 'freight car' shell demolished a truck in which a driver, a helper and five passengers were riding," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919.

Karp, George D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Kearns, Charles. Minoa. "Friends have word this week of the safe arrival in France of Private Ernest Carhart and Charles J. Kerins," (probably Kearns). The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Keefe, William C. Fayetteville. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression. The arrangements for the farewell were made by Henry Straub and Chester R. Eaton. Some $50 was raised for the supper and as nearly all expenses were donated. Mr. Straub gave nearly $30 to W. M. Jones, Red Cross treasurer, to be used for a celebration when the next contingent goes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "News has been received from Camp Dix that Jacob Hullar, Jr., and William Keefe have been appointed corporals," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. "There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Corp. William Keefe, Hosp. Corps, Camp Dix..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Arthur Hughson and Will Keefe were home from Fort Dix over Christmas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. Corp. 309th Field Hospital Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "William C. Keefe of the 309th Field Hospital Corps, writes from Camp Dix to the Bulletin thanking the people of Fayetteville who so generously helped to make a merry Christmas for the Fayetteville boys in camp. He says: 'To the boys in camp nothing appeals more than a box from home. My box helped to decorate the table at a banquet on New year's eve. To C. R. Eaton, Henry Straub, Emmet O'Brien and Wilbur Mason who acted as committee especial thanks are due,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "William Keefe is expected home from Camp Dix today to spend a few days before going to France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "William C. Keefe who is connected with the medical department of the Field Hospital, Camp Dix, returned Sunday to his duties after spending a four days furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Keefe," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Keefe have received news that their son William Keefe, of the 309th Field Hospital, has arrived safely overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Mrs. William Keefe has received a letter from her son, Private William Keefe who is in Germany, saying that he is expected to sail for home the last of May," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/28/1919. "Priv. William Keefe of the 309th Field Hospital Corps has notified his mother of his arrival Wednesday in New York. He left immediately for Camp Dix where he will receive his discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/30/1919. "William Keefe and George Williams who served overseas with the 78th Division received their discharges at Camp Upton last week and are now at their homes here," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/6/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Kellar, Oliver. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Keller, David H., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Keller, J. E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army

Kelley, Edward. Fayetteville. "News has been received from the front this week of the gassing of two Fayetteville boys, private Walter Voight, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Voight and private Edward Kelley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kelley," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

Kelley, Thomas. Fayetteville. "Thomas Kelley and Carl Daggett of this village (Fayetteville) enlisted Saturday at the army recruiting station in Syracuse and are now at the expansion camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/14/1917. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression. The arrangements for the farewell were made by Henry Straub and Chester R. Eaton. Some $50 was raised for the supper and as nearly all expenses were donated. Mr. Straub gave nearly $30 to W. M. Jones, Red Cross treasurer, to be used for a celebration when the next contingent goes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "News comes from Camp Greene that Thomas Kelly, one of the Fayetteville boys at that camp has been transferred by request to a machine gun battalion that will leave next week for the front," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Thomas Kelley, Inft., Camp Greene, N. C...." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Carrol Daggett and Thomas Kelley are home from Camp Wadsworth over New Year's," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. "Thomas Kelley, who is at Camp Green, N. C. writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Kelley that he has been promoted to corporal. With ten other men he has been detailed to study the new Browning machine gun so that he can instruct others," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. Co. D, 30th Inf. (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Kelly have received word from their son, Thomas, that he has been transferred to the Third Division of the army of occupation in Germany," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/7/1919.

Kendall, Ed. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Kennel, David W. Manlius. "Among those from this section who went to Camp Syracuse Tuesday for special and limited service were David W. Kennel, Manlius; Floyd R. Bristol, Minoa; Herbert H. Lade and Frank D. Huntley, Kirkville; Herbert W. Coakley, Fayetteville...(and) Phillip A. Clark, Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

Kenny, John. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Keough, Charles. "Charles Keough of Camp Syracuse spent the week-end with his mother, Mrs. Mary Keough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. "Charles Keough, a former resident of Fayetteville, who has been in training at Camp Syracuse left Thursday for Camp Fremont, Cal., where he has been assigned to the 22d infantry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918.

Kidder, Pancoast. "Capt. Pancoast Kidder, formerly of Fayetteville, with an insurance business in Syracuse, now chief billeting officer of an American army unit, has arrived in France, friends have been informed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/15/1918.

Kimball, Harlan D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Kimball, Louis. Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. James Donahue visited the latter's son, Corporal Louis Kimball of the U. S. Recruiting Service at Fort Slocum, near New York, last week. Corporal Kimball received notice that he was made a beneficiary in the will of an eccentric Utica man whom he had befriended several years ago and who died a short time ago, leaving an estate of $750. He will receive $200 as a token of the man's appreciation," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/23/1917. "Louis Kimball is home from Plattsburg on a furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Sergeant Louis Kimball of Fort Slocum is spending a few days with his mother, Mrs. James Donahue," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917. "The picture of Louis Kimball, son of Mrs. James Donahue of this village is used to illustrate a poem "The Soldier" in the current number of the Ladies Home Journal. Young Kimball who is in the recruiting service stationed at Fort Slocum, makes a fine looking soldier as depicted by the International Film Service. While in Manlius his fine figure commanded attention, especially among the girls," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "Corporal Louis Kimball, son of Mrs. James Donohue of this village, is still maintaining his reputation as a basketball player. He is now a corporal in the army and stationed at Fort Slocum where last week he almost saved the Fort team from defeat by the Syracuse University team. Of the game a local paper says: At first, the Syracuse team ran away with the game and it was with surprise that the fans saw the soldier boys apparently put to rout. Then Kimball who played a grand game for Fort Slocum, evened up matters only to have the college team score on a foul. He later returned, however, at the end of the half when the soldiers tallied again on a foul. It was 10 to 3 in favor of Syracuse. Only one field goal had been contributed by Fort Slocum in the initial half. Then came the rush of the second half between the soldiers caused a flurry by getting through the Syracuse defense several times. Parker scored and then Kimball again and the college team then added a foul. Again Kimball broke through and got it 'over the top' to the cheers and joy of the big following of the team from the Fort. The lead was pulled down to 11 to 9 when the college players again forged to the front and increased their lead. Parker and Kimball again came to the rescue of their mates and they made a brilliant effort to force their way across 'No Man's Land' to the enemy line but the whistle brought the great battle to a finish before they could accomplish their purpose," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918. "Sergeant Louis Kimball of Fort Slocum has been ordered to the Officers Training Camp, with prospective promotion," The Fayetteville Bulletin," 4/5/1918. "Sergeant Louis H. Kimball of Fort Slocum is home for two days. On Saturday he plays on the Fort Slocum ball team in an exhibition game at Albany for the benefit of the Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Sergeant Louis Kimball of Fort Slocum is enjoying a brief furlough at the home of his mother, Mrs. James Donahue," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1918. "Sergeant Louis Kimball of Fort Slocum, New York, has received a valuable prize for throwing a javelin 135 feet in a recent athletic contest, according to reports sent his mother, Mrs. James Donahue," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Sergeant Louis Kimball, who is home on a furlough from Fort Slocum, expects to sail for Russia at an early date," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Sergeant Louis Kimball was home from Fort Slocum over Sunday on a four-day furlough. Sergeant Kimball is the star pitcher for the Fort Slocum team which has a heavy schedule for the season which keeps the former Manlius ball tosser in fine form," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919. No. 5 Hamilton Apts., 1927 Manlius Directory.

King, George D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

King, George Leroy. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1908, known as "Rip." U. S. Army.

King, Henry C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

King, Maurice Pickard. St. John's School cadet, class of 1917. U. S. Marine Corps. From Bangor, Me., known as "Delik." "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. The other cadets who have been recommended by General Verbeck at the request of the government are: ...Maurice Pickard King of Bangor, Me...Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Appointed Second Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps," The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 27. "Navy Department orders announce that Maurice P. King and Roy L. Stickles of the Manlius Schools have qualified for their permanent appointment as second lieutenants in the United States Marine Corps. The orders also indicate that Carl W. Meigs has qualified for his probationary appointment in the same rank," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917.

Kingman, Ralph W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Major at Chickamauga Park, GA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Kinsella, Daniel. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. 504 Orchard St., flag seater, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Kinsella, John J. Fayetteville. "John Kinsella of Boston, who has been spending his vacation with his parents was called to Camp Devens, Mass., Monday by a telegram from his draft board ordering him into service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. "John J. Kinsella of this village, stationed at Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass., has been promoted to Sergeant, 1st Class, Q. M. C.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. Sergeant-Major John J. Kinsella, who is home on a five-day furlough returns Sunday to Camp Devens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. "Sergeant Major John Kinsella of Camp Devens is spending the week at his home here," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "John J. Kinsella returned Sunday from Camp Devens, Mass., having been released from service last week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/7/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 127 W. Genesee St., merchant/grocer, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Kinsella, Thomas. Fayetteville. "Hamilton Armstrong, Ira Ellis, Francis Sutter, Hugh Carey and Thomas Kinsella have been discharged from the student officers' training corps at Syracuse University which demobilized Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 504 Orchard St., mgr. coal yard, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Kirschler, Charles F., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Klock, Fred H., Jr. Manlius. Core maker, Seneca St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. To go 2/23/1918 to Camp Devens, MA, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Private Fred Klock was home from Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass., over Sunday. He reports that the contingent which he accompanied to Camp Devens a month ago is expecting to go overseas this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "Private Fred Klock writes his father from France that he is well and hungry for a nice package of 'Red Head.' He says he expects soon to be given a position as wagoner with a supply train," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Private Fred H. Klock, 308th Infantry, U. S. A., spent a brief furlough at the home of his father, Fred Klock, Sr., the last of the week, before returning to Camp Mills, where he will receive his discharge Friday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/9/1919. "Dr. Lester P. Crowe and Private Fred Klock, both of whom recently returned from overseas, and Sergeant Walter LaGrange who has been in various camps in the motor transport service, all received their discharges last week and have returned to their homes in Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/16/1919.

Knapp, Hubert. Fayetteville. "Henry J. Knapp is spending the week with his son, Dr. Hubert Knapp, at Baltimore, previous to the latter's departure Sunday for Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., to join the Medical corps. Dr. Knapp served a term as regimental surgeon in the Maryland National Guard and was placed on the retired list. Last week he was ordered to report for active duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/13/1917. "H. J. Knapp has received a card from his son, Captain Hubert Knapp announcing his safe arrival in France where he is in charge of one of the temporary American hospitals," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "The remains of Mrs. Hubert Knapp, wife of Captain Hubert Knapp, who is now in France, will be brought here Saturday from Genoa for burial. Mrs. Knapp died Wednesday after an illness of over a year with tuberculosis. Captain Knapp, who formerly held a lucrative practice in Baltimore was called into service a year ago and Mrs. Knapp, who was in ill health went to Genoa, where Mr. Knapp's brother, Arthur, is located...Captain Knapp is a son of Henry J. Knapp of this village, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. "Captain Hubert Knapp, formerly of Baltimore, Md., who recently returned from service overseas is the guest of his brother, Carroll Knapp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Knight, Edward D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Knorr, Guy L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Knox, James E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Kohler, Charles S., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Konvicka, William N. Fayetteville. "William Kanvucky has returned to his duties on the U. S. S. McDonough after a week's furlough at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Osborne,"The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... William Konvicka, U. S. S. McDonough..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Marine, U.S.S. McDonough (as of 1/4/1918). In France as of 5/3/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin. "William Konvicka of the N. S. navy yard at Philadelphia is spending a short furlough at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Osborne," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1919. "William Konvicka of the battleship McDonough, is visiting Ambrose Osborn," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/1/1919. "William Konvicka, who has been visiting Ambrose Osborn, left Monday for Philadelphia, Pa.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 547 E. Genesee St., machinist, 1927 Fayetteville Directory. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, d. 10/28/1941, ae. 55.

Kuhn, August. Manlius. At San Antonio, Texas, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Kupfer, Albin Krill. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Kup," from Kiukiang, China. U. S. Army.

Kyser, Leslie N. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Signed up September 9, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Camp Jackson serving as a Private with Battery E, Field Artillery. Received his discharge on January 2, 1919 at Camp Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Lade, Herbert H. Kirkville. "Among those from this section who went to Camp Syracuse Tuesday for special and limited service were David W. Kennel, Manlius; Floyd R. Bristol, Minoa; Herbert H. Lade and Frank D. Huntley, Kirkville; Herbert W. Coakley, Fayetteville...(and) Phillip A. Clark, Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918.

LaGrange, Walter. Manlius. "Walter LaGrange and Walter Hyatt have been inducted into the army for special service and left Tuesday for Camp Syracuse. Walter LaGrange, who is one of the few natural born mechanics, expects soon to be assigned to gas engine repair work. His leaving Manlius will be greatly deplored by his many friends among car owners," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Walter LaGrange writes from Camp Holabird, Md., that he now has charge of 45 motor mechanics. He recently hurt his hand and has been unable to do any work with his hands for several weeks," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Survivor of his sister, Mrs. Ethel Minor, 26, wife of Charles Minor," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918. "Private Walter LaGrange writes from Camp Holabird that the work of the Motor Transport Division is closing up. All the fall he says he has been with a fleet of trucks traveling between the camp and Baltimore and sleeping in the trucks or in tents. It does seem good, he says to get back into the barracks. The carting shop is already closed and when the repair shop closes he expects to close his army career. Nearly all the trucks have been taken away from the camp. Baltimore, he says, is a great city but the girls annoy the army boys so much that Walter says he longs for home and a midnight spin on the old Cicero plank," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Sergeant Walter LaGrange writes from Fort Wayne, Ill., that he sees no chance of being released from service for at least five or six months. General Wood recently addressed the Motor Transport unit to which he was attached and told them that they would be needed for several months. Sergeant LaGrange thinks he may be sent to Texas with a large convoy of motor trucks. The quarters at Fort Wayne he says are much better than at Camp Holabird, Md., where he spent the summer and he has had opportunity to visit all the automobile factories in Detroit and vicinity," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/7/1919. "Sergeant Walter LaGrange writes friends in town that he expects to leave motor transport service and return to Manlius the last of the week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/9/1919. "Dr. Lester P. Crowe and Private Fred Klock, both of whom recently returned from overseas, and Sergeant Walter LaGrange who has been in various camps in the motor transport service, all received their discharges last week and have returned to their homes in Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/16/1919. 113 Fayette St., molder, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Lally, George L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Lance, Gilbert S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lancefield, Leslie M. Manlius. "The Manlius Center road has been an unlucky spot for Leslie Lancefield. Last spring he went over the embankment with a party in a Ford car and Saturday night he had another narrow escape when his Ford locked wheels with a similar car in the same spot...the accident was due to blinding headlights," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Leslie Lancefield, only son of Mr. and Mrs. William Lancefield of Manlius, employed in the H. H. Franklin shops, Syracuse, has enlisted in the Marines," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "For the first time in the history of Military Lodge, a special dispensation was secured for the purpose of conferring the first three degrees in Masonry upon one candidate at the same lodge session. This was done in the case of Leslie M. Lancefield at a special meeting which was held Friday evening. Mr. Lancefield, who attained his majority but a few days previous to this event, left Syracuse Monday evening, with a contingent of enlisted men, bound for the Great Lakes United States Naval Training Station, Ill., which is located thirty-five miles from Chicago, where he is entered as a machinist's mate. Prior to enlisting in the service of Uncle Sam, the young naval recruit was employed at the H. H. Franklin works. About thirty employees of the shops made him a farewell visit at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Lancefield, Saturday evening, when he was presented with a handsome wrist watch. On Thursday evening a party of sixty-nine friends and neighbors, including the Methodist orchestra, made a surprise visit at the Lancefield home, when the honor guest was presented with a fine gold Masonic ring, and a solid silver knife, fork and spoon in collapsible case. Several selections were rendered by the orchestra, and ice cream and cake was served by the visitors. Mr. and Mrs. Lancefield gave a family dinner in honor of their son Sunday at which covers were laid for 39. On this occasion he was presented with a liberal sum of money," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. William Lancefield will leave Friday for the Great Lakes Training Camp, Ill., to spend a week with their son, Leslie," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. William Lancefield returned from a week's stay with their son, Leslie, at the Great Lakes Training Camp. They expect later to leave Southern trip, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lancefield have received word that their son, Leslie M. Lancefield, who enlisted as an aviation machinist, has finished his course at the Great Lakes Training School, Ill., and will be sent to New York for a special ignition course at Columbia University. Several boys from Syracuse who enlisted at the same time will also take the course," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Leslie Lancefield has been transferred to the University of California, San Diego, where he is enrolled in the student body," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Leslie M. Lancefield, returned Thursday from the U. S. Naval air station at San Diego, Cal., having been released from service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/28/1919. 511 Pleasant, inspector, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Landon, Herbert W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lane, Frank A. Fayetteville. "Local address at time of induction, Fayetteville, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Lansing, Louis S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lansing, R. Schuyler. "R. Schuyler Lansing of Syracuse, a former Fayetteville boy, is with the Three Hundred and Eighth Field Artillery on French soil," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918.

Laurence, Lloyd N. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

LaPoint, Arthur. Fayetteville. "...Arthur LaPoint will leave Monday for Camp Jackson, S. C.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. "Arthur LaPoint writes relatives here that he left Camp Joseph Jackson on Nov. 9 for his trip overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/15/1918. "Arthur LaPoint is home from Camp Jackson, having been given his discharge this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

?Lavin, Chas. H. Kirkville. "Signed up July 22nd, 1918 at Baldwinsville, N.Y., his local address at the time being Kirkville, N.Y. (V.1) or Clay, N.Y., R.F.D. #1 (V.2 & Orig.). He was inducted into service at Camp Dix, serving as a private with Quarter Master corps, Cook and Bakers School #322. He served overseas from Jan. 1st, 1918 to Aug. 3rd, 1919. Discharge as a Corporal received Aug. 11th, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Lawton, Charles Sterling. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Designated to the Reserve Officers Training Camp, Madison Barracks, N.Y., 1917.

Lawyer, David B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lay, Harold T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Private. Wounded somewhere in France while carrying out a comrade," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15. Private, 27th Division, killed in action or died of wounds, The Haversack, 1919, Manlius, NY, p. 103. "Died of wounds received in action. 'Private, because he would not wait for training camp. With 27th Division. The last we heard--letter written October 15th he had been in hospital since the battle of Mt. Kemmel (we think) injured while carrying out a comrade,' " The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 26.

Leach (Leech), Ambrose. Fayetteville. "Ambrose Leech of this village (Fayetteville) enlisted Monday in the navy at the recruiting office in Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/18/1917. "Ambrose Leech of this village (Fayetteville) is one of the sixty naval recruits who will leave tomorrow night for the Newport training station. The recruits will be given a rousing sendoff with a big parade by the different military units in the city tomorrow. General Verbeck will be marshal of the parade," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Ambrose Leech, U. S. Navy..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Ambrose Leech and a shipmate, George Blackwood are at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Leech (should be Leach) on a short furlough from naval duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917. Marine, U.S.S. Columbia (as of 1/4/1918). Ambrose Leech, who has been in a hospital for some time, has been granted a discharge and is now at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Leech at Peck Hill, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Leach (Leech), Ernest. Fayetteville. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Ernest Leech, U. S. Navy" The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Marine, U.S.S. Nashville (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Leboutillier, Austin. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Leffingwell, William Murray. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Will" and "Lefty," from Watkins, NY. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

Leigel, Henry. Fayetteville. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Henry Liegel, Marines, Mare Island, Cal..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Marine Barracks, Magazine Guard (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Leinbach, Harry J. St. John's School, former instructor.

Leland, Claude G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Leonard, Lloyd S. Manlius. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Henry Daniels, Lloyd Leonard and Harry K. Stevens left Saturday for Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Privates Lloyd Leonard and Russell Randall are home from Camp Dix for the week-end," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. "Private Lloyd Leonard returned Wednesday to Camp Dix after a week's furlough at his home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "News has been received here of the illness of Mrs. Lloyd Leonard in Philadelphia where she is staying while her husband is at Fort Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. "Mrs. Lloyd Leonard of Syracuse spent Friday and Saturday at the home of her cousin, Mrs. Maurice Tarr. Private Leonard is still cooking at Camp Dix, although he looks for an early discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/7/1919. 144 W. Seneca, molder, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. b. 1896, d. 1974, buried Feb. 1, 1974, ae. 77, h/o Cora E.

Leonhard, Charles H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Leonhardt, Jacob M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Leonhardt, Joseph M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Leonhardt, William R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

LeRoy, Francis H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lewis, Raymond C. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Lewis, William Hodge. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as "Bill," from Buffalo, NY. U. S. Army.

Lightfoot, John B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "The majority of the men who attended the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg last summer and received their commissions, have been mustered out of the service. Lieuts. Girton, Jones, G. M., Bradley, F., and Schouten who attended this camp are back at school now, and it is expected that Lieut. Lightfoot will be back before Easter," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26. "Lieut. Lightfoot who received his commission at the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg last summer, has returned to school. Lieut. Lightfoot has been stationed in the S. A. T. C. at Syracuse University," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 24.

Lighton, Henry G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lindemyer, Leon. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Lindsay, Harold L. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies. London Scottish.

Little, George Stanley Victor. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Vic," from Guilford, NY. U. S. Army. "G. S. Victor Little and Alva W. Snyder, of St. John's school have received commissions as second lieutenants in the U. S. army, and are now members of the Officer' Reserve Corps. They are daily expected to be assigned to duty. Lieut. Little graduated from St. John's and is now attending the law school of Syracuse University. Lieutenant Snyder is a member of the class of 1917 and also of St. John's band," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/11/1917. Assigned to 50th Infantry, Syracuse. Killed in an airplane accident on April 16, 1922, The Wind Mill, June 1922, p. 43.

Lloyd, Frank T., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. 1st Lt. American Air Service, France. "Flight Commander of a testing field in France. Last July when testing out an English machine his motor stopped about fifty feet up over a woods. His plane came down and he got a compound fracture of the jaw. Was in a hospital for three months. Is now back at his work and he writes is as fine as ever, with the exception of some scars and the loss of three teeth," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 26.

Loebs, Carl H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Logan, Raymond. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Long-Lance, Sylvester Chahuska. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Chief," from Cherokee, NC. With the Allies. "Sylvester Long Lance, Cherokee Indian, who was the best all-around student graduated from St. John's Military school, Manlius two years ago lies wounded in France. As first lieutenant of 'Princess Pat's' regiment, he went through the battle of Vimy Ridge unscratched, only to get a shrapnel wound in the head on one of the quietest days that followed. Upon his graduation here, Long Lance was designated by President Wilson for appointment to West Point but failed in his entrance examinations. He disappeared before entrance, however, and was not heard of until a friend in New York received a letter, dated June 1st, which follows: 'I am in a field hospital convalescing from a wound in the head received a couple of weeks ago. Nothing serious; only a piece of shrapnel in the back part of the head and a broken nose--the latter sustained in falling on my face, I presume I came through the April 9th scrap (Vimy Ridge) without a scratch, being the only officer of my rank left in my company, only to get hit a month later on one of the quietest days we have had lately. Such is war! Any way, I find that open warfare, which has ensued since we took Vimy Ridge, is much more interesting and endurable than the trench stuff that we had to tolerate all winter. We are able to see miles behind 'Fritz's' lines now, whereas, during the winter, a few yards of No Man's Land and the German front line was the visible limit from our trenches. I am enjoying the green trees and sunny hillside surrounding the hospital here, after so many dreary months in the drab trenches. One would hardly know that there was a war on if it were not for the distant rumble of the 'heavies' and the drone of the battle planes overhead. We have 'Fritz' on the run now, and we are holding all the trump cards, as far as I can see from observation here. 'Fritz' personally, is getting pretty well 'fed-up' with war. It is not infrequent that he voluntarily comes over and surrenders--when he gets a chance to sneak from his own lines," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/27/1917. "Probably one of the first Manlius boys to fight against Germany in Europe was Sylvester Long Lance, a Cherokee Indian. Long Lance joined the famous Princess Pat's Canadian regiment and he fought at Vimy Ridge, where his regiment was almost annihilated. He was wounded and was the only lieutenant in his battalion who was alive after that famous battle. Long Lance was graduate from the Manlius schools in 1915. That same year he asked permission to enter West Point. But he went to Canada and joined the Princess Pat regiment and went to France and fought with distinction," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

Looker, Oscar Ferrand. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Oc" and "Ocky," from Detroit, MI. U. S. Army.

Looker, Ream C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lovett, Godrey M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Lowe, Fred. Fayetteville. "Francis Fulmer of this village (Manlius) and Fred Lowe of Fayetteville left today for Potsdam where they have been ordered by the local draft board for training at the Polytechnic Institute for special army service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. "Fred Lowe, who is taking special army training at Clarkson School of Technology, Potsdam, is home for a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. "Fred Lowe has returned from Atlanta, Ga., where he was released from service last week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918.

Lucey, Walter S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Ludlum, Clarence A. Jr. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Paw" and "Lud," from Jamaica, NY. U. S. Army. "lst Lieutenant. Gassed and slightly wounded on August 5th in the second battle of the Marne," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

Lycett, Edward L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Air Service, died of disease, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Lycett, William, Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Lygert, Elliott Milton. Fayetteville. "Signed up 11/13/1918 at Solvay, local address Fayetteville. Inducted in service at Camp Humphrey," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Lynch, Russell. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

McAllister, Elliott, Jr. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Mac," from San Francisco, CA. U. S. Army.

McBride, Edward H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

McCarthy, Dennis P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. "2nd Lt. Commended by General Pershing for efficiency, March 26th, 1918," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

McCuen, Donald Lee. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1907, known as "Mac." U. S. Army.

McDermott, Frank. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

McDowell, Walter J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

McGiffert, Rutherford D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

McGinley, Paul T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

McGruer, Dr. Henry A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Hospital Unit G, France when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

McIlle. Mycenae. "M. C. Sponenburg has sold his farm and stock to Mr. H. Ihle of Arkansas, who has taken possession," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. "A gathering was held at Colonial hall (Mycenae, N.Y.) Friday evening to meet Private McIlle, who was on a two-day furlough from Camp Louisiana. His parents recently bought a farm of M. C. Sponenburg," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/24/1919.

McIver, William R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

McKay, James. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

McKeever, J. Lawrence. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Flying Cadet Air Service, died in an airplane accident, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

McLean, Hugh. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Mabie, Edgar B. Mycenae. "Mrs. Wilbur M. Jones has received a letter from her nephew, Private Edgar B. Mabie, of Mycenae saying that he is in a hospital in France suffering from wounds received in battle on Oct. 17. Private Mabie is a member of the ill-fated Company C, 108th Infantry. He says he was struck by six pieces of shrapnel, one of which fractured his leg. He expects to be sent to a base hospital in England," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/22/1918. "The 108th Infantry, Twenty-seventh division which includes many Manlius boys, has won the most coveted honor on the field of battle. Major General O'Ryan has cited the entire regiment for the 'exceptional valor of officers and men.' Citations also have been issued to the 105th Infantry, the 107th and the 104th and 108th Machine Gun Battalions. Following the main battle of Duck Valley on September 29th-October 2d, when the Hindenburg line was pierced for the first time, the 108th infantry returned to the line October 14th and again on October 17th. It was withdrawn from action October 21st and so far as can be learned it has been in no engagement since that time. The men of the Twenty-seventh division of the American army, who are coming home soon and who include the former Syracuse units of the National Guard, have received, through their commander, a letter of praise from Field Marshal Haig for the brave manner in which they shattered the Hindenburg line Sep. 29," The Fayetteville Bulletin, November 29, 1918.

MacDougal, William D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy. Captain in U. S. navy when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

MacNabb, Alexander B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

MacNish, George H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

MacNabb, Alexander B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

MacNish, George H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Madison, Chester W. Fayetteville. Glovemaker, Chapel St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "At least two of Fayetteville's patriotic married men have waived their rights to deferred classification because of dependent wives and are preparing to go forth to do their bit at the next call. These are Wilbur W. Mason and Chester Madison. The latter endeavored to enlist some time ago but was turned down on account of eyesight," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/8/1918. "Chester W. Madison of Fayetteville has been named captain of the contingent of County Board No. Two which will be entrained for Camp Dix on Tuesday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Mrs. Chester Madison and son, Gordon, are at Wrightstown, N.J. where Mr. Madison is in training at Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. "Mrs. Chester Madison has received word that Mr. Madison has arrived safely overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mrs. Chester W. Madison has received word from her husband Sergeant Madison that he is wounded and in a base hospital in France. A part of the letter, which is dated Oct. 6 follows: 'I am in a place I never expected to be in France, a hospital. Now don't be worried, I am wounded but not seriously, in fact only slightly. A piece of shrapnel hit me in the right groin, the metal scarcely penetrated my leg. It was nothing more or less than a painful bruise. I am lying on a cot in a hospital ward as I am writing this. Today is Sunday and I was hit Thursday night about 5:30 p.m. A shrapnel shell is one which contains about 70 to 100 round steel balls about the size of a marble. When it explodes these balls fly in all directions and of course the shell casing flies apart in irregular jagged pieces. The shell that hit me exploded about 10 or 12 feet from me, spite of that, I was much less wounded than any of several others who were hit by the same shell. However, I am alive today solely because I had my heavy cigarette case and steel mirror in my left shirt pocket directly over my heart. I also had one of the maps you sent me, and two of your letters and my aluminum comb in the same pocket. A shrapnel ball went through my blouse, tore the pocket off my shirt, dented my cigarette case and mirror all out of shape, entirely cut the map to pieces, and tore a jagged cut in your own letters and then glanced off almost penetrating the case and mirror. To say that I am lucky is expressing it mildly. I was also lucky in having on two pair of pants. But for that, the wound on my leg would undoubtedly have been worse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. "Mrs. Chester W. Madison has received word from her husband Sergeant Madison that he has recovered from his wounds and was able to participate in the big battle before the declaration of peace," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Private Wilbur Mason writes Fayetteville friends from Viserny, France that things do not look very encouraging for his early return. A few days before the letter was written he says he saw Sergeant Chester W. Madison, Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle while they were on their way to port of embarkation for their homeward trip," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Sergeant Chester W. Madison is home on a short furlough after strenuous service with the 78th Division. He will return to camp tomorrow and expects to receive his discharge in a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, d. 1/17/1960, ae. 71.

Manchester, Howard N. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Marconio, Marino. Manlius. In France, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Marino (Martino?), John. Manlius. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...John Marino..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917.

Marsh, Ellis. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Marsh, Gordon. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Martell, Arthur. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Martelle, Arthur J. Signed up at Manlius, local address being Minoa, N.Y. at the time," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Martin, Justin Carlile. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. 2nd Lieutenant, Co. K. 147th Inf. 37th Division, France, A. E. F. Severely gassed June 5, 1918. Returned to active duty Sept. 7, 1918. Slightly gassed during a three days battle on the Sheldt River on the Flanders front in October. Attended intensive training school in May 1918. Received commission at Plattsburg, Nov. 1917. Sailed for France Jan. 1918. The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 24.

Martin, Oscar P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Martz, John Eben. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1907, known as "Eb." U. S. Navy.

Mason. "Miss Grace Mason of Cleveland, Ohio, was a guest one day last week at the Porter Stilwell home while enroute from New York, where she went to see her brother sail for France to join the Ambulance Corps. Mr. Mason will be remembered as a former student at Fayetteville high school.

Mason, Stuart C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Mason, Wilbur W. Fayetteville. "At least two of Fayetteville's patriotic married men have waived their rights to deferred classification because of dependent wives and are preparing to go forth to do their bit at the next call. These are Wilbur W. Mason and Chester Madison," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/8/1918. "A. E. Russell of Manlius has succeeded Wilbur Mason of Fayetteville as collector for the Metropolitan Insurance company. Mr. Mason has enlisted in the Naval Reserves, having been released from draft by the local exemption board," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. To go to Fort Dix, 4/29/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Mason left Monday for Erie, Pa., where they are spending the week with relatives. Mr. Mason leaves Monday for Camp Dix and Mrs. Mason will go to Vermont to make her home with her mother," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918. "News from Fayetteville soldier boys indicates that they are all on their way 'over there.' Charles O'Brien, Ernest Hotaling and Wilbur Mason have been transferred to Newport News, embarkation point for southern camps..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Private Wilbur W. Mason of Fayetteville, a member of the 308th Field Artillery of the Seventh-eighth division, has arrived safely overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. "Private Wilbur Mason writes Fayetteville friends from Viserny, France that things do not look very encouraging for his early return. A few days before the letter was written he says he saw Sergeant Chester W. Madison, Sergeant Leonard Kantak and Corporal Frank Battle while they were on their way to port of embarkation for their homeward trip," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Private Wilbur W. Mason, according to notice received by Fayetteville friends, arrived in New York Wednesday with the 308th Field Artillery, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/16/1919. "Mrs. Wilbur W. Mason has returned from Charlestown, N. H., where she has been staying with her mother while Mr. Mason was in the service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/20/1919. "Wilbur W. Mason returned home Thursday after having served overseas with the 308th Field Artillery of the 77th Division. Mr. Mason was in the front line of the Argonne drive for three and a half months previous to the signing of the armistice. Beside his gun he watched the doughboys as they advanced under the barrage of his battery, at times many of them falling thick and fast under enemy machine gun fire," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/20/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Mastin, Benjamin Q. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. 303rd Infantry, 78th Division, either killed in action or died of Wounds, The Haversack, 1919, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Matz, George W. C. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, from Reading, PA. U. S. Army.

?Mawson, Albert H. Manlius. "Albert Mawson writes that within ten days after arriving at the navy yard at Philadelphia, Pa., he was assigned to the ship building squad," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/13/1917. "Albert Mawson of the U. S. Receiving ship at Philadelphia, Pa., was an over-Sunday guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Mawson," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. "Latest advices from Albert H. Mawson say he does not expect to sail on the Van Steuben, on which he has made his home the past month, repairing it for service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/14/1917. "Mr. Albert H. Mawson of the navy yards, Philadelphia, was home over Sunday, making the trip by auto with his sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Hitchcock," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917. "Sergeant Albert H. Mawson, now in France, writes an interesting letter on ship board of two weeks' voyage with some rough seas that came over the decks so that drill had to be suspended. There were 7 transports with about 1,700 soldiers on board convoyed by battleships and destroyers. They trailed a U-Boat staff as a target for the war vessels to practice on. The escorts turned back with an outbound fleet as soon as the transports were safe in harbor. A fleet leaves about once in four days. The cry of land thrilled him more than the U boat scare, he said. The sea seemed too large for a U boat to find them," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Albert Mawson, who is a carpenter in the navy writes home of his arrival in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "Word was received the past week from Albert Mawson, who is working in an aeroplane shop in France, that he has been promoted from shipwright to carpenter's mate, 3rd class," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. "Albert Mawson writes from France that they are now having their first real winter weather. Not much snow but a very cold wind. He also writes that on moonlight nights they are obliged to go down into the dugout, three and four times a night and stay from fifteen minutes to an hour each time, as the Germans make their air raids on bright nights," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "News has been received from Albert Mawson, who is located at Dunkirk, France, who says he can hear the roar of the big guns. Air raids are numerous above their barracks on moonlight nights. He has been enjoying a seven-day furlough, visiting in Leeds, England. He found a family by the name of Mawson, related to his father," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Word has been received that Albert H. Mawson, C. M. 2c, who has been located at the U. S. Naval Aviation station, Dunkirk, France, since October 1917, of his safe arrival in New York on the U. S. S. New Hampshire on Saturday last. Mr. Mawson had hoped for a short furlough but instead has been transferred to Charleston, S. C.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Albert Mawson, C. M. 2nd of the Aviation Detachment, U. S. N., Camp Glenn, N. C. is spending a 20-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Mawson after having recently returned from overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919. "John Hale of the U. S. Marine Corps was given a welcome home reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Wetmore Thursday evening, which was attended by two other returned overseas men, Carroll Adams and Albert Mawson," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. Buried Oct. 24, 1977, ae. 81. "He signed up June 30th, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at the time being East Syracuse, R.F.D. #3. He was inducted into the Navy at Manlius serving as a shipwright, stationed at U. S. Naval Air Station, Dunkerque, France, taking part in Anti submarine and mine patrol duty by sea plane from Oct. 15th, 1917 to Jan. 24th, 1919. Received his discharge as a Carpenters Mate, 2nd class, April 14th, 1919 at Moorhead City, N.C.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Mayn, Harold L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Meade, Ralph H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Meagher, John L. Mycenae. "Walter Meagher of Black Hawk, Utah, has returned home. He and his brother, John, have enlisted in the Navy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "John Meagher, who is with the recruiting soldiers, visited his parents recently," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917. "Corporal Wm. Hogan of the 108th Infantry, Spartanburg, and his sisters spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Michael Gleason. Corporal Hogan came to Fayetteville especially to see Mr. and Mrs. John F. Meagher and assure them of the excellent health and spirits of their two sons, Private Walter L. Meagher and private John L. Meagher as well as all the boys of that populous camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "Private Walter and John L. Meagher of Camp Merritt, N.J., have been spending a few days with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Meagher. The boys were recently transferred from Co. C, 198th Inf., Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C., to the 19th and 35th Engineers, Casualty Detachment, Camp Merritt, N. J.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Meagher have received word that their sons, Walter and John, have arrived safely in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "A Welcome Home Reception was held on R. W. Ford's lawn Saturday evening in honor of Ambrose Daniels and John Meagher, Jr., who have just returned from overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/18/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 215 S. Manlius, general insurance, 1927 Fayetteville Directory. "Signed up April 23rd, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at the time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army as a 1st class Private with Co. C 108th Infantry. He served overseas from Feb. 27th, 1918 to June 28th, 1919. He was discharged as a 1st class Private July 8th, 1919 at Camp Upton, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Meagher, Walter L. Mycenae. "Walter Meagher of Black Hawk, Utah, has returned home. He and his brother, John, have enlisted in the Navy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Company C of Syracuse, the roster of which includes Clifford Delong of Manlius and Walter Meagher of Kirkville, left yesterday for New York for regimental mobilization," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. "Corporal Wm. Hogan of the 108th Infantry, Spartanburg, and his sisters spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Michael Gleason. Corporal Hogan came to Fayetteville especially to see Mr. and Mrs. John F. Meagher and assure them of the excellent health and spirits of their two sons, Private Walter L. Meagher and private John L. Meagher as well as all the boys of that populous camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "Private Walter and John L. Meagher of Camp Merritt, N.J., have been spending a few days with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Meagher. The boys were recently transferred from Co. C, 198th Inf., Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C., to the 19th and 35th Engineers, Casualty Detachment, Camp Merritt, N. J.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Meagher have received word that their sons, Walter and John, have arrived safely in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 607 Clinton St., asst. postmaster, 1927 Fayetteville Directory. "Signed up June 1st, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at that time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army as a private with Co. C, 108th Infantry and Co. G, 35th Engineers 27th Division A.E.F. Served overseas from Feb. 1918 to March 1919 with the A.E.F. Received his discharge as a 1st class private April 9th, 1919 at Camp Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Megrath, Bryan Verbeck. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Fat," from NY, NY. U. S. Army.

Meigs, Carl Warren. St. John's School cadet. Graduate class of 1917. U. S. Marine Corps.From East Syracuse, N.Y., known as "Megsy." "Appointed Second Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps," The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 28. "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps....Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Navy Department orders announce that Maurice P. King and Roy L. Stickles of the Manlius Schools have qualified for their permanent appointment as second lieutenants in the United States Marine Corps. The orders also indicate that Carl W. Meigs has qualified for his probationary appointment in the same rank," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917. Also served in World War II.

Mellon, Matthew T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Meyer, Fenimore. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as "Fen," from Riverhead, L.I., NY. U. S. Army.

Miller, Adelbert. Manlius. At Fort Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Miller, Austin J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Miller, Carl. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Miller, Giles P., Jr. Manlius. "Giles Miller, jr., who recently enlisted in the navy expects to leave in a few days for the naval training station at Newport," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1917. "Giles Miller, who returned home last week from State College, Pa., has accepted a position with the Merrell-Soule company at Arcade. Mr. Miller intended to enlist in the navy and had taken a physical examination for the purpose but before being sworn in the position was offered him and he accepted," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. "Giles Miller, jr., who recently enlisted in the navy expects to leave in a few days for the naval training station at Newport," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Giles Miller of this village (Manlius) is captain of a squad of fifty naval recruits which left Syracuse today for the training station at Newport," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. At Naval Y. M. C. A., Brooklyn, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Giles P. Miller, who enlisted in the navy last summer, spent a week's furlough with his parents, returning Monday to the naval station in Brooklyn. Young Miller has made two trips across the Atlantic as signalman on a transport. During one of the trips a transport behind the one to which he was assigned was torpedoed and it is believed that the submarine which torpedoed it was sunk by the destroyers which convoyed the transport. He is well pleased with the work and the fare that he receives," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918. "Giles P. Miller of this village (Manlius), who arrived last Thursday on the U. S. S. Osage from his third trip overseas, was given a commission as signal quartermaster when the vessel reached its dock in Brooklyn and was also given seven days' leave. He is now visiting his sister, Mrs. Anna Barden at Hartford Conn. Quartermaster Miller likes the sea and enjoys better health than before he enlisted. On his last trip he remained at a French port for a month. The weather he says was warm and the peasants were all busy in their gardens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918. "Giles Miller, jr., of the U. S. navy, who has been spending several days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Giles Miller, Sr., described graphically several of his experiences as Quarter-Master Signal Man in the Navy. Mr. Miller has visited Le Havre and other French and English ports and is very enthusiastic over his work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. "Giles Miller Jr., of the U. S. Navy, who returned to New York Monday after a furlough of several days spent at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Giles Miller, Sr., was given a hearty send-off by a merry party of half a hundred friends at the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Bell Friday evening. The interior was prettily decorated for the occasion with flags and flowers. Dainty refreshments were served and music and speeches were the order of the evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mrs. Giles Miller...received a telegram Sunday from her son, Quartermaster Giles P. Miller, announcing his safe arrival in Brooklyn. This is Quartermaster Miller's seventh return trip. He will join his mother in Hartford for Christmas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Giles P. Miller has been honorably discharged from the United States Navy and accompanied his mother from Hartford, Conn., to Manlius Wednesday evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919. "Q. M. Sergeant Giles Miller, who was recently discharged from naval service, left Monday for Arcade to resume the position with the Merrell-Soule company which he relinquished when he went to work for Uncle Sam," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919.

Miller, Lehman Wellington. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1908, known as "Pompadour." U. S. Army. Captain at Washington, D.C. when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Miller, Sidney S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Millis, John G. Manlius. "Three members of the Manlius Training unit, Corporal John Millis, Ross Van Doozer and Horace Ellis enlisted Monday in the regular army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "John Millis and Ross Van Doozer, who enlisted in the army last week, left Fort Slocum Wednesday for the Mexican border." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/20/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ..John Millis..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Millis received a letter today from their son, J. G. Millis, who is a private in the 29th Infantry stationed at Panama, stating that he had just underwent a serious operation for appendicitis and rupture at the hospital at Ancon," The Fayetteville Bulletin 8/10/1917. "Private John G. Millis of 29th Infantry, Co. 4, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Millis, who underwent a serious operation at Ancon hospital Panama for appendicitis and rupture is reported much improved, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. "John Millis, who underwent an operation for appendicitis last summer while on duty in the Panama zone and who has since been obliged to return to the hospital, has been granted a discharge. He arrived in New York this week and is expected to arrive at the home of his parents within a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. "Mrs. Arthur Millis has receive a letter from her son, John, who is stationed in Panama stating that on November 8th he was again sent to the hospital at Ancon. This is the third time Private Millis has under a very serious operation. "John Millis has returned from Panama, where, owing to impaired health he received an honorable discharge from the United States Army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Millis gave a dinner Sunday in honor of their son, John, who has been stationed at Culebra, Panama with the 29th Inf.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "John Millis gave an interesting talk on Panama and Life in Camp at Cole's Hall (Manlius) Wednesday evening at the monthly meeting of Modern Woodsmen," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Manlius draft registrants who changed to Class 1 in the recent reclassification include Dennison Richburg, Ivan Cooper, John Millis and Edward Tuttle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. Name appears as a silver star on the Manlius service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

Mills, Asher. Eagle Village. Operator, R1, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Four Manlius boys this week answered their country's call and enlisted in the army at the Syracuse recruiting office. They are Frank Call, Henry Tyler, Jay Cross, and Asher Mills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Asher Mills..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Asher Mills, Jay Cross, Henry Tyler and Frank Call, who are in training at the fair grounds spent Sunday with their parents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. At Camp Green, Charlotte, N.C., by 11/30/1917, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Privates Leslie Myers of Camp Dix and Asher Mills of Camp Wadsworth, are at their homes on a furlough of ten days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale gave a party Wednesday evening of last week in honor of the latter's brother, Asher Mills, who has been home on a furlough for several days from Camp Wadsworth," and "Mrs. Elmer Mills entertained Friday evening in honor of Private Asher Mills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "Asher Mills is at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Mills, on a ten-day furlough from Camp Green, N. C.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Asher Mills has returned to Camp Green. He expects soon to be sent to France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918.

Mires, Harold Maynard. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, from Earlville, NY. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. U. S. Army.

Mitchell, Daniel. Manlius. Teaming, bds., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Private Daniel Mitchell, who has been home on a ten-day leave of absence from Camp Zachary Taylor, has been visiting his sister, Mrs. Fred J. Cathers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918.

Mitchell, Frank M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. "Lieut. 'Bondy' Mitchell, who graduated in 1909 paid us a short visit February 27. Lieut. Mitchell entered the first Officers Training Camp at Madison Barracks, May 12, 1917. He then went to the School of Arms at Harvard University. From there he was transferred to Camp Upton and assigned to 'F' Co., 309th Infantry, 78 Division. Lieut. Mitchell was in the same Company with Mark Bradley and Larry Johnson. He left for France May 20, 1918, and while on the Australian front this incident took place. He was under orders not to go out on any night patrols, so he and an Australian Captain went out during the day and captured a light German machine gun and killed the four Germans that were manning it. He returned over no man's land under a heavy machine fire. He was mentioned in the British Orders and awarded the British War Cross. He was wounded in the battle of St. Mihiel and it resulted in shell shock," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 23. "Lieut. Frank M. Mitchell, adjutant general, Second battalion, 309th infantry, is the only officer left out of a group of twelve who were around a table at battalion headquarters when a German 9.2 shell landed in the middle of the table. Lieutenant Mitchell is the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Mitchell of Apulia. He is 28 years old. He was graduated from St. John's school at Manlius and was employed in the Apulia postoffice when America entered the war. The next day he entered the war, too. May 10th he was ordered to Madison barracks, from which officers training camp he was graduated a first lieutenant, ranking the four who made his grade. He was next sent to Cambridge, Mass., for instructions in trench warfare, and then assigned to the 309th infantry at Camp Dix. He was made battalion adjutant shortly afterward. His story of the battle, in which he escaped so fortunately, despite the fact that he may lose his leg, is contained in the following letter to his parents: 'Our acting major had been hit and I was directing the battalion movements. I had a bunch of officers in the tent with me, twelve in all, and four orderlies. A German 9.2 shell struck the table and killed all in the tent except me and my orderly,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918.

Mitchell, Herbert C. Manlius. Laborer, bds., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "George W. Steltzner and Hubert C. Mitchell are the only selects from this section to go with the contingent which leaves Syracuse Aug. 26 for Camp Gordon, Ga.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Listed as Herbert C. Mitchell in History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Mix, Guy Agard. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1907; P.G. 1908, known as "Augurin" and "Skinny Mick." U. S. Army.

Modisette, Welton M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Moffat, David H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Mogavero, James. Minoa. "Signed up while residing at Minoa, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Montague, Wellington. Fayetteville. Quartermasters Corps, detached (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Montgomery, Earl. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Moore, Bailey H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Moore, Glen A. Minoa. Clerk, Main St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Private Glenn Moore of Pelham Bay spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. ""Glen Moore of the Naval Training School, Pelham Bay, is home on a short furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918. "The funeral of Glenn A. Moore, 24, who died Friday of influenza at Pelham Bay was held Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist church (Minoa). All business places were closed and the Masonic lodge and S. E. Terwilliger Hose company attended in a body. The services at the church were conducted by the pastor, Rev. S. S. Sanford assisted by Rev. F. J. Purrington, a former pastor. The Masonic quartet rendered two hymns, "Nearer, My God, To Thee" and "Gathering Home." The bearers were four comrades in the service. The obsequies at the grave were conducted by the chaplain of the Masonic lodge, after which a salute of three guns was fired, the last reveille sounded and the flag-draped casket was lowered. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Moore; three sisters, Mrs. Irving Witchie of Bridgeport and Mrs. Mtya McChesney and Miss Laura Moore of Minoa; two brothers, Harry Moore of East Rochester and Guy Moore of Bridgeport," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Buried in Minoa Methodist Cemetery, but stone is unreadable. Minoa. Name appears with a gold star on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Moore, Harold F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Moorhead, Arna. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 118 Elm St., molder, 1927 Fayetteville Dir. Purple "Military rites were conducted by the Clarence A. Dennis Post of the American Legion Tuesday afternoon for Arna H. Moorhead, 45, a veteran of World War I, who died Saturday after an illness of two weeks. Mr. Moorhead saw two and one-half years of overseas service with the U. S. troops, and was in action in four major battles, for which he was awarded medals for outstanding service, they were the battles of Montdidier-Noyon; Meuse-Argonne; Aisne-Marne, and St. Mihiel. He was made a member of the order of the Purple Heart by virtue of the fact that he was wounded in action. He was also given a citation for bravery and unusual conduct, signed by the late president Wilson. After the signing of the Armistice, Arna volunteered for military police duty and remained overseas for another six months. When he returned to the State he came to Fayetteville and has since lived here. The American Legion has charge of the service at the home and at the grave where a volley was fired by the members of the Archie Van Patten Post of Manlius. Taps were sounded by Bert Hopstein. The tradition of presenting the Flag which is draped over the casket to the nearest of kin, was carried out when John Meagher presented it to Mr. Moorhead's mother, Mrs. Boyd Muckey, who survives him," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942.

Morre, John G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Morrell, John H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Morris, George. Manlius. "Signed up while residing at Manlius, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Morrison, Abram S. Minoa. "Private A. S. Morrison of Camp Taylor, Montgomery, Ala., is home on a ten days' leave on account of the serious illness of his aunt, Mrs. Estella Schuyler," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. "Russell, Phyllis and Paul Terpening of Mohawk are here for a visit with their cousin, Private A. S. Morrison, who is home from Camp Taylor, Alabama, on a furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Private Abram S. Morrison has returned to Montgomery, Ala., after having been called here by the death of his aunt, Mrs. C. E. Schuyler," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. "Private A. S. Morrison has been called home from Camp Taylor, Ala., because of legal complications arising over the settlement of the estate of his grandfather, Abram Shoemaker," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Mosgrove, John A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Motsiff, Louis Barnes. Fayetteville. Clerk in bank, Walnut St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Louis Motsiff, who recently enlisted in the Naval Reserves, has returned from a week's vacation, granted him by the City Bank where he is employed. He expects soon to go to Pelham Bay Park for training," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Lewis Motsiff who recently enlisted in the Naval Reserves, left Monday for Pelham Bay Park," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. "Grove Phinney and Louis Motsiff were home from Pelham Bay naval training station for over Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. "Louis Motsiff was home from Pelham training camp the first of the week to attend the funeral of Mrs. Albert Dickens (sister)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. "Louis Motsiff has returned from the naval training camp at Pelham Bay, having received his discharge after passing examinations for entrance to Annapolis," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Fayetteville, d. July 31, 1939.

Muckey, Floyd A. Manlius. "Floyd Muckey, Walter M. Hyatt and Waite Cross are the only Manlius boys who leave with second contingent of drafted men Friday for Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "Floyd Muckey was home from Camp Dix over Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917." Private Floyd Muckey has returned to Camp Dix, after spending the holidays at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marks Muckey," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "Private Floyd Muckey was home from Camp Dix over Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "Sergeant Floyd A. Muckey has been home from Camp Dix for a few days prior to sailing overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Marx Muckey have received word that their son, Corporal Floyd Muckey has arrived safely overseas with the 310th Infantry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Muckey have received word from their son, Corporal Floyd Muckey, that he is on his way to Bordeaux, from which port he will sail for home. He expects to arrive in New York about June 1," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919. "Sergeant Floyd Muckey arrived home last week after a year's service in the 310th Infantry of the 78th Division in the world war. Sergeant Muckey participated in some of the fiercest battles of the war, his company being cited for 'wonderful courage and endurance under circumstances of extreme danger and hardship' at Thiacourt, at Saint-Juvin and the Bois des Loges," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919. 119 Mill St., lineman, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Murdock, Albert. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Murray, William B. Fayetteville. Reported to have enlisted, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917. Name appears in History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Myers, Leo P. Kirkville. "Signed up while residing at Kirkville, N.Y.," Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Myers, Leslie David. Manlius. Clerk, Seneca St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "The following from County District N. 2 left yesterday for Camp Dix......David L(eslie) Myers, Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. "At Camp Dix, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Privates Leslie Myers of Camp Dix and Asher Mills of Camp Wadsworth, are at their homes on a furlough of ten days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918. "Private Leslie Myers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Myers of Manlius has been transferred from the 310th Regiment, Camp Dix to the National Army, 60th Infantry, Camp Greene, N.C.", The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Word has been received of the safe arrival overseas of Private Leslie D. Myers, Co. C, 60th Infantry. Private Myers is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Myers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. John Myers...received a letter from their son, Private Leslie Myers during the week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Mrs. David Reynolds has received word from her grandson, Leslie Myers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Myers, that he is now in Germany and recently enjoyed a furlough of five days spent in a French city," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Mr. and Mrs. John Myers have received word from their son, First Class Private, Leslie Myers, that he is well, and hopes for an early return to the U. S. A.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/28/1919. "Leslie Myers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Myers, returned Saturday from overseas. Mr. Myers served several months in the Army of the Occupation in Germany," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/1/1919. "Corporal Leslie J. Myers is expected to land in New York during the present week. Corporal Myers has served 17 months in France and Germany," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1919. 105 High St., mechanic, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. Buried June 15, 1960, ae. 64.

Myers, Milton C. Kirkville. "Signed up while residing at Kirkville, N.Y.," Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.