IN THEIR HONOR

WORLD WAR I SERVICEMEN

TOWN OF MANLIUS

Part II of II

Submitted by Kathy Crowell

Naum, Vasil. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Nester, Howard Waltham. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as "Cigarettes," from Geneva, NY. With the Allies.

Newberry, Arthur Cleveland. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1908, known as "Nux." U. S. Army.

Newsholm, Charles E. Manlius. At Fort Monroe, Va., The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Nimms, Raymond. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Nims, Arthur L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

?Noble, Willis Brogan. Minoa. "Signed up March 8, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being Minoa, N.Y., (Vol. 1) or 315 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N.Y. (Orig.) He was inducted into the Army at Kelly Field, serving as a private with the 65th Aero Service. He received his discharge as a 1st class Sergeant on December 2, 1918 at Camp Pike, Ark.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Nolan, Daniel. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Nolan, Dennis T. Minoa. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Signed up May 25, 1918 at Manlius, N.Y. (Vol. 1) or Syracuse, N.Y. (Vol. 2). His local address at that time being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Camp Dix, as a private with Co. F., 102nd Ammunition Train, 36th Co., 9th Battalion, 153 Depot Brigade. He served overseas from October 17, 1918 to January 15, 1919. Received his discharge as a private on January 20, 1919 at Camp Dix," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Nowell, Ames. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Noxon, Malvern. Fayetteville/Minoa. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: Malvern Noxon, Inft., Camp Empire, Panama..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Co. H, 5th Inf. (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Noyes, Curtis D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

O'Brien, Charles A. Fayetteville. Clerk, Lincoln Ave., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. Will go 2/23/1918 to Camp Devens, MA, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Charles O'Brien, who was captain of the contingent from this district which went to Camp Devens Saturday, writes home that all the boys from this county are under quarantine and will not be allowed out of the barracks until March 9," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918. All the boys from this district who were in the last contingent sent to Camp Devens, except Charles O'Brien have been transferred to Camp Upton at Yaphank, L.I. O'Brien writes home that he doesn't know the reason why he was not transferred with the others," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. "Private Charles O'Brien has been transferred from Camp Devens to St. Johns, Fla., where he has been assigned to duty as truck-driver in the Quartermaster's Department," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "News from Fayetteville soldier boys indicates that they are all on their way 'over there.' Charles O'Brien, Ernest Hotaling and Wilbur Mason have been transferred to Newport News, embarkation point for southern camps and it is believed that Lieut. Donald Armstrong sailed from that port last Thursday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Private Charles O'Brien writes from France that he has just met the first Fayetteville boy he has seen since he landed in that country several months ago. While at mess one day he heard some one call 'Hello, Chuck' and looking up he saw James Gooley, formerly of the Palmer farm marching through the camp. Jumping from the mess table he marched alongside Gooley to the railroad station and swapped news about the 'folks back home,' The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. "Private Charles O'Brien writes his parents, Postmaster and Mrs. D. M. O'Brien that he is at general headquarters, at Le Havre, France, driving a Dodge car for the officers. He says the motor transport base is soon to be given up but has no inkling as to when he will return," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Private Charles O'Brien, son of Postmaster and Mrs. D. M. O'Brien is expected to arrive Sunday at Newport News after having served fifteen months with the 429th Motor Transport Corps. During the last several months he has been serving with the Graves Registration unit near Chateau-Thierry and Belleau Woods," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/1/1919. "Charles O'Brien returned home Sunday after receiving his discharge at Camp Dix the previous day. Mr. O'Brien served six months with the Motor Transport Division. For the last several months he has been serving with the graves registration unit," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 204 Lincoln Ave., mgr., Victory Store, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

O'Brien, James Edward. Minoa. To go to Camp Devens 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

O'Brien, John E. Minoa. Signed up March 28, 1918 at Solvay, N.Y., his local address at the time being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Camp Merritt, serving as a private with the 5th Engineers. He served overseas from June 2, 1918 to February 4, 1919, taking part in the battle of St. Mihiel. He received his discharge as a Sergeant on February 21, 1919 at Camp Upton," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936. Possibly same as above.

O'Donnell, John Joseph. Minoa. "The following from County District N. 2 left yesterday for Camp Dix...John J. O'Donnell, Minoa..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Signed up November 22, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being 938 S. State St., Syracuse, N.Y. (Vol. 2-Orig.) or Minoa, N.Y. (Vol. 1). He was inducted into the Army, serving as a Private with Co. G., 310th Infantry and co. C., 60th Infantry. He received his discharge as a private on July 25, 1919 at Camp Upton.

Ogilvie, Geoffrey. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ogilvie, George E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ogilvie, Lester Woodruff. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, from Richmond, L.I., NY. U. S. Army. Lieutenant, killed in action Aug. 25, 1918, after seizing a German machine gun and saving his comrades by killing the crew of another German gun, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Sergeant, Co. "L," 112th Infantry, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103. 2nd Lt., Co. L, 118th Inf., The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 27. "Traveron, France, February 26, 1919. To: General William Verbeck, Manlius Schools, Manlius, New York. My dear General:-- A copy of the Wind Mill, received yesterday, brought to my attention an account of the death of Lester Ogilvie, one of St. John's Old Boys. He was a Sergt. in Co. L, 112th Inf. and was in charge of an outpost platoon on the Vesle River just east of a village called Fismette. I was Battalion Adjutant at the time and know personally of the excellent courage displayed by Ogilvie. The position was a most precarious one and could only be reached at night. It was therefore isolated from the battalion for about 14 hours out of 24, but despite of this we always receive encouraging messages and never at any time feared that any situation would not be property met by the Sergeant. It was considerable shock therefore when I was advised of his death because I was more or less of a stranger in the Regiment and Ogilvie was the only man I had ever seen before reporting to the organization...On July 14th our men first came in contact with the Germans south of Reims where the Boche attempted to cross the Marne. The world of course knows what happened. From this date on we raced overland on the heels of the enemy and finally reached his great defensive position on the heights between the Vesle and Aisne. After some very nasty fighting on the Vesle (where Ogilvie was killed) wherein the Boche attempted several counter attacks with the intent to put an end to the continued advance of the doughboys, we were relieved on the 8th day of September, 1919...John D. Dickson, 1st Lt., 112th Inf.," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 29. Lieutenant Lester W. Ogilvie, Company L, 118th Regiment (Infantry) was killed in action on August 25th, 1918. Ogilvie was a cadet at St. John's during the school year, 1914-1915, graduating in June. (Extract from a letter written by Serg. R. N. Sudds, Col. L., 118th Infantry, August 29th, 1918: "They, the Huns, got my best friend. Sergeant Ogilvie paid the price, but it cost them highly. He found a machine gun and ammunition in the woods, near the front lines. He always was of a mechanical and ambitious turn of mind, so he lugs it up on the line and hides it for some fun. Well, a Hun machine gun out front had been bothering the whole outfit, and, as luck would have it, he spotted it. So he gets his gun in order and lets them have it. Well, that Hun gun never shot another round at us. The outfit on our right made an advance, and found only the officer alive out of the whole crew. They took him prisoner. The officer said a machine gun on the American side had suddenly cleaned out his whole crew. Ogilvie then went into his dug-out--a shallow pit. About fifteen minutes later, Fritz started shelling and trench mortar work. One of the trench mortar shells hit right in the foot of his dug-out and exploded. He yelled, 'Help, Boys,' and, despite the danger, half a dozen fellows went and gave him first aid, but he looked up at them and smiled and said: 'I am done for, boys, they got me.' He was buried in the evening. There were none but what regretted it, but, at the same time, it increased the determination to get Fritz, a hundred times. A lot of them found some Fritzes and simply lifted them off the earth the next time up. I am going to look for a few next time and get them too," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 13.

Ogilvie, Walter E., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Olmsted, Bruce C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Once, George B. Manlius. Serving in the English army, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

Oot, Clarence C. Kirkville/Manlius? "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., his local address at the time being Manlius, N.Y., (Vol. 2) or Kirkville, N.Y. (vol. 1). He was inducted into the Army at Syracuse, N.Y. (A.L.)," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Oot, Thaddeus B., Dr. Manlius. "Signed up August 27, 1917 (Vol. 2) or March 1918 (A.L.) at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address at the time being 1120 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N.Y. Also Manlius, N.Y. (vol. 1). He was inducted into the Army at Syracuse, N.Y., serving as a Private with Unit G. Base Hospital #31. He served overseas from March 2, 1918 to July 20, 1919. He received his discharge as a 1st class Private on July 26, 1919 (Vol. 2) or August 1919 (A.L.) at Camp Upton, L.I. His 1936 address being 301 Barrington Rd. (A.L.)," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Orr, Loren F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Osborn, Ambrose G. Fayetteville. Railroad clerk, Genesee St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Ambrose G. Osborne of this village (Fayetteville), who is a member of the naval reserves, left Saturday for Buffalo where he was assigned to sea duty on the U. S. S. Georgia now at Charlestown navy yard, Boston. Mr. Osborne was formerly on the U. S. S. Vermont, retiring from service six years ago. For some time he has been assistant agent at the West Shore station here. He is a member of Military Lodge No. 93, F. & A. M. of Manlius and Commander of Burhans Camp S. of V.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "Ambrose Osborne of the cruiser Georgia is home on a ten-day furlough. Mrs. Osborne accompanied him from Boston where she has been staying since Mr. Osborne's recall to duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/15/1917. "Ambrose G. Osborne of the battleship Georgia is home on a short furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...A. G. Osborne, U. S. S. Georgia..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Oiler on U.S.S. Georgia (as of 1/4/1918). Ambrose G. Osborne of the United States navy is spending a few days in town, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Mrs. Ambrose G. Osborne returned Monday from Boston, Mass., where she has been visiting her mother," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. "The patriotic service last Sunday morning was impressive. Mr. W. H. Peckham, in well-chosen words presented the cooperating churches with a Roll of Honor containing twenty names of boys who are in service from the homes of the united congregation. The Roll of Honor, tastily framed was presented on behalf of Mrs. Ambrose Osborn, who gives it in honor of her husband. Ambrose was called to the service one year ago last Sunday, the next day after a state of war was declared to exist," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "Ambrose G. Osborne, chief engineer on the Georgia, has been ordered to training camp to take a course for commission as ensign," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. "Ambrose G. Osborne left Monday, after spending a week at home, for Pelham Bay Park where he will enter the naval camp for officers to become an ensign," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. "Ambrose G. Osborne returned Thursday from Pelham Bay Park where he was commissioned as ensign in the U. S. naval reserve force on May 20. He will return here under orders of the commandant of the third naval district until June 9 on which date he is to be transferred to Commandant of the naval academy at Annapolis, Md., for four months' instruction before going into service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Ensign A. G. Osborn, U. S. N., left Sunday for Annapolis, Maryland, where he will have four months intensive training at U. S. Naval Academy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. "Ensign Ambrose G. Osborne is home from the naval academy at Annapolis on ten days' furlough before being assigned to duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin," 9/20/1918. "Ensign A. G. Osborn, U. S. N., left Sunday for some Atlantic port where he will return to active service aboard the U. S. S. Louisiana," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. "Mrs. Ambrose G. Osborne will leave Sunday for Boston where she will join Ensign Osborn for the holidays at the home of her parents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Ensign Ambrose Osborn was home from Annapolis on a twenty-day furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. "Ensign Ambrose G. Osborn returned home this week after receiving his discharge from the navy. He served during the war on the cruiser Louisiana," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Salt Springs Rd., 1927 Fayetteville Directory. Living in Fayetteville in 1941 when mentioned in father's obituary, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/24/1941. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, late of Bay Pines, FL, d. 1/18/1969, ae. 79.

Osborn, Henry Wagner. Fayetteville. Farmer, R1, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Henry W. Osborne who was seriously burned by an explosion from a gasoline engine being used on the Bridgeport-South Bay road, two weeks ago, is nearly recovered. Painful burns resulted when he attempted to prime the engine and it was fired by a delayed spark. Nearly the whole front of his body was blistered," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/15/1917. "Henry W. Osborne, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Osborne, has been notified of his acceptance as a private in the 23d Engineers Corps for road building in France, and will leave Monday for the camp at Annapolis Junction, Md. None but experienced men are enlisted in the corps and as the German prisoners do the unskilled labor, chances are good for rapid advancement. The corps expects to sail for France within a few weeks," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Henry W. Osborne, Eng. Corps, Camp Meade, Md..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "H. W. Osborn of Co. F 23rd Engineers, Camp Meade, Maryland was home on a three-day furlough over Christmas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. Engineer Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "Co. F. 23rd Eng. Camp Meade, MD. Dear Sir: Thinking that some of the readers of your paper might care to know how things are going with us boys who are getting ready to go to the front, I write you some of the camp news. Being in the Engineering Corps I am not with the boys who have gone from Fayetteville and Manlius, but am stationed here at Camp Meade. This is one of the larger cantonments and has thirty-two square miles of land within its boundaries and has sixteen hundred buildings. We use twenty tons of bread each day, and three thousand tons of coal each month. And when the men are all out in column of fours they reach from one horizon to the other, we have about forty thousand men here. And the 23rd is the only enlisted regiment in camp and the largest regiment in the world. I wish to thank the people at home for being so thoughtful in sending cards, letters and such nice packages. I am especially thankful to the Eastern Star society, the Ladies Auxiliary to the Sons of Veterans, the boys of the basketball club, and others. All may be sure that everything is thankfully received and makes us just so much more determined to do our best to bring this terrible war to a successful close. The weather is much colder here than usual and when we were on the rifle range, at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, where we lived in tents, we felt as though we were real heroes without going any farther. I was very successful at the range and was one of the five or six who qualified as 'expert riflemen.' Here in camp we had a very fine Christmas dinner, and also had a big spread New Years eve. The boys here who drill each day in the fresh air, sure are strong for the eats. We miss the milk and butter and sugar, but on the whole we have no kick to make on the way Uncle Sam feeds us." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "Henry W. Osborne, Fayetteville boy, who is at Camp Laurel, Maryland, writes that he has been promoted to corporal in Company F, 23d Engineers. He has also won a sharp-shooters' badge. Corporal Osborne expects shortly to go overseas where the engineers will engage in road building and general reconstruction work, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Co. F, 23rd Engineers, Camp Laurel Md., March 23, 1918, Dear Editor: Perhaps the doings of some of your soldier boys may interest you. I know the doings are very interesting to us. We are camped here on the Maryland State Fair Grounds and race track. We live in tents and use the exhibition buildings for mess halls in same manner as the fair grounds at Syracuse were used a year ago. The buildings here, however, do not amount to anything compared to the N. Y. S. buildings, and there are only about four thousand of us boys camped here. We are just half-way between Washington and Baltimore, about twenty miles from either place. We moved here from Camp Meade early in January and are as much at home here now as we were any time in our lives. We drill and work and play every hour of daylight. There is not a minute wasted and so we do not have time to worry or get discontented. In the evenings we have lectures, song and musical entertainments, dances and some times, about once each week we have prize boxing matches. I have been in one of these and won the decision. Sundays we have our own religious meetings and the buildings we hold them in are busy all day, as there are so many denominations represented here. We have a complete regiment here, made up of several technical companies, several wagon companies and several truck companies. Some times we have a field meet and each company is represented, making a real lively day. Friday, March 22, about five hundred of us were taken on our large trucks, for a sight seeing tour around the city of Washington. There were about thirty trucks with about twenty men in each truck. We sure had a fine trip. We left Camp Laurel at eight o'clock in the morning and arrived in Washington at about 11 and the first place we visited was the capitol building. We entered by the main stair case and spent several minutes admiring the fine paintings on the inside of the main dome. There certainly is some fine work there. We went next into the gallery around the Senate chamber. The Senate had not been called to order as yet and very few of the Senators were there. Next we entered the gallery of the House of Representatives. I happened to sit next to the reporters pit and a young newspaper man pointed out the democratic leader, Kitchin and Champ Clark, Uncle Joe Cannon, the representative from my home district, General Sherwood, the Civil War veteran, who was the leader of the pacifists and several of the other prominent men who happened to be there. As we were leaving the capitol some photographer had us all stand on the steps while he took our picture. On the way out we met Miss Rankin, the representative from Montana and I shook hands with her as did many others. After we left the capitol building we drove over to the Red Cross station near the railroad yards, where the Red Cross feeds all troops who pass through the city. Surely the Red Cross is doing a great work and every woman who belongs has a good reason to be proud of her membership. We visited the new national museum, a place where one could profitably spend at least a week. I saw groups of all the American Indians at their domestic and native tasks, also saw noted animal groups presented by Roosevelt. There is a specimen of almost every living animal between the two poles and bones of some animals that have been dead for several ages. Also all kinds of relics of the past centuries. After we left the museum we drove around the city, passing the White house, the new Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument, Library of Congress, the United States Treasury and other beautiful buildings and also a few places called Negro dumps. Washington struck me very much as a patch-work quilt looks. One place is very fine and beautiful and the next place is dark and tumbled down. I think I saw some of the grandest buildings I have ever seen, and also some of the dirtiest tenements. The soldiers were in a holiday spirit and all waved their hands at the girls who filled every window and doorway as we passed along. Several stated that when the war is over Washington is where they are going to stop. We had one grand day and arrived back in camp at 7 o'clock. Now we are ready to work just a little harder and drill a little better than we ever have before. For this trip we have to thank Uncle Sam, the Red Cross, our officers, and the people of Washington who were so pleasant to us all. Henry W. Osborn," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Osborn have received word that their son Corporal Henry W. Osborn, has arrived safely in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. In France as of 5/3/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin. "France, Aug. 18, 1918. Dear Folks: When I started across the Atlantic ocean last March I did not do so with the intention of becoming a letter writer, but if there is any one who cares to have a glimpse of France and her people and American camp life through my eyes, I am very glad to do what I can to let them. The trip across the ocean was long and tedious, we were a full two weeks coming and only in real danger of a submarine but once that we ever knew of. I was on watch at the time; the danger signal was given and the ship made such sharp turns and fast speed that we were soon out of danger. The next morning I saw a torpedo destroyer towing three torpedoes which it had picked up at day break. I was on the same ship which carried our unfortunate friend and comrade, Corporal Peck of Dewitt. I was very sorry and quite shocked at the news of his death as I did not even know he was in our regiment. There was very little sickness on the ship and hardly any sea sickness, although there were about ten thousand men on board. It was the second largest transport in the service and every man on it was an enlisted man, a fact of which every one was very proud. On board ship we were served two meals a day only, but we did hardly any work and very little exercise, so I suppose we were better off for not having too much to eat. It is a great feature of the army that one rarely eats too much. One reason is that he seldom gets too much and another is that as soon as the edge is taken off from his appetite he does not care for the army cooking. When we landed in France our eyes were met by a sight very new to us, in all stone and tile buildings and very crooked streets. The water-front was all abustle and populated entirely by American soldiers and labor troops. Hardly a Frenchman was to be seen anywhere and the only wooden shoes that we saw for a long time were worn by the French children who tagged along beside the column of marching men and begged for tobacco and cigarettes. American soldiers are forbidden to sell or give away tobacco in any form as France permits the American government, the Y. M. C. A. and the Red Cross to import it without paying any duty. Our first two nights in France we slept in one of Napoleon's prison barracks. We saw the place of execution with its bullet riddled post and wall, we had a bath in the old fashioned baths and slept on beds made of wooden slats and nothing but a blanket under us. It was hard to take but we took it good naturedly as all the American soldiers are taking all the hardships of war. Here we saw our first railway carriages and they looked very queer indeed. The engines are small and look more like the old fashioned switch engines of the States than anything else. Also had our first sight of milk being delivered on hoof. A girl was driving a band of goats along the street milking them at the different houses. The French carts are nearly all two-wheeled affairs and when more than one horse is driven they are always hitched tandem. A few of the things that impressed me strongly are the lack of great wealth, the abundance of small property owners and great numbers of healthy looking poor children. Their common inheritance seemed to be red cheeks and wooden shoes. Coming from the seaport to this camp we passed through many other American camps. Some of them were artillery schools, some aviation camps and others were depots and storehouses being built. In and near the aviation camps we saw all kinds of air craft doing all kinds of flying. And here in France anywhere one can see an airplane most any time of day. All of the camps seemed to have more than their share of mud and all the men wore rubber boots. Most all of these camps have been drained this summer and had streets built in them so that they will be real pleasant this coming winter. We were lucky to get a camp which is dry and we have a large river to bathe in and good well water to drink. Our camp, like most all the camps in France has its sleeping barracks which hold about sixty men each. We sleep in springless bunks which hold four men, two on each deck. We have a kitchen and dining room under canvass, and of late have had stools in the dining room where we could sit down to eat. For a long time we stood up to eat, where we had no shelter at all and when it rained the water would drip from our hats into our food and coffee. We did not mind when it went into the coffee for the only thing that is to be said about army coffee is that it is wet anyhow. We have a 'Y' tent and a real baseball diamond, from which we enjoy most of our real sport. It seems that most every man can think he is a ball player and in a company of soldiers there always is enough for a good game. Our company like most other engineering companies has never done anything that it is enlisted to do. We are a highway company at present and are building a big railroad bridge. Our company has made such a good reputation for itself that it has been separated from the rest of the regiment and held here for this special work. We are in the first army and the rest of the regiment is in another army. I sure am proud to say that I am a member of Co. F, of the 23d Engineers and that I have worked my way from a buck private to the rank of sergeant, which rank I received here in France after five months of active service. I have never been on the battle front and so cannot tell of things there from actual experience, but hope to go there soon, and if things are like the stories that come to us by the men in the hospitals, I soon will have enough to tell. Just before we go to the front we expect to be able to go to a rest camp. We have been working hard and the government has camps where men who have served six months in foreign service can go for several days. Here one sleeps in a real bed and eats on honest to God dishes, no reveille or taps and only to do as one wishes. The government pays railroad fare and living expenses so that every one can go. But only a few can go from each unit at any one time. Perhaps when you read this I will be there. Sincerely, Sgt. Henry W. Osborn," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. J. Fred Osborne have received letters from their sons, Sergeant Henry W. Osborne and Private Fred Osborne telling briefly of their part in the recent advance in France. Sergeant Osborne states that he was gassed and lay in shell hole clinging to the mud for 48 hours while both Boche and American shells were raining all around. Fred Osborne states that he received a shrapnel wound in his knee during the big battle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Sergeant Henry Wagner Osborne, a former employee of the Manlius Publishing Company, who is now in the Engineers Corps, sends the following interesting account of his experience in the big drive in the Argonne Forest: Aix les Bains, France, Nov. 30, 1918. Dear friends: When last I wrote you I was a soldier in name only, in fact I was only a citizen of the United States working for Uncle Sam, at least that is the way most of us looked at it. We were away back in the S. O. S. building a railroad bridge. This bridge was near Nevers across the Loire river and is the largest bridge built by the American army in France. It is a two-track bridge and 2,150 feet long, built of steel girders setting on pile piers. We completed the work on the bridge near the first of October and were sent to gas school. We were issued gas masks and steel helmets and shown how to wear them and how to get the masks on in the least possible time. There are two things a soldier always carries at the front, his gas mask and helmet. For a long time an American soldier did not need any other pass word, on the front. Upon completing our gas training we were loaded into box cars and started on our career as real soldiers. We spent four days in these cars, living on canned beef, canned tomatoes, and bread. We also had plenty of English walnuts which we found in a car on the French local freight. Most of us had given up hopes of ever getting near the front and I can tell you we acted more as though we were going to a picnic than as though we were going to war. We, of course, did not know where we were headed for and were much surprised when the fourth day found us in the edge of the Argonne woods. We were detrained at Clemont and when we pulled into the station we were given one of the grandest sights of the war, an aerial battle. Several German planes were out on a raid and were attacked by two American planes. The Germans shot the two American planes to the ground and then went on with their observation work. It may read mighty queer but the truth is the Germans had all the best of the air fighting during the whole Argonne drive. Our machines carried out many successful night and day bombing raids, but the Germans had their best aviators on this front and the Americans had to turn tail and run from the German battle planes. The anti-aircraft guns protected the American airdromes and ammunition dumps. As soon as we left the train we set up our 'pup tents' and went to sleep. We were awakened at one o'clock by the barrage that marked the start of the Argonne drive. We did not go to sleep again and in fact did no more sleeping for over a week. This first barrage was some four miles one way and six miles the other way from us, the battle line here being the shape of a horse shoe. Verdun was at one heel calk, Grand Pre at the other calk and the toe laying to the North East. In the morning, soon after daybreak the heavy firing ceased and we knew that the 'dough boys' were going 'over the top.' 'Over the top' is spoken with meaning which one cannot understand until one has been 'over' or at least seen the remains. Sherman was right when he described war. As soon as we were fed we were away on the march. We marched straight toward the toe of the horse shoe, and when night came we had passed the heavy artillery, 'heavie's' as they were called here. We marched until an hour after sun down and at last camp up to our cook wagon and were soon fed and rolling in blankets. I shall never forget that march. The road was two solid lines of trucks and foot soldiers were not allowed on the road. We struggled along in the ditch, through fields, over barbed wire entanglements, across trenches, through wrecked towns and on and on through wasted country. We could see shells bursting in the air over the battle line and saw a German plane shoot down an American observation balloon. This last was a grand sight. The balloon was a captive sausage style and was only a minute burning up after it was hit. The German made his get away all right. We saw 'Fritz' try to get several other balloons but the anti-aircraft guns compelled him to fly high and so he could not make a direct hit. Here we came upon the first narrow gauge railroads we had seen, they wind in and out among the hills and go in places where one would think it impossible. They are used principally to haul ammunition and food for the 'dough boys.' Many of the lines we used here were ones that had been captured from the Germans. We marched only about twenty miles this day, but on account of the hard going every one was worn out and was more than glad to drop down at every chance. We had not been in our blankets more than an hour when 'whang' a big shell brought us all to our feet. We had not been able to see where we were pitching our camp and had pitched it in the midst of three other units. One a hospital, one an ammunition dump, and one a French artillery train. Some German observation plane had noticed these camps in the bullseye of his target. There was only one gun shelling this special place and so the shells came at regular intervals of about four minutes. We could hear the low bark of the gun, a moment's silence, the whine and rush of the shell and then the heavy explosion. I have always tried to make myself believe that the Germans must shell hospitals by mistake, but this one had a large white cross painted on the tents and large red cross flags floating, and as the range is always found in the day time, they must have shown very plainly. We did not camp there until after dark so 'Fritz' could not have been shooting at us. We were under shell fire for sixty hours with only a rest of two or three hours at a time. We made our camp this first time in the little shelter holes the 'dough boys' had slept in the night of the first day of the drive. We worked on the roads near this camp for four or five days during a hold up in the drive. The second time the drive was started it was heralded by the heaviest barrage of the whole war. The American artillery set hub to hub and plenty more in support to be rush up as soon as the infantry went so the fresh guns could get in ahead of those already at work. We moved up again when the drive started anew and were repairing roads between the light and heavy artillery until war was stopped. The second night we were under shell fire we were gassed and so for the next two weeks, we were a mighty sick bunch of men. The second camping place we found was in a hollow and we paddled around in mud up to our ankles and did not even have straw to put under our blankets. Some found a few boards and the rest threw their rain coats on the ground and slept on them. Thank Heaven we were here only four days and then moved up again. This was our last move and we moved into some vacated German barracks and were in sight of the front line German trenches and about one hundred yards behind our own '75S.' These German barracks we moved into were on the East bank of the Meuse River and North of Dun. Here we were when the armistice was signed and there our company still is. And so ended the last three weeks of the war and my experiences in the Argonne drive. I could go on and tell of the dead and wounded and the destruction and all the misery, but it is over and so let us forget it all as soon as possible and think of something more pleasant. After war ceased and we had the roads in good shape again a certain number of us were granted leaves to go to a rest camp for seven days. I was the only sergeant to get this permission and so was sent in charge of the detachment from our company. We were sent here to Aix Les Bains, the world renowned sporting resort. Aix Les Bains is near the border of Switzerland and just in the edge of the Alps. It has some very noted hot sulfur baths and many very fine hotels. Also a Casino which is noted all over the world and second only to the one at Monte Carlo. The Y.M.C.A. occupies the Casino and it is the grandest home the 'Y' has in any place on earth. There is a large fine theater, a ball room, a library, a lecture room, and many other large rooms which were used as gambling rooms. Harry Thaw at one time owned this casino for a period of twenty hours, having won it on a gambling wager. The place is worth a million dollars. This is the finest leave area of them all, and is used to send soldiers to who have been on the front. About ten thousands soldiers can be taken out of here at one time. I have taken the baths, enjoyed the well cooked meals of the best hotel in town, been up on Mt. Reward where one can see Mt. Blanc on a clear day, and have slept in the first bed I have felt since I have been in France. Sure I have enjoyed myself here and thank Uncle Sam and the Y.M.C.A. for seven of the pleasantest days I have spent in France. Now I am to go back to my company and wonder and wait for that great time when we start for home. We were in the first five hundred thousand coming over so we have hopes of being among the first to return. So the next time you hear from me I shall probably be back in Fayetteville and it will not take so long for the news to reach you. Until then I am as ever, Your friend, Henry W. Osborn, Co. F, 23rd Engr's, A. E. F., France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Sergeant Henry W. Osborn, a former employee of the Fayetteville Bulletin, writes from the American University Bureau in France: 'Am taking an agricultural course. Enjoying it fine and gaining many good points about fruit and vegetable gardening. Our regiment has been ordered home and expect to be out of service by the 4th of July. Sure will be glad to be back in old York State and in Fayetteville again. Seems 14 years since I have been away, and it has only been 14 months since we sailed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/16/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Living in Belle Vernon, PA in father's obituary, "The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/24/1941.

Osborn, Joel Fred, Jr. Fayetteville. Blacksmith, R1, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "J. Fred Osborn Jr., youngest son of J. F. Osborn of Fayetteville has enlisted in the aviation corps of the U. S. Army and is now at Denver, Colorado," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/28/1917. Aviation Corps, Denver, CO (as of 1/4/1918). "Private Joel Fred Osborn, Jr. who is now stationed at Garden City Long Island spent a few days at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Osborn, last week. He belongs to 838 Aero Squadron," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. "Henry Osborn, Fred Osborn, jr., Walter Worden, Walter Voight, Lewis Hayden Eaton, Caryl Daggett and William N. Konvicka are reported to be in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Osborne have received word that their son, J. Fred Osborn, Jr., has arrived safely in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. J. Fred Osborne have received letters from their sons, Sergeant Henry W. Osborne and Private Fred Osborne telling briefly of their part in the recent advance in France. Sergeant Osborne states that he was gassed and lay in shell hole clinging to the mud for 48 hours while both Boche and American shells were raining all around. Fred Osborne states that he received a shrapnel wound in his knee during the big battle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Dry Hill Rd., 1927 Fayetteville Directory. Living in Santa Monica, CA, in father's obituary, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/24/1941.

Osborn, Leonard. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Infantry. Died of disease, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Ostrander, Malvern J. Minoa. "J. E. Ostrander has received word that his son, Malvern J. Ostrander, has arrived in New York from Brest," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/25/1919. "Sergt. Malvern J. Ostrander has returned from France and is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ostrander," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/2/1919.

Ostrander, Melvin. Minoa. "Sergt. Melvin Ostrander of Spartanburg, S. C., spent a short furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Ostrander, Thursday and Friday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1918.

Oswald, Richard Willing. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1906, known as "Runt." U. S. Army.

Otteson, Lou M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Otto, Freeman M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

Page, David Benson, Jr. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as "Hefty," from Oswego, NY. U. S. Army. Lieutenant, 56th Engineers, died of disease, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Pardee, Howard J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Parker, Burton. "Burton Parker, former bookkeeper at the paper mill who has been recently discharged from the Cornell training camp, is visiting friends in town (Fayetteville)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918.

Parsons, Gideon C. Fayetteville. Drafted, to leave Sunday for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, Friday, May 24, 1918. "Private Gideon Parsons who has been stationed at the Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., returned home this week after having received his discharge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 113 Mill St., woodworker, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Parsons, M. H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Patten, James. Minoa. "Signed up Nov. 4th, 1917 at Solvay, N.Y., his address at the time being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the Navy at Pelham Bay as an Apprentice Seaman on U.S.S. Pensacola - supply ship. Received his discharge as a 1st class Fireman on Mar. 4th, 1919 at Brooklyn Navy Yard," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Patterson, Sardis L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Paulsen, Edgar P. St. John's School, former instructor.

Paxton, Charles H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Payne, Harold E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Peabody, Orlando S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Peck, Eugene C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Peck, Walter E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Perkins, Monroe. "Monroe Perkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Perkins, who has had a position with the Taylor Instrument Company at Rochester, has been ordered to training camp for selective service. He attained his twenty-first birthday only a few weeks ago," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. Former Fayetteville resident.

Perley, Harold O. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Perry, Harold B. Fayetteville. "A German helmet taken by Sergeant Harold B. Perry at the battle of the Marne is on exhibition at C. R. Eaton's store. The helmet was sent to Sergeant Perry's brother Irving D. Perry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. Sergeant Harold B. Perry, brother of Irving D. Perry of this village (Fayetteville), died of pneumonia in a base hospital in France on his twenty-second (?) birthday according to a telegram from the War Department. He was stricken a long time ago and had sent word home through the commanding officer of his company that he was on the road to recovery. Later he suffered a relapse. He had been in France seven months. Besides his mother, Nellie Perry of Syracuse, formerly of this village, he is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Morse O. Dell Plain, Miss Laura Mae Perry, and a brother, Irving D. Perry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Gold medals were given the families of those who died in the service at Fayetteville's Welcome Home Day, Oct. 4, 1919. These were Charles Skinner, Harold Perry, Floyd Stanard and Clarence Dennis," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/10/1919. "Irving D. Perry went to Hoboken the first of the week to accompany home the body of his brother, Sergt. Harold B. Perry, who died of pneumonia in France on Nov. 22, 1918, his twenty-third birthday. Besides his brother he is survived by his mother, Mrs. Nellie Perry, and a sister, Laura, both of Syracuse and Mrs. Morse Dell Plain, a sister of Chicago, " The Manlius Eagle, 12/31/1920.

Peters, John P. Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Capt. Commanding officer of British General Hospital No. 1," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

Petit, Bruce. St. John's School cadet. "Two boys from St. John's school Larry Johnson and Bruce Petit, have been wounded in France, according to an unconfirmed report...Petit was graduated from the aviation school at Ithaca and is attached to the flying corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918.

Petus, Frazier F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Pette, Bruce S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Pette, Kellogg Ashley. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914; Post Graduate, 1915; known as "Kell," from Brooklyn, NY. U. S. Army. Lieutenant, artillery, United States Reserves.

Pflueger, Theodore S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Phelps, J. B. St. John's School, former instructor.

Phillips, Stanley. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Phinney, Grove G. Fayetteville. "Grove Phinney, who enlisted in the Naval Reserves several weeks ago has been ordered to report at the training station at Pelham Bay next Thursday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Grove Phinney and Louis Motsiff were home from Pelham Bay naval training station for over Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 204 Thompson St., carpenter, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Phinney, Russell. Fayetteville. "Private Russell Phinney, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Marcellus Miles, is the first Fayetteville boy to return from overseas service, having arrived home Monday morning. Aside from a slight lameness caused by being hit in the knee by a fragment of shell in the Argonne forest drive on Nov. 7 Phinney is looking fine. Phinney, after training at Camp Merritt, went overseas with Company C, 12th Field Artillery last June and since that time participated in the principal battles in which the Americans were engaged. He was in the battle of Chateau-Thierry, Soissons, St. Mihiel and in the Argonne Forest drive, being wounded on Nov. 7, four days before the armistice was signed. Private Phinney says he saw Walter Voight after the latter had been gassed. He also was present, he says, when Private Archie Van Patten, who was killed on August 20, was buried. In describing the finding of the body of Archie Van Patten, Phinney says that when the artillery advanced in following up the infantry he was sent out with a burying party and that Van Patten's body was among several found near together. The side of the face of the soldier who the chaplain said was Van Patten was badly disfigured so that he was not able to identify him although he had seen him several times before the war. Phinney was in a base hospital near Paris from Nov. 8 to Dec. 26, when he was sent to Brest, from which port he sailed three weeks ago. He is now stopping with his grandparents at High Bridge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Pierce, James R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Piquet, Peter V. Fayetteville. "Signed up on Aug. 8th, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at that time being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Ft. Slocum as a private serving with Battery C., 34th Field Artillery. Received his discharge as a Cook on Feb. 3, 1919 at Camp McClellan, Ala.," Named spelled Piguet, Peter V. History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Pope, Allan M. St. John's School. "Captain Allan M. Pope of the Manlius Schools has been ordered to report to Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont, and will leave for his new duties June 15," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917.

Pope, Allan M. St. John's School, former instructor.

Pope, Arthur W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Pope, Morrill S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Pope, William R. St. John's School, former instructor. "William N. Pope, manager of the Post Exchange at St. John's School last year, left Syracuse Tuesday to join the aviation section of the Signal Corps. Mr. Pope, whose home is at Lakeland, has recently been in the employ of the Syracuse Trust company," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918.

Post, John B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Poucher, Rollinson W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy. "Lieutenant. Commanded the U. S. Submarine Chaser No. 246," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

Powell, John K. Manlius. "Sergeant John K. Powell is home on a ten day furlough with Mrs. Powell at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Shawl. They spent last week at the home of Dr. and Mrs. William Powell of Clayton," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Mrs. John Powell left during the week for Atlanta, Ga., where she will remain until Mr. Powell sails for 'Over There,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

Pratt, Charles D. Fayetteville. Lieutenant Charles Pratt is home from Jacksonville, Fla., having received his discharge from the Quartermaster's Corp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Pratt, Fayette D. Fayetteville. "Fayette Pratt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pratt of this village, has enlisted and has been accepted for the aviation corps. He is now awaiting an assignment," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Fayette Pratt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pratt, has enlisted in the aviation corps and left yesterday for Fort Dick, Leavenworth, Tex., where he will undergo training for three months," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Fayette Pratt was home from the aviation camp at Cornell over the week end," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Fayette Pratt of the aviation corps is home from Ithaca on a ten-day furlough. After having been at a training camp at Texas for several months he was sent to Cornell to complete his course in ground work and expects now to be sent to France for training in flying," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Pratt, Lee. Fayetteville. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... Lee Pratt, Tobyhanna, Pa...." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Sec. 575th Ambulance Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "Lee Pratt is now in service in France with an ambulance unit," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. The (Presbyterian-Baptist, Fayetteville) Church Day was well attended...parts of a letter from Lee Pratt, who is in France were read and we felt very seriously that the war is coming to our homes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Prentice, Eugene H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Prentice, Walter. Fayetteville. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression. The arrangements for the farewell were made by Henry Straub and Chester R. Eaton. Some $50 was raised for the supper and as nearly all expenses were donated. Mr. Straub gave nearly $30 to W. M. Jones, Red Cross treasurer, to be used for a celebration when the next contingent goes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "J. C. Hullar, Walter Prentice and Arthur Gaugel, Fayetteville boys who went with the second contingent of drafted men to Camp Dix, have been transferred to a cantonment in Georgia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917. Fayetteville. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Walter Prentice, Signal Corps, Camp Gordon," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918. 307th Signal Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "Word has been received from private Walter Prentice that he arrived Monday at Newport News and will go to Camp Upton for his discharge. He served overseas with the 307th Field Signal Battalion," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Present, LeRoy. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Preston, Julius H., Jr. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Pritchard, Reuben Parker. Fayetteville. "Signed up Aug. 27th, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address then being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army as a Cadet at Ft. Niagara and served with Battery F., 345th Field Artillery. He served overseas from June 30th, 1918 to June 7th, 1919 at St. Mihiel, Argonne, and Army of Occupation. Received his discharge as a 1st Lieutenant F.A. on July 8th, 1919 at Camp Devens, Mass.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Proctor, John F. St. John's School, former instructor. "The school has been very fortunate in securing Captain Proctor of the Royal Flying Corps. Captain Proctor has been 'over there' and is teaching the cadets the real stuff. He has already given several lectures on the war and expects to give practical work as soon as the weather permits. His work in connection with Government Inspection was invaluable and enabled the school to make a good showing," The Wind Mill, April 1918, p. 5. "Trench raiding was illustrated (at St. John's school commencement) by a picked squad under the direction of Lieut. J. F. Proctor, who was wounded overseas with the Canadians," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

Prophet, Wilson Brown. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1906, known as "Prophet." U. S. Army.

Quinby, Kenneth Malcolm. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, from Pittsburgh, PA. U. S. Army.

Rabe, Earl Stephen. Kirkville. "Signed up May 24th, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at that time being Kirkville, N.Y., R.D.#2. He was inducted into the navy at Newport as a Machinists Mate, 2nd class, being assigned to the U.S.S. Preston. Received his discharge as a Machinists Mate, 2nd class, on Sept. 12th, 1919 at Detroit, Mich.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Rafferty, William Carroll, Jr. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Bill," from Honolulu, HI. U. S. Army. "2nd Lieutenant. Decorated by the French for gallant flying at the front," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

Ramage, James B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ramsdell, Harry T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Randall, Russell C. Manlius. To go to Fort Dix, 4/29/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "Mrs. Lena Randall left Wednesday for Camp Dix, N. J. to bid her son, Russell, Godspeed overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. Mrs. Lena Randall is still at Camp Dix, N. J., where her son, Russell was stricken with scarlet fever on the eve of his departure for France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "Privates Lloyd Leonard and Russell Randall are home from Camp Dix for the week-end," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. "Mrs. Lena Randall has received news of the safe arrival overseas of her son, Private Russell C. Randall who is in Battery B, 80th Field Artillery," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "John Chappel received a letter Tuesday from his nephew, Private Russell Randall, telling of his safety in France, and of his satisfactory treatment," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Mrs. Lena Randall received a letter Monday from her son, Bugler Russell Randall, now in Germany, stating that he expects to remain in that country with the American Army of Occupation," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Priv. lst Class Russell Randall expects to sail from France June 16, and reach Manlius by July 4," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919. "Private Russell Randall has returned from overseas to Camp Mills and expects to return to Manlius about July 4," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/27/1919. 506 Pleasant, coremaker, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. Buried Nov. 27, 1968, ae. 73.

Ray, Charles H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Raymond, Ralph W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Reakirt, Robert. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rebstock, Howard. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Reed, Edward. Minoa. "Edward Reed who had a month's leave of absence to assist in farm work has returned to Newport, R. I., where he is stationed with the Naval reserve forces," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Reed, Walter S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Reuting, Paul D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rice, Charles K. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Richards, Melzar G. St. John's School, former instructor. "Col. Melzar C. Richards, of Mexico, who was instructor in military tactics at the school ten years ago, has again been assigned to the school by the war department. Col. Richards has been serving as quartermaster at Camp Funston, Kas., the past year," The Fayetteville Bulletin.

Richards, Robert W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Richards, James B. Kirkville. "Signed up Aug. 3rd, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his address at that time being Kirkville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army as a Private at Camp Upton, serving with 20th Depot Service Co. He served overseas from Sept. 20th, 1918 to July 7th, 1919. Received his discharge as a private on July 14th, 1919 at Camp Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Richards, T. Robinson. Kirkville. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., and was inducted into service in World War at Kirkville, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Richberg, F. Dennison (Denison). Manlius. Farmer, Fayette St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Miss Mabel Judge, who will wed Denison Richburg on August 15, was showered by a party of friends," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "At the Presbyterian church next Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock will occur the marriage of Miss Mabel Judge, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Judge, and Dennison Richburg..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1817. "Dennison Richburg has been appointed substitute carrier on J. Allen Patrick's route. The latter has resigned and expects soon to move to the city. Mr. Richburg expects to take the examination for carrier when one is announced to fill the vacancy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. "In the reclassification of registrants recently ordered by General Crowder,...Denison Richburg of Manlius has been changed from class 2 to Class 1," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. "Manlius draft registrants who changed to Class 1 in the recent reclassification include Dennison Richburg, Ivan Cooper, John Millis and Edward Tuttle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. "Dennison Richburg left Monday for Buffalo where he will take special training as an enlisted man in the army technical school as a machinist," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. "Corporal Dennison Richburg was home from Buffalo for the week end," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Sergeant F. D. Richburg was home from Buffalo Technical High for the week end. He expects to leave Buffalo this week for 'somewhere,' The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Dennison Richburg...who was voluntarily inducted into service a few weeks ago and who has been taking an army course at Buffalo technical school, was also ordered to Camp Taylor (Louisville, KY), this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "Telegrams announcing the critical illness of Sergeant Dennison Richburg of pneumonia at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., were received Wednesday by his wife, Mrs. Mabel Judge Richburg and his mother, Mrs. Jennie Richburg. A second telegram received this morning stated he was better. Mrs. Richburg left Wednesday for Camp Taylor," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Name should appear as a blue star on the Manlius service flag, but is not listed in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Dennison Richburg, who is ill with pneumonia at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky., is improving. His mother, Mrs. Jennie Richburg, who was called to his bedside last week, is now engaged as a regular nurse in the camp Taylor military hospital, where she will remain indefinitely," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918. "Private Dennison Richburg of Camp Taylor, Va. and Earl Steltzner of Camp Dix, N.J. have received honorable discharges and returned to Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. "Willard Butts, Dennison Richburg, Horace Ellis and Earl Steltzner, all recently returned from army service, were tended an informal reception in the Presbyterian parish house Monday evening. Talks were given by Rev. Frederick Perkins of the Manlius Schools and the returned soldiers. Ice cream and cake were served by the women of the society, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/10/1919. 119 Smith St., merchant, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. Buried Nov. 12, 1978, ae. 83.

Richer, Harold. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag; drafted, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

Richmond, Ralph Skinner. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Rich," from Albany, NY. U. S. Navy.

Richmond, Vance L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Richmond, William, Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Roberts, Charles C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Robertson, Arthur C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rockwood, Arthur R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Roemer, John. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Lieut. Roemer has returned to school after being commissioned from an infantry training School, Camp Gordon, Ga., on February 3, 1919. He also a course in the Machine Gun School at Camp Hancock," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 23.

Rogers, Milton. Fayetteville/High Bridge. "Milton L. Rogers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee C. Rogers, formerly of this place, now of Marcellus, has enlisted in the Cavalry. Mr. Rogers has been employed by the O. M. Edwards manufacturing company. He leaves Monday night for Fort Slocum and from there will go to Texas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918. "Private Milton L. Rogers of the Machine Gun Troop, 11th Cavalry, Fort Myer, Va., who enlisted in the U. S. A. more than a year ago has received an honorable discharge, and returned Friday to his home at High Bridge," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/14/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Romer, George F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rose, Burton U. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rose, Floyd. "Floyd W. Rose of Syracuse, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Rose, and a former Manlius boy, was one of four members of the Syracuse force of the New York Telephone company, who left Syracuse Monday night for Chillicothe, O., where they will enter the training camp for the Signal Corps of the United States Army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917. "Floyd Rose, a former Manlius boy, who has been with the New York Telephone company, reports his safe arrival in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

Rosenbaum, Bertram. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rosenbaum, H. Merle. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rosenfield, Charles D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rosenfield, Walter A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain in Cav. when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Roth, James P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Rowland, Dudley E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

?Ruddy, Michael. Manlius. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Signed up Nov. 10th, 1915 at Syracuse, N.Y., giving his address as Syracuse, N.Y. He was inducted into the service at Syracuse, N.Y. as a private in the Army with Co. B., 104th Machine Gun Battalion, serving overseas from May 18th, 1918 to March 19th, 1919, taking part in battles at Hindenberg Line and St. Souplet. Received his discharge as a Private April 3rd, 1919 at Camp Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Ryan, Daniel F. Fayetteville. To go to Camp Devens, MA 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. Name appears in History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Sadler, John H. St. John's School cadet. Captain in the Marine Corps, Boston when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Sanborn, Leslie. Minoa. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder as L.A. Sanborn.

Sanford, Carlton M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Sanford, George A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Fort Oglethorpe, GA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Saniro, Mike. Minoa. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Sauer, Howard. "Mr. Howard Sauer, a former resident spent Thursday night with Anson Smith, also calling on other friends, previous to being called in his country's service. Mr. Sauer has enlisted in the aviation corps, expecting soon to go to Ithaca," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. Formerly a resident of Green Lake.

Scanlon, Howard. Manlius. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Buried Manlius Village Cemetery. Buried July 14, 1984, ae. 88.

Schadt, Charles L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Schaertel, Walter M. Fayetteville. "Signed up at Manlius, while residing in Fayetteville, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Schaff, William S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Schaffner, Gabriel E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Schas, William D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Lieut. Schas, former 1st Lieut. in Co. 'B' who received his commission at the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg spent a week at school recently. Schas has been stationed in the S. A. T. C. at Brown University," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 24.

Scheidt, Karl F. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914; 1915, known as "Inkie" and "Karl" from Norristown, PA. U. S. Army.

Schell, Earl W. Fayetteville. "Signed up Oct. 25th, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the service at Camp Dix, N.J. as a private in the Army with 303rd Reg. of Military Police, 78th Division. Served overseas, taking part in battles at St. Mihiel and Argonne. Received his discharge as a 1st class Private June 13th, 1919 at Camp Dix, N.J.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Schell, Franklin. Fayetteville. "His address at the time of his induction into service being Fayetteville, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Scheuerman, Harold P. Minoa. "Philip Scheurman, 69, proprietor of the Scheuerman hotel...died last Friday...Mr. Scheurman's parents came from Bavaria in 1847 and settled in Syracuse, where a year later he was born...At the age of 17 he married Miss Barbara Dippold, and three years later he went to Minoa and engaged in the hotel business. Mrs. Scheuerman died soon afterward and in 1884 he married Miss Jane Oot...there are five daughters...and two sons, John Scheurman and Harold Scheurman of Minoa, also a sister," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "John Scheurman and Harold Scheurman, sons of the late Philip Schuerman, left Tuesday night for Fort Slocum to service in the medical corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917. "Mrs. Philip Scheuerman and her daughter, Mrs. Charles Sandorf, left Friday for New York, where they will meet Harold Scheuerman, recently transferred from Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., to Camp Merritt, N. J.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Mrs. Jennie Scheuermann and Mrs. Nellie Burns returned Monday from Fort Oglethorpe, Atlanta, Ga., where they visited private John Scheuermann. On their return trip they also visited Private Harold Scheuermann at Camp Merritt, N.J.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "Harold P. Scheuerman of Camp Merritt, N. J., is home on a short furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Private Harold Schuerman of Camp Merritt is visiting his mother, Mrs. Jennie Schuerman," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. "Harold Scheuerman writes from Camp Merritt that he has been rated a first class private," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. Buried St. Mary's Cemetery, Minoa, 12/5/1891-2/15/1936. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Signed up Dec. 8th, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the service at Ft. Slocum as a private in the Army with the Medical Department assigned to Field Hospital #36. He received his discharge as a 1st class private Aug. 16th, 1919 at General Hospital #1, at N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Scheuerman, John. Minoa. "John Scheuerman and Harold Scheuerman, sons of the late Philip Scheuerman, left Tuesday night for Fort Slocum to service in the medical corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917. "Mrs. Jennie Scheuerman and her daughter, Mrs. Clara Foell of Syracuse, have accompanied John Scheuerman to the seaboard. Private Scheuerman passed through here last week en route to a port of embarkation. He was given a 24-hour furlough to visit his home, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. "Mrs. Jennie Scheuerman has received word that her son, John, who embarked several weeks ago, had arrived overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. Died 1920, age 33, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/2/1920. "The funeral of John Scheurman, 33, who died suddenly while on his way to church, was largely attended Wed. at St. Mary's church. Mr. Scheuerman was the son of the late Phillip Scheuerman. He is survived by the mother, Jennie Oot Scheuerman; by a brother, Harold Scheuerman, and five sisters, Mrs. Frederick Foell, and Mrs. Frederick Messer of Syracuse; Mrs. George Woolever, Mrs. Charles Shandorf and Mrs. Willis Remlinger, of Minoa," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/2/1920. Buried St. Mary's Cemetery, d. 3/28/1920, ae. 33. "Mr. Scheuerman...enlisted in the service in December 1917, and was ordered to France, serving with the medical detachment of the Nineteenth machine gun battalion. He was engaged in field work when the armistice was signed. He was discharged in July 1919," East-Syracuse library scrapbook, article of 3/29/1919, no paper cited. Although his name appears with a gold star on the Minoa War Memorial boulder, Scheuerman did not die during the war. "Signed up Dec. 8th, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the service at Ft. Slocum as a Private in the Army with the Medical Department, 19th Machine Gun Battalion. Served overseas from Aug. 31st, 1918 to June 16th, 1919, taking part in battle at Purvenelle, Sect. A.E.F. in France. Received his discharge as a private, 1st class, June 30th, 1919 at Camp Upton, N.Y. Died June 30th, 1919. (I suspect this error in record of death is the reason why Minoa has a gold star on its memorial boulder next to Scheuerman's name. He was discharged on June 30, 1919 and actually died March 20, 1920/K. Crowell.)

?Schlausker, Henry C. Manlius. Reported as having enlisted, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917.

Schmidt, Isadore. Minoa. "Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Schmidt were called to Pelham Bay naval station Friday, where their son, Isadore, is ill with pneumonia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918. "Isadore Schmidt of the Naval Reserves, Pelham Bay, is at home on a brief visit. He will sail for France, Monday, on the transport, Tallahassee," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/14/1919. "Isadore Schmidt of the Naval Reserves, left Sunday to report for duty on board the Tallahassee, bound for France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919. "Signed up June 3rd, 1918 at Syracuse, his address at the time being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the navy at the Receiving Ship, New York, serving as a Seaman, 2nd class, and assigned to U.S.S. Tallahassee. Received his discharge as a Seaman, 2nd class, Sept. 15th, 1919 at the Receiving Ship, New York," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Schmidt, John E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Schmidt, Joseph. Minoa. "Joseph and Isadore Schmidt have enlisted in the navy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Signed up June 3rd, 1918 at Syracuse, his address at the time being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the Navy at the Receiving Ship, New York, serving as a Seaman, 2nd class. Received his discharge as a Seaman, 2nd class, Dec. 22nd, 1918 at the Receiving Ship, New York," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Schouten, Carl P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "The majority of the men who attended the Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg last summer and received their commissions, have been mustered out of the service. Lieuts. Girton, Jones, G. M., Bradley, F., and Schouten who attended this camp are back at school now, and it is expected that Lieut. Lightfoot will be back before Easter," The Wind Mill, February 1919, p. 26.

Schulz, George F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Schweitzer, Conrad. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Scovill, Justin S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Started at Princeton University in the S. A. T. C., but was chosen to be transferred to C. O. T. C. Guess it was St. John's Manual that got the Colonel's attention when he picked me out," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 25.

Sears, Eldon. Manlius. "Eldon Sears, formerly of Manlius, has become a member of the United States Cavalry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Local address Manlius, N.Y. Inducted into service in the cavalry," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Seay, H. H. St. John's School, former instructor.

Sebree, John B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps. Captain at Galveston, TX when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Seiberling, Charles W., Jr. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Seib" and "Pop," from Akron, OH. U. S. Army.

Seiberling, T. Karnaghan. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Seidel, George N. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Seitz, Cameron. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Shafer, Carl. Manlius. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "Frank Battle, Leonard Kantak and Carl Shafer have enlisted in the munition supply corps and expect soon to be employed as chauffeurs on trucks hauling munitions from the railroads to the trenches in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Karl Schaffer..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917.

Shaw, J. Ernest. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Shear, Hugh R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Shellenberger, J. O. J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Shears, Karl R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Sheldon, Carew. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Shepard, George Searle. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Shep," from North Easton, MA. U. S. Army. Died in France in May, 1918 of wounds received in action, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Lieutenant, 18th Infantry, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103. "Shepard was the first Saint John's boy to die in action in the war. He was also the first resident of North Eastern, Mass., to lose his life in the war. He left Saint John's in 1915 and attended the first Plattsburg Training Camp. He was afterward a student at the Rhode Island State College, Kingston, R. I. Quoting some extracts from two letters written by him, one to Mr. Marsh and the other to General Verbeck: (1) 'I am now at a British army school for a five weeks' course, most of the work is in bayonet fighting and Lewis gun.' (Oct. 24th, 1917). (2) 18th U. S. Inf., Amex forces, France. 'I am at last settled with a regiment of the regular army. I am quite satisfied with my luck to be with such an organization. After my course at the school I spent a week in the trenches, near Passchendaele, and was only a few miles away when the Canadians took the ridge. The artillery made more noise than I ever imagined could exist. I found out that it is perfectly good form to duck one's head when a shell comes dangerously near.' In May, 1918, Lieutenant Shepard died in France from wounds received in action," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 14.

Shepard, Thomas D. St. John's School, former instructor.

Sherman, A. O. St. John's School cadet. Infantry, U. S. Army

Sherman, Outram W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Sherwood, Edward Duane. Fayetteville. "Six Fayetteville boys expect to leave Syracuse next Thursday for the cantonment at Camp Dix, near Wrightstown, N.J. to be trained for the battle against German autocracy. The men now called represent 45 per cent of the quota under the first call. Five per cent of the quota went forward a few weeks ago and are assisting to put the camp in readiness for the men who leave next week. The Fayetteville boys who have received cards notifying them that they have been certified by this district board and to hold themselves in readiness to leave on twenty-fours' notice, are...E. Duane Sherwood..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/21/1917. "Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression. The arrangements for the farewell were made by Henry Straub and Chester R. Eaton. Some $50 was raised for the supper and as nearly all expenses were donated. Mr. Straub gave nearly $30 to W. M. Jones, Red Cross treasurer, to be used for a celebration when the next contingent goes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "E. Duane Sherwood of this village (Fayetteville) is captain of the quota from District No. 2 which left Syracuse at 10 o'clock this morning over the D. L. & W. for Camp Dix. L. Stickley's auto took the Fayetteville boys to Syracuse at 7 o'clock this morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917. "News has been received from Camp Dix that E. Duane Sherwood of this village who was captain of the second contingent of drafted men from this district has been promoted to sergeant. Mr. Sherwood was formerly a member of Troop D and the experience led to his promotion," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ... E. Duane Sherwood, Camp Dix..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "E. D. Sherwood Tells of Life at Camp Dix. Editor Bulletin: I thought it might interest you to know how the boys of Company G, 310th Infantry, are faring on Thanksgiving Day. Our cooks certainly outdid themselves and served us a dinner that the Onondaga would find it hard to equal. Our company kitchen was a very busy place last night and the cooks and kitchen police worked far into the morning baking pies and cakes and preparing for our Thanksgiving celebration. Dinner was served at 12:30 p.m., and we all entered the mess hall prepared to enjoy ourselves. Our menu was as follows: Olives, celery, pickles, oyster stew, oysterettes, roast pork, apple sauce, asparagus tips with butter sauce, combination salad, roast turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, fruit salad, cream peas, giblet gravy, oyster dressing, plum pudding with cream sauce, chocolate layer cake, mince pie, fancy cakes, cheese, ice cream, fancy cakes, old-fashioned sweets, coffee, chocolate, almonds, pecans, walnuts, peanuts, popcorn, grapes, apples, bananas, pears, cigars, cigarettes. You may be sure that we did full justice to our Thanksgiving dinner and as our captain and officers dined with us, it was a sort of state occasion. We lost about half of our company who were transferred to the 82nd division, Camp Gordon, Ga., on November 2nd. Yesterday, however, we received forty-three men from the last draft contingent. Among them was E. S. Cross whose home is near Kirkville. Our training is progressing very rapidly. For the last two weeks we have had bayonet exercises and trench warfare, 'going over the top,' etc. Last week we shot on the target range, about five miles from camp. I am on duty at regimental headquarters in the Adjutant's office alternate days so that I get several days of drill each week. We are having ideal weather here. On waking yesterday morning we found the ground covered with snow, the first of the season, but there is not much of it left this afternoon. People who live around this neighborhood say that the winters here are very mild. Our training is doing us world's of good and we are rounding into shape to tackle the Kaiser and make a good job of it. Your Sincerely, E. Duane Sherwood," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917. Head Quartermasters Brigade 310th Inf. (as of 1/4/1918). "Sergeant E. Duane Sherwood, of Headquarters Co., 310 Infantry, Camp Dix, N. J. has been spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sherwood in Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "Sergeant E. Duane Sherwood of Headquarters Co., 310th Infantry, Camp Dix, has been assigned to the officers' training camp, Camp Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla. and left for that place the 29th," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. "John L. Sherwood of Fayetteville received word Wednesday that his son, E. Duane Sherwood, had received a commission of second lieutenant at Camp Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla., and ordered to report at once to the office of the quartermaster-general in Washington. Lieutenant Sherwood went to Camp Dix on September 28 and advanced there from private to corporal and sergeant. He commenced his training for the lieutenancy at Camp Johnston two months ago," The Manlius Eagle, 7/11/1918. Formerly employed at the Syracuse office of the Continental Can Company. "Lieut. E. Duane Sherwood has returned from the Pacific Coast where he has been establishing a standard system of property accounting. He spent some time in this capacity at the thirteen different army supply depots throughout the United States and recently received his discharge at Washington, D. C. He will take up his former position in the office of the Continental Can Co., Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/11/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. "Signed up Sept. 28, 1917 at Manlius, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army as a private at Camp Dix, serving with Company G. 310th Infantry. Received his discharge as a 2nd Lieutenant April 4, 1919, at Washington, D.C.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Sherwood, Harry. "Harry Sherwood, a former Manlius boy, is in the Ordnance Service and is now stationed at the Watervliet arsenal," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918.

Sherwood, Henry F. Fayetteville. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/26/1918. "Henry F. Sherwood was home from Camp Dix last week for a short furlough, returning Sunday. He has been assigned to Camp Johnston, Florida and left for that place Tuesday," The Manlius Eagle, 7/11/1918. In the same camp as his brother, E. Duane Sherwood. "Both young men were employed at the Syracuse office of the Continental Can company," The Manlius Eagle, 7/11/1918. "Sergeant Henry F. Sherwood has returned from Camp Jackson, S. C., where he has been stationed as company clerk for the Quartermaster Detachment since January, at which time he was transferred from Camp Johnston, Fla. He received his discharge on April 4 and will resume his position in the office of the Continental Can Co., Syracuse, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/11/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. "Signed up May 25, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y. His local address being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Camp Jackson, S.C. as a private with Quarter Master Corps Camp Supply. He was discharged as a Sergeant Quarter Master Corps, April, 4, 1919, at Camp Jackson, S.C.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Sherwood, Lewis R. "Lewis Sherwood of Syracuse, a former Manlius boy and a former member of Battery A, will sail from Philadelphia for France this week where he expects to serve as a chauffeur in the American ambulance corps. It was while Sherwood was working in Philadelphia last week that recruiting officers in search of trained chauffeurs, secured his enlistment in the special unit which sails this week for the European battlefields," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/11/1917. "A card received by Manlius friends announces the safe arrival of Lewis Sherwood in France on June 1. Sherwood, who is a former Manlius boy, sailed with an engineering corps from Philadelphia on May 15. He expects to serve as mechanician with an ambulance corps connected with U. S. A. Base hospital No. 10. At the writing he says he was 'billeted' in a private home in Blackpool, a famous summer resort in France. He says he had a rough trip across the water but saw no submarines," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. "Lewis Sherwood writes Manlius friends that life in the ambulance corps in France is altogether too tame for him. Instead of being assigned to work driving an ambulance as expected he was detailed to act as Major's orderly and at odd times he makes up beds and does other work around the hospital," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/27/1917. "Somewhere in France. Dear Friend: I am still alive and well except for being tired out. I never expect to get enough rest until the war is over. We work night and day here. This last week we have been especially busy. There has been doings on the front, it has been raining for ten days and the boys here in the trenches are in mud up to their knees. We get them covered with mud. I don't do much of the hospital work as I am orderly for our commanding officer, Col. De Laney, our president and director, Maj. Harte and for two other Majors; Maj. Norris and Maj. Gibbons. I have to carry their messages, shine their shoes, make their beds, etc. When we have convoys or evacuations of wounded is the only time I get among those who have done the fighting. It will be awful when our lads get here and we have to get them. This is bad enough; we get them who have not had their first shave, with broken legs, arms, legs off, arms off, some literally shot and broken to pieces. People in America have absolutely no idea about this war. No one can have until they have been here and seen it. It sure makes one forget all the things he ever learned in the Bible. Believe me there is no place like the old U. S. England is bad enough; France is worse. I don't dare write my feelings and thoughts or the censor would have me on the carpet. I can't even make an interesting letter. I hear from home occasionally but for the last fortnight not a letter. I would appreciate a letter very much as letters from my friends do cheer me and Oh! I get so lonesome. Yours very sincerely, Lewis Sherwood," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. "Lewis Sherwood, formerly of Manlius, now an orderly attached to Base Hospital No. 10, France writes friends that he will undergo an operation on his ears," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/15/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Sherwood Syracuse, formerly of Manlius, have received a letter this week from their son, Lewis Sherwood, who is serving as orderly at a base hospital near the battle front in France. He says the hospital attendants have organized a band, the instruments being provided by a local philanthropist, and that he is now practicing regularly on a trombone. His health, which was poor for a time is now improved. A short time ago he found an acquaintance from Syracuse brought in among the wounded from the front. He sends his thanks to Manlius friends for letters and regrets that he has not had time to answer all of them," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Sherwood of Syracuse have received notice that their own Quartermaster Sergeant Lewis R. Sherwood, a former Manlius boy, is now the proud possessor of the French Croix de Guerre. Sergeant Sherwood was decorated by a French general while he was confined in an Armenian hospital. The citation was presented for conspicuous bravery in caring for wounded while under heavy and dangerous fire. Sergeant Sherwood expects to sail for home as soon as he is released from the hospital, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/7/1919. "Quartermaster Sergeant Lewis Sherwood, former Manlius boy, who left Syracuse to join a hospital unit nearly three years ago, returned to his home in Syracuse after having received his discharge this week at Camp Dix. Sergeant Sherwood not only saw service in the hospital but on the battle fields where he was twice wounded. After strenuous work he was taken ill and confined to a hospital for some time," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/25/1919. "Sergeant Lewis Sherwood of Syracuse, who recently returned after two years service with a hospital unit near the front lines in France, visited Manlius friends Friday. He is still suffering from the effects of gas which leave large blotches on the skin as it leaves his system. Sergeant Sherwood expects soon to visit his brother, Harry, at Nashville, Tenn., and on his return to take a bride in Philadelphia," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1919.

Shober, Samuel L., Jr. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Sam," from Broadmoor, Colorado Springs, CO. U. S. Army. "Sam Shober, now an officer of the Motor Transport Corps in France received the Croix de Guerre while a member of the American Ambulance," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 27.

Simmons, John B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Simon, Cletus. Minoa/East Syracuse. Farmer, R2, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Sergeant William Costello and Cletus Simon are home on a short furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. Possible town of Dewitt resident.

Simon, Edward J. Minoa. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y. Local address being Minoa, N.Y. at time of induction," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Skinner, Charles. Fayetteville. "Walter W. Cheney, jr., of Manlius and Donald Armstrong and Charles R. Skinner of this village (Fayetteville), were among the members of Troop D who were mustered back into federal service at the State Armory in Syracuse Sunday night. The Troop is now mobilized and awaiting orders for guard duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/6/1917. "Sergeant Donald Armstrong, Corporal W. W. Cheney, jr., and Charles R. Skinner left Thursday with Troop D for Peekskill where the Troop has been assigned to work in guarding a certain section of the Catskills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "Following the practice being adopted by other churches, the Men's Club of Trinity church (Fayetteville) has presented the church with a service flag having three stars for three members of the parish now in the service--Charles Skinner, Lucian Hale and Jacob Hullar, Jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917. "A letter received from Camp Wadsworth this morning by Dr. George J. Bryan states that Private Charles Skinner who has been seriously ill with spinal meningitis, is improving," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: ...Charles Skinner, Camp Wadsworth..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "News of the death of Charles Skinner, 21, Fayetteville's first soldier to die in service in the present war, was received Thursday morning by Dr. George J. Bryan. Private Skinner, who died Wednesday at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, had been ill with spinal meningitis for over two months. A week ago a report came from Spartanburg that he was improving. This was followed by a message early in the week that he was worse. Young Skinner enlisted in Troop D when it went to the border in August 1916. His first application for enlistment was rejected and only his patriotic persistency secured his acceptance and this was a day or two after the Troop left Syracuse. He followed immediately and after serving on the border did guard duty with the Troop in the Catskills. The troop then went to Spartanburg and was mustered into the 102d Machine Gun Battalion. Shortly after this, Private Skinner was taken ill with the dread malady against which medical skill is of little avail. Sergeant Donald Armstrong was the only one of his friends permitted to see him in the hospital. The remains, which are accompanied by Corporal Edward L. Reilly representing the company, are expected to reach Fayetteville Saturday morning. A detail from the quartermaster's department of the Syracuse expansion camp will meet the body at the depot in Syracuse and accompany it to Fayetteville where a brief funeral service will be held at the cemetery and the remains will be placed in the receiving vault. Private Skinner is survived by his father, Thomas Skinner of Albany and a sister, Miss Marion Skinner of Fayetteville. Previous to his enlistment Private Skinner had made his home with Dr. and Mrs. George J. Bryan." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/4/1918. "The funeral of Private Charles R. Skinner of the 104th Machine Gun Battalion was largely attended Sunday from the home of his cousin, Mrs. George J. Bryan and at Trinity church where the service was conducted by the rector, Rev. A. E. Dunham. Many friends of the young man from Syracuse attended the funeral. Among these were members of the Old Guard of Troop D, N.Y.G. Corporal Edward L. Reiley represented the machine gun company at the services," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity (Trinity church, Fayetteville). As it is near All Saints' Day it will be a memorial to the faithful departed, especially Private Chas. Skinner and Lieut. Clarence Dennis," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918. "Gold medals were given the families of those who died in the service (at Fayetteville's Welcome Home Day, October 4, 1919). These were Charles Skinner, Harold Perry, Floyd Stanard and Clarence Dennis, " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/10/1919.

Skjibred, Eric. "Eric Skjibred of Liverpool, formerly of Fayetteville, an employee of the Brown-Lipe company, was killed in action October 17 while serving with F Company, 311th Infantry, according to a telegram from the War Department received by Miss Christine Christensen, a cousin, at Liverpool. Private Skjibred was brought from New York to Fayetteville several years ago by John Pratt. He worked on Mr. Pratt's farm and for other farmers in this section several years going to Liverpool about two years ago," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/22/1918.

Slifer, John. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Sloan, Frank Anderson. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1908; 1909, known as "Tod," from NY, NY. U. S. Army.

Smiley, John. Minoa. "John Smiley, who enlisted at the Canadian recruiting station in Syracuse, left Friday for Toronto, where he will undergo final examination. Mr. Smiley is a native of Ireland and is a British subject. A few months ago he married Miss Beatrice Norman, daughter of Fred Norman of Elm street," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "John Smiley, who recently enlisted in the Canadian army, is home from a camp in Toronto on a five day's furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. "John Smiley is home after a year's service in France with the Canadian Corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/18/1919. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "He signed up Feb. 12, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the Canadian Army at Toronto, Canada, serving as a private with the 15th Battalion, 48th Canadian Highlanders. He served overseas from June 5, 1918 to June 25, 1919. He took part in the engagement West of Cambrai. He received his discharge at Toronto, Canada, Aug. 11, 1919," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Smith, Edward. Manlius. "Edward Smith, who enlisted in the U. S. Army in 1916, and who has been in active service in France, has received an honorable discharge and is now in Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/21/1919.

Smith, Elmer E. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Smith, George W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Smith, Henry M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Smith, Leighton. Fayetteville. "Layton Smith has been discharged from the army on account of ill health and returned home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Smith, Norman Burlingame. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914; 1915, known as "Norm," from Providence, RI. U. S. Army.

Smith, Stewart W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Smith, Warren. Fayetteville. "Charles Goodfellow and Warren Smith of this village were among the selectives from this village (Fayetteville) sent with the contingent of 21 from this district Wednesday to Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918. Red Cross outfits consisting of sweater, socks and wristlets were furnished to Warren Smith and Chas. Goodfellow of Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. "Private Warren Smith has returned home after being discharged from Camp Hancock, Ga.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/17/1919.

Smylie, Roy S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Snyder, Alva William. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. "G. S. Victor Little and Alva W. Snyder, of St. John's school have received commissions as second lieutenants in the U. S. army, and are now members of the Officer' Reserve Corps. They are daily expected to be assigned to duty. Lieut. Little graduated from St. John's and is now attending the law school of Syracuse University. Lieutenant Snyder is a member of the class of 1917 and also of St. John's band," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/11/1917.

Snyder, Frederick S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Camp Shelby, MS when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Snyder, George. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Sobles, Floyd R. Fayetteville. "Signed up May 16, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y. His local address being Fayetteville, R.F.D. #1. He was inducted into the Army at Syracuse, as a private with Company B. 9th Infantry. He served overseas from Sept. 6, 1917 to Feb. 18, 1919. He received his discharge as a private, March 4, 1919 at Camp Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Sobles, Leon Denzel. Fayetteville. "Signed up Oct. 1, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y. His local address being Fayetteville, R.F.D.#1. He was inducted into the Army at Syracuse as a private with Company E. 6th Engineers. He served overseas from Dec. 5, 1917 to March 15, 1919. Received his discharge as a private, march 25, 1919 at Camp Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Soule, Malcolm. Fayetteville. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., his local address being Fayetteville, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Soule, Walter. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Sponable, Robert. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Sponenburg, Alfred. Kirkville/Mycenae. "Alfred Sponenburg has enlisted and leaves Saturday for camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

Sponenburg, Charles. Kirkville/Mycenae. "Charles Sponenburgh, who went to Camp Dix in the last quota, has returned to his home here," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918.

Springer, George G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Stabb, Frank. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Stafford, Frederick G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Stair, Phillip Whitney. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Phil" and "Steps," from Toronto, Ont, Canada. U. S. Army.

Stanard, Floyd R. Fayetteville. "Floyd Stanard left Tuesday for Camp Syracuse where he will be trained for limited service in the auto truck line," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. Name appears on the Methodist Episcopal (Fayetteville) church service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin 8/9/1918. "Floyd Stanard of this village, is one of the soldiers from Camp Syracuse with the epidemic in a Syracuse hospital," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918. "Floyd R. Stanard, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Stanard, is the second Fayetteville boy to die while in the service during the present war. Private Stanard, who was a member of the Third Casual battalion at Camp Syracuse was taken ill last week Wednesday. He was so ill with the influenza that while in line at the medical headquarters he toppled over and was taken at once to the Crouse-Irving hospital where he died Wednesday. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church, Rev. Charles K. Bull officiating," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918. "Gold medals were given the families of those who died in the service (at Fayetteville's Welcome home Day, Oct. 4, 1919). These were Charles Skinner, Harold Perry, Floyd Stanard and Clarence Dennis. " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/10/1919.

Stanton, Clarence John. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as "Rube," from Canastota, NY. U. S. Army.

Stebbins, Alexander S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Stegmaier, T. Edward. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Steltzner, Earl. Manlius. To go to Fort Dix, 4/29/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "Private Earl Steltzner of Camp Dix visited Manlius friends the fore part of the week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Private Earl Steltzner of Fort Niagara visited friends in town the first of the week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. "Private Dennison Richburg of Camp Taylor, Va. and Earl Steltzner of Camp Dix, N.J. have received honorable discharges and returned to Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. "Willard Butts, Dennison Richburg, Horace Ellis and Earl Steltzner, all recently returned from army service, were tended an informal reception in the Presbyterian parish house Monday evening. Talks were given by Rev. Frederick Perkins of the Manlius Schools and the returned soldiers. Ice cream and cake were served by the women of the society," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/10/1919.

Steltzner, George W. Manlius/Eagle Village. "A farewell party for George Steltzner who left Monday night for Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, was given at his home Saturday evening. About fifty friends and neighbors were present. Mr. Steltzner was presented with a money belt containing $45.00," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. "George W. Steltzner and Hubert C. Mitchell are the only selects from this section to go with the contingent which leaves Syracuse Aug. 26 for Camp Gordon, Ga.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "George Steltzner has received his discharge and has returned from overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919.

Stevens, Carl. Manlius. "Carl Stevens has enlisted in the U. S. Navy, and expects to enter the service Saturday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918.

Stevens, Francis P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Stevens, Harry K. Manlius. Drafted, to leave Sunday for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, Friday, May 24, 1918. "Henry Daniels, Lloyd Leonard and Harry K. Stevens left Saturday for Camp Dix," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

Stevens, Wynne C. St. John's School, former instructor.

Stewart, H. Edgar. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Stickles, LeRoy Lewis. St. John's School cadet. Graduate class of 1917. From Rochester, N.Y., known as Stick. "Appointed Second Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps," The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 32. "Carl Meigs of East Syracuse has been recommended by General Verbeck of St. Johns, Manlius, for a commission as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. The other cadets who have been recommended `by General Verbeck at the request of the government are: ...Lewis LeRoy Stickles of Rochester, N.Y....Meigs and Bennett will receive commissions in the regular Marine Corps if they pass the required examinations at Brooklyn, and the others will be made officers in the reserve," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917. "Navy Department orders announce that Maurice P. King and Roy L. Stickles of the Manlius Schools have qualified for their permanent appointment as second lieutenants in the United States Marine Corps. The orders also indicate that Carl W. Meigs has qualified for his probationary appointment in the same rank," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917.

Stickley, Winslow. Fayetteville. "Winslow Stickley is home from Yale Students' Army Training Camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, 1898-1935, ae. 37.

Stickney, Herbert Whiting. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, from Albany, NY. U. S. Army. 1st Lt. Writes from Contrexeville, France: "All buildings have been converted into hospitals for our boys. Like many others I have spent some time in one of them. Kindest regards to you and good St. John's. It has given me wonderful backing during my 6 months service in A. E. F." The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 25.

Stoddard, Rev. Clayton. "....ordered to report ready for entrainment at the Court House Headquarters on Tuesday morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "The Rev. Clayton Stoddard, Pastor of the North Manlius Baptist church, was among the men sent to Camp Dix Tuesday morning by County Board No. 2. The clergyman did not claim exemption from service though he could easily have obtained it, and was anxious to be mobilized. He isn't the gloomy sort of a preacher either, and the boys aboard the coach were emphatic that he would lend merriment on the trip down rather than solemnity," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. "Signed up April 2, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y. His local address being 256 W. Kennedy St. He was inducted into the Army at Kirkville as a private with Company F, 311th Infantry, 78th Division. He served overseas from May 19, 1918 to Aug. 10, 1919, taking part in battles at St. Mihiel and Argonne. He was wounded Oct. 31, 1918 and received his discharge as a Corporal, Aug. 15, 1919 at Camp Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Straub, Homer O. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Strauf, Myron Rocks. Manlius. "....ordered to report ready for entrainment at the Court House Headquarters on Tuesday morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918.

Stringham, Ray D. Minoa. To go to Camp Devens, MA 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918.

Stucey, Francis J. "Francis Fulmer has received a letter from Francis Stucey, a former Manlius boy who is now serving in Co. K, 28th Infantry in France. In the letter Stucey says: 'I enlisted May 10th in the U. S. army. We have been over here about three months now. We are hiking about 20 miles every day. All we want now is for them to give the word go and we will all do our best to clean up for those Germans. They are getting the worst of it right along now. They sure can't last much longer. Some of the Frenchmen that come back from the front for a rest state that all the prisoners that they are getting now are boys between 16 and 20 years of age. There sure has been a bunch of them killed off," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917. "The name of Francis Stucey, nephew of Mr. and Mrs. John Neary, and youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. John Stucey of Detroit, formerly of Manlius, appears on the 'slightly wounded' army list of April 8. Private Stucey has been in France for some time," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Kenneth Sutfin has received a card from Francis Stucey, a former Manlius boy in the service, that he is now on his way from France to his home in Detroit, having lost one of his legs in action," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918. "Reports received here that Francis Stucey, a former well-known Manlius boy, had lost a leg in action and was on his way to his home in Detroit, are contradicted in the following letter just received from him by Francis Fulmer: June 8, 1918. My dear friend Francis: It has been a long time since I last wrote you and there has been so much excitement going on that it would take a book to tell it all so I will have to skip a lot and write only enough to let you know that I am well and getting on fine although I have been in the hospital twice since the first of April. I was wounded slightly both times. I will be ready to go at it again pretty soon I hope. Believe me we are showing those Heinies what American chaps are made of. You know when we used to go rabbit hunting together and the way we would knock those cotton tail over. Well I'm not stretching it a bit when I say that we gave the Huns just what we gave those rabbits. When any one tells you that those Germans can fight you tell them they are crazy. I suppose you get most of the war news out of the papers over there every day so I won't bother to tell you any in this letter. If I would be allowed to put it in I could give you some straight facts and it wouldn't be any of that old country bull that they tell some times. I have been wounded twice now but I hope some other day I will have a chance to get back at those cowards of Huns. I suppose you get sick of reading about the war all the time, so I will change the subject. I sure would be glad to see you and go to some dance hall and shake my restless legs a bit around to old dance room with some swell Jane. I wished you could see some of these French girls over here. I'll bet you would take the second look at them before you went on your way. Some of them are sure dazzling. I am writing this letter while at Base Hospital 27. It is a very fine hospital and we get swell treatment. I was at Base 2, at Paris and that was also a swell place. We had an aireoplane raid one night while I was at Paris and it was sure quite interesting for a short while. I saw that church where so many people got killed and wounded when the shell from that large gun in Germany hit it. I got a pass this afternoon from one until five and I went down town and I had a swell time. I trust that every one is well at your home and around the town. I suppose the old place is sure some dead. I have often wondered if you were in the army yet. I received a letter from home about two weeks ago and every thing is getting on fine. Every one is busy around there with the summer crops. With love and best regards to all, I remain as ever, your old pal, Francis J. Stucey, Co. K, 28th, Inf. Amer. Ex. Force, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

Styron, James. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Suhr, Henry W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Quartermaster Corps, died of disease, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103.

Suits, Walter J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Sumner, Gordon. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Sutter, Carl T. Manlius. "Signed up Aug. 16, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y. His local address being Manlius, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Camp Meade as a private with 1st G. R. Corps. He served overseas from Dec. 16, 1917 to May 21, 1919. He received his discharge as a Sergeant, June 3, 1919 at Meade, Md.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Sutter, Francis. Fayetteville. "Hamilton Armstrong, Ira Ellis, Francis Sutter, Hugh Carey and Thomas Kinsella have been discharged from the student officers' training corps at Syracuse University which demobilized Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Swasey, Carleton. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Swanton, Hobart Pond. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1908, known as "Babe."

U. S. Navy.

Swift, Thomas C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Symonds, Albert H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Taylor, Clayton B. Fayetteville. Drafted, to go 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mrs. Fred J. Ingison and Miss Helen Wright, of Syracuse will leave Saturday morning to spend a few days with Private Clayton Taylor, at the home of his brother in Williamsport, Pa.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. "Private Clayton Taylor of Camp Dix spent the past week with relatives in town," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918. "First-class Private Clayton B. Taylor writes from Camp Dix that the stories circulated about Fayetteville last week concerning his death are very much exaggerated. In a letter to the editor of the Bulletin he says: 'I am quite sure that if you could peep into room 22 of the Camp Adjutant's office that you would say that First-Class Private C. B. Taylor is very much alive," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Private Clayton Taylor is home from Camp Dix on a two-day furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918. "Private Clayton B. Taylor of Camp Dix is spending the week in town," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Battalion Sergeant Clayton B. Taylor, who recently was discharged from service at Camp Dix, is visiting his sister, Mrs. Fred Ingison," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/18/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Taylor, George F. Manlius. St. John's School, former instructor. "Signed up at Manlius, address at induction Manlius, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Local Forms, 1936.

Taylor, Richard T. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Plattsburg, NY when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Temple, Henry. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Terry, Thomas E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Thomas, Emmett. Minoa. "Emmett Thomas, who has been in training with the United States marines, is spending a week's furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thomas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918. "Emmett Thomas has returned to Pelham Bay after a five days' furlough," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919. "Emmet Thomas, who is stationed now at the Brooklyn Navy yard, spent the week-end with his parents here. He expects soon to be in the service on the high seas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/25/1919. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Thomas, Robert B. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Thompson, Francis W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy. Died of disease Oct. 24, 1918 at Great Lakes Training Camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Ensign, United States Navy, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103. "Thompson was a cadet at Saint John's during the year 1915-1916. He enlisted in the Navy on May 24th, 1918, and entered the Great Lakes Training Camp, Ill., in the Aviation Division. He died on October 24th, 1918. He was to have received his rating as ensign on October 25, 1918," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 15.

Thompson, Frederick M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. '15 who is now a First Class Private, Co. 'A' 23rd Engineers, A. E. F. This (cartoon in The Wind Mill) was drawn at Monte Carlo while Tim was on one of his extensive trips about France. He was a very distinguished member of our renowned Band for four years and an artist on the Wind Mill board. Enlisting in the Engineers early in the spring of 1918, going overseas the following fall, he is now stationed in Belgium," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 26. Class of 1916, known as "The Deacon" and "Tommy" from Detroit, Michigan.

Thompson, Robert Westfield. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Rexall," from Binghamton, NY. U. S. Army.

Thorpe, James P. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Tillinghast, C. W., Jr. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned lieutenant at Madison barracks at Plattsburg, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917.

Tillinghast, Frederick. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Tilton, Elmer H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Townsend, Bruce Ogden. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Red," from Trumansburg, NY. U. S. Army.

Tracy, Benjamin. Fayetteville. "Benjamin Tracy, who recently joined the Naval Reserves, left Thursday for Pelham Bay Training Camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918. "Mrs. Burnell H. Tracy returned Tuesday from New York, accompanied by her son, Benjamin who has been discharged from the naval training camp at Pelham Bay," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 307 S. Manlius St., merchant, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Tracy, Harold B. Fayetteville. Draftsman, Ordnance Department (as of 1/4/1918). "Harold Tracy was home from the Philadelphia navy yard over Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "Harold Tracy is home from the Brooklyn Navy yard for a few days. He has enlisted in the Naval Reserves and expects to be assigned to the Stevens Institute for training to become a machinist's mate," The Manlius Eagle," 7/11/1918. "Harold Tracy, who is in the naval reserves, sailed Friday on a Swedish ship loaded with provisions for some of the starving countries of Europe. Just at what ports he will land he had no idea when he sailed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. "Harold Tracy, U. S. merchant marine service, of the steamer Petro Emmanuel, plying between Philadelphia and Brest, spent Sunday with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Tracy. He expects to be discharged after one more trip across," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/18/1919. "Harold Tracy of the U. S. Merchant Marine Service was home from Bay Ridge this week, returning Wednesday. He hopes soon to be released from service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/9/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 500 S. Manlius St., bookkeeper, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Travis, Pierce M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Tumbridge, Judd. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Tuthill, James A. Brown. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Tut," from Brooklyn, NY. U. S. Army.

Tweedy, Edmund R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Tyler, Henry R. Eagle Village. "Four Manlius boys this week answered their country's call and enlisted in the army at the Syracuse recruiting office. They are Frank Call, Henry Tyler, Jay Cross, and Asher Mills," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Henry Tyler..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Asher Mills, Jay Cross, Henry Tyler and Frank Call, who are in training at the fair grounds spent Sunday with their parents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. In France, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Mentioned as safe after a trench engagement, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Mrs. Barbara Tyler, mother of Private Henry Tyler, whose death in France occurred recently, is seriously ill from the shock caused by the ill tidings, at her home in Eagle Village," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918. Name appears as a gold star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "A double funeral for Private Waite A. Cross and Private Henry R. Tyler was held Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church. Rev. E. W. Williams conducted the service at the church and Archie Van Patten Post of the American legion the military services at the grave. Private Cross was buried in the Manlius cemetery (Cross is buried in the Fayetteville Cemetery) while the remains of Private Tyler were taken to Fayetteville after the first service. The church was filled with friends of the young soldiers and their families who came to pay last tribute....Private Tyler is survived by his mother, Mrs. Barbara Tyler, and one sister, Mrs. Marguerite Holmes. He was killed July 1, 1918, while serving with Company D, Fifth Machine Gun battalion at Chateau-Thierry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/16/1921.

Tyo, David William. Fayetteville. "Signed up Apr. 23, 1917 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army, at Syracuse, serving as a private, with Co. C-108th Infantry. He received his discharge, as a private, Dec. 13, 1917, at Camp Wadsworth, S.C.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Local Forms, 1936.

Underwood, George C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Upton, Lester W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Utley, Romeyn. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Valentine, Clark W. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., local address Minoa, N.Y., (listed as Clark, Valentine); also "Signed up May 11, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the army at Syracuse, N.Y. as a private with the Motor Machine Gun Battalion. Received his discharge as a private 1st Class March 4, 1919 at Hancock, Ga." (as Valentine, Clark W.), History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Van Auken, Philip. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Van Auker, Glenn. Fayetteville. "Private Glenn Van Auker, who was home from Camp Merritt the fore part of the week, left Thursday for New York where he will take part tonight in a benefit play given by the soldiers from his camp, Private Van Auker being the 'leading lady,' "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Van DerVeer, Francis W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Van Dooser, George H. Manlius. Clerk, Smith St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "George Van Duzer, who recently enlisted in Battery A, has been honorably discharged on account of trouble with his eyes. He will undergo treatment at a hospital and hopes to be able to reenlist," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...George Van Doozer..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "George Van Dooser, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser of Smith street, has written his parents that he left Fort Slocum Wednesday for Texas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. "Two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser have been promoted to corporals within the last few weeks. One son, Ross H., is at Camp Gillard, Culebra, Panama and the other son, George is at San Antonio, Texas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "George Van Dooser, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser of Manlius, who is in the balloon section of the signal corps has been transferred from Waco, Texas, to Fort Omaha," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/19/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Doozer received a letter on Saturday from their son George, of the 18th Balloon Regiment, announcing his safe arrival in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/15/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Doozer have received a letter from their son, Private George H. Van Doozer who is with the 18th Balloon company in France, saying that he is well and hopes to be home soon. Accompanying the letter is a recent picture which would indicate that he is being well fed. He also sent home a number of souvenirs taken from Germans," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser have received word that their son, Sergt. Ross H. Van Dooser, who is in the Panama Canal Zone, will be home on a furlough May 1. A letter from their other son, George H. Van Dooser, 1st Balloon Company, who has been at Camp De Souge, France, near Bordeaux, states that he has just returned from a five-day leave of absence during which time he visited Paris, Chateau-Thierry and Reims and also went to the trenches at Belleau Wood. He expects to sail for home soon," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/18/1919. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser received word Wednesday from their son, George, that he had arrived at Newport News, Va., and would be home some time during the next ten days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/9/1919. "George Van Dooser, who returned early in the week from France, was tendered an enjoyable surprise party Wednesday evening by a number of friends at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser, Wednesday evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919.

Van Dooser, Ross H. Manlius. "Three members of the Manlius Training unit, Corporal John Millis, Ross Van Doozer and Horace Ellis enlisted Monday in the regular army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "John Millis and Ross Van Doozer, who enlisted in the army last week, left Fort Slocum Wednesday for the Mexican border. Horace Ellis remained at Fort Slocum where he has a position as barber," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/20/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: ...Ross Van Doozer..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. At Camp Gaillard, Panama, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. "Two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser have been promoted to corporals within the last few weeks. One son, Ross H., is at Camp Gillard, Culebra, Panama and the other son, George is at San Antonio, Texas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918. "First Class Private Ross Van Dooser, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser, has been transferred to the 33d regiment, Gautan, Panama," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Van Doozer have received a recent letter from their son, Corporal Ross H. Van Doozer, who is at Culebra, Panama, saying that it is very hot there and that he hopes soon to get back to good old Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Van Dooser have received word that their son, Sergt. Ross H. Van Dooser, who is in the Panama Canal Zone, will be home on a furlough May 1. A letter from their other son, George H. Van Dooser, 1st Balloon Company, who has been at Camp De Souge, France, near Bordeaux, states that he has just returned from a five-day leave of absence during which time he visited Paris, Chateau-Thierry and Reims and also went to the trenches at Belleau Wood. He expects to sail for home soon," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/18/1919. "Corporal Ross Van Doozer is home on a thirty-day furlough from Panama, where he has eight months more to serve. He has already served two years and four months of his enlistment period of three years," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919. "Sergeant Ross Van Doozer was the guest of honor at a frankfurter roast which was held on Cosy Island Wednesday evening of last week, and attended by a party of about twenty young men and women friends of the young soldier, who returns next week to Panama. Sergeant Van Doozer was also given a pleasant surprise Wednesday evening of this week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/27/1919.

Van Ever, Frank. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder. "Van Never (sic), Frank A. Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., address being Minoa, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Van Nostrand, Ralph E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Van Patten, Archie Leroy. Manlius. Machinist, R2, Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. To go 2/23/1918 to Camp Devens, MA. "Private Archie Van Patten, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. Van Patten, is the first Manlius boy to make the supreme sacrifice. According to a telegram received Wednesday night by Mr. Van Patten his son was killed in action on Aug. 20. Young Van Patten formerly attended Manlius high school, later attending Central high school in Syracuse where he graduated. He then became associated with his father in the real estate business in the city, later working in the Franklin shops. Several months ago he was called in the draft and after training went to France with Company F, 306th Infantry. Letters dated Aug. 16 and 18 were received by his parents and other friends in Manlius on Wednesday's mail. The letters stated that he was just back from the firing line for a brief rest, and his parents are hoping that yet there may be some mistake in the report of his death as occurring on the 20th. He was an active young man and popular with his associates. Besides his parents he is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Jay Tripp of Columbus, O., and Miss Gladys Van Patten, who resides at home," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918. Name appears as a gold star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. Russell Phinney "was present, he says, when Private Archie Van Patten, who was killed on August 20, was buried. In describing the finding of the body of Archie Van Patten, Phinney says that when the artillery advanced in following up the infantry he was sent out with a burying party and that Van Patten's body was among several found near together. The side of the face of the soldier who the chaplain said was Van Patten was badly disfigured so that he was unable to identify him although he had seen him several times before the war," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Manlius post of the American Legion has selected the name of Archie LeRoy Van Patten post, in honor of the brave young dispatch runner who lost his life at Chateau-Thierry. Young Van Patten was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. Van Patten of this village," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/8/1919. "Funeral services for Private Archie Leroy Van Patten, son of the late Fred N. Van Patten, were held at the home of his mother on Tuesday, with the Rev. T. B. Caldwell of Rochester, officiating. Military honors were paid at the grave by the Archie Leroy Van Patten Post of the American Legion. The Rev. C. H. Ford of Manlius, chaplain of the post, conducted the ritual. Van Patten was killed in action on Aug. 20, 1918. He was a dispatch runner of Company F of the Three Hundred and Sixth Infantry, Seventh-seventh Division, A. E. F. He was 26 years old. When first called to the colors he trained at Camp Devens, Mass., but later was transferred to the Seventh-seventh division at Camp Upton, going overseas with that command. He landed in France on May 2, 1918, and went to the front with his regiment after the usual period of battle training. Van Patten went through the first offensive of the Seventh-seventh without a scratch, and reached a rest area on Aug. 18. Writing on that day, he indicated that he was in the rear of the battle front. A hurry call for additional troops saw the Seventy-seventh instead hurled again at the enemy, and the Manlius soldier fell two days later, killed by a shell. His family was at first reluctant to believe the report of his death, and appealed to the adjutant general of the army, and to the Red Cross, for an investigation. The War Department, however, later sent a confirmation of the cable. Grief for his son was one of the contributing causes to the death of the elder Van Patten, who was president of the realty corporation bearing his name," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/10/1921. Buried Fayetteville Cemetery, "1892-1918, Priv. Co F. 306 NY Inf. Killed in action."

Van Wagner, Hobart. Fayetteville. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., local address Fayetteville. Inducted to Co. B, 20th Field Artillery," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Vance, Robert C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Vandewater, M. S. St. John's School cadet. With the Allies.

Vecchiarello, Luggi. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Verbeck, Guido Fridolin. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1906, known as "Jap." U. S. Army. "Battery A under command of Captain Guido Verbeck left for Plattsburg Monday night, where its guns will be used by the student officers at the training camp. The men of the battery will act as instructors. Although the battery left for a point within the state, it carried with it full equipment for no one knows where it may be sent when its work at the training camp is completed. The men went away with a full realization that they may see France before they see Syracuse again," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/13/1917. "Manlius and its immediate suburban territory has already furnished 19 for the army, navy, or national guard units but as this number has already been deducted from the state's quota the village will get no further credit than it receives in the general credit to the state's quota. These are: Captain Guido F. Verbeck..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917. "Lieutenant Edward Granger will succeed Captain Guido F. Verbeck as commandant (Manlius Schools) as the latter has been assigned as artillery instructor at the officers' training camp at Plattsburg," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. News comes from Spartanburg of the birth of a daughter to Major and Mrs. Guido F. Verbeck, formerly of this village. This is the first girl to be born in the Verbeck family in two generations," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. "Major Guido F. Verbeck, 106th Field Artillery, Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C., who has been in Albany on special duty, has been ordered to return to his command. Major Verbeck was formerly captain, commanding Battery A, First Field Artillery, N.G.N.Y. of this city. He was promoted after a course of instruction at Plattsburg," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. Graduate of St. John's School, Manlius. "General William Verbeck left Wednesday night for New York to bid good-bye to his son, Major Guido F. Verbeck of the 106th Field Artillery, who sails this week for France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. "Maj. Guido F. Verbeck, formerly captain of Battery A of Syracuse but now attached to the One Hundred and Sixth Field Artillery, was reported near the trenches several days ago," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918. Name appears as a blue star on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "Major Guido F. Verbeck has been made a lieutenant-colonel according to advices received last week by his father, General William Verbeck of St. John's School. Leaving Syracuse with 'A' as captain, the young officer was promoted to major at Camp Wadsworth, S.C. This brought his detachment from 'A' and a new assignment to the One Hundred Sixth Field Artillery, with which he went overseas. Lieut. Col. Verbeck is now with the Thirty-third Division -- the old Illinois National Guard--which is commanded by Maj. Gen. George Bell Jr. The Thirty-third is now at Troyon and St. Dizier, but the field artillery regiments of the Twenty-seventh have undoubtedly rejoined their own division," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918. "Lieut. Colonel Guido F. Verbeck arrived yesterday in New York on the America. He was with the 106th Heavy Field Artillery. Speaking of Colonel Verbeck's work to a reporter Colonel Klemm, his superior officer said: 'Col. Verbeck is the kind that rises from a captain to a lieutenant colonel by sheer force of ability and accomplishment. He didn't get that leaf on his shoulder for nothing. No better artillery officer was in action over there. Lieutenant-Colonel at 32, he is a soldier with whom I am proud to be associated," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/14/1919. "Lieut-Col. Guido Verbeck, former commander of Battery A, 104th Field Artillery arrived in Syracuse Tuesday on the same train that was taking home the Buffalo men of the 106th Field Artillery, the outfit with which he was attached at the end of the war. He came at once to Manlius to see his father and mother, Gen. and Mrs. William Verbeck, and then to Cazenovia, where his wife has been living since he went to France. He is now in the Officers' Reserve Corps and will not re-enter the National Guard. His plans as yet are somewhat indefinite, but eventually he probably will settle at the Manlius Schools and remain in the Officers' Reserve Corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/4/1919. "Capt. Merwin Armstrong of Fayetteville and Lieutenant Guido Verbeck of Manlius have been named by Lieutenant Col. John B. Tuck as members of the organized post in the county," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919. St. Johns Ave., Commandant of Cadets, Manlius School, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried in the Verbeck private cemetery, former St. John's campus, Manlius, 5/2/1887-7/27/1940; Commandant, Superintendent, 1910-1940 The Manlius School, formerly St. John's School. "Signed up May 17, 1918, his local address being Manlius, N.Y. He was inducted into the army at Camp Merritt as a captain with Co. A - 104th and 106th Field Artillery. He served overseas from May 6, 1918 to March 18, 1919. Received his discharge as a Lieut. Col., April 1, 1919 at Upton, L.I.," History of Onondaga Co. Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Verbeck, Hugo A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at San Francisco, CA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Verbeck, Karl. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. St. Johns Ave., Quartermaster, Manlius School, 1927 Manlius Directory.

Verbeck, William. St. John's School. "Gen. William Verbeck, head of the Manlius Schools and former adjutant-general of the New York State Division, N. G. N. Y. has been returned to the reserve list. This places General Verbeck at call of the President Wilson of Governor Whitman for active duty as brigadier-general, the rank he has always held. When John A. Dix was governor of the state he removed Major-Gen. John F. O'Ryan as division commander and elevated General Verbeck to that position. Following the election of William Sulzer as governor, Major-General O'Ryan was reinstated and General Verbeck removed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/20/1917. St. Johns Ave., President, Manlius School, 1927 Manlius Directory. Buried in the Verbeck private cemetery, former St. John's campus, 1/18/1861-8/24/1930; President, The Manlius School, 1888-1930.

Vernon, Victor. Fayetteville. "He signed up April 22, 1918, his local address being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into service at Washington, D.C., in the navy. He received his discharge as a Lieut., April 30, 1919 at Philadelphia," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Versen, Harry F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Vickery, Rev. Charles R. Manlius. "Rev. C. R. Vickery has written forty-two personal letters to the soldier boys in training at the different camps, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917. "Rev. Chas. R. Vickery, pastor of the Methodist church, returned from New York Wednesday with completed plans for his going overseas in Army Y. M. C. A. work. The personnel Board of the National War Work Council, before which Mr. Vickery appeared, decided that his business training, educational qualifications, experience and record abroad has fitted him for one of the responsible commissions that they control. Mr. Vickery is to go as General Y. M. C. A. secretary into one of the camps 'Somewhere' over there. He is informed that he will have charge of a Base Camp where daily there will be thousands of our own men. As these men come and go in varied conditions some of his demands will be to keep cheerful, and bring inspiration to other men who are war weary, homesick, who are facing unusual temptations. The red triangle there means the soldiers' home, club, church, his school, his place of rest, his recreation center, his bank, his post office, and place for friends and relatives who are called to his bedside in the hospital. It will mean plenty of long hours, high tension, nerve-racking work and actual danger. Mr. Vickery's strong physique and genial personality well fit him for this kind of a task. The completion of passports is the only thing that remains before Mr. Vickery's sailing which is expected within the next two weeks. The work of the church which he leaves has already been well provided for, and as his family set immediately at the task of packing his 'kit bag' with a smile they preach a strong sermon to the men at home to step into the breach and line up to a red-blooded man's high duty," The Fayetteville Bulletin," 4/5/1918. "Rev. Chas. R. Vickery, who will sail tomorrow for England to take charge of Y.M.C.A. camp during the war, was tendered a farewell reception by members of his church and congregation at the Methodist church parlors Tuesday evening. The room was tastefully decorated with red snapdragons and calla lilies. The Ladies Aid Society served ice cream and cake. Brief addresses were made by Rev. George Perrine of Christ Episcopal church, Rev. R. N. Rand of the Baptist church, Rev. Charles K. Bull of the Fayetteville M. E. church, Rev. Dr. E. M. Mills, superintendent of the Syracuse-East district of the Central New York Conference, and Mr. Vickery. Mrs. Vickery and daughter, Miss Almeda Vickery, will remain at Manlius while Mr. Vickery is away. He will be a guest in Syracuse this evening at the annual banquet of his consistory class, members of which became thirty-second degree Masons in 1917," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918. "Rev. Chas. R. Vickery, pastor of the Methodist church, left Manlius on Thursday for New York, from which port he sailed a few days later for Europe. He is to be General Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. at one of the disembarkation points in England," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918. "Rev. Charles R. Vickery, who was one of the fifty-seven American Army

Y. M. C. A. workers on the Orissa, which was sunk Sunday by a submarine, cabled Mrs. Vickery Monday of his safe arrival in London. Cable dispatches to the press association give the following account of the sinking of the vessel: The vessel was struck amidships when proceeding at about ten knots in a large convoy under the protection of a number of destroyers. It was a bright moonlight night. There was an immediate heavy list, and three minutes later the boilers blew up, extinguishing the lights all over the ship. Two of the members of the crew who lost their lives were caught below and went down with the ship. The third man was the ship's baker, who, after reaching his lifeboat station, went back for his money belt. Destroyers which were sent to the rescue immediately, picked up the passengers in lifeboats within half an hour and landed at a British port. The submarine was not seen at the time the vessel was torpedoed, but several of the survivors told a story of a periscope appearing for a moment in the midst of the lifeboats. 'It was said the periscope was seen from nearby torpedo boat destroyers which, however, did not fire for fear of hitting the lifeboats,' said the Rev. Charles Vickery of Manlius, N.Y. 'If the periscope did appear it was only for a brief moment. While the lifeboats were being picked up one American and one British destroyer circle the spot, dropping several depth charges.' The number of persons on board the vessel was about 250. Although the time was brief, all the boats were launched successfully. Most of the Americans had little clothing and no baggage. Several of them lost their passports and all their money," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918. "Mrs. Vickery received a letter from Mr. Vickery which was written in London on Sunday night after his boat, the Orissa, had been torpedoed in the early morning. Mr. Vickery states that the boat had disappeared beneath the waves 12 minutes after she was struck. He feels their escape was miraculous. He says the experience made every one of them fighting men. He says he had been enjoying the splendid assortment of knitted things the Red Cross gave him and misses them tremendously. He sends greeting to the many kind friends of Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918. "Rev. C. R. Vickery Tells How He Spent Sunday. London, July 5, 1918. It was a bright Saturday forenoon when the wire brought us an electric message from a camp eighty miles away that Sunday night five thousand American boys were coming to an empty canteen. The warehouse responded as it does many times daily to such calls. Forty other camps had their wants that day too. Closing time came and still the prepared two tons of food supplies stood awaiting shipment. Motor trucks had broken down, been called elsewhere, or overworked. We closed for the day. Spied on the street a three ton motor truck returning from a long journey. The accustomed tale of want was told the driver. He and we had been hours without food. We opened the warehouse, loaded the truck, ate a bite together, and decided we would go along to help hasten the delivery. Night found us forty miles beyond the big city where we slept on the truck. Sunday dawned clear, fragrant, and radiant. A hasty breakfast of a Spanish onion and a brown bread loaf we chanced upon, supplemented by a cup of tea, hospitably given by a good English lady who saw us stop the night before. After prayers we were off for the day. The air was balmy in the whirling, changing, scenes, past miles of hedges, thatched roofs, and yards filled with multitudinous bloom. After a time we came to a group of camps where we gave each some of the things they needed most that won for us a glad hand and a grin as broad as our fair land grows upon a manly face. Our boys have a mighty job on hand here and are proud to tackle it with every inch of their sturdy manhood. With only sparse greetings and lengthy farewells we sped on our errand of 'inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these brethren, ye have done it unto me,' all the time racing with the trainloads of khaki we were going to feed. Two-thirty o'clock came just as we turned into a mighty lively place and gave a caress to the faithful engine that had been so tireless. As our two ton cargo was stowed away in the big tent we sought the king of the kitchen. He saw at a glance that our onion and bread had not lasted. We were soon treated to an ample meal we could well appreciate, and the more so as we were told 'you "Y" men do so much for us that we just love to serve you.' Like a happy-hearted soul at the close of a faithful day, our motor was soon lightly humming a homeward tune past hedgerows gaudy with color of yellow and crimson, green and blue, where rabbit and magpie, pheasant and quail, paused to see who hurried so on this quiet day. The little children along the way, unconscious of war, waved chubby hands to be answered by our salute, and a sadness bit at the heart to release that a fiend could live who would turn such innocent life into destruction. At a railway station late that evening our joy was full when train after train pulled in loaded with cheering smiling, boys from the 'land of the free and the home of the brave.' There amid the greetings our hearts had the joy of knowing we had supplied the need two hours ahead of the hungry, well-earned demand. We could have stayed and stayed, and loved those boys as our own life, but must hurry on to be ready to serve on the morrow. Am willing to admit this was a strange day for a preacher. The next day hurrying along the London streets I met our own beloved Bishop L. B. Wilson dressed so like myself that I hardly dared speak his name. He had a London wait, and I being here a little longer than he, we were soon companions. We talked of the great 'Y' work, of his interest in it, and anon I told him of my yesterday to which he replied, 'when you get to heaven you will have special mention made of that one of your Sabbath works.' Dear home people, the Bishop's words are your message. These are days where only service counts. Days that are so tense that they call for your full strength, and God's benediction at night. Charles R. Vickery," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918. Name appears as a triangle on the Manlius service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918. "London, Dec. 10, 1918. Dear Editor: For some time I have planned to write you a letter of thanks, appreciation and friendship for your paper, its news and the home touch, but as this was an extra rather than an essential in the Fritz game it hasn't come. We all had to play better and faster than he, else he won. Now, the cleaning up after the performance is about like any church affair. Most people want to go home and let some one else do the unspectacular but necessary thing if we are going to be ready for the next great act. So I am here yet on a job as big as ever. Our 'Y' huts and hotels in London get about five thousand sailors daily on leave now, and these have to be fed and housed. Our motor vans that haul food in the day meet trains nights and transport these men in safety about this vast city. These men give me a surprise, happy home touch every few days, just as true as we try to do the same for them. Just read in the Eagle (Manlius newspaper) Mr Ransier's tantalizing advertisement of choice chocolates, but alas! I could not eat the advertisement. Some of the kind young friends of Manlius who have kept the home fires burning in my heart by their gracious letters expressed pity for me away at Thanksgiving this year, but dear ones, that was the one happiest day of my stay over here. For it I handled a ton of American gobblers for Eagle Hut for the occasion and to show their appreciation for my part in giving five thousand American boys a full turkey dinner I had a turkey too. We cleared a space big enough in one room of the warehouse to set a table to which we invited the Syracuse contingent of the Red Cross nurses who could get away for the time and we enjoyed a turkey and mince pie dinner that will ever be happy in our memory. Where the mince pie came from is another story. The next day five of we 'Y' secretaries had the delight of a famous Devonshire turkey dinner at the happy American home of a relative of Mrs. Jennie Curtis, who has shown me no end of kindness. There we sat down to a beautifully laid table of snowy linen and silver, and eats that made us absolutely forget that there had been a war on. Later we were favored with music from other guests that made an evening of great pleasure. Some day now I cherish the hope to see my dear ones soon. However, my vision has its cross lines. Was recently asked to go to Russia with a four hundred ton shipment of supplies that leave tomorrow, which would mean two years more for me, but I thanked the 'Y' and am here. Some other proposals have been made me, but I think so much of Miss Liberty that I do not care for her to see me but once more unless she turns around. One of my associates said to me today that the only thing he would stand in line here two hours for would be a boat home. It will not be long now before our boys at this rate will all be out of England. Home will never have looked as good to them. They will touch American soil gladly if not with reverence, realizing in a deeper sense that 'There's no place like home.' With very sincere regards I am, yours sincerely Chas. B. Vickery, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/3/1919. "Because of his efficiency as a Y worker while in charge of the London headquarters of the Y. M. C. A. Rev. Charles R. Vickery, formerly pastor of the Manlius Methodist church, has now been placed in full charge of the system which he perfected, and will travel from one Y base to another throughout the United Kingdom, inspecting the warehouses, huts, clubs and buildings. In addition he will look after the supplies for the six large hotels the Y has recently leased in London. These hotels are the Cosmos, Grafton, Connaught, Palace, Macfarlane and Cambridge. On a recent trip to Winchester and Southampton he writes, 'The leaves are all off the trees but the grass is green everywhere. Lots of evergreen here, with a profusion of holly and mistletoe,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/31/1919. "Rev. Charles R. Vickery, formerly pastor of the Manlius Methodist church, arrived Tuesday at his new home in Madison street, Syracuse, after more than a year of arduous Y. M. C. A. work in England. We went over to do religious work, but was put in charge of a warehouse being told he would need all the religion he had to run it. The work grew and Mr. Vickery had charge of all the thirteen warehouses in the British Isles which supplied the 167 Y. M. C. A. camps. He went over on the Orissa, which was torpedoed April 28, 1918, and went to the bottom in twelve minutes with its $8,000,000 cargo. That was at 1 a.m. At 11:30 that night Mr. Vickery was in London in time for the worst air raid of the war. Of twenty German planes which came over, nine were downed. He was at Plymouth on May 31 when Read and the Nc4 arrived. He went out on a tender with newspapermen to greet the argonaut. The warehouses under Mr. Vickery did a business of $18,000 a day; for instance, 425 tons of chocolate a week and 7,500,000 cigarettes a month were sold. There was a $10,600,000 stock on hand when war ended. The warehouses were closed May 1. On Memorial Day Mr. Vickery assisted in the service at the Paighton cemetery. Mr. Vickery came back on the Saxonia, reaching New York Friday. Mr. Vickery had the distinction of seeing the Princess Pat married. He laughs at the 13 hoodoo, but he can't exactly refrain from telling about his experience with the number, especially in the trip across. 'It is funny,' he admitted. There were 13 ships in the convey, we started on the thirteenth of April, it was the captain's thirteenth trip, we were 13 days on the water, there were 13 Methodist preachers in the group, the ship went down in 13 minutes, and to top it all off, a black cat had kittens. But I'm not superstitious,' he insists, and to prove it, adds that he was in charge of 13 warehouses in England, and got home on the thirteenth. 'When England gets a dry navy and army she won't need quite as much help from America,' he remarked. 'The commander made three cabins the night we were struck trying to get into his own, and there was no search made for him when he didn't appear. Dirty British beer in clean American stomachs went to the head of a few of our boys,' he remarked, and the British navy with its world wide supremacy is saturated with it, in his estimation. While on a trip through Scotland Mr. Vickery visited the oldest Masonic lodge in the world, the Mother Killwinning, No. 0, which, when numbers were being drawn forgot to get one, and so has been known by the distinction title throughout the world. In London he was made charter member of the original headquarters for Masonry, which is organized with the purpose of sustaining permanent social headquarters in England. Here a fraternal spirit among charter masons is to be furthered and means by which members in all parts of the world may get in touch with one another are being instituted. The new club has been adopted. Mr. Vickery stated by Motherland Lodge No. 3861, and has been given an entire floor in the building at 3 Southampton st., Strand, London, W. C. 2, where Col. Seymour Bullock is secretary. Mr. Vickery was a special guest of the Square club June 12. The local man was met in New York by his wife, his daughter, Miss Almeda Vickery, and sister, Miss M. Belle Vickery. He will go to the Adirondacks soon for the summer," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/18/1919.

Vincent, Harry J. "Harry J. Vincent, 31, of Syracuse, a former Manlius boy, who enlisted with the American Legion in Canada over a year ago, enlisted last week in the U. S. tank corps at the temporary recruiting office in Syracuse. The requirements in the tank corps are especially strict. Candidates must have had mechanical experience and must be of strong physique. In order to meet the physical test, Mr. Vincent had to undergo a minor operation at the hospital from which he is now recovering. He expects to be accepted within a few days. He has served in the engineers' corps and in the Royal Flying Corps in Canada where he obtained rank as corporal. Failing to be given opportunity for flying, a few weeks ago he returned to Syracuse for an operation. When the opportunity offered he enlisted in the tank corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

Viner, Charles L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Voigt, Walter. Fayetteville. Machinist, Warren St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. To go to Camp Devens, MA 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "...sweater, pair wristlets and two pairs socks were also given to Ernest Clay and Walter Voit, Camp Devens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. In France as of 5/3/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin. "Mr. and Mrs. Henry Voight have received a letter from a nurse in a hospital in France saying that their son Private Walter Voight, who was recently gassed, is recovering and will return to duty in a few days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918. "News has been received from the front this week of the gassing of two Fayetteville boys, private Walter Voight, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Voight and private Edward Kelley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kelley. According to a letter written to Mr. and Mrs. Voight by a hospital nurse young Voight is unable to see to write and fears are entertained that he may lose his eyesight," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Henry Voight have received a letter Wednesday from their son, Private Walter Voight stating he had arrived at Newport News and hoped soon to be home. Private Voight's eyes were badly injured when he was gassed while in the front line trenches, last summer," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/14/1919. "Private Walter Voight returned Tuesday from Newport News where he arrived last week from overseas. He is in the best of health and his eyesight which was injured when he was gassed last summer, is now good. After he was gassed he was confined to the hospital for six months and thus missed all the big battles," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Voigt, Theodore. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Voit (Voigt?), Glenn. Fayetteville. Mentioned as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Volles, Arthur C. Fayetteville. "He signed up April 8, 1918 at Buffalo, N.Y., his local address being recorded as Fayetteville, N.Y., or 607 E. Division St., Syracuse, N.Y. He served as a private of marines with Co. 88 - 1st Marines, U.S. Marine Corps. He served overseas either from Aug. 21, 1918 or Sept. 17, 1918 to Nov. 27, 1918. He received his discharge as a private, 1st Class, April 1, 1919 at Philadelphia," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Vonhold, John G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wadsworth, Edward Longfellow. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as Gink" and "Wad," from Eastport, Maine. U. S. Army.

Wadsworth, Ronald Bibber. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Wad," from Eastport, Maine. U. S. Navy.

Walker, Frank D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Walsh, John Jacob. Minoa. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., local address being Minoa, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Wannamaker, Victor F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wannamaker, Walter L. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Ward, Russell R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Warner, Charles. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Washburn, Andrew. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Waterbury, Robert H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Watrous, Livingston. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1909, known as "Watty," from NY, NY. U. S. Army. Captain at Camp Dodge, IA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Watson, G. Horton. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Waxel, Gordon. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wein, Joseph. Fayetteville. Auto repairer, Genesee St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Joseph Wein of this village (Fayetteville) enlisted Wednesday in the U. S. army at the Syracuse recruiting office," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917. "There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: Joseph Wine, Cav., Fort Bliss, Texas..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917. Troop A., 5th Cav. (as of 1/4/1918). Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Wein, Peter. Fayetteville. Laborer, Genesee St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. Drafted, to leave 5/26 for training camp, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918. Name appears on the Church of the Immaculate Conception service flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918. "Peter Wein and Claude Benedict were home from Camp Dix for the Fourth," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918. "Peter Wein, who is in the Quartermaster's Corps at Camp Dix, has been promoted to sergeant," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918. "Sergeant Quartermaster Peter Wein is home from Camp Dix where he has charge of a change of fifty Negroes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918. "Sergeant Peter Wein of Camp Dix is spending the week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Wein," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. Buried Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Fayetteville, 1893-1953, son of Samuel V. and Anna Wein.

Welles, Charles F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Wells, Kenneth B. "Rev. Kenneth B. Wells of Old Lyme, Conn., a former pastor of the Presbyterian church (Manlius), has secured a three-months leave of absence from the church in order to do Y. M. C. A. work in the army training camps in the South," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917.

Wescott, Alec M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

West, Kenneth G. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Commissioned at Plattsburg as a lieutenant after training at Madison barracks," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/14/1917. Died of disease at a New Jersey camp Sept. 7, 1917, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. 1st New Jersey Field Artillery, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103. "West was the first Saint John's boy to die in the service after the declaration of war with Germany. He...graduated (from St. John's) in June, 1917. He was a private in the First New Jersey Field Artillery, and he died of appendicitis at Sea Girt, New Jersey, September 7, 1917," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 14.

Westwater, Richard. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Marine Corps.

Wheat, Maxwell C. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wheaton, Homer J. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Pompey native, class of '00, '01. "Corporal Wheaton Killed. Was Native of Pompey and Former Student at Saint John's. He was born in Pompey but went to Syracuse in 1902 to attend the Law College where he was a student until 1904. Previous to that time he had been a cadet at Saint John's School. When the National Guard was called out in 1916, he was sporting editor of the Worcester Gazette. He enlisted in Company G, Ninth Massachusetts Infantry, and went with that regiment to the border. He was in the same unit at the time of his death. Corp. Homer J. Wheaton, 34, of Company G, 101st U. S. Infantry, Manlius school boy, Syracuse University law student and the last of the old Wheaton name in Onondaga county, was killed in action with Pershing's forces in France on February 27th," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918. "Corporal Homer A. Wheaton, the first American to be awarded the Distinguished Service Medal (Cross), the Congressional mark of valor of which marshal Foch received the third. Corporal Wheaton's act was to throw himself upon a bomb about to explode, thereby saving the lives of his companions in the trench," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Corporal, Co. "C," 101st Infantry. Distinguished Service Cross, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103. "The Syracuse Herald, through Mr. Edwin F. McIntyre, has very generously presented us with the original drawing for their full page illustration in colors, depicting the heroic act of Corporal Homer Wheaton, St. John's, '00 who gave his life for his comrades by throwing himself upon a bomb which was thrown into an American trench. The painting is by the Herald's well-known artist, 'Vic' Lambdin, and is unusually well suited for exhibition, as well as worth of preservation," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, March 1919, p. 17. "Corporal Homer A. Wheaton. Wheaton entered St. John's in 1898; was Captain of the football team; left school in 1901. "With great presence of mind and extraordinary courage, he threw himself upon an unexploded bomb which was thrown into an American trench, and by covering it with his body saved his comrades in the trench. He was killed, but the other men lived. It was one of the bravest deeds in the history of the American Expeditionary Force. He was one of the Manlius Four Hundred in the war," The Syracuse Herald, June 9th, 1918; also The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 12. "Corporal Wheaton was the first American to be awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, the Congressional mark of valor, of which Marshal Foch received the third. Corporal Wheaton's act, through which he lost his life, was to throw himself upon a bomb about to explode, thereby saving the lives of his companions in an American trench," from a Syracuse newspaper reprinted in The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 12.

Wheeler, David R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain in the Signal Corps, Mineola, NY when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Wheeler-Nicholson, Malcolm. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wheeler, William D. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Whelan, Sidney S. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

White, Edward. Minoa. "He signed up Feb. 22, 1918 at Solvay, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Camp Upton, serving as a private with Co. K., 308th Infantry. He served overseas from April 6, 1918 to May 4, 1919 taking part in the battles of Vesle, Meuse and Argonne. He was gassed. He received his discharge as a private, May 19, 1919 at Camp Merritt," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

White, John E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

White, Ray A. Minoa. "Signed up at Manlius, N.Y., local address being Minoa, N.Y.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Whitehead, George F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Whitehead, Thomas E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Whitman, George Harold. Manlius. "Signed up at Manlius. He served with the Marines," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Whitney, James McVickar. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Graduate class of 1917. From Morris Plains, N.J., known as "Whit" and "Mac," The 1917 Haversack, The Manlius Schools, p. 36. Killed in his tank by a head on shot, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918. Tank Corps, The Haversack, Manlius, NY, p. 103. James McVicar Whitney. He was a cadet at Saint John's during the school year, 1916-1917, and was graduated in June 1917. (Extract of a letter from Corporal Donald M. Call of Co. B, 326th Battalion, dated October 25, 1918). 'My dearest friend over here, was killed in our last affair in the Argonne. His name was Whitney, James McV., and he was the finest, truest, and most refined little gentleman I ever met. Oh Dad! I was so fond of him. I feel simply terrible about it. I met some tank men down here the other day who came down after I did, and they told me about it. He and his tank were missing for several days. Nobody knew anything about him. Then they found the tank and 'Whit,' and his driver had been killed in the tank. I suppose they must have been hit head on by an explosive shell or something. I am afraid our losses were pretty heavy up there. The Huns put up a terrific fight and we paid for every foot of ground we took. If only 'Whit' could have been spared--there are so few, so very few like him. He was such a lovable sort of boy," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 14.

Whittaker, Fred. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1915, known as "Lord." U. S. Army.

Widrick, Meade. St. John's School cadet. Major at Fort Monroe, VA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Wiedeman, William A. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wilde, Bertram. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wildrick, Meade. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1906, known as "Skinny." U. S. Army.

Wiley, Walter. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Willard, Ray Francis. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1916, known as "Jess," from New Berlin, NY. U. S. Army.

Willett, George Louis. Fayetteville. "He signed up June 6, 1918 at Solvay, N.Y., his local address being Fayetteville, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Camp Dix, serving as a private with Veterinary Division at Camp Dix. He received his discharge as a private May 14, 1919 at Camp Dix," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

Williams, E. R. Fayetteville. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Williams, George Edward. Fayetteville. "....ordered to report ready for entrainment at the Court House Headquarters on Tuesday morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918. "Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Williams have received word that their son, Private George E. Williams, has arrived safety overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918. "William Keefe and George Williams who served overseas with the 78th Division received their discharges at Camp Upton last week and are now at their homes here," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/6/1919. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 107 Warren St., railroad man, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Williams, Harold E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Williams, Irvine A. St. John's School, former instructor.

Williamson, Benjamin. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Willis, Charles F. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Willis, Herbert E. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wilson, George R. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Windram, Reginald. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wolcott, Robert Wilson. St. John's School cadet. Class of 1914, known as "Bob," from Sewickley, PA. U. S. Navy.

Wolfe, Clifford W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Wood, Jessie C. Minoa. To go to Camp Devens, MA 2/23/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "Corp. Jesse Wood, who spent the week end with Mr. and Mrs. S. Williams, returned to Camp Devens, Mass. Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918. "He signed up Feb. 23, 1918 at Syracuse, N.Y., his local address being Minoa, N.Y. He was inducted into the Army at Camp Devens, serving as a private with Co. A., 151st Depot Brigade. He received his discharge as a private Oct. 31, 1918 at Camp Devens, Mass.," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder

Wood, John. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa War Memorial boulder.

Woodworth, Allen. Fayetteville. Advertising agent, Genesee St., Rural Directory of Onondaga Co., 1917. "Allen Woodworth has enlisted in the Gas Defense Service and has gone to Washington," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917. Gas Defense Corps (as of 1/4/1918). "Allen Woodworth son of Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Woodworth of this village who is in the gas defense division of the military service, and located at Akron, Ohio, is reported ill with typhoid fever," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918. "Allen Woodworth of the gas defense division, who has been ill at a hospital at Chester, Pa., is improving. His mother, Mrs. L. M. Woodworth of Fayetteville is with him," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918. Name appears as a star on the Methodist Episcopal, Fayetteville flag, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919.

Worden, Walter H. Fayetteville. "Walter Worden, of New Haven, Conn., son of Mrs. Palmer Worden of this village, enlisted in the army last week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917. 67th Aero Squad (as of 1/4/1918). "Walter H. Worden of the 67th Aero Squadron, who is now in France wishes to thank all those who so kindly thought of him at Christmas time," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918. "Mrs. Elizabeth A. Worden has received a letter from her son, Walter of the 67th Aero Squadron, telling of his safe arrival in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918. Name appears as a returning soldier/sailor in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/3/1919. 308 High Bridge, toolmaker, 1927 Fayetteville Directory.

Worrell, Samuel H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army. Captain at Camp Devens, Ayer, MA when mentioned in The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

Wotkyns, Steele. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Wright, Charles. Former trombone player with the Manlius Band. Already in service as of 5/31/1918, The Fayetteville Bulletin. "Charles Wright, only son of Mr. and Mrs. George Wright of Port Byron, formerly of Manlius, is now a bugler in the army and is located 30 miles behind the firing line in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918.

Yale, Wesley. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

York, Barney H. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

York, Edwin W. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Navy.

Young, Perry. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Zuill, Albert M. St. John's School cadet. U. S. Army.

Zullo, Giovanni. Kirkville. To go 2/23/1918 to Camp Devens, MA, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918. "His local address is recorded as Kirkville. He signed up at Marcellus, N.Y. He was killed April 18, 1922," History of Onondaga Co. War Veterans, Court House Records and Original Forms, 1936.

* * *

HOME FRONT NEWS

"The wave of patriotism which is sweeping over the whole country is strongly manifest in Manlius. Flags fly from a large majority of the residences of the village. Patriotic sermons were preached Sunday in the various churches. At the union service at Christ church Sunday evening a flag given by W. W. Cheney was presented to the church by Lieutenant R. M. Ballantyne who carried it in the processional. It was formally received by the rector, Rev. A. E. Taylor, who made a few remarks telling what the flag stood for and the duty of every true American in the present crisis. The Manlius training unit will soon reorganize for intensive training, some of the members being desirous of entering the army officers' reserve training corps. In answer to cards sent out Tuesday by Major H. C. Durston, the organizer of the unit, nearly all the 53 members of the unit have sent replies stating their desire to continue training and also to enlist when volunteers are called for. It is likely that many graduates of St. John's will secure commissions in the Officers' Reserve Corps. Graduates of military schools who have completed a course of military training under a U. S. Army officer, after also completing such additional practical military training as the Secretary of War shall prescribe, are eligible for appointment as second lieutenant in the Officers Reserve Corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/6/1917.

"General Verbeck has been authorized by the government to establish a school for aviation at (St. John's School). An instructor, mechanic and one government airplane will be assigned to the school. All cadets qualifying in aviation will be commissioned as officers in the flying division of the United States Army Signal Corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917.

"Officers from the Syracuse recruiting stations visited Manlius and Fayetteville this week in an automobile covered with flags and advertising banners, recruiting literature being distributed at every stop. According to latest reports from Washington, it is the policy of the War Department to discharge from service at the termination of the present emergency all men who have enlisted in the regular army since the declaration of war or who shall enlist during the present emergency. This policy also includes the National Guard. This new policy puts an entirely new complexion on the recruiting situation which it is believed will make the work much easier," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917.

"Syracuse University has gone on record as favoring military training for its students under expert instruction in co-operation with the War Department in Washington," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/13/1917.

"Chief Bullard of the Manlius Fire Department has received a letter from Adjutant General Stotebury acknowledging receipt of notice of the department's volunteering to serve for home defense in the village of Manlius and stating that the department would become a unit of the Governor's Home Defense guard of which Horace S. Wilkinson is general chairman for this county. As General Verbeck is chairman of the committee on Defense, Security and Recruiting the department will be subject to his orders. A meeting of the department for the purpose of arranging for drilling will be held Saturday evening at fireman's hall. There are 46 members in the fire department and each signed the roll sent to Albany volunteering their services for home defense," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/27/1917.

"Discharges from the National Guard will not be granted enlisted men solely because they are married, according to instructions sent out to adjutants general by the militia bureau. Where a soldier has independent means which will prevent his family from becoming a charge upon the government, he will not be mustered out. The war department has also ruled that men who married since a state of war has existed with Germany will be considered as single men," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/27/1917.

"Fayetteville suffragists have responded promptly to the call for help in conducting the military census. Some fifteen will work with the National League for Woman's Service in putting this through in the village (Fayetteville)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/4/1917.

"In view of the new principle established by Congress whereby every able bodied citizen becomes liable to call sooner or later, the Manlius Volunteer Training Corps will broaden its scope so as to give military training to all who desire it and who believe it their duty to prepare themselves to the limit of their opportunity. The first drill under the new plan will be held next Monday evening at 8 o'clock in the Dodge Gymnasium of Saint John's school. Every able bodied citizen of the Town of Manlius between the ages of 17 and 45 is invited to join the Corps. Drills will be held Monday and Friday. Six members of the Training Corps have already joined the Army or National Guard, the roll of honor being as follows: Willis C. Farnham, Coast Artillery Corps, Regular Army; Edwin Goodfellow, Battery A. N. Y. National Guard; Geo. Van Doozer, Battery A, N. Y. National Guard; John Millis, Regular Army; Horace Ellis, Regular Army; Ross Van Doozer, Regular Army," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/4/1917.

"George Reed who has been inspecting transit plugs for British shells at the Precision Die Casting plant, has completed his work and sailed today for England," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/11/1917.

"Syracuse will be the largest single army expansion post in the United States, according to the orders issued by the War Department Monday for bringing the regular army to its full war strength. Eight regiments of infantry and one regiment of field artillery will be raised at Syracuse. At least three infantry regiments now on the Mexican border will be sent to Syracuse immediately for expansion. Thus there will be at Syracuse twelve full regiments of infantry and two regiments of artillery. In all probably 30,000 men must be taken care of at that point...In addition to the state fair grounds it is believed that 650 acres will be required for the camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/18/1917.

"The government announces that a town of 2,000 buildings and groups of warehouses will be erected near Syracuse for the cantonment of soldiers to be stationed there. Thirty-two towns will be erected at mobilization camps, each capable of providing for 22,000 soldiers. Each will be a complete little city," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917.

"Fayetteville will be required to give the naval and military branches of the government about twenty and Manlius about fifteen men if the provision of the conscription bill as passed are carried out in full...it is found that the first draft of 500,000 will see some 1,200 men, roughly speaking, put into service, and the second draft will demand an equal number," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/18/1917.

""More than 50 per cent of the employees of S. Cheney & Son on Thursday signed applications for Liberty bonds in amounts of from $50 to $300. The bonds were bought on the installment plan the $50 bonds being paid for at the rate of $1 per week and the $100 at $2 a week, the amount to be deducted from the men's wages by the firm," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917.

"A meeting of the French Wounded Relief for sewing will be held in the parlors of the Presbyterian church (Fayetteville), "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/25/1917.

"Every man between 21 and 31 years of age must register between the hours of 7 a. m. and 9 p. m. next Tuesday at the polling places of his election district," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/1/1917.

"The total registration in the town of Manlius under the Military Conscription act is 551, of which 62 are aliens and 278 claim exemption. District No. 1 in the village of Manlius has the most men eligible for conscription, the total registration being 86. In the lower district 14 are registered. The total registration for the two districts is 160. 7 aliens were registered in District No. 1 and 13 in District No. 2. In districts No. 3 and No. 4 in Fayetteville the total number registered is 153. The number registered is slightly under the war department estimate that the number registered would be 11 per cent of the population. It is expected that about ten per cent of those registered will be required to fill the first draft," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917.

"Two hundred and three men liable for military draft were registered here (Minoa) Tuesday. Thirty were aliens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917.

"A local branch of the National Red Cross Society was formed at the meeting at Smith hall (Manlius)...more than 60 names are now enrolled on the membership list," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/8/1917.

"The cadets of the Manlius Schools have turned in Liberty Bond subscriptions amounting to $159,000," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/15/1917.

"I wish to deny the stories being told about me which allege that I was arrested in Pittsburgh for making unpatriotic remarks and that I was fined $500 and would suffer loss of my pension. There is no truth whatever in the statement as I was not arrested nor fined. I still remain the same loyal American citizen that I proved myself in the Civil war. Godfrey Buechner (former Eagle Village area farmer of German heritage)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917. (Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey Buechner celebrated their golden wedding anniversary...Mr. Buechner came to America in 1862 and when the Civil War broke out he joined the army, serving three years. He was in several battles, including Bull Run and the battle of Gettysburg, and was present at Lee's surrender...Mr. and Mrs. Buechner, after the war, located in the town of Clay. Later they moved to Manlius, where Mr. Buechner was a well-known farmer for forty years. About a year ago he retired and moved to Fayetteville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917.

"One million pounds of fresh beef will be needed to supply the troops now in the provisional training camp at the State Fair grounds during the three months beginning July 1," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/22/1917.

"All the people of Fayetteville are requested to assemble in the school hall next Sunday at 7:30 p.m. for a patriotic service under the auspices of the Red Cross Society. The singing will be led by the Community Chorus, and efforts are being made to secure a rousing address. This will take the place of the monthly union meeting, as the congregations of all the village churches will unite in the rally for patriotism and humanity," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917.

"One feature of the (4th of July) parade will be a company of soldiers from the state fair encampment ground. Another feature...will be the appearance in the parade of all men who registered under the federal draft. About 150 of these men are undergoing training each evening at the (Fayetteville) school ground under the direction of M. B. Birdseye....all citizens are urged to provide floats or decorate carriages or automobiles, keeping in mind that the keynote of the celebration this year should be along patriotic lines...in the evening patriotic songs will be sung in Genesee Park, with the Community Chorus leading...(and) it is requested that everybody suitably decorate their house with the stars and stripes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917."

Nine million pounds of hay, oats and straw and nearly 3,000 cords of wood will be needed for the citizen's training camp, United States Army, Syracuse, during July, August and September." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/29/1917.

"Temporary organization of a local Red Cross unit (Minoa) was effected Monday night at a meeting in the school auditorium. E. M. Lyon was made chairman and Elliott Baker secretary," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917.

"Manlius women are making comfort kits for all boys from Manlius who have enlisted in army, navy or national guard. These kits which are valued at $5 are made of khaki and have pockets for all kinds of comforts from hair oil to corn plasters. The soldiers' initials are worked in red on the khaki," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917.

"The Red Cross committee are now on the home stretch in securing the $600 which has been apportioned to raise in the village of Manlius. Manlius business men have subscribed over $200 to the fund and nearly $200 has been raised by contributions at church, tag day sales and benefit performances at Star Theater. The women of the village are now making a house-to-house canvass of the village for contributions and memberships," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/6/1917.

"A Red Cross chapter was established at a (Minoa) meeting here Wednesday evening. One hundred and fifty persons were present and many of them offered their homes for the care of convalescent soldiers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/13/1917.

"On July 30 will commence the big drive for the $5,000 a year Red Cross Aid and War Relief Fund in Fayetteville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/20/1917.

"Exemption Boards throughout the country are busy sending out notices to the men whose numbers were first drawn in the recent war draft to appear if they desire to make claims for exemption. Twice the number of the quota for each district will first be notified to appear...in this district, which is known as No. 2, the quota is 188; District 1 is 190 and No. 3, 222, making a total of 600 for the towns...: The first men to be called from the town of Manlius for the district quota in the order of their drawing: Harlow M. Bennett, Minoa; Edward E. Flogel, Kirkville; Harvey J. Pease, Fayetteville; George Edward Greiner, Kirkville; Martin H. Doyle, Fayetteville; Joseph Hand, Fayetteville; Beech L. Burdick, Manlius; Harry Whitely, Fayetteville; Raymond V. Green, Kirkville; Charles Patric Scanlon, Manlius, R. F. D.; Thomas A. Davis, Fayetteville; James Edward Kelley, Minoa; Adelbert H. Miller, Manlius; George W. Worden, Fayetteville; James E. Patten, Minoa; Robert H. Miller, Manlius; Ernest H. Hotaling, Fayetteville; John M. Quirk, Manlius; Clayton C. Noxon, Fayetteville; Roger H. Cross, Fayetteville; Bob Haley, Minoa; William E. Costello, Minoa; Earl M. Thurston, Fayetteville; Edmund Cox, Minoa; David C. Nash, Fayetteville; David W. Kennel, Manlius; Samuel Fagerson, Minoa; George Springstube, Manlius R. F. D.; Mike Commedeno, Manlius; Clifford C. Porte, Minoa; Walter J. King, Minoa; Frank A. Van Vanever, Minoa; Arthur J. Gaugel, Fayetteville; Waite A. Cross, Manlius; Raymond Barrows, Fayetteville; Pearl L. Bajus, Fayetteville; Roy Schaefer, Manlius; Ernest J. Phelps, Manlius; Leonard V. Kantak, Manlius; W. Oliver Shearer, Manlius; Ernest E. Morgan, Manlius; Harry J. Fillmore, Manlius; Ray Hayes, Manlius; Asher Dunlap, Manlius, R.F. D.; W. F. Lewis, Manlius, R. F. D.; J. C. Hullar, Fayetteville; Kirk B. Smith, Fayetteville; Frank W. Benedict, Manlius; C. A. Goodfellow, Fayetteville; Floyd A. Muckey, Manlius; MacG. McMartin, Fayetteville; Raymond L. Landers, Manlius; John T. Fulmer, Manlius; William J. Sullivan, Manlius; Bert Everingham, Manlius; Giles P. Miller, Manlius; James H. Littler, Manlius; Milton K. Bex, Manlius; Horace Holmes, Manlius; Will O. Relph, Fayetteville; Ray Everingham, Manlius; Ralph E. Murray, Manlius; Jacob W. Cohen, Manlius; Harry Everson, Manlius, R. D., Archie Van Patten, Manlius; Harold D. Goodfellow, Manlius; W. W. Cheney, Jr., Manlius, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/27/1917.

"Only the district board can receive claims for discharge on the ground that one is engaged in industry, including agriculture found to be necessary to the maintenance of the military establishment, the effective operation of the military forces, or the maintenance of national interest during the emergency...At no time has it been expected that many married men will be forced to the front but there are exceptional cases (if there are no children and where even the wife by reason of earning her own living is not dependent upon her husband) where if the husband falls a subject to the draft he will probably be unable to set up sufficient cause for exemption...The rules sent to the exemption board for the guidance read in giving list of those entitled to exemption in part as follows: 'Any married man whose wife or child is dependent upon his labor for support. Any son of a widow dependent upon his labor for support.' "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/27/1917.

"The regular meeting of the Fayetteville Branch of the Syracuse Chapter of the American Red Cross will be held at Odd Fellows' hall at 2 p. m., this afternoon. Mrs Ernest I. White of Syracuse will make a special appeal for knitting for the sailors on a war vessel, sailing at an early date. Mrs. White represents the National League For Women's Service, and will appeal to individual efforts. The materials will be supplied by Mrs. White, and any who cannot attend the meeting, may secure the wool and directions from Mrs. D. R. Collin. Mrs. White desires to have it clearly understood that this work does not conflict with Red Cross service, but applies to a field not covered by the Red Cross. The regular Red Cross work and instructions will proceed as usual," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/3/1917.

"Groveland Family Theater (Fayetteville). Special for Saturday night, 'When Duty Calls,' great patriotic feature introducing the making of a soldier at the mobilization camp, State Fair grounds," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/3/1917.

""Mrs. E. H. Plampin, president of the Fayetteville branch of the Red Cross reports the following work completed by local members during the month of July: 57 nightingales, 39 ambulance pillows, 28 tray cloths; 21 handkerchiefs, 12 wipes, 9 table napkins, 9 wash cloths, 5 knitted wash cloths, 1 pair of knitted hospital socks, 1 counterpane...the local branch now has a membership of about 150 and new members are being added each week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917.

"Early in the spring, a group of Fayetteville women, under the leadership of Mrs. George J. Bryan, " organized "a Community Canning Club." "The club sells the canned products and devotes all profits to some war relief work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917.

"Some of those who were accepted as physically fit (for the service) and the grounds upon which they claimed exemption, follow: Clifford E. Brown, Minoa, dependents; Albert C. Barber, Manlius, enlisted; Henry C. Schlausker, Manlius, enlisted; Charles A. Goodfellow, Fayetteville, dependents; Lucius A. Tibbitts, Minoa, dependents; Joseph R. Upham, Fayetteville, dependents; Arthur F. Peters, Kirkville, dependents; James W. Phelan, Manlius, dependents; Bert Boyle, Manlius, dependents; Arnold G. Tusinini, Manlius, dependents; Wilbur R. Krafft, North Manlius, dependents; Fred A. Chapman, Kirkville, pilot; Walter W. Hayatt, Manlius, dependents; Beach L. Burdick, Manlius, dependents; William A. Sullivan, Minoa, dependents; Carsto Petroff, Minoa, alien; Ray Doyle, Fayetteville, dependents; Roy G. Shaffer, Manlius, dependents; Manor E. Phelps, Manlius, dependents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/10/1917.

"Owing to the shortage of glass, the Canning Club is having difficulty in obtaining jars for their products," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917.

"List of men from this vicinity physically fit not claiming exemption. Quota, 128; fit and not applying for exemption 105; failing to appear, 16:...Edward S. Cross, Fayetteville; Charles N. Mills, Manlius; James F. Purcell, Fayetteville; John L. O'Shea, Manlius; G. Henry Sponenberg, Kirkville; William T. Ryan, Manlius; John J. O'Donnell, Minoa; Carl H. Clough, Manlius; Walter Prentice, Fayetteville; Claude A. Davis, Manlius; William F. Lewis, Manlius; James E. Brady, Minoa; William C. Keefe, Fayetteville; A. N. Daniels, Manlius; James W. Phelan, Manlius; Waite A. Cross, Manlius; Arthur J. Gaugel, Fayetteville; Frank A. Van Ever, Minoa; Pearl L. Bajus, Fayetteville; George Sprinstube, Manlius; Leslie D. Myers, Manlius; Floyd A. Muckey, Manlius; Jacob C. Hullar, jr., Fayetteville; Glen F. Trinder, Fayetteville; Edward D. Sherwood, Fayetteville; Clarence Oot, Kirkville; Fred A. Chapman, Kirkville; Arthur J. Martell, Minoa; Leonard V. Kantak, Manlius; Norbert H. Carhart, Minoa; William E. Costello, Minoa; Arthur J. Hughson, Fayetteville; Roger H. Cross, Fayetteville; Raymond V. Green, Kirkville; Adelbert H. Miller, Manlius; Charles P. Scanlon, Manlius; Beach Lyman Burdick, Manlius; Edward E. Diegel, Kirkville; George E. Greiner, Kirkville...The official list of men in the district who failed to report for physical examination on call of the board...in a number of cases notifications to appear were returned unopened. In one case the man is in an insane asylum. In at least seven and probably eight cases the men have enlisted. The list includes: Charles A. Whitmore, Pompey, enlisted; Walter Widger, Fabius, enlisted; William B. Murray, Fayetteville, enlisted; James A. Patten, Minoa; Edmund Cox, Minoa; Christopher Salinas, Minoa; Austin Vinton, Minoa; Walter J. King, Minoa; James Edmondson, Minoa; George Gardner, East Syracuse; Frank M. Defoe, East Syracuse; Oliver D. Fisher, Fabius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/17/1917.

"It is a matter of first importance that the soldier be kept morally and mentally, as well as physically, fit. For his well-being and efficiency, the moral and intellectual stimulus of good reading is absolutely indispensable. The War Department asks The American Library Association to assume responsibility for providing adequate library facilities in all cantonments and training camps, stating that thousands of books and magazines are needed at once to meet the requirements of officers and men. Every community is urged to do its part. The Fayetteville Library will undertake to co-ordinate local efforts in this direction, with the national work. It will receive, sort, classify, pack and hold, subject to shipping orders, all books and magazines contributed in this community. It is confidently hoped that not only individuals, but that every local organization will cooperate in this patriotic service. If you will write in each book your name and address, the soldier who reads it will know that someone is his friend and stands ready to help him. Books of good stories will be wanted most, books of adventure, sea stories, detective stories, historical novels and collections of short stories, especially humorous ones. Foreign language study books, especially French grammar and dictionaries, are much needed--possibly more than any other non-fiction books. In one camp nearly one-fifth of the men are studying French. They should have easy readers and stories besides their text books. Books of travel, biography and history, especially lives of heroes and travels in the countries at war. Technical books on aviation, telegraphy, submarines, automobiles, signaling, first aid and hygiene," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917.

"Yarn has been received by the local branch of the Red Cross for making the sets consisting of sweater, muffler, socks, wristlets and helmets. The Chapter's quota is 5,000 sets by September 15th. Mrs. L. N. McIntyre will distribute the yarn and receive completed work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917.

"Instruction in knitting sets for soldiers will be given at the meeting of the Ladies' Auxiliary, Sons of Veterans..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/24/1917.

The Red Cross "articles sent in to headquarters during the month are as follows: 400 gauze compresses, 186 wash cloths, 13 knitted wash cloths, 48 napkins, 176 handkerchiefs, 12 sponge wipes, 4 hot water bag covers, 12 hospital shirts, 36 pairs hospital slippers, 6 ambulance pillows, 21 bandages. To the (Fayetteville) membership list has been added 20 annual and 5 subscribing members, besides one annual subscription changed to a subscribing, with the Red Cross Magazine contributed to the Fayetteville Free Library....Through the interest and influence of Mrs. Dwight Collin, three sewing machines have been purchased and loan to the local branch so long as they shall be needed....during August $51.87 has been turned in to the Syracuse Chapter, of which this is a branch," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/7/1917.

State Fair a Success. "The Carnival parades this year were confined to the Children's and the Military...2,000 soldiers, two regimental bands and Troop D of mounted police participated in last night's (Thursday) parade," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/14/1917.

"Fayetteville's Drafted Men Honored by Patriotic Citizens. The patriotic citizens of Fayetteville packed Everingham hall Wednesday evening to bid farewell to young men of the village who left this morning for Wrightstown, N. J., as members of the national army. The entertainment opened with a banquet, served by women. Those enjoying the repast were the eight conscripts, W. M. Jones, president of the village, Dwight Collin, president of the Community Club and the speakers of the evening. Lieut. F. Lucien Hale of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of Fayetteville, was the first speaker. He gave some interesting details regarding the hard training required of recruits in the aviation corps. General William Verbeck of Manlius predicted a long war and said the United States would have 7,000,000 men in arms before peace was declared. He gave some good advice to the young men as to what would be expected of them. Attorney Charles A. Hitchcock of Syracuse gave a patriotic address which brought forth much applause. After the banquet a dance was held in the hall. The men making up Fayetteville's contribution to the army are: J. C. Hullar Jr., Arthur Hughson, Arthur Gaugel, E. Duane Sherwood, Walter Prentice, William C. Keefe, Carl Daggett and Thomas Kelly. Daggett and Kelly have enlisted in the regular army and are now with the infantry in camp near Syracuse. They were granted a pass to attend the farewell. The Fayetteville band, under their new leader, Paul Hadley of Syracuse rendered several selections and made a good impression. The arrangements for the farewell were made by Henry Straub and Chester R. Eaton. Some $50 was raised for the supper and as nearly all expenses were donated. Mr. Straub gave nearly $30 to W. M. Jones, Red Cross treasurer, to be used for a celebration when the next contingent goes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917.

"This week the National Library War Council appeals for one million dollars for immediate use to build and equip libraries at the soldier training camps through the country. The thirty navy training camps and marine corps camps will also be provided with as complete library accommodations as possible. This appeal is for money only--not books, as cash alone can provide the necessary buildings, expert librarians, etc., necessary for this most important branch of war work. The book appeal will come later. The Y. M. C. A. which did such efficient work among our soldiers and sailors, has turned over all the library work to the American Library Association, and under the direction of its War Council, it will cooperate fully with the Y. M. C. A. Fayetteville is asked to raise $75 toward this fund. All interested to help are used to leave contributions marked "War Fund" at our local library next week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917.

"Don't throw away the wrapping paper. It's scarce and valuable these days," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/28/1917.

"Supervisor W. C. Hunt returned Thursday from Brockton, Mass., where for the fourth year he acted as a judge in the Holstein Class at the Brockton fair. The fair was attended by nearly 200,000 people and the profits which will amount to over $200,000 will be given to the Red Cross. Supervisor Hunt will give the $25 which he received for his work to the Fayetteville Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917.

"Village President, W. M. Jones, Dwight R. Collin, president of the Community Club, A. T. Armstrong, T. W. Sheedy and W. E. Bennett, who have appointed a Liberty Loan committee by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, are meeting with the Liberty Loan Committee of Syracuse this afternoon and receiving instructions in how to sell a million dollars worth of Liberty bonds in Fayetteville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917.

September Red Cross report, Fayetteville. "The articles made and sent to the Syracuse Chapter follow: 42 abdominal bandages, 6 pajamas, 6 lounging robes, 66 handkerchiefs, 11 tray cloths, 12 napkins, 6 knitted wash cloths, 12 linen wash cloths, 5 comfort bags, 120 compresses, 2 hot water bottle covers, 2 ambulance pillows, 1 linen sheet, 1 bed spread. All will be interested to know that the knitting is showing results. 93 articles were sent in during the month; 23 sweaters, 16 scarves, 27 wristlets, 15 pair socks, 6 pairs bed (incomplete), The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917.

"Newton D. Baker, secretary of war, on Wednesday informed a committee of Syracuse men that the troops now in the mobilization camp at Syracuse would be moved to Europe before the winter was over. Whether there would be any further use of the camp established on the Van Vleck road with the State Fair grounds as the location for the supply depot, Secretary Baker could not say..."The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917.

"The Manlius Red Cross branch has been keeping constantly at work. Each week from twenty to thirty women have met at the Methodist church and the material made has received most favorable comment from the Syracuse inspection. In addition to the work done at the meetings, the ladies have knitted and sewed at home. Some 420 surgical dressings have been turned in, together with 206 bandages and 26 nightingales, 5 sweaters, 11 mufflers, 14 wristlets, 8 pairs of socks and wash cloths have been knitted. A Junior Manlius Red Cross Work meeting was enthusiastically attended by forty young people on Friday. Trench Candles are being made and there are classes in sewing and knitting. Those in charge of the department to whom the credit is due for its success are: Mrs. Chas. Bishop, Miss Ruth Carrington, Mrs. Edward Evans, Mrs. Burr Johnson, Mrs. T. P. Kellett, Mrs. Allen Patrick, Mrs. Thomas Pattinson, Mrs. Wm. Sulvan, Mrs. Howard Tuttle and Mrs. B. W. Van Brocklin, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/5/1917.

"Fayetteville is becoming aroused to the fact that the nation is at war and that money is needed to win the war. Not all as yet are aroused but the Liberty Loan committee is working hard to arouse the citizens who are still sleeping. Thursday afternoon an encouraging beginning was made in the campaign by Mrs. Wilbur Mason and J. H. Fort of the Syracuse Loan committee who visited the factories of the Stickley company, Precision Die Casting company, Merrell-Soule company and McIntyre Bro's and secured a large number of subscriptions for bonds. At the McIntyre paper mill every employee subscribed. Mr. Fort and members of the Manlius committee also visited the Cheney shops at Manlius and obtained subscriptions from a large percentage of the men," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917.

"Contributions of jellies and jams will be gratefully received by the Red Cross and can be left at A. G. Williams store next week. The Syracuse Chapter will act as distributing agent, sending these gifts to the boys, sick in hospitals, and even to those in the trenches...The National League for Woman's Service is also collecting jams and jellies for the sick soldiers. Mr. Martin Doyle has kindly consented to receive contributions at his store (Fayetteville)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917.

"Miss Gertrude Bower of the State Food Conservation Bureau will give a demonstration on substitutes for meat for the housewives of Manlius at the high school laboratory (Manlius)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917.

"W.J. Minch of New York and L. Earl Higbee of New York addressed an audience of about fifty at school hall last evening in the interests of the Liberty Loan. Gen. William Verbeck presided and St. John's band furnished music," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917.

"General William Verbeck has been asked to nominate forty-two men who have been trained at St. John's, to be commissioned second lieutenants in the United States reserves. The power conferred on General Verbeck is unique, as few if any other military school directors in the country outside of West Point have ever been privileged to make so many officers for war service before. The order is the second distinction given the Manlius schools within a month. Only recently the schools were placed at the head of a list of ten leading military schools of the country, which the War department designated as rendering distinguished service by their training and through their graduates who had entered active service. All the men will be chosen from graduates of the Manlius Schools, mostly from among the recent classes, so that a young and active list with military tactics still fresh in their minds will be advanced for the use of the government. Each of these men is to be ordered to a second officers' training camp, to take intensive training for a higher commission. He will receive the rank of a second lieutenant upon nomination by General Verbeck and will work for higher honor in camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/19/1917.

"The Precision Die Casting company has accepted a contract for hand-grenade parts for the United States government which will keep their shops working night and day for some time," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917.

"Troops are breaking camp at the Syracuse expansion camp. The last regiment will leave Saturday and the only soldiers that will be left will be two provisional battalions and the quartermaster's and medical corps departments," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917.

"Augustus T. Armstrong of Fayetteville has succeeded W. W. Cheney, sr., as chairman of Local Exemption Board No. 2, Mr. Cheney having resigned on account of the strain made on his health by so many business interests," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917.

"That we must be prepared for peril from the Pacific side as well as from the Atlantic was the startling announcement made by General Verbeck, who presided at the Liberty Day meeting held Wednesday evening at high school hall. General Verbeck, who was born in Japan is who is thoroughly familiar with the Japanese says that the people there are galled by the fact they are denied the rights of other aliens in this country and that some slight misunderstanding is liable to cause this country trouble from the Pacific side. 'Therefore,' he said, 'We must be prepared for what may happen.' Gerben Rubenstein was introduced by General Verbeck. The later paid the General strong compliment for his opening address. He said the news of peril from Japan was news to him but he knew that it was a matter on which General Verbeck was posted. The speaker carefully explained why the government preferred to have the liberty bonds bought on time than to have the banks take money from regular channels of circulation to purchase them. He was followed by Mr. Krumble, who arranged the village of Manlius for not having subscribed a larger amount. He told what had been done in other places and why Manlius should do more to maintain its standing. H. E. Ransier of the local committee made a report of subscriptions and said he did not believe Mr. Krumble understood the situation or he would not have been so ready to criticize. Although so far $21,000 worth of bonds have been subscribed for in the village and there are some sections not yet covered by solicitors and some credit due to the village for subscriptions made in the city by residents of the village which will be given it later. The work of solicitation was started late owing to the fact that the local committee did not get organized until late. W. W. Cheney, sr., was named as chairman of the committee by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York but on account of his duties on the exemption board was unable to serve. J. J. Costello was later induced to accept the chairmanship and a working committee organized," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917.

"The town of Manlius made the best showing of any town in the county in the second Liberty Loan campaign which closed Saturday night. With 780 subscribers the town subscribed $167,100. Of this amount the village of Manlius subscribed the largest part, $86,400. However, of this amount $52,600 was subscribed by the cadets of the Manlius Schools, the entire amount being raised by Major H. C. Durston within three or four days. The village of Fayetteville subscribed $53,750 through the local committee and it is believed that $25,000 or $30,000 was subscribed by citizens of the village through Syracuse banks," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/26/1917.

"Commencing Nov. 2, the burdens of war grow heavier in the entire nation. Letter postage will advance from 2 to 3 cents an ounce. Post-cards will cost double their former price, and there will be a war tax of 1 cent addition on parcel post packages for every 25 cents in stamps required. The postage on rural delivery letters on routes from office where mailed remain at two cents but drop letters are increased to two cents. All railway tickets costing over 35 cents, and mileage books of all kinds will be taxed 8 per cent. Freight is to be taxed 3 per cent. Theater tickets of all kinds will be taxed 10 per cent. This will mean a ten cent movie ticket will be taxed one cent, a fifteen-cent ticket, two cents and a twenty-five cent ticket, three cents. Syracuse movie houses, however, decided to make the rates even money and jumped the prices 5 cents. On telephone messages costing 15 cents or more a tax of 6 cents will be collected, "The Fayetteville Bulletin 11/2/1917.

"Fifteen hundred tins and jars of canned vegetables, fruits and jellies will be sold today and tomorrow at M. H. Doyle's store by the Community Canning Club. This assortment of foodstuffs is part of the contribution of the village to the food conservation campaign which is being carried on throughout the nation. The club was organized last summer under plans outlined by Cornell University. Fayetteville residents who had surplus products in their gardens or orchards turned in the supplies to the club, which was conducted by six women of the village, and they were then preserved. Everything in connection with the work was donated. The domestic science class of the high school aided the project. The money derived from the sale this week will be given to some cause which will help the nation in its war needs. A certain amount of it will be retained by the club for the purchase of equipment which will facilitate the work in future seasons," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917.

"Despite the stormy Fridays the attendance during October average thirty which is encouraging when it is considered that the meetings have been held weekly. But the officers do not feel that they can grow lax in their efforts to alleviate suffering and bring a ray of comfort to those who have given their all. The (Red Cross) women responded generously to the call for jellies and jams with an offering of twelve dozen glasses. The work finished and sent in for the month consisted of: 12 bed shirts, 6 pajama suits, 311 compresses, 174 abdominal bandages, 19 T bandages, 24 wash clothes, 21 table napkins, 2 ambulance pillows. There are one hundred and six names on Mrs. McIntyre's list who have volunteered as knitters. They have completed during the month: 12 pairs socks, 4 helmets, 18 pairs of wristlets, 10 scarves, 22 sweaters. Four new annual members have been added to the membership list and have turned in $131.25 contribution to the chapter, received from the Fayetteville War Chest. A generous amount of linen from Mrs. D. R. Collin and a bed spread from Mrs. Wilkin were also contributed, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917.

"The National League for Women's Service wants the women of Manlius and vicinity to give jam, jellies and preserve fruit to be sent to our sick and convalescent soldiers all over the country. The Syracuse War Chest will handle the supplies in Syracuse. Locally they may be left at Phillips mill. Mrs. William Verbeck has been appointed by the League to look after details in the Manlius Division. Here is a chance for every Manlius housekeeper to show her patriotism and make a sick soldier happy by giving him some of her own 'putting up,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917.

"At Fowler's hall, Manlius, N.Y. Friday evening, November 2, 1917 at 8 o'clock. Gustave A. Strebel, candidate for assemblyman for 3rd District, Joseph U. Sharkey, and Philip Ott will speak on the issues of the campaign. Thomas Roone, chairman. Vote for peace. Everybody welcome. Socialism is the hope of the world," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917.

"S. Cheney & Son Labor Bulletin. Wanted: Some good strong active young men to learn moulders trade under instruction. Apply Supt. S. Cheney & Son, Manlius, N.Y," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917.

"Following the practice being adopted by other churches, the Men's Club of Trinity church (Fayetteville) has presented the church with a service flag having three stars for three members of the parish now in the service--Charles Skinner, Lucian Hale and Jacob Hullar, Jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917.

"In connection with the annual corn Show, to be held at the Court house next Wednesday and Thursday there will be a Patriotic County and Food Show on Tuesday in which Fayetteville housewives will have exhibits. Special prizes will be given for canned and dried fruits and vegetables and for war bread made of cornmeal, oatmeal, rice, rye, potato and buckwheat. Ribbon prizes will be given for other kinds of bread. A model kitchen will be exhibited and Miss Gertrude Bower will give demonstrations in meat substitutes, children's meals and balanced meals. In the evening there will be addresses by prominent scientists and food experts," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917.

"The committee for the Fayetteville Soldiers Christmas Fund desire that the relatives of all soldiers and sailors from this town leave their address with E. W. O'Brien at the post office by November 27th, so there will be no delay in mailing packages to them. A committee of several ladies will be appointed to purchase the gifts to be sent. The success of the benefit which occurs on Nov. 27 is assured, as more than one hundred tickets have been already sold and delegations are expected from the neighboring villages. The basketball game should prove interesting as the Fayettes have a good team this year and expect to walk away with a big score while the Roosevelts are veterans with great records. The Fayetteville orchestra donates its services for the occasion and M. C. Everingham donates the use of the hall, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/2/1917.

"John McGrath and Francis Fulmer have left the employ of S. Cheney & Son, and have accepted positions with the Remington Company at Ilion which the government has taken over for a munition plant for the manufacture of rifles to be used by the American soldiers in France," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/16/1917.

"The sixty-eight men from Onondaga county, including several from Fayetteville, who were transferred from Camp Dix to Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga., last week were given a farewell banquet by their comrades Thursday night" The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917.

"What about the American and Belgian and French orphans? Shall we remember them with a white Christmas? Methodist Episcopal Church, Fayetteville news, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917.

"The women of the Manlius M. E. church and society have packed and sent Thanksgiving boxes to Camp Dix, Panama and other places where Manlius soldiers are stationed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917.

"Suspected German Spy Hides in Village Lockup. Charles Kofahl, who was sent to the penitentiary for six months by Justice Wilkin Tuesday on a charge of vagrancy, may not be a German spy as is suspected, but he has all the blundering requisites of a German diplomat. When he found he was being followed by Chief of Police Bullard he ran into the village lockup to hide and here the chief caught him hiding behind the hook and ladder truck. Evidently fearing his identity might not be easily established he carried his discharge from the German Landstrum and also papers showing that he was reenlisted in September, 1914, a month after the war broke out. He also carried letters to German consuls in New York and San Francisco. After running into jail with all these military papers in his possession Kofahl says that he has been a sailor on the Great Lakes, has served as baker's assistant in some cities and has traveled in pretty much every section of the country. He told Justice Wilkin that he came recently from New Jersey and had been at Warners looking for a job. He said he had no money and none was found on him. The documents found on Kofahl...Just what incentive might bring a German spy to Manlius is not known as no munitions are manufactured here. Soldiers, however, are being rapidly turned out at St. John's school, a little experimental work in plating shells has been carried on at the Cheney foundries and parts of Brockway trucks which are used in the army are being made here (Manlius), "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917.

"Every Mason in the State is to be asked to contribute $5 to a special war fund to be raised by the New York Grand Lodge...There are enough members of the fraternity to make the fund more than $1,000,000 if each contributes his share. Grand Lodge officers believe that the fund will be raised," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/23/1917.

"You can't prove it by the attendance at picture shows that folks are fretting over the war and the high cost of living," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

"Members of Fayetteville Chapter, O. E. S. are requested to meet at the home of Mrs. George Ebeling, Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock for the purpose of preparing Christmas boxes to be sent to the boys from the Fayetteville Masonic lodge, who have gone to the front," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

"Fayetteville has been suffering from a coal famine for the past few days, not a pound of hard coal to be found. Some families have had to resort to burning soft coal. Hoping to relieve the situation B. H. Tracy today appealed to Carleton Chase fuel commissioner for the county," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917

"George C. Van Deusen, organizer of St. Paul's church, Syracuse, who has been engaged in hospital work in France during the summer, will talk on his experiences at the front for the benefit of the local chapter of the Red Cross (Fayetteville) Monday evening at school hall. An admission fee of ten cents will be charged," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

The war-savings plan provided for by the Treasury department goes into operation on Monday, Dec. 3. The plan puts it easily in reach of every American citizen to save money and at the same time aid the Government by supplying it with the news of war. Stamps, which are the Government's certificates of indebtedness, are to be sold in two denominations--thrift stamps, which cost 25 cents each, and war-savings stamps, which cost from $4.12 to $4.23 each, according to the month in which they are purchased. With the first thrift stamp the purchaser is given a thrift card with spaces for 16 stamps. When 16 thrift stamps have been purchased and affixed the thrift card can be exchanged for a war-savings stamp by paying the difference between the $4 the thrift stamps represent and the current value of a war-savings stamp, which in December, 1917, and January, 1918, will be $4.12, and thereafter 1 cent for each succeeding month during the year 1918. ..The thrift stamps do not bear interest, but the war-savings stamps bear 4 per cent, compounded quarterly. The certificates will be dated Jan. 2, 1918, and mature Jan. 1, 1923. The stamps and certificates can be obtained from postoffices, banks or trust companies, at railroad stations, stores, factories and many other public places," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

"Over two hundred attended the basketball game and dance given Tuesday evening at Everingham hall for the benefit of the Christmas fund for the Fayetteville soldiers. The receipts of the evening will net about $40 for the fund. The Roosevelts basketball team came back in their old form and defeated the Fayettes 30 to 22. After the game the Fayetteville orchestra furnished music for dancing which was enjoyed until a late hour. There are now twenty-six Fayetteville boys in the service who will be remembered at Christmas time, the list being as follows: Malvern Noxon, Inft., Camp Empire, Panama; Joseph Wine, Cav., Fort Bliss, Texas; Glenn Ferguson, Marines, U. S. S. Hancock; Arthur Hughson, Mach. Gun Batl., Camp Dix; Jacob Hullar, Depot Brigade, Camp Gordon; Carroll Daggett, bugler, Inft., Camp Green, N. C.; Thomas Kelley, Inft., Camp Greene, N. C.; Henry Liegel, Marines, Mare Island, Cal.; Edward Cross, Camp Dix; Capt. Merwin Armstrong, Eng., Corps, Camp Meade, Md.; Donald Armstrong, Camp Wadsworth; Charles Skinner, Camp Wadsworth; Lee Pratt, Tobyhanna, Pa.; Louis Eaton, Med. Corps, France; A. G. Osborne, U. S. S. Georgia; Henry W. Osborne, Eng. Corps, Camp Meade, Md., William Konvicka, U. S. S. McDonough; Corp. William Keefe, Hosp. Corps, Camp Dix; E. Duane Sherwood, Camp Dix; Walter Prentice, Signal Corps, Camp Gordon; Capt. Mortimer B. Birdseye, Camp Upton, Yaphank; Lucien Hale, Canadian Aviation Corps; Arthur Gaugel, Camp Gordon; Ambrose Leech, U. S. Navy; Ernest Leech, U. S. Navy," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

"Camp Dix Covers 8 Square Miles. Includes 1,400 Large Buildings in Ten Sections. In Each Section There Are About Forty Barracks, Each Accommodating 167 Men," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/30/1917.

"At a meeting of the representatives of the four Protestant churches of the village (Fayetteville) held Sunday afternoon at the Baptist church it was voted to be the sense of the meeting that the combining of the churches for union meetings in order to conserve the coal supply was considered a patriotic necessity which would result in spiritual welfare and it was suggested that committees be appointed from each church to arrange for twelve consecutive union meetings," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917.

November Red Cross Report (Fayetteville). "The articles made and sent in during the month comprise: 923 compresses, 20 triangular bandages, 120 drains, 17 pajama suits, 48 handkerchiefs, 12 wash cloths, 36 table napkins, 14 tray cloths, 6 hot water bottle covers, 9 ambulance pillows, l afghan, 2,091 trench candles or a total of 3,382. During the month a large quantity of cloths of good quality has been donated and sent to the Relief for the French wounded; also a contribution of treasure and trinkets for the fund to relieve the blind soldiers of France. Great praise is due the knitters who have turned in 49 sweaters, 41 pairs socks, 27 pairs wristlets, 7 helmets, 6 scarves, l pair bed socks. For the first quarter or since the knitting was instituted Sept. 1,757 skeins of yarn have been given out and 511 skeins returned, worked up into garments...Three electric motors for the sewing machines have been presented by the Community Canning Club. At the November 30th meeting Captain M. B. Birdseye gave an outline of the work of the officers' training Camp at Fort Niagara," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/7/1917.

"Mrs. Dwight R. Collin is in receipt of a letter from Mrs. Ernest I. White, chairman of the National League for Women's Service thanking the women for contributions of jellies and jams which were sent to sick soldiers in various camps, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917.

"Die makers are working day and night at the Precision Die Castings shops making the molds which will cast five million hand grenades for the United States government. Work on an addition to the west wide of the shops is also being rushed. This will be of concrete 30x60 feet. The company will also utilize a part of the Stickley shops as a finishing room. When the contract is under way both the night and day forces will be doubled and it is likely that 300 hands will be employed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917.

"The coal famine in Fayetteville was broken Wednesday by the arrival of three cars of coal, the first to arrive within a week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917.

"S. Cheney & Son have a service flag out showing twenty stars, indicating that the number of men who were formerly employed by them are now in the Army or Navy of the United States," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/14/1917.

"It cost the town of Manlius over $3 a vote to count the 31 soldier' votes Tuesday and it probably cost the state as much more to get them by special messengers from France and from various cantonments," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917.

"Business men of Fayetteville have purchased a village service flag with 28 stars which will be hung across Mill street opposite the postoffice. Fayetteville lodge F. & A. M. will also soon hang out a service flag," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917.

"The gifts for the Fayetteville soldiers and sailors were sent away last Friday and should reach them by Christmas as only one went to France, that being sent to Private Lewis Eaton. Tobacco was sent to those who smoke and boxes of Schraffts' to the remainder, postage on these being large. M. H. Doyle furnished these materials at cost and C. R. Eaton, E. W. O'Brien and W. W. Mason did the packing and addressing. Christmas cards were sent in each package. More tobacco will be purchased with the remainder of the fund and sent to those who have since enlisted and those who may be drafted in the future," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917.

"The proposition for the uniting of the four Protestant churches of the village during the winter in order to save coal seems to be 'dying in the bornin.' The Episcopal and Methodist having backed down on the proposition and the Baptist and Presbyterian churches will vote on the question next Sunday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917.

"Manlius now has a coal administrator and a large stock of Emergency Coal Cards but it has no coal. Clerk E. D. Smith is the acting fuel administrator according to an agreement entered into between the coal dealers of the village and the village board. If you want coal you simply go to Mr. Smith who will be found each evening between 7 and 9 at the cozy council chamber which is always warm and comfy. Here Mr. Smith holds sway with plenty of cigars for the men and candy for the ladies. Mr. Smith will present you with one of the emergency coal cards which you have to sign, making affidavit to the fact that you haven't 500 lbs. of coal on hand. It is then Mr. Smith's duty to inform you that there isn't any coal to be had but as the weather is getting warmer you are not likely to need any for the furnace. Being a friend of John D., he will then suggest buying an oil range and an oil heater. After smoking one of the fuel administrator's cigars and getting thoroughly warm you can go home happy and chop up one of the doors in order to keep warm the rest of the night. But things are not always likely to be thus for Manlius dealers now have eight cars of coal en route and some are likely to blow into Manlius most any day," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/21/1917.

"The Manlius Red Cross supply headquarters and work room has been moved to the north-east ground floor room of the Manlius Improvement Company building. This room is across Seneca street from the Manlius Free Library and in addition, to being centrally located, will be open all the time. The regular Tuesday afternoon meetings will still take place, at which work will be planned and given out," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918.

'Men laid off in local factories because of the fuel order are being given plenty of opportunity to work during the enforced vacation. Farmers are offering wood choppers $1.25 per cord for cutting wood and carrying men to and from work. It is said good workers can make $4 or $5 a day at this price for cutting. A few years ago farmers only paid 50 cents a cord and choppers then thought they were making good money. Men are also wanted to cut ice on Snook's pond where J. D. Houseman is filling his ice house for supplying Fayetteville and Manlius patrons next season. The ice is 19 inches thick and of fine quality. J. E. Thompson, another local dealer, is harvesting the ice crop at the Wellwood reservoir. He has his houses about two-thirds filled," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/11/1918.

Fuel Administrator Garfield under President Wilson closes down factories for five days and declares every Monday a holiday for the next ten weeks. Food stores could keep open a half day and drug stores day and evening. This closed factories, saloons, stores (except for the sale of drugs and foods), places of amusement and nearly all office buildings. "The most urgent thing to be done is to send to the American forces abroad and to the Allies the food and war supplies which they vitally need," says Garfield. At the Cheney Foundry, 300 men are laid off; at the Precision Die plant, Fayetteville, 50; Stickley shops at Fayetteville, 100; the McIntyre paper mill, Fayetteville, 20," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918.

"Manlius is not as yet as hard hit as some other towns of the county by the existing coal shortage, as no public buildings have been obliged to close owing to lack of fuel. Although fuel is being dealt out only by the pink ticket system and in half-ton lots to a customer, there seems to be no real distress, as there is coal at both the Cole and Hale yards, and delivery is being made to those in need of something to burn," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918.

"The Fuel Administration expects school children throughout the country to do the tagging work on 'Tag-Your-Shovel-Day,' which has been set for January 30, planning to make it a school holiday. In this extra effort to save coal for war purposes the Fuel Administration will try to get a tag on every coal shovel in the country. On the face of each tag are the words: 'Save that shovelful of coal a day for Uncle Sam.' On the reverse side are hints for saving coal," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918.

"A private in Uncle Sam's armies, regular, National Guard or National Army, receives in cash, as long as he is in the United States, $33 a month, in addition to food, clothing and medical attendance. When he is sent to Europe he gets 20 per cent extra, whether in training or in the trenches, which brings the minimum cash pay up to $39.50 a month, or $1.30 a day...if 'there's a wee wife waiting' she receives each month direct from Uncle Sam $15 a month...if there is one child with the wife, the allowance is $25 a month; two children, $32.50, and so on up to the point where with a wife and six children Uncle Sam pays $50 a month in cash to the family. It may not be enough to support them, even with what the enlisted man can send home out of his wages, but it is at least a recognition of Uncle Sam's responsibility and a bulwark against dependence on charity. Allowances are also provided for dependent parents, $10 a month for each, and for brothers, sisters and grandchildren, $5 a month for each, with the proviso that in any case the government will not pay to the dependents of any man more than $50 a month....If he dies from injuries or disease received in line of duty, the widow, children and widowed mother receive sums ranging from $20 to $75 a month, according to size of family. No distinction is made between a private and the highest officer. In addition every man may take out insurance up to $10,000 at the actual cost of furnishing such insurance in peace times -- the entire nation through the treasury bears the war risk. This insurance is wisely safeguarded to protect it from creditors, shyster lawyers and loan sharks," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918.

"On Friday afternoon of last week a Junior Red Cross Auxiliary was organized at the Manlius high school," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/18/1918.

"The Precision Die Casting company, Fayetteville, is one of the half dozen war industries in this county exempted from the fuel closing order of last week. The Precision company is engaged in making hand grenade parts for the war department," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918.

The girls of the Fayetteville Domestic Science school will hold a sale of war breads. War loaf cake is to be sold at 25 cents, Boston Brown bread, 7 cents, graham bread 15 cents, oatmeal cookies 15 cents a dozen, oatmeal macaroons 15 cents a dozen, oatmeal bread 5 cents, potato spice cup cakes 15 cents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918.

"St. John's Military Band of Manlius will give a concert in Tully February 1st for the benefit of the Hospital Air Society of that village," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/25/1918.

"The sale of sugar by the local merchants grows daily more restricted," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918.

"Esther Miller of the senior class of the (Manlius) high school won the bronze medal offered by the State Education Department for the best composition toward furthering the sale of the second liberty bonds," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918.

"The Garfield closing order was more universally obeyed, if anything, Monday than it was last week. A lone barber shop which kept open elected considerable criticism from the more patriotic citizens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/1/1918.

"During January 2,629 articles were completed (by the local branch of the Red Cross-Fayetteville) and sent in to headquarters. 22 hospital shirts, 26 pajama suits, 272 abdominal bandages, 113 slings, 2,010 compresses, 125 four tail head-bandages, 30 substitute handkerchiefs, 30 wash cloths, l ambulance pillow. The attendance has numbered 244. The hall is comfortably warm and a social half-hour is spent at noon over a cup of coffee and a sandwich. There is much enthusiasm shown in the work, many taking work home for completion. The knitting department reports 153 articles: 36 sweaters, 4 scarves, 5 helmets, 56 pairs socks. An outfit consisting of helmet, pair wristlets and pair of socks was sent to H. W. Osborne, Camp Meade and a pair of socks to Sergt. Donald Armstrong, Camp Wadsworth," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/8/1918.

"Hazen Kelley, French Ambulance driver and bomb thrower, will give his postponed lecture at the (Manlius) high school February 9," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/8/1918.

" 'Heatless Tuesday' was observed at the E. U. Scoville Foundry and the S. Cheney & Son lower shop, in addition to the 'Heatless' Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/8/1918.

"The Precision Castings company has taken another contract for the government, the making of Ventura tubes for airplanes. These are an L shaped tube in one end of which a vacuum is formed by the airplane rushing through the air. This vacuum then acts on a gauge telling the speed of the airplane, the same as a speedometer tells the speed of an automobile. About two hundred hands are now employed on the night and day forces at the plant. Nearly 80,000 firing devices for hand grenades are also being put out a day as well as thousands of plugs for shells. Twenty-two casting machines making four castings at a time and operating at a casting speed of 100 an hour are kept busy night and day," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/15/1918.

"Never before in the history of Central New York agriculture have such high wages been offered for farm help but this fact has not induced men who have had experience in farming to take jobs in the country. The pay for married men ranges from $50 to $60 a month and that for single men from $30 to $45. The inducements for men with families include a house and a garden, and some farmers are even offering the privilege of keeping pigs and chickens. But even these high prices as compared with previous years are not equal to what machine shops and munition factories are paying. When a man with but little experience can earn $20 to $25 a week of 48 hours in factories he is not likely to go back to the farm and work for $14 to $16 and board for a week of 70 to 80 hours," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/15/1918.

"More than 30 Manlius men and women are now employed at the Precision Die Castings shops at Fayetteville, where large war orders are now being gotten out," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918.

"The local (Minoa) school, which since November 22 has been in session but four weeks, reopened Monday as did also the school at Fremont Bridge, which closed two weeks ago. Justice E. M. Lyon, clerk of the Board of Education, has secured from the county administrator the promise of a carload of coal for school heating and from now on it is expected there will be no further shortage," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918.

"Schools in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, which have been enlisted for war work in the Junior Membership and School Activities Department of the Red Cross, have been asked by the Atlantic Division of the Red Cross to make 56,000 French and Belgian refugee garments. This is the first definite task to be assigned to school children enrolled in the Red Cross Junior Department. It is the result of an appeal from Red Cross representatives in France who cabled that thousands of homeless and helpless women and children there are in need of warm garments," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918.

"The eastern part of the United States faces a food shortage likely to continue for the next sixty days. In making this disclosure yesterday, Food Administrator Hoover declared that the situation is the most critical in the country's history and that in many of the large consuming areas reserve food stores are at the point of exhaustion. The whole blame is put by the food administrator on railroad congestion, which he says also has thrown the food administration far behind in its program for feeding the Allies. The only solution he sees is a greatly increased rail movement of foodstuffs even to the exclusion of much other commerce," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/22/1918.

"The Fayetteville War Savings Stamp committee met Monday evening...informal reports also were made of the progress of thrift stamp sales at the McIntyre mill and of the installation of stamp stations at every store in the village...the committee will give prizes for slogans or mottoes for use during it campaign...write your motto plainly...and put in a plain envelope addressed to War Savings Stamp Committee and leave at any stamp station of the post office...Lick a stamp/And paste the Kaiser," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918.

"The (Kirkville) Red Cross will meet at the church parlors," (The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918.

"The sale of thrift stamps has been actively taken up at the (Manlius) high school. The work of the junior auxiliary of the Manlius Red Cross is progressing very satisfactorily. ..since January 1st of this year the following materials have been prepared and sent in to the Syracuse Chapter: 3 pkgs., handkerchiefs, 5 pairs infants slippers, 38 prs. bed slippers, 3 pillows, 12 pkgs. abdominal bandages, 6 pks. four tail bandages, l pkg. triangular bandage. ..," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918.

"The Red Cross will meet at the (Kirkville) church parlors Thursday morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/1/1918.

"Contributions of the Fayetteville Red Cross Chapter during February...$125.00. Knitting Report: 39 Sweaters, 31 pairs wristlets, 16 pairs socks, 2 helmets, 1 scarf; 2350 compresses, 440 4-tail head bandages, 620 abdominals, 100 many tail B, 25 T bandages, 83 triangular, 24 bed shirts, 26 pajama suits. Attendance-253. Sets consisting of sweater, pair wristlets and two pairs socks were also given to Ernest Clay and Walter Voit, Camp Devens. About 170 skeins of yarn were worked into articles...our list shows 273 members at present which represents a small percentage of the village population," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918.

"The Thrift Stamp Sale in the (Fayetteville) school has been very successful thus far. About $55 worth of stamps have been sold. ...A chapter of the Junior Red Cross is being organized in the school which will assist the regular Red Cross chapter and help in all kinds of work for war relief. Over $70 has been raised by the boys' pledges to the Y.M.C.A. fund. This fund will be used for work at the front. The Y.M.C.A. is hoping to raise a million dollars through the public schools of the country,"The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918.

"Minoa. A thrift stamp sale was inaugurated in the local school on Monday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918.

"On Friday evening of this week...there will be given a series of moving pictures in the (Manlius) high school chapel for the benefit of the Junior Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918.

"The War Saving Stamp campaign is now under way in Manlius. The village has been covered with posters and stamps have been placed on sale in nearly all business places. At St. John's School the stamp sale is in charge of T. Elliman, a young but patriotic cadet who applied to Washington for a stamp agency before the Manlius campaign opened. Already $150 worth of stamps have been sold at the school and it is expected there that $1,000 worth will be sold before the campaign is over. Thrift stamps are being sold at the high school at the rate of over $20 per day, nearly $100 worth having been sold up to the present time although the sale of the stamps was not begun until last Thursday. Parents are urged to encourage the children in investing in thrift stamps as there can be no safer investment for their money besides teaching them a lesson of patriotism as well," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/8/1918.

"According to reports of local committees made at a meeting Tuesday night at the Village Inn $1650 worth of Thrift Stamps had been sold up to that time. $400 worth of the stamps were sold within the week at the (Fayetteville) post office," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918.

"Patriotic Emergency Farm Labor Committee Announced. Fayetteville business men are co-operating with nearby farmers so that maximum crops may be grown. The New York State Food Commission through the Bureau of Production is organizing "Patriotic Emergency Farm Labor Committees" in every village in the state. These committees will make a canvass of the villages and enroll every person who may be able to do one or more days' work upon nearby farms during the coming season...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918.

"Books wanted for soldiers and sailors. Two million books are needed by the Library War Service of the American Library Association to furnish reading matter to soldiers and sailors in camps in America, on transports, on board naval vessels and overseas. A big drive to get these books is to be carried on in Fayetteville during the week of March 18-25. In this work patrons of the library and all organizations of the community are urged to cooperate. Please go to your book-shelves, select as many good books as you can spare, wrap and mark "Library War Service." Send books to the Public Library or telephone 106M and they will be called for," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918.

"Young men of the village (Manlius) have raised over $100 toward buying tobacco, cigars and candy for Manlius soldier boys in camp or at the front," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918.

The Manlius Red Cross branch has turned in to the Syracuse station the following completed articles during January and February: 215 abdominal bandages, 860 compresses, 80 triangular bandages, 155 T. bandages, 50 sweaters, 58 pairs of wristlets, 2 mufflers, 7 helmets, 1 pair bed socks, 20 hospital bed sheets, 8 three inch bandages, 18 four inch bandages. The inspector of work at Syracuse has complimented the local ladies on the quality of work turned in by the Manlius branch. The Juniors are also holding enthusiastic meetings at which hospital supplies, bandages and comfort pillows are being made. The girls are also turning in nice quantities of knitted articles," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/15/1918.

"The Junior Red Cross workers (Manlius) have plenty of enthusiasm and interest but lack materials. Old white goods, either cotton or linen could be used to good advantage. If any friends of the cause have such materials they would care to donate it would be very gratefully received and called for by some of the Junior members. The boys of the high school are to be divided into groups to assist Saturday in the collection of garments which may be donated to the Red Cross. Since this will be the last week of work at the high school during the month of March the report of work done for the month is given here: 11 comfort pillows, 1 afghan, 2 helmets, 11 pairs bed socks, 12 pairs baby socks, 2 dozen wash cloths, 25 abdominal bandages, 5 four-tail bandages," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918.

"A large amount of cast-off clothing for the war sufferers has been received at the red Cross headquarters in the Glove Factory block (Manlius) but the officers of the local chapter hope that still more will be received before the weeks' drive closes next Monday. nearly everything except men and women's stiff or straw hats and rubber goods are acceptable. Members of the Junior Red Cross will call for any clothing Saturday if they will phone W. W. Cheney, jr.," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/22/1918.

"It is expected that Onondaga County will be asked to subscribe about $17,000,000 of the third Liberty Loan. This loan will amount to three billion at 4 1/4 per cent. The new bonds will be non-convertible, but bonds of the first and second Liberty Loans may be converted into the new 4 1/4 per cent securities," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918.

"The Standard Bearers, an organization of young women and girls of the Manlius M. E. church, are working at the church for the French and Belgian orphans. The New York State Branch, to which the local auxiliary belongs, has appropriated $45,000 to this cause," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 3/29/1918.

"Most of the books contributed in this community for the use of soldiers and sailors are being shipped from the library. There were 260 books in today's shipment," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918.

"The War Savings Stamp Committee of which Prof. L. T. Wilcox is chairman has arranged for a patriotic meeting to be held this evening at School hall in order to interest more citizens in the thrift habit. Lieutenant McKinney who is in charge of the United States naval recruiting station in Syracuse, and Captain Featherston, in charge of the British-Canadian recruiting mission in that city, will be speakers. They will tell interesting stories of army life and explain the duties of citizens in war time. The meeting is free to all and there will be no solicitation," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918.

"Manlius is preparing for a drive for the third Liberty Loan which opens Saturday. Gen. William Verbeck is chairman of the local committee and other members are Walter W. Cheney, Dr. H. E. Ransier, W. E. Bennett, W. M. Scoville, C. A. Phillips and S. C. Cheney. Although General Verbeck was not a member of the previous loan committee he did valuable work and at St. John's School over $50,000 of bonds was taken," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/5/1918.

"The Fayetteville Grange manifested its patriotism at its last meeting by voting to buy an $100 Liberty Bond and $10 to Rev. Charles Vickery for Relief Work in his new field on the battle front. It was also voted to purchase a pocket testament for each soldier going from this section," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"The War Savings Stamp committee is about to open a campaign for converting old gold and silver into thrift stamps. An office will be established in town so that articles of gold and silver can be tested and their true value obtained. If such are articles are exchanged for stamps in Syracuse, Fayetteville loses credit and the person making the exchange may not get full value," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"The patriotic service (Fayetteville) last Sunday morning was impressive. Mr. W. H. Peckham, in well-chosen words presented the cooperating churches with a Roll of Honor containing twenty names of boys who are in service from the homes of the united congregation. The Roll of Honor, tastily framed was presented on behalf of Mrs. Ambrose Osborn, who gives it in honor of her husband. Ambrose was called to the service one year ago last Sunday, the next day after a state of war was declared to exist," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"The total apportionment of the Third Liberty Loan for the town of Manlius is $129,300. Of this amount the villages of Manlius and Fayetteville are each expected to absorb $51,700 and the village of Minoa $25,900," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"The W. S. S. Committee have established the following stations for selling War Savings Stamps (in Fayetteville): J. D. Nichols store, A. G. Williams, B. G. Benedict, Mrs. Wein, M. C. Everingham, Mrs. Graves, A & P, M. H. Doyle, Mott Bros., C. R. Eaton, D. F. Bartlett, Pease & Agan, A. M. Coon, High School. Buy stamps at these stations," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"Elliot F. Baker has been appointed chairman of the Liberty Loan committee and with J. A. Leonard, Julius Platz, Raymond Schaefer, Leo Helfer, Merle Costello, Ralph Walsh, Harry Hoag and Carl Veeder will conduct the campaign in this district (Minoa)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"Arrangements have been made with Miss Gertrude Bower, state agent, for a demonstration here (Minoa) of the making of war bread. Mrs. E. Baker has been appointed chairman of the local food conservation committee," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"To accommodate those taking part in the play 'Somewhere in France,' which the women of St. Ann's parish (Manlius) will present Friday evening at Jamesville, a special car will leave Manlius at 3 p.m. and returning will leave Jamesville at 11 o'clock," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918

"The third Liberty Loan drive will open Sunday afternoon in Manlius with a meeting at Fowler Hall at 3:30. The speakers will be General William Verbeck, chairman of the local loan committee, Rev. E. B. Russell, Captain Harry F. Wilston of the Royal Flying Corps and Lieutenant Graham of the British Recruiting Mission all of whom have been service at the front and will tell of their experiences. Music will be furnished by St. John's band. If the day is pleasant a parade will be made by the local organizations. All the church bells will commence ringing at 3:15 and continue ringing until the opening of the meeting. The singing of patriotic songs will be a feature of the meeting. There will be no soliciting at the meeting," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"The S. Cheney & Son machine shop and the Scoville shop are busy on a war contract taken by the Globe Malleable Iron company of Syracuse to supply two million forged steel plugs for 75 millimeter guns for the U. S. government. The plugs are stamped out of red hot steel 4 at a time at the Globe Malleable plant and the work of threading the plugs is being done in eleven different plants. S. Cheney & Son are threading 1,000 and the Scoville company 500 daily. The plugs are for temporarily handling the shells having an eye in which a hook can be placed. Before the shell is inserted in the gun the plug is removed and the fuse inserted," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"Most of you know that books are being gathered and forwarded to the camps. But you don't know just how your own particular bunch is to be put into camp. Your Library Association will see that they are sent if you will see that the Library receives them from you. To make it convenient, as the library is open only six times a week, Mr. Hubert Ransier has offered to receive books at his (Manlius) store," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/12/1918.

"Trinity Church, Fayetteville. Third Sunday after Easter. There will be the usual service at 10:30 a.m., but as this is Liberty Loan Sunday there will be a special musical service at 5 o'clock when the Liberty anthem will be sung," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

"Fayetteville is preparing for a great drive next week in the Liberty Loan campaign. On Tuesday Edgar F. Brown of Syracuse will make short addresses in all of the factories, speaking at the Precision shops, the Stickley shops, the paper mill and the meat block factory. On Thursday evening a mass meeting will be held in school hall. Prominent Syracuse speakers and British soldiers from the front will speak. It is expected that music will be furnished by the Community Chorus," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

"A Liberty Loan meeting was held in Grange hall (Minoa) Tuesday evening. Elliott Baker, Principal of Minoa high school was chairman of the meeting," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

"Minoa reported Tuesday subscriptions of $8,000 as a result of a parade and meeting Monday night, at which Captain Featherston and Frederick V. Bruns spoke," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

"Inability to secure sufficient help caused the Waldorf Manufacturing company last week to close the (Manlius) branch which it had started in the bakery block. The fact that several Manlius women are earning $15 to $20 per week at the Precision Castings plants at Fayetteville where munitions are being made has discouraged women from attempting to become operators on shirt waists as the pay is not as large," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

"The third Liberty Loan drive was inaugurated auspiciously Sunday with an enthusiastic meeting at Fower hall (Manlius) in the afternoon when nearly $6,000 in bonds were subscribed for. Preceding the meeting there was a parade by St. John's cadets, accompanied by the school band, the Manlius band and Manlius firemen. General William Verbeck, chairman of the local committee, presided at the meeting which was addressed by Dr. John MacInnis of Syracuse, Captain Williston and Lieutenant Graham of the British recruiting office in Rochester, and Edgar F. Brown of Syracuse. Both Captain Williston and Lieutenant Graham told briefly of some experiences at the front and the crying need of help from America to win the war. They are now in this country endeavoring to interest recruits and those training for the army to take up aerial photography. Mr. Brown spoke unreservedly of almost unmentionable German atrocities and of the urgent need of the United States putting the loan across quickly as a protective measure. A feature of the meeting was several trench songs sung by the cadets of St. John's school just the same as the Sammies are now singing them in France. At the request of General Verbeck the large audience gave three rousing cheers for the loan, the army and the president," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/19/1918.

"Fayetteville is the twelfth village in the county to go over the top in the third Liberty Loan campaign. Minoa has gone over the top in the Liberty Loan, having exceeded its quota of $25,900 by raising $27,000 in subscriptions. Cadet D. Towbridge Ellman, 16 years old, is trying to make the Manlius Schools a 100 per cent school in the safe of thrift stamps. He has sold $700 worth of stamps to the faculty and student body and has resolved to make it $1,000 before the school year closes," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918.

"Fayetteville went over the top in the third Liberty Loan after a stirring patriotic meeting at school hall last evening during which $9,000 was subscribed. Wilbur M. Jones, chairman of the local committee, presided and stirring appeals to help the government were made by Rev. F. W. Betts and F. V. Bruns of Syracuse and Private Bob Tompkins of the Canadian forces. The audience sang patriotic songs and when the subscription blanks were passed around the necessary $9,000 was quickly subscribed...As usual Fayetteville factories have helped loyally in swelling the total of the village. At the Precision shops, where night and day forces are earning big money on war contracts $20,000 was subscribed; at the McIntyre Bro's. paper mill every employee subscribed and at the Stickley shops the men also subscribed liberally. Members of the Liberty Loan committees and the Red Cross are planning to participate in the big parade in Syracuse. Any willing to donate use of automobiles to carry the war workers and parents of boys in the service in the parade should advise W. M. Jones," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918.

"Up to Wednesday night $33,000 had been subscribed toward Manlius' quota of $51,700 in the third Liberty Loan," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918.

"S. Cheney & Son Labor Bulletin. Wanted: A few women core makers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/26/1918.

"Thrift stamp sales at the local post office aggregate $3,900," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918

Fifteen boys and two girls from the (Fayetteville) high school have enlisted in the U.S. Working Reserve and are doing farm work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918.

"James Bullard won a box of cigars offered by H. E. Ransier to the one who would obtain the most bond subscriptions during the open-air concert Tuesday evening," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918.

"Manlius Camp Modern Woodmen of American will go on record as the first Manlius lodge to purchase a Liberty Bond, the camp having purchased a fifty dollar bond at it's Wednesday evening meeting," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918.

"Employees of the S. Cheney & Son machine shop have made life so unpleasant for a socialist workman, who refused to buy a Liberty Bond that yesterday he decided that discretion was the better part of valor and he 'come across,' this morning," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918.

"Manlius has not only gone over the top in the third Liberty Loan campaign but it has gone so far over the top that it is grasping the stars. It already has one start to its credit for having doubled its quota of $51,700 and expects to have a second star before the campaign closes on Saturday night...Up to Wednesday night a total of $120,400 had been subscribed in Manlius. Of this amount $83,900 was subscribed at St. John's and $36,500 by citizens. Of the latter amount $5,000 was subscribed at S. Cheney & Son upper foundry," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/3/1918.

"Miss E. B. Beard of Fayetteville, state president, presided at the meeting of the Consumers' League held Saturday at Utica when measures for the protection of women workers were discussed. On account of the increased calls for women workers the League adopted standards based upon recommendations made by the Federal War Department and by the British Health of Munition Workers Committee..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918.

"Captain J. F. Proctor of the Canadian Royal Flying Corps is giving the cadets at St. John's School intensive training preparatory for entrance in the next officers' training camp at Plattsburg...some fifty cadets have received appointment to the training camp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918.

"A service flag with twenty stars in the form of a Roman cross was dedicated Monday night in St. Mary's (Minoa) church," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918.

"The total revised amount subscribed in Manlius in the Liberty Loan campaign is $164,650, of which $120,550 was subscribed at St. John's school and $44,100 by citizens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918.

"The post office department has decided to admit women to the civil service examinations for rural mail carriers during the war," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/17/1918.

"An Auxiliary of the Fayetteville branch of the American Red Cross has been organized," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

"Citizens of Fayetteville will give the six selects who go Sunday to training camp a fitting farewell tonight. After a dinner at the Village Inn a public reception will be given at 8 o'clock at Everingham hall. Addresses will be made by local speakers and music will be furnished by Fayetteville band. The boys who will be honored are Clayton Taylor, Peter Wein, Henry Sherwood, Walter Butler, Claude Benedict and Gideon Parsons, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

"Some forty core makers at the Cheney foundries walked out Wednesday when an Italian was put to work to succeed Henry Daniels who is called to the draft. Understanding that the Italian was to be taken out the men went to work this morning but when they found the Italian they again walked out," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

"13,000 troops are soon to be quartered at the camp on the Van Vleck road near Syracuse, according to a telegram received from the war department Wednesday in the city," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

"Edgar Paulsen, physical instructor at St. John's school, was ordered to buy $10 worth of thrift stamps by Justice Sutherland for riding his horse Friday night on the sidewalk in front of Ransier's drug store," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

"Nearly 100 boys and girls from Manlius high school are beginning gardens at the advice and under the director of the National War Garden Commission which has for its aim the utilization of every spare foot of land in every community that the year's output of food products may be greatly increased. Each pupil is supplied with a record book for the keeping of a complete record of all the expenditures, labor, sales, etc., in order that the experience will enable them to learn the value, not only of their time and efforts, but also the possibilities of such a venture. This is a worthy movement and it is hoped that the parents will do all in their power to encourage the efforts made. Prizes will be offered in the fall for the best results obtained," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/24/1918.

"Lucky dollar cards of four thrift stamps are now on sale at the tent opposite postoffice every day from 9 until 7. In order that Fayetteville meets its quota of $32,000 in the sale of war stamps it behooves every citizen to visit the booth early and often. Up to date $9,500 worth of stamps have been sold," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"Fayetteville now has only one meat market where a few weeks ago it had three. Owing to high price of meat the demand has decreased and A. G. Williams, George Ebeling and Charles Goodfellow have closed their markets leaving P. H. Costello's market the only market now open," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"Everingham hall was filled with the citizens Friday evening who gathered to do honor to the six boys who left ...for Camp with the first quota of the second contingent. Lieutenant McKinney of the Marine Recruiting Office in Syracuse, was the principal speaker and he gave a stirring patriotic address," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"County Board No. 2, which includes the town of Manlius, which has practically exhausted its Class 1 and will be forced to send into service registrants in Class 2 if another call is made, will appeal to the state adjutant general for relief and ask that it not be called upon to supply men in deferred class until all other boards in the county do. The district, which has an unusually large farm population, has sent to the various training camps all of its Class 1 men except fifteen. The bulk of the registrants in this district, being farmers, have been placed in Class 2-C, being given this deferment on account of their occupation. There are a few men in Class 1 who are farmers and who have been 'passed over' by the board in the selection of men ordered to camp. This rule came direct from the President and was compulsory. The board is worse off for available men than any other district in the entire county," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"Fayetteville Protestants and Catholics will unite Sunday evening in a War Flag service at the Church of Immaculate Conception in recognition of the patriotic Catholic young men of the parish, now in the army, navy or marine service. The service will be threefold: The blessing of the flag, an address and benediction of the sacrament and after the service the flag will be suspended from a wire elevated and fronting the church. There are about twenty-two Catholic young men of the parish now in service whose names will be read during the flag service...Catholics and non-Catholics are invited," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

" To keep pace with the general speeding up of the country, St. John's School is holding its graduating exercises this week--two weeks earlier than scheduled. The change in program was caused by the demand of the war department for more St. John's boys for the Reserve Officers' Training Camp which opens at Plattsburg next Tuesday. After first placing the quote from St. John's at 30, the number was increased by the department three times, as it was found some of the other six schools were unable to furnish their quotas, until now the quota has reached 96. The school, however, still has 24 more boys prepared to enter the camp if the government wants them. General Verbeck hopes that before the camp opens the quota may once more be raised so that every boy who has undergone the intensive course may be given permission to go. Forty-nine boys will graduate Friday from St. John's...a complete system of trenches has been constructed on the hills to the west of the main building, and here daily practice of going over the top, seizing the 'enemy trench,' and bayoneting dummies, has been held....The appointment by the War department of so many cadets at the Plattsburg camp is a high compliment to the Manlius schools, which are, in fact, the only preparatory institution East of the Mississippi and North of the Gulf of Mexico entitled to send men for the course," (R.O.T.C), The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"Manlius has practically raised its quota in the Red Cross drive which ended yesterday. The quota is based upon $1 per capita and as Manlius has a population of 1300 its quota was $1300. President Cheney estimates the local chapter has over $1,000 now on hand and the reports of all committees are not yet in," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"Manlius Band gave an open air concert Tuesday evening in front of the Fowler block for the purpose of assisting the Red Cross in selling tickets for the benefit play. The next regular concert will be given Saturday evening. As several of the band members are likely soon to leave in the draft it is very doubtful if the concerts will be continued the entire summer. The conductor, Ethan Caldwell, expects soon to be ordered in special work as draughtsman, having passed the physical examination Wednesday. Floyd Hoag, drum player, and Harry Thompson, clarinet player, expect to leave in the next draft. William P. Coates, trombone player leaves next week for Ohio. Charles Wright, a former trombone player, is already in service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"While nearly all the coremakers at the Cheney foundries are still out the strike seems to be nearing the end as several of the coremakers have openly expressed themselves as feeling that the walk-out was a little hasty. It is said at the office that the Italian to whom the men objected was a particularly capable workman and that there was no other workman capable at the time of filling the vacancy. At the request of the foreman the Italian had frequently worked extra hours nights to get out work and his staying at night had been misconstrued by the men who believed he was staying to 'hog' the work. A half dozen men are now at work in the core room and it is believed practically the entire force will be at work next week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"A new order issued from the state headquarters of the Red Cross will discontinue the custom of giving knitted articles and comfort kits to the draft contingents leave home. The reason assigned is that knitted articles are unnecessary during the summer and if given now will be worn out, lost or damaged by the time the articles are needed in the autumn," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/31/1918.

"Fayetteville has passed the halfway mark in the Thrift Stamp drive to reach the quote of $3,200 apportioned the village," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"Children's Day Service (Presbyterian-Baptist church, Fayetteville)...no more important service is held than that of the children. The offering outside the envelopes will go toward caring for the suffering children in the war zone. Give thought to the offering you make and let it represent a real interest in the little lives so full of tragedy...on Wednesday evening...a motion picture lecture on 'Canada, Our Ally in The War,' will be given in the church auditorium," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"Amount subscribed by the citizens of Fayetteville for farewell reception to the soldiers leaving for camp in September 1917...$52.00; to supper to supper for farewell reception $23,76; bal. turned over to W. M. Jones for safe keeping $28.24; Oct. 16, 1917 to Fayetteville band in payment for bandmaster used for reception 3.00; Jan. 12, 1917 to service flag 11.40; May 24, 1918 bal. on hand $13.84; May 24, 1918 subscriptions to meet deficit $6.67; supper for boys leaving May 25, 1918 $6.75; cigarettes for soldiers $7.20; printing of hand bills $2.00; donation to M. C. Everingham for use of hall and for burning of lights $2.00," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"The proposed absorbing of Fayetteville's War Chest by the County Defense Committee is most strenuously objected to by officers of the local committee which was organized as Red Cross Aid and War Relief of the third and fourth election districts of the town of Manlius...at a meeting of the officers of the Fayetteville Red Cross Aid and War Relief held yesterday resolutions were passed declaring it was to the best interests of the Fayetteville War Chest that the work be continued upon its present basis," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"Rev. Albert Fitch of Berkeley, Cal., who is on his way home from England where he has been serving in a Y. M. C. A. camp, was a guest of his cousin, Chester R. Eaton (Fayetteville). Mr. Fitch gave an interesting talk on his experiences in work at the monthly supper Wednesday evening at the Baptist church. Mr. Fitch says this country has failed to awaken to the necessity of the conservation of food. The situation in England he says is becoming acute. For a year past he says he has not had one good meal. All non-essentials in the way of food have long ago been dispensed with and only food essential to life is to be had and all of this in quantities carefully limited by the card plan," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"Over 500 attended the service flag dedication service at the Church of the Immaculate Conception Sunday night, nearly half the large congregation being Protestants who omitted services at their churches to attend...The (service) flag was carried from the rectory to the sanctuary by six children preceded by Corporal Harry Goodfellow carrying the national colors. R. B. Hayes Post, G. A. R., attended in a body, nine members being present. After the service the flag was suspended between the church and street. The flag ordered by the committee of the parish failed to arrive in time to use on the occasion and the one used was made by ladies of the church. It contains thirty-three stars representing the members of the parish now in service. The stars on the flag are for the following young men now in service: Dr. Maurice Evans, Dr. Lester P. Crowe, Leonard Kantak, Arthur Gaugel, Paul Gaugel, William Keefe, Thomas Kelley, Charles O'Brien, Henry Liegel, Louis Motsiff, Joseph Wein, Clayton Taylor, Harry Goodfellow, Harold Kane, Francis Evans, Herbert Coakley, Francis Clear, Daniel Kinsella, Francis Stucey, John Powell, John Enders, Carl Enders, Ludwig Enders, Frank Call, Peter Wein, Daniel Gallagher, John Bracken, James Cahill, Joe Brown, Leonard Gaudio, Patrick Buggle, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"Red Cross and War Relief received and expended from Sept. 1917 to June 1st, 1918: Received $1506.75," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"According to government experts there is now only enough wool in the United States to allow each man a suit once in four years," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"A subscription is being taken for the purchase and maintenance of a community service flag. The matter is in the hands of Jessie Leonard of the home service committee and subscriptions will be received at his store in North Main street (Minoa)," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/7/1918.

"Manager Pike has offered to donate the Groveland Theater (Fayetteville) for Tuesday and Wednesday evenings of next week to the Red Cross. Special feature films will be furnished and the entire receipts turned over to the local chapter," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"Fleets of heavily loaded canal boats leased by the government, are daily being conveyed through Oneida lake along the north shore," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"Red Cross and War Relief work has constituted a great deal of the work of the Domestic Science school (Fayetteville) this year. By their self-sacrifice in devoting their spare time to sewing, the girls have made it possible for seventy refugees to have warm, comfortable clothing during the winter. A number of hospital shirts have also been completed. Conservation, both in food and clothing, has been the basis of the work all through the year. A large number of conservative dishes, together with cakes and cookies, have been successfully tried. The various new war breads have been especially successful, as the ladies who have attended the exhibits testify. In the sewing department, also, the girls have manifested a spirit of patriotism, and a knowledge of economy. Nearly every girl has remodeled at least one old dress during the year, with very satisfactory results, and the entirely new dresses which the girls have made are characterized by simplicity and good workmanship," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"Fayetteville citizens pledged themselves to buy approximately $20,000 worth of thrift stamps during the year at the meeting Friday night at school hall...the total pledges made Friday night in the town of Manlius amounted to $31,072, divided as follows: Fayetteville high school, W. E. McIntyre, com., $20,000; Manlius high school, S. C. Cheney, com., $6,000; Minoa high school, Elliott Baker, com., $3,582; Kirkville high school, E. K. Vedder, com., $1,490. Supervisor W. C. Hunt is in charge of the War Stamps work in the town," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"Children's Day service last Sunday (Presbyterian-Baptist) was beautiful. The offering for Syrian and Armenian Relief Fund was $116.85," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"Fayetteville Methodism is to be congratulated on its loyal support of the War Emergency Fund," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"The second annual Fayetteville Foresters Minstrels--Everingham hall...under the management of Chas. T. Fales of Chittenango. Mr. Fales is the man who put the big show on last year and he has added many new features to the program this year. Part of the proceeds are for the Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"Soldiers and sailors when on furlough and traveling at their own expense are hereafter to be granted a railroad rate of 'approximately one cent per mile,' " The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"The total pledges made Friday night in the town of Manlius amounted to $31,072, divided as follows: Fayetteville, $20,000; Manlius, $6,000; Minoa, $3,582; Kirkville, $1,490," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/14/1918.

"The War Chest Boosting Car entertained a large crowd at Genesee Park (Fayetteville) ...last night. The program opened by the chorus of Red Cross girls singing America. Nicholas Peters who was in charge of the car introduced Sapper Boucher and Harry Skerritt both of whom gave short appeals to the people to give to the War Chest. Supervisor Hunt also gave a short talk. Solos were rendered by members of the chorus who were accompanied by a mandolin quartet. A number from here followed the War Chest car by trolley and automobiles to Manlius where another appeal was made. Here the crowd was fully as large as at Fayetteville," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918.

"The entire town of Manlius has now been organized for the Syracuse and Onondaga War Chest drive. While the quotas for the various villages of the town have not been apportioned it is understood that they will be based on $12 per capita per year for each man, woman or child over 16 years of age..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918.

"The thrift stamp sale at the (Manlius) high school now totals $1,283.75. All but three are now 100 per cent thrift stamp rooms, that is, every pupil having purchased at least one thrift stamp," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918.

"Mr. H. A. Van DeMyer, the new pastor of the (Manlius) Presbyterian church, has organized a boys' military unit, which will take the place of the Boy Scout organization which was recently disbanded," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/21/1918.

"Onondaga county has 6,000 men with the colors; but the deaths among them are fewer than the losses here at home in automobile and drowning accidents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918.

Among the numerous orations at the commencement of Manlius high school were: The Council of National Defense," "America's War Aims," and "Woman's Work in the War." The valedictorian, Clarence Anguish, was introduced by Mr. Newton but did not take part as he had left school in the spring when the call came to help on the farms...The address was made by Attorney H. H. Skerritt of Syracuse...The enthusiasm and patriotism of the speaker were truly contagious. He told of the great battles of history, its great men and women and how they had been influenced by duty. He pictured most vividly the present world crisis and the duty of each loyal citizen at this time, showing how international duty would be a factor in world destiny. Mr. Newton presented the diplomas in behalf of the Board of Education, after which he presented the Board with two liberty bonds of $100 each, which were purchased by the pupils and teachers of the school in the second liberty loan. Mr. Newton explained how these bonds had been paid for from small contribution and how it had been planned that at some future time the money should be used to help decorate assembly hall...Mr. Newton explained the many war projects in which the students have been interested the past year...the orchestra and audience joined in the Star Spangled Banner...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918.

"For the first time in a decade Fayetteville will have no Fourth of July celebration this year...the many drives for liberty loan, Red Cross, War Chest, etc., had practically exhausted the purses and energies of our citizens and what would be most enjoyed on the Fourth would be a quiet rest," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/28/1918.

"S. S. Frost evidently believes one can show their patriotism even in the selection of a car, as evidenced by his purchase of a Liberty car," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

"McIntyre Bros. are preparing to install a new 100-horse power water wheel which will aid in conserving coal the coming winter," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

Precision Castings (of Fayetteville builds a new plant at Pontiac, MI to replace one destroyed by fire..."With the completion of the new foundry at Pontiac, work will be rushed on government orders for bronze castings to be used in the manufacture of naval and anti-aircraft guns," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

Red Cross report of Fayetteville Branch for June 1918. Amount turned in $1204.38," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

"The War Chest made a great showing in this vicinity (Mycenae). There is a star in every home but three," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

"Manlius draft registrants who changed to Class 1 in the recent reclassification include Dennison Richburg, Ivan Cooper, John Millis and Edward Tuttle," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/5/1918.

"Sugar cards for canning have been received by the local grocers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/11/1918.

"The new fight or work rule has somewhat relieved the shortage of labor at local factories. At the Precision shops now can be seen bell hops from the Onondaga, clerks from city stores and a private secretary, all having to run machinery they never before heard of," The Manlius Eagle," 7/11/1918.

"Colonel W. C. Hunt, who was in charge of the County War Chest here in the town of Manlius says that according to latest tabulation the total subscribed in the town is over $30,000. Of this amount Fayetteville subscribed $12,982; Manlius, $8,178; Minoa, $2,225; Kirkville, $1,360 and North Manlius $1,080. The amount subscribed by the N. Y. Central employees in the Minoa yards which is to be added to the Minoa subscription has not been reported to him," The Manlius Eagle, 7/11/1918.

Fuel Administrator Garfield fearing fuel failure in winter, curtails fuel use. Four dark nights a week for Northeastern States, including New York, is declared, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 7/26/1918.

"War stamp sales at the local postoffice (Fayetteville) amounted to $2,500 during the month of August. Altogether over $9,000 worth of stamps have been sold at the Fayetteville Office," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918.

"The Thrift Kitchen (Fayetteville) has now on sale canned beans, beets, Swiss chard and carrots," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918.

"A feature of the (Fayetteville Grange) program will be a patriotic song entitled "Democracy," which was written by Mrs. Della M. Perkins (of Fayetteville) and dedicated to Fayetteville Grange, which will be sung Saturday for the first time in public," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918.

Red Cross report receipts turned into Chapter to July 1, 1918 $1353.48; including other proceeds, total to date $1453.48, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/2/1918.

"A chorus of ten young ladies from Manlius, who appear in the costume of Red Cross Nurses, and sing war songs, aid in the attractiveness of meetings, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

"Girls for the Nurses' Reserve must be between 19 and 35, unmarried, in good health. They will be given three years' preliminary training in hospitals overseas in this country before going overseas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918

"Mrs. George F. Butts, who has been appointed chairman of the Committee for the town of Manlius for obtaining enlistments for the United States Students Nurse Reserve, has arranged for a week's recruiting campaign that will cover the entire town...Forty-two young women have been recruited in the nurse drive in Syracuse, and as the quota fixed for this county is 130, 88 nurses are yet to be enlisted...Girls for the Nurses' Reserve must be between 19 and 35, unmarried, in good health. They will be given three years' preliminary training in hospitals in this country before going overseas. The nurses who enlist during the drive will not be allowed to go overseas until they have been trained in the hospitals on this side. They will, however, it is stated, be doing patriotic service, since every recruit enlisted in the county during the drive will release one nurse for service overseas, as well as to help in lessening the shortage of nurses which authorities say is inevitable," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

"Last Sunday evening the Methodist church (Fayetteville) honored itself as well as its boys in khaki by unfurling its service flag presented by the Sunday school. Stars appear representing the following names: Allen Woodworth, Gas Defense Service; Jasper Goodfellow, Navy; Arthur Hughson, Camp Dix; Alfred L. Coe, Buffalo Technical Training; Ernest Colton, Camp Meade, Technical; Ambrose Leach, Navy; Ernest Leach, Navy; George Edwards, Camp Dix; Walter Butler, Camp Dix; Harold Richer, drafted. To these are already added the names of Paul Baum who has enlisted in the Heavy Artillery at Fort Slocum and Floyd Stanard, who has gone to Camp Syracuse," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

"Fayetteville always does it share to help the boys as is shown by the July report of the War Chest. There are already 668 subscribers and during July the treasurer, Mrs. M. C. Everingham, has turned in to headquarters $1,069.00, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

"All subscribers to the War Chest are enrolled as members of the Red Cross and the first dollar paid, pays their membership fees to the Red Cross, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

"The five War Chest treasurers reported a total of $2,764 collected in the town of Manlius up to August 1," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

"Observance of federal regulations governing wheatless days in hotels, restaurants and other public eating places were discontinued Wednesday by Huntington B. Crouse, deputy food administrator. Under recently revised regulations, hotels, restaurants and public eating places must not serve to any one person at any meal more than two ounces of Victory bread or rolls, or four ounces of muffins...There still remain restrictions on the use of wheat flour, not more than six pounds to be used by one person during the month. The two-pound per capita basis for the use of granulated and other forms of sugar will hold during the month, the regulations state. Restaurants and other public places will be permitted two pounds for every ninety meals served. Under no circumstances will they be permitted to replenish their supply. It is not expected that the rule on buying equal amount of wheat flour and substitutes will be changed for some time," The Fayetteville

Bulletin, 8/9/1918." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/9/1918.

"The Fort Stanwix Canning company (Fayetteville, formerly Merrell-Soule) have an order for 30,000 cases of peas for the U. S. Navy. The local factory expects to furnish the navy about twenty-five per cent of its pack," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/16/1918

"The retirement of W. J. Harvie as manager of the Suburban railroad will be regretted...while Mr. Harvie has shown a willingness to build up a better road he has been badly handicapped by war conditions that have resulted in lack of patronage and consequent lack of funds," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918.

"Sugar cards, which entitle the head of a household to the purchase of two pounds of sugar per month for each member of the family are now in use at all the local stores," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918.

"5,000 attend the Farmers' Picnic at Suburban Park...the passing of the horse is noted in the fact that 606 automobiles were counted at one time on the grounds while less than 100 horses were in the hitching space. A few years ago a half dozen men were required to look after the horses which were hitched almost the entire length of the grove...A Canadian sergeant, who said he was wounded and sent home, gave a talk from the band stand, telling of a few things he had seen over there. The talk he said was for the benefit of the Red Cross but at the close he took up a collection for himself," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/30/1918.

"Manlius Red Cross knitters are requested to finish and return all articles they have made together with all unused yarn the first week in September," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/23/1918.

"Fayetteville Red Cross receipts to August 1, 1918, total to date $1516.44. Most of the contributions of money for the month have been given by the young people and children of the community. They have sold flowers, ice cream, lemonade and pop-corn and their efforts have netted the Red Cross over $30.00," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918.

"Mrs. C. E. Plampin, chairman of the Fayetteville Branch of the Syracuse Chapter of the American Red Cross, has had instructions to appoint a chairman for the Home Service Section to represent Fayetteville. The work of this section of the Red Cross is being developed to fit each locality. In general, the Home Service aims to maintain close contact with households of men absent in service. The objects are to assure soldiers' families of correct information in details of proper address for mail and parcels, and to be 'clearing house' for advice and assistance to those 'over here' who find themselves confronted with unfamiliar problems," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918.

"According to a new rule of the war industries which is expected to result in conserving paper no publisher can continue subscriptions after three months after date of expiration unless subscriptions are renewed and paid...The order reducing the amount of print paper that may be used by weekly newspapers by 15 per cent has been prepared by the pulp and paper section of the war industries board and will be effective September 15th," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918.

"Saint John's School will open on September 19 with the largest registration in its history...dearth of teachers is the problem now confronting General Verbeck," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/6/1918.

"Manlius Branch of Red Cross is having a fine new service flag made for the village and wants the names of all the young men of Manlius who have answered their country's call. Relatives are requested to leave names with Postmaster Costello," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/13/1918.

"St. John's School opened Thursday with 365 cadets, the largest enrollment in the history of the school. Last year the total enrollment was 300. For the past two weeks General Verbeck says an average of ten applicants a day have been turned away,"" The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918.

"Mrs. E. A. Plampin, president of the local branch of the Red Cross has sent out circular letters to the women of Fayetteville telling them of the urgent need of more clothing for French and Belgian refugees and urging them to greater effort," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918.

"Washington dispatches announce that the War Department will abandon the recruit camp at Syracuse temporarily. If the war continues it will re-open next spring. The purpose is to discontinue it for the winter or cold season as it did last year about the middle of October. It is not intended to abandon the camp, however, while the war lasts," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918.

"Chief Bullard counted only 50 cars passing through Manlius on the last Gasless Sunday and less than a dozen of these were owned in Manlius," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/20/1918.

"The National Thrift Bags for War Relief Work have been distributed throughout the community, and will be gathered up next Monday," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918.

"In a letter to one of his chums, one of the Manlius boys in France gives an insight into fighting other things than Boches. A part of the letter follows: Since I have left home I have done some traveling and seen some country and I guess I will see a lot more of it if I have good luck. I was not in England very long but saw a few of the large cities while I was there. I have covered a lot of ground while in France. It is quite a sight at first to go through cities and towns and see all the buildings of stone or plaster and the tile or thatched roofs but it does not take very long before one gets used to such things. After being up in the lines for some time we came back Thursday morning to a rest camp. This is the first American camp I have been in since I left the States. Since we left the (B. E. F.) sector there has been a small Y. M. C. A. (in a barn) where one can buy chocolate, tobacco, matches, etc. (when they have them) but here they have a regular place, moving picture shows, etc. The fellows move up in the lines for a time and then come to this rest camp for a few days. The band plays here every day, baseball games, some kind of entertainment every night, so you can see it is quite a place. A certain bunch of fellows stay here all the time and have sort of a stock company to make fun for the soldiers. Friday I went to a delousing station to get rid of the cooties. Most of us had them, and believe me, they are small but they get there just the same. We marched down to the place and first checked everything we had in our pockets and each man got a number. We went then in another room and picked out our place by the number and at each place was a bag to put every thing we had on in except our shoes. All the bags were gathered up and put in a large vat and a high pressure of steam was turned on in the vat. We were then marched in another room to take a shower bath. Here they have a real bath, (I will not tell you when the real bath before that was). In the B. E. F. sector the water was turned on for five minutes and then shut off, the men turned out in the room where their clothes were and another bunch sent in. When I was there I was almost afraid to put soap on myself for I was afraid the time would be up and the water turned off and there I would be covered with soap standing like September Morn and no water around. Here it was different. We had good lot of water for twenty minutes. We went then in another room and waited about ten minutes and our clothes were taken out of the vat and given us. The clothes were one mass of wrinkles but the cooties were dead so we did not care how we looked. It is a common sight to see the fellows 'reading' their shirts," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918.

"Manlius quota for the Fourth Liberty Loan has been placed at $53,700, but after having trebled its allotment of $651,700 in the last loan the committee has no more idea of stopping when it gets this amount than the Manlius boys have of stopping when they reach the Rhine. Chairman Charles A. Phillips and practically the same corps of workers, who proved so successful under General Verbeck in the last loan are going to put the quota over and Manlius citizens again show that they will back the boys across so that in the end the world may be made a decent place to live in...Mrs. Lee, chairman of the ladies' committee," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918.

"Syracuse University has been selected by the War Department as a station for a Student's Army Training Corps during the coming college year. Captain Clifford A. Gross, infantry, U. S. A., has been assigned as commanding officer of the Corps and is now enlisting men between 18 and 45 years of age, who have completed a high school course or its equivalent and are physically qualified for general or limited military service...They will be granted the advantages of a period of University training coupled with the requisites of military science, which will in all probability make them eligible for commissions in the United States army shortly. Classes in the University begin on October 1st. Courses in military science will be started at the same time, and all enlisted in the corps will on that date become soldiers of the United States Army. They will be under strict military discipline and required to live in barracks and eat at a common mess at the expense of the government. Tuition expenses of men enlisted in the corps will be paid by the government and in addition each member will be paid $30 per month by the War Department. Members of the corps will be required to study under supervision and must complete 12 hours of military drill weekly," The Manlius Eagle, 9/26/1918.

"The annual inspection of Manlius Fire Department will be held Tuesday afternoon, October 8. During the exercises the new village service flag being made by the Red Cross workers will be raised and addresses will be made by prominent speakers. There will be over 50 stars on the flag representing young men in Election Districts Nos. 1 and 2 who are now in the service," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"The Red Cross has arranged for a barrel for receiving peach pits saved by citizens to be placed at M. H. Doyle's store (Fayetteville). The peach pits are for use in making carbon for gas masks," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"Military training for boys 16 to 18, as required by law, will be commenced in Fayetteville next week. Irving D. Perry has been appointed training instructor by the State Military Commission and he will give instruction for hour and a half periods one night each week in accordance with the Commission's manual of training. The law is compulsory for all boys between 16 and 18. While the law went into effect last year it was found impossible to make it effective at once and training was commenced in only a few places," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"St. John's School at Manlius has been designated as one of the Central Officers Training camps in this part of the state, and men will soon be sent for training. Announcement to this effect was made Thursday by the Selective Service Headquarters at Albany, which headed by Major F. S. Hutchinson, takes complete charge of the work formerly under the jurisdiction of the adjutant general," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"The Fourth Liberty Loan will be ushered in tonight at 8:30 by the ringing of all the church bells in the county. At the street corners in all villages there will be a display of red fire or the flare of torches. At the same time copies of the Stars and Stripes, the paper being published by the boys at the front, will be placed in every home. A meeting of the local committee will also be held at the high school to complete the details of the drive which starts tomorrow and lasts ten days. Fayetteville's quota for the Fourth Loan is almost double that of the last loan, its allotment this time being $73,500 while in the third loan it was $46,700. In the second loan its quota was $136,700, but how the village came to be given this large amount was never fully explained to the committee...The total quota for the town of Manlius is $22,600 divided as follows: Fayetteville, $73,500; Manlius $73,500; Minoa, $44,500; Kirkville, $18,900, North Manlius, $12,200," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"Because of epidemics of Spanish influenza in army camps, provost Marshal-General Crowder yesterday canceled calls for the entrainment between October 7 and 11 of 142,000 draft registrants. During the twenty-four hours ending at noon today, 6,139 new cases of influenza in army camps had been reported to the office of the surgeon-general of the army. One hundred and seventy deaths, resulting chiefly from pneumonia following influenza, and 723 new cases of pneumonia also were reported," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"Syracuse is in the grip of the epidemic now sweeping the entire country. Within forty-eight hours, up to Thursday night, twenty-two deaths were reported among the soldiers at the selective service camp. One hundred twelve new cases at the camp developed Wednesday, such serious complications that the patients were removed to Syracuse hospitals, already over-crowded with soldier patients in cots set up in every available inch of room. Seven hundred and forty-two soldiers are being cared for in four hospitals with the staffs in constant fear that the number would be increased with no place to put the new-comers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"The Patriotic Nine, a (Minoa) band of Red Cross juniors, has rented the village hall and engaged Remlinger's orchestra for a social on October 4 for the benefit of the Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"Miss Mildred Goodelle, chairman of the women's committee of the fourth liberty loan campaign (Minoa), has appointed the following captains: Mrs. Grace Brown, Mrs. Grover Lavier, Mrs. Nellie Burns, Mrs. Glenn Edwards and Miss Katherine C. O'Brien. Elliott E. Baker, chairman of the men's committee, has appointed as captains, Joseph Strodel, Jesse A. Leonard, P. C. Thomas, Grant Goodelle and Elmer Harter," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"The home service committee (Minoa) has been appointed by the Red Cross to take care of the interests of absent soldiers and sailors and to give information to their parents and dependents," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"The Patriotic Nine, a band of Red Cross juniors, has rented the village hall (Minoa) and engaged Remlinger's orchestra for a social on October 4 for the benefit of the Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/27/1918.

"Syracuse University has been selected by the War Department as a station for a Student's Army Training Corps during the coming college year," The Manlius Eagle," 9/27/1918.

"Dr. Bryan, village health officer, estimates that there are over sixty cases of influenza in Fayetteville and immediate vicinity but that few of the cases are serious. Only three cases in which pneumonia developed have thus far proved fatal...Mrs. Adah Thrall is seriously ill with pneumonia at her home in Spring street. When the influenza broke out in Camp Syracuse Mrs. Thrall volunteered her services and served as nurse at the Crouse-Irving hospital where she contracted the same disease..." The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Buy bonds before it's verboten," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Fayetteville is fast climbing to the top in the Fourth Liberty Loan, having already $60,000 of its quota of $71,500 subscribed. Every factory has already reported 100 per cent. At the Precision shops the 183 day employees have subscribed $12,000 and the 63 night employees have subscribed $5,050. The 48 employees of the L. & J. G. Stickley shops have subscribed $2,800 and the McIntyre Bro's. Paper Company and the Fort Stanwix factories are also 100 per cent. An enthusiastic meeting was held Wednesday night at school hall when the liberty Car entertainers with the Camp Syracuse band were present...Three soldiers back from the front on account of wounds were present but were unable to talk much. One of the soldiers who had been gassed, and who attempted to talk toppled over in a faint but soon recovered. Enthusiastic meetings were also held at the Precision and Stickley shops Wednesday when Hal Fitzimmons, champion riveter of the world, drove home facts connected with the war and the necessity of subscribing to the loan," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Before our next issue we (The Fayetteville Bulletin) expect to remove the names of all subscribers from our list who are over three months in arrears in accordance with ruling of the War Industries Board," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"At the (Minoa) Red Cross meeting Wednesday the following women were appointed to solicit for the Red Cross linen shower: Mrs. M. J. Sullivan, Mrs. Anna Woolever, Mrs. P. C. Thomas, Mrs. Ella Long, Mrs. Julius Platz, Miss Jennie Edgerton and Miss Celia Graves. Each householder is expected to contribute at least one piece. The linen is for use in Red Cross hospitals," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Residents of Minoa filled the school building Tuesday night and waxed enthusiastic over the fourth liberty loan. Subscriptions for $6,300 bonds were taken," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Dr. E. B. Merwin, Manlius village health officer, estimates that there are sixty cases of influenza in Manlius and nearby. At present he is the only physician on duty and his time is more than occupied," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

" 'The Liberty Four submarine car was accorded an enthusiastic welcome in Manlius last night. The Syracuse Recruit band accompanied the car and furnished music during the evening. Previous to the arrival of the car St. John's band entertained the large crowd with a short concert in front of the Fowler block...a chorus sang the new Syracuse song hit, 'Hit for Victory," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"While sickness and bad weather has somewhat delayed the work in the Liberty Loan drive in Manlius the workers intend to hasten work the next few days. On Wednesday Hal Fitzimmons, champion riveter of the world, spoke at the Cheney foundries and at the Solvay quarries. Superintendent E. E. McDowell with an auto load of singers and speakers was at the high school the same day. At St. John's school an active canvass is being made and the cadets have been urged by General Verbeck to send to their parents for subscriptions in order to stimulate the work. General Verbeck will give the boy who secures the most subscriptions the gold medal of the Order of the Phoenix which is the highest honor conferred at the school, to the second highest the Silver Phoenix and to the third, fourth, fifth and sixth certificates of honorable mention," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Curtiss are ill with the influenza at their home in Pleasant street (Manlius). Dr. Curtiss has been ordered to report for medical service in the army the last of the week, but it is not likely that he will be able to go. A petition signed by leading citizens, asking that the Doctor be exempted from military duty, and allowed to continue his home practice, which includes the medical oversight of the Manlius Schools, has been sent to the war department. The only remaining village physician, Dr. E. B. Merwin, has received his questionnaire and looks for a call at any time. This threatens to leave the community with no doctor at all," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"The Red Cross rooms will be open during October on Tuesdays, Wednesday and Thursdays. Yarn for knitted articles has now arrived and is ready to be given out. All knitted articles should be returned to Mrs. F. G. Lee next week. An inventory of all work and materials is required every month by the Syracuse chapter before materials are issued," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918

"Local autoists who would favor 'gasoline cards,' with a stated ration of 'juice' for their use, to the 'gasless Sundays,' must abide by the present regulations," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Washington, Oct. 1-The Senate today refused to grant the request of the president that the woman suffrage resolution be passed as a war measure. After five days of bitter debate, corridor conferences and cloak room negotiations, the Susan B. Anthony federal amendment, enacted by the House last January, received on the final call two votes less than the necessary two-thirds majority. Fifty-four senators were recorded for suffrage and thirty against it, with twelve absent...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Fayetteville went over the top with whoop in the Fourth Liberty Loan this week, being credited by the War Committee with $100,650 worth," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

" 'The Liberty Four' submarine car was accorded an enthusiastic welcome in Manlius last night. The Syracuse Recruit band accompanied the car and furnished music during the evening. Previous to the arrival of the car St. John's band entertained the large crowd with a short concert in front of the Fowler block...Francis Saunders...and a chorus sang the new Syracuse song hit, 'Hit for Victory,' the audience joining in the chorus. The entertainment concluded with the singing of The Star Spangled Banner," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/4/1918.

"Liberty Loan workers thus far have raised two-third of Minoa's quota. They are not discouraged, however, and will recanvass their territory if necessary. Some men earning over $5 per day have disposed of the matter by claiming all their earnings are necessary to meet coming expenses," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

"The four children of Joseph Morel have earned $5 this week for the Red Cross Chapter by the sale of candy and gum," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/11/1918.

"...Manlius is on the way over the top in the loan drive. Already over $25,000 has been subscribed by citizens of the village and $25,500 is pledged at St. John's School. Many cadets who have appealed to their parents for subscriptions have not yet received replies," 10/11/1918.

" 'In my pocket I have my registration card which places me in Class 1. I have waived all rights to exemption and stand ready to go if my country needs me.' This statement from Senator J. Henry Walters, candidate for majority leader in the Legislature...brought forth much applause during his address Tuesday afternoon at the annual inspection of Manlius fire department and unfurling of the village service flag. The exercises and fine weather drew out a large crowd from the country round as well as from the village. After the parade on the principal streets of the village by the fire department with apparatus, and Manlius band Village President, Horace Laning, at the reviewing stand introduced General Verbeck as chairman of the day. After a brief patriotic talk regarding the Manlius men in service and the requirements of army life General Verbeck introduced Senator Walters. The Senator spoke of the great work the Americans were doing on the battle front and what the world owed America for its part in the war. He also spoke of what we owed the boys over there and the backing and honor that should be accorded them by every patriotic citizen. After the exercises a demonstration of the chemical engine was given in the rear of the village hall where a huge bon fire was started and then quickly extinguished. A meeting of those living outside the corporation who might be interested in protection offered by motor fire apparatus to help in its purchase failed to elicit any interest and it is likely that if motor apparatus is purchased it will have to be bought by and used for the village alone. Following is a list of the men represented by the 56 blue stars, three gold stars, one silver star and triangle on the service flag which now floats across the street: Horace E. Ellis, Howard Scanlon, Carrol S. Adams, Russell C. Randall, Leslie D. Myers, Waite A. Cross, Henry Tyler (gold), Jay Cross (gold) George Steltzner, Hubert Mitchell, Frank Call, Daniel Mitchell, Earl Steltzner, Willis Farnham, F. D. Richburg, Edwin P. Goodfellow, Coburn E. Goodfellow, John Bracken, Leslie Lancefield, Ross H. Van Dooser, George H. Van Dooser, Floyd Muckey, John Enders, Raymond Hayes, Francis Fulmer, John J. Hale, Jr., Walter LaGrange, Raymond Balsley, Howard Barnum, Walter Cheney, Jr., John P. Cheney, Archie Van Patten (gold), Harold J. Alexander, Francis Evans, Maurice Evans, Giles P. Miller, Floyd Hoag, Hubert Butts (silver), Willard Butts, Earl Combs, Eric L. Coan, Rev. Chas. R. Vickery (triangle), Fred Klock, Harry Durston, Louis Kimball, David Kennel, Leonard Kantak, Guido Verbeck, Burt Boyle, Michael Ruddy, Fred H. Joynt, Dr. R. M. Ballantyne, Willard Estes, Lloyd Leonard, Dr. C. E. Curtiss, Lewis Doyle, John Millis (silver), Frank Battle, T. R. Granger," The Fayetteville Bulletin," 10/11/1918.

"Supervisor Hunt today announced that he believe that the town of Manlius is over the top, $220,850 having been reported by the committees of the different villages while the quota for the entire town is $222,600. In addition to the amount reported by the committees there is a large amount yet to be credited to the town by workers in city factories from Manlius and Fayetteville who have subscribed in the city with the understanding their home town will receive credit," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918.

"Huntington B. Crouse, county food administrator, has received the new set of table rules that go into effect October 21, and they are to be adhered to in all public eating places where good taste and patriotism are recognized as essential as good service...First -This is the rule that requires 20 per cent of wheat flour substitutes in bread, and not more than two ounces of it to one person at a meal, or four ounces of other bread such as corn and rye. Second - Toast as a garniture or under meat cannot be served. Third - No bread shall be served until after the first course, no nibbling on bread while you wait for something else to eat. Fourth - Only one kind of meat at a meal. Fifth - No bacon as a garniture. Sixth - Only a half ounce of butter to each person. Seventh - Only a half ounce of American cheese to each person. Eighth - No sugar bowl on the table and only one teaspoonful of sugar to a person at a meal. Ninth - Only two pounds of sugar to be used for every ninety meals served, except such sugar as allowed hotels having a bakery license. Tenth - No food shall be burned and all refuse must be saved to feed animals or render into fats. Eleventh - No food to be displayed so that it may spoil. Twelfth - No double cream or cream containing more than 20 per cent of butter fat to be served. In addition to the twelve 'general orders' there are other suggestions. The 'fourth meal' such as suppers, luncheons, teas and banquets are condemned as unnecessary. Attention is directed to the conservation of all cereals, coffee and ice, and people are urged to use more fresh vegetables and fruits. Reduction of the use of china, linen and silver is urged for labor saving and, wherever possible, food is to be served on one plate, eliminating side dishes. All hotel menus must be in plain English actually describing food, the order says," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918.

"Syracuse Chapter of Red Cross is in great need of towels for the army; hand towels, 18 by 30 inches, bath towels, 19 by 38 inches. Every household should give one or more in this worthy drive. Manlius Red Cross rooms which have been closed during the epidemic will be open Tuesday to receive the towels contributed by citizens," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918.

"Village Fuel Administrator E. D. Smith has received the following announcement from Delos W. Cooke, New York State Fuel Administrator: 'On account of the extraordinary demands of the War Department for stove and chestnut coal for use in camps and cantonments, anthracite in chestnut and stove sizes has already become so scarce that other sizes must be substituted. It will be impossible for mine operators and shippers to supply the trade with the usual percentage of egg, stove, chestnut and pea sizes of anthracite. Retail dealers will have to take and pass on to their customers a larger proportion of egg and pea in place of the usual amount of stove and chestnut. Local fuel administrators are authorized to restrict the sale of coal to those residing outside of established cities, towns or villages and who have either standing or cut wood available for fuel purposes. You are requested to issue such instructions to local coal dealers in this respect so as to restrict the sale of coal in accordance with this general principal. It is felt that the use of wood instead of coal is the patriotic duty of those who have wood available...," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918.

"The American Red Cross has undertaken for the Government the collection of peach seeds, plum pits, cherry pits, prune pits, and other kinds of fruit pits as well as nut shells of all kinds. Two hundred peach seeds or seven pounds of nut shells will make enough carbon to furnish one gas mask. There is a shortage of carbon at the present time and every one is asked to save every nut shell and every pit. The pits should be dried. In all the stores in the village (Fayetteville) will be found receptacles for the deposit of the above mentioned necessities. It is necessary for everybody to save these very important carbon materials so that our boys may have gas masks fully supplied with the carbon to combat the German gas," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918.

""The federal food administration has revised existing rules governing the sale of sugar to consumers. While these still permit two pounds per person per month, they restrict the sale to one pound at a time. Thus, per individual, one pound may be purchased between the 1st and 15th of the month and the other pound between the 15th and the 30th," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/18/1918.

"Town $104,000 Over The Top...Fayetteville quota 73,500 subscriptions 127,500; Manlius quota 73,500, subscriptions 116,150; Minoa quota 44,500; subscriptions 50,900; Kirkville quota 18,900, subscriptions 19,150; N. Manlius quota 12,200, subscriptions 12,550 = $326,300 in subscriptions. The total number of subscribers to the Loan in Manlius outside of St. John's school is 363...employees of S. Cheney & Son subscribed $10,800 and St. John's School, entire, subscribed $77,000," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918.

Influenza seems as rampant in Manlius as ever and resulting pneumonia is claiming its victims every day. Dr. E. B. Merwin, village health officer, finds cases continue to increase and does not believe that it will be advisable to lift the ban on churches, schools and public gatherings for some time yet. He says no date has yet been suggested to the village board of health. Manlius Italian colony is now the center of the epidemic. In one family on Mill street there are four victims in one house," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918.

"It is requested that all books of Manlius Reading Room be returned to the library Saturday afternoon for the purpose of fumigation before the library is reopened," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918.

"The women of Manlius have responded generously to the appeal of the Syracuse Red Cross for towels for use in the army hospitals," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918.

"Manlius branch of the Red Cross has received $14.80 as its per centage of the National Thrift Bag League drive in town. 1,480 lbs. of various materials suitable for war and relief work were collected and one cent a pound was given by the League to the Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918.

"In these days of fuel conservation the W. O. C. Coal company (Charles E. Cole, Manlius) is recommending screenings for banking fires at night. Many furnace tenders cover the fire at night with ashes. These prevent the coal from burning fast and keeps the house warm but when ashes are used in bedding down the fire the heat is almost all shut off, the house cools off quickly and there is a waste of a fire next morning in building up a fire sufficiently hot to quickly warm up the house...screenings are now selling here (Manlius) at $4.60 per ton," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/25/1918.

"John W. Brooks of the Community and Labor Board of Syracuse addressed the manufacturers of Manlius and Fayetteville at the office of the Cheney foundries Thursday night explaining the rule regarding the employment of labor on war work and non-essential work. Among those present were W. W. Cheney Sr. of S. Cheney & Son, E. D. Smith and H. S. Whitney of the Scoville factory, B. H. Buell of the Precision Castings Company, L. N. McIntrye of the McIntrye Paper company and C. M. Kessler of L. & J. G. Stickley," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918.

"Only September 12 registrants between the ages of 19 and 21 and 31 and 36 are to be sent to camp to fill the next quota, according to instructions received by local boards from the provost marshal-general yesterday. If there are any of the twenty-one-year-olds of August 24 left they too will be inducted. None of the commissioners has yet received definite information when the next continent will leave but New York State has been called upon to supply 24,000 men some time in November," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918.

"The Precision Castings Company has received its third order for ten million timing devices for hand grenades for the U. S. government. This is a small clock work attachment that screws in the grenade and is set to explode the grenade in a certain number of seconds after it leaves the hands of the thrower. The company is also making plugs for British shells and small airplane parts. Usually ten eight parts are cast at a time and in the banner week 94,000 hand grenade parts were turned out. The metal used consists of 90 per cent lead and 10 per cent antimony to harden it. In some instances zinc is also used. In castings formerly made by the company a per centage of tin was used but the present price of tin is too high to admit of its use in parts for munitions. Lack of metal has delayed work on the new order but it is expected the full force of 185 day and 65 night employees will go to work next week. Men on the casting machines make $40 to $50 per week while inspectors and trimmers make $20 to $30 per week. About twenty-five women are employed in the trimming room," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918.

"Ban to Be Lifted Saturday morn. Only Seven New Case Influenza in Seven Days. Diet Kitchen Affords Much Relief to Afflicted Families. State Nurse Returns to City. Manlius, The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/1/1918.

"November 11th, 1918, to celebrate the signing of the armistice, a holiday was declared at Saint John's. In the morning, the cadets were addressed by the Rev. R. N. Rand of the Baptist church of Manlius. Mr. Rand's talk was stirring and patriotic, the cadets heard it with interest. Afterwards, the Corps paraded with the band, through Manlius and Fayetteville," The Wind Mill, December 1918, p. 20.

"The memorial service last Sunday was largely attended. Two gold stars were placed on the service flag. The blue star represents Lieut. Lucien F. Hale of the Royal Flying Corps," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918.

"Fayetteville, like Syracuse, Manlius and other places throughout the country, victims of the United Press hoax, celebrated the supposed surrender of Germany yesterday by the blowing of whistles, ringing of bells and firing of cannon. The band paraded the streets followed by a procession of boys with all kinds of noise making instruments. Employees of the L. & J. G. Stickley shops were given a half holiday with pay," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/8/1918.

"Manlius and Fayetteville held a joint peace celebration Monday. St. John's band marched to Fayetteville and paraded the principal streets of the village and Fayetteville high school pupils marched to Manlius and paraded. In the afternoon the Fayetteville band and a motley gathering paraded the streets and Prof. L. T. Wilcox gave a stirring patriotic address at Genesee park. Ever an enthusiastic patriotic worker Prof. Wilcox was at his best in his talk at the park and he kept his audience closely interested. Bells were rung and whistles blown during the entire day. Practically every business place in Manlius and Fayetteville closed at noon. The Manlius band went to Syracuse where it headed the Syracuse Journal employees in the peace parade. In the evening it serenaded the Journal office where a number of the band members are employed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/15/1918.

"One of the features of the National Grange meeting at the Mizpah in Syracuse Wednesday was the singing of 'Democracy,' of which Mrs. Della M. Perkins of this village (Fayetteville) is author. A quartet of St. John's cadets sang the verses while the entire audience joined in singing the chorus as the words were flashed on the screen. Mrs. Perkins then recited 'Barbara Fritchie.' She wore a dress over one hundred years old and made a big hit with the Grangers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/15/1918.

"At the Precision Castings plant the work for some time has been practically 100 per cent war orders. Work was temporarily suspended yesterday on a new ten-million contract for hand grenade parts but later orders were received to continue until further notice," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/15/1918.

"T. Aaron Levy, School commissioner of Syracuse gave an earnest talk (at School Hall, Fayetteville) on the reconstruction period that must follow the war. The result of the war he said, would be to bind the allied nations of the world together in one vast brotherhood. After the wondrous part the Italians had played in the war they could no longer be looked down upon as 'wops' and dagoes. The war had placed all nations on an equal footing and when their representatives leave the peace table they will have become one vast brotherhood working for the benefit of humanity," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/22/1918.

"The local War Stamp Committee, of which W. E. McIntyre is now chairman, is preparing for an intensive drive in the 'Victory and Thanksgiving tribute to Pershing and the Boys Over There' which will be launched tomorrow and cover a period of one week. A committee to be known as Pershing's Couriers will be appointed at a meeting to be held today and a complete canvass of the village will be made," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/22/1918.

"The making of brass handles for trench knives which promised employment for quite a number of Manlius men the coming winter is likely to be passed up with the general discontinuance of making of implements of warfare. The E. U. Scoville company which had a sub-contract for 110,000 handles from the Oneida Community and which intended to start up its brass foundry Thursday, has received orders to suspend all operations. The order also affects the F. H. Realize brass foundry which also had a sub-contract under the Scoville company. 50 tons of brass had already been ordered for the work. The Cheney foundries are not as yet affected by the signing of the armistice as their orders are not direct war orders, being principally for making machinery for making munitions and for parts of trucks," The Manlius Eagle, 11/22/1918.

"A 'Carry On' message from the War Council of the American Red Cross on behalf of the War Council, asks every member of Fayetteville branch A. R. C. to bear in mind the solemn obligation which rests with each one to Carry On. There will be an abundance to do and even at the moment of peace let no Red Cross worker falter. Millions of American boys are under arrest; thousands of them are sick and wounded. Come to our Fayetteville work rooms with a feeling of gratitude that you are able to render service in this great work, and by so doing represent the heart of America. Mrs. E. A. Plampin, Chairman, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918.

"The 108th Infantry, Twenty-seventh division which includes many Manlius boys, has won the most coveted honor on the field of battle. Major General O'Ryan has cited the entire regiment for the 'exceptional valor of officers and men.' Citations also have been issued to the 105th Infantry, the 107th and the 104th and 108th Machine Gun Battalions. Following the main battle of Duck Valley on September 29th-October 2d, when the Hindenburg line was pierced for the first time, the 108th infantry returned to the line October 14th and again on October 17th. It was withdrawn from action October 21st and so far as can be learned it has been in no engagement since that time, "The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918.

"The men of the Twenty-seventh division of the American army, who are coming home soon and who include the former Syracuse units of the National Guard, have received, through their commander, a letter of praise from Field Marshal Haig for the brave manner in which they shattered the Hindenburg line Sept. 29," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918.

"Pershing's Couriers,' under the chairmanship of S. C. Cheney are making an active canvass in the War Stamp drive for the 'Boys Over There.' Manlius' quota is $7,350 and with the week broken up by the holiday it appears doubtful if the amount will be subscribed by the time the drive ends on Saturday," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 11/29/1918.

"On the service flag to Saint John's School (est. 1869) appear more than five hundred stars. Among them, at the close of the Great War, eight have been changed to gold, representing the former members of our School who have made the final sacrifice in the cause of freedom. And it seems appropriate that we commemorate the deeds of these men, in so far as we have been able to learn them," The Wind Mill, St. John's School, December 1918, p. 11.

"All of America's soldier and sailor dead will be returned from the battlefields and hospital cemeteries of France at the expense of the Federal Government in 1920. This is concretely the plan of the War and Navy departments, which will act in concert. The custom of bringing home the bodies of American soldiers has been the nation's policy for generations...Approximately 20,000 American dead now rest in French soil," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918.

"...deputy clerks in the Board of Supervisors who are compiling the official permanent record of men in this county who have gone into the army or navy, estimate that July 12,000 young Onondagans have gone into service. Already the Board has 8,000 names but lacks much of the data necessary to make the record complete," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/6/1918.

"Total receipts by Fayetteville branch of Red Cross during November $1540.55. "During the month of October our work room was closed owing to the epidemic, but our branch was able to send to the Crouse-Irving hospital a large quantity of linen, bath robes and handkerchiefs. A charge for $17.00 was sent to Mr. Ellis, treasurer of the Syracuse Chapter to be used expressly for the relief of families suffering from the epidemic. The check was received from the Thrift Bag Co., of Albany, it being our percentage on bags collected in Fayetteville. During the month of November 317 garments have been made. A large quantity of clothing has been sent in for the refugees. During the month of November 24 sweaters and 12 pairs of socks were turned into the Syracuse Chapter. Outfits consisting of sweater, socks and wristlets were furnished to Warren Smith and Chas. Goodfellow of Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. A sweater was donated by Miss Ruth Williams and a pair of socks by Mrs. Slingerland. Mrs. F. Mathews, Chairman," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918.

"More than twenty schools to teach women and disabled soldiers how to operate farm tractors will be established this winter throughout New York state by the federal food board. The schools will be located at centers to be announced later and the 'term' will be one week," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/13/1918.

"Mrs. F. H. Mathews, chairman and her canvassing committee have already enrolled over one hundred Red Cross members in the universal drive being made this week throughout the country. This number does not include members of the War Chest who have subscribed $12 or more and who automatically become members of the Red Cross. These are entitled to buttons and they should apply for same at Mr. Mathews' headquarters at M. H. Doyle's store by Saturday night in order that their names may be added to the new Red Cross enrollment. Many large subscribers to the War Chest have handed in their dollars for separate subscriptions for themselves and families to the Red Cross," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918.

"Over fifty employees of the Precision Castings shops were laid off Tuesday after a dispatch was received from Washington advising the company to suspend the making of hand grenade parts. The company had received a third order for ten million timing devices and had just commenced work on it when the armistice was signed. The company was also engaged at the time in making airplane parts but this order was canceled a few days after peace was declared. The company has orders for considerable commercial work and expects soon to get back on a peace basis and resume the making of automobile parts which was its principal line of work before the war," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/20/1918.

"Changing from war to peace basis in industrial plants has affected the wages of Fayetteville workers as it has that of workers in other cities having munition plants. Some of the employees of the Precision shops who were earning $40 to $50 a week are now only earning $15 to $20. The Onondaga Milling company has also cut the wages of its employees from $3.50 to $3.00 per day. The Precision company, however, expects soon to be reestablished on commercial work and will then offer the men opportunity to earn good wages on piece work," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918.

"On the service flag of St. John's school there are over 500 stars. Among them, at the close of the Great War, eight have been changed to gold, representing former cadets who have made the final sacrifice in the cause of freedom. These include Lieut. Clarence A. Dennis, U. S. Marine Corps, killed in action at Bouresches, June 8, 1918. Corporal Homer A. Wheaton, the first American to be awarded the Distinguished Service Medal (Cross), the Congressional mark of valor of which Marshal Foch received the third. Corporal Wheaton's act was to throw himself upon a bomb about to explode, thereby saving the lives of his companions in the trench. Lieut. Lester W. Ogilvie, killed in action Aug. 25, 1918, after seizing a Hun machine gun and saving his comrades by killing the crew of another Hun gun. James McVicar Whitney who was killed in his tank by a head on shot. Captain Gifford D. Horton, flight commander, British air service, reported missing after being cited for bravery. Lieut. George S. Shepard died in France in May of wounds received in action. Kenneth G. West who died at a New Jersey camp Sept. 7, 1917. Francis W. Thompson died Oct. 24, 1918 at Great Lakes Training Camp. In memory of these boys General Verbeck has suggested that a Memorial Hall be erected in place of the Y. M. C. A. hut, which had been planned, in which may be installed appropriate memorials and tributes to those who answered their country's call. To this end letters have been sent to all Old Boys and friends of the school asking for subscriptions," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918.

"Soldiers discharged from camps and returning to their homes are to be given one month's pay, plus transportation allowance of 3 1/2 cents a mile from their mobilization points to their home town, the State Defense Council has been advised. Their railroad tickets will cost them two cents a mile by the most direct route home," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 12/27/1918.

"The proceeds of the Fayetteville Red Cross will be used to make booties for the baby war orphans of Belgium and France, thousands of which are needed," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 1/10/1919.

"Five hundred and fifty St. John's graduates served in the United States forces during the world war, about two-thirds of them as commissioned officers," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 2/21/1919.

"Business conditions in the Fayetteville factories seem to have reversed since the close of the war. Six months ago the Precision Castings shops was running night and day on war orders and paying wages never before heard of in this village while the Stickley furniture shops had only half a force working on a few Red Cross orders. Now the Precision shops have only half a force at work while more orders are pouring into the Stickley shops than can be handled. The Eastwood branch, where a patent combination wood and metal bed is being made in large quantities, is also behind on orders. McIntyre Bro's. paper mill has closed down for two weeks in order to install a new machine for cutting and winding Kraft and tissue paper in rolls, as it comes from the paper making business. They report the paper business just now rather slow and buyers hesitating to place large orders during the present unsettled conditions," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/4/1919.

"Amount turned in to (Fayetteville Red Cross) Chapter to March 1, 1919, $1558.04...Worked completed and sent in: 40 pajama suits, 75 petticoats, 24 dresses. Contributions for Refugees: 1 box new clothing, 100 pieces; 1 box coats," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 4/11/1919.

"The women of Trinity Presbyterian church (Fayetteville) will give a 'Welcome Home' to all young men, who have been in army service, Friday evening from 8 to 10 o'clock. The affair will be held in the church annex, which will be prettily decorated for the occasion," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919.

"Rev. Capt. Charles H. L. Ford will preach the annual sermon to Bolster Post G. A. R. and to veterans of the late war at Christ Church Sunday evening...Not only are all the young men returned from service invited but also parents of those in service and of those who have made the supreme sacrifice. Manlius will honor the veterans of the two wars in much the same manner as in past years. ...The parade will form in North street at 9:30 a.m. It will include St. John's band, veterans of the Civil War in automobiles, veterans of the late war, St. John's Troop, Manlius fire department and decorated automobiles. The line of march will be from North to Pleasant, to Fayette to Seneca streets and to the cemetery. Here the graves will be decorated by a detail of girls from the high school after which the memorial service of the G. A. R. will be read and an address given by Rev. Charles H. L. Ford. The committees hope that every automobile owner in the vicinity will honor the veterans by decorating their cars and taking part in the parade. It is also hoped that citizens along the line of march will decorate with national colors," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/23/1919.

"The number of hospital articles made by the Fayetteville Branch from June 1917 to April 18, 1919 was 51,536. This does not include the oakum picking. The knitted garments, consisting of sweaters, helmets, socks, wristlets, scarves, numbered 889 articles. Besides these there were contributions of 349 booties and bonnets. Hospital supplies made and contributed, numbered 2,111 articles. These included table napkins, tray cloths, pillows, afghans, comfort bags, quilts, etc. Fifteen boxes of clothing, one hundred new garments and sixteen pieces of bedding have been sent to France. The total output of Red Cross articles made has been 54,520. The amount turned to the Syracuse Chapter since June 1, 1918, is $353.66. This amount has been received through donations and subscriptions, but does not include the amount raised during the Red Cross drive in December. The total amount turned to the Chapter since this branch was organized is $1558.04. Porch meetings will be held during the summer," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/6/1919.

"General William Verbeck will have charge of the military features of the Victory Parade in Syracuse July 4. Just now he is busy getting in touch with the heads of the various units of the Twenty-Seventh and Seventy-Eighth Divisions, in order to have all the men who served in these divisions in the line of march," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/13/1919.

"Fayetteville will be represented in the Syracuse Welcome Home parade on July 4 with a float representing its war activities. A subscription paper for the purpose of raising $150 to defray the expenses of building the float is being circulated by Village President, C. M. Kessler," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/20/1919.

"Manlius post of the American Legion has selected the name of Archie LeRoy Van Patten post, in honor of the brave young dispatch runner who lost his life at Chateau-Thierry. Young Van Patten was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. Van Patten of this village," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/8/1919.

"At the meeting of the local post of the American Legion Friday night Dr. Reginald Ballantyne was elected a delegate to the County meeting. So far only thirty-three returned soldiers have joined the Manlius Post. Although some sixty are eligible for membership. The mission of the post is entirely to benefit its members and their country and the officers are wondering why more are not taking interest in it. Meetings are held every other Friday night," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919.

"Manlius will welcome its returned soldiers and sailors in a formal manner with a reception and parade on Saturday afternoon and evening, Sept. 6. Tentative arrangements were made at a meeting of citizens Wednesday night at the village library at which time committees were appointed. The committees will report at a meeting to be held next Wednesday evening. The plans include a parade at 6 o'clock, of band, fire department, other organizations and decorated automobiles. Following the parade a reception will be held at Fowler hall where refreshments will be served to all. Village president Walter W. Cheney will extend the glad hand to the boys and thank them for their service in behalf of the village. Following this there will be a musical program and other features to be arranged by the program committee...The reception will not be confined to the village but is for all soldiers and sailors of the first and second election districts and all residents of these districts are invited to attend the reception and honor the boys by driving their cars in the parade," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 8/29/1919.

"There will be a get-together meeting of the Archie Van Patten Post of the American Legion in Smith Hall at 8:00 p.m. Friday night, September 5th. The officers desire that all service men attend. The Post, in a body, will attend the Village Welcome Home meeting, Saturday night, and every local service man should be enrolled with the Post by tomorrow night," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/5/1919.

"Preparations are completed for the formal welcome home and reception for soldiers and sailors from this section who have returned from service. It is estimated that nearly 100 young men from Manlius, Eagle Village and Oran were in the service during the late war and it is hoped that all these will attend. Dinner will be served all the soldiers at the Methodist church parlors at 6:15. After the dinner the soldiers will be taken in automobiles to the village hall where the parade will form. It is planned that the parade will leave the village hall promptly at 7 o'clock. It will include band, fire department, returned soldiers in automobiles, and decorated cars. The line of march will be to Washington street, to Academy street, to North to Pleasant, to Fayette, to Seneca, to Fowler hall. At Fowler Hall Village President Walter W. Cheney will welcome the soldiers on behalf of the village and Colonel Verbeck will respond. Rev. Charles R. Vickery is expected to make a few remarks about soldier life. Ice cream and cake will be free to all who attend. After the reception there will be a pavement dance for which the band will furnish music. A suitable space will be roped off on the brick pavement and Chief of Police Bullard will see that the dancing is not interfered with by any kind of traffic," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/5/1919.

"Manlius welcomed home its returned soldiers and sailors Saturday evening in a most enthusiastic and cordial manner. Not since the firemen's convention ten years ago has such a crowd been seen in the village. It is estimated that there were 2,000 people on the street. The program of the evening started with a dinner at the Methodist church parlors, which thirty-five men who had been in service, thoroughly enjoyed. After the dinner the men were taken in automobiles to the village hall where a parade was formed of band, fire department and some forty decorated automobiles. All along the route the service men were applauded and across the street a large banner bade them 'Welcome Home.' Nearly every business place was well decorated. The Donohue block and the A. & P. store were also handsomely illuminated. When the crowd surged into Fowler Hall a fuse blew out and plunged the hall in darkness, necessitating an adjournment to the street where the speakers spoke from the band platform in front of the hall. Rev. R. N. Rand chairman of the committee of arrangements, introduced Village president Walter W. Cheney, Jr., who welcomed the boys on behalf of the village and told how well the village had responded to the calls for men, money and supplies to prosecute the war. Colonel Verbeck responded," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/12/1919.

"Saturday, October 4, will be Welcome Home Day in Fayetteville. This was decided on at a meeting of citizens held Monday night at the Village Inn. Irving D. Perry was named as chairman of the general committee with power to name sub-committees and W. M. Jones was elected treasurer. The program as arranged for the day will consist of a parade of the different organizations of the village, the boys returned from service, with Troop D as escort, a ball game between representatives of the army and navy, field sports, address by Prof. L. T. Wilcox from postoffice steps, banquet for soldiers and sailors at Village Inn and reception and dance at Everingham hall in evening. Bronze medals will be struck off commemorating the occasion and will be presented to each man from the village who entered the service. To meet the expenses, funds will be solicited and if no objection develops on the part of the contributors the money left in the treasury of the Fayetteville War Chest will be used to pay for the banquet and medals...over sixty Fayetteville boys entered the service during the recent war and it is hoped to have every one present on Welcome Home Day," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/19/1919.

"Thirty-seven horses sent by the War Department for use of the cavalry of the (St. John's) school arrived last week and fifty-three more are expected to arrive in a few days...the school is now controlled by The William Verbeck Corporation, recently organized, of which General Verbeck is president," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 9/19/1919.

"No fairer autumn day could have been selected by the village of Fayetteville than last Saturday, the day it selected to welcome home its returned soldiers and sailors. In the language of the poet all nature smiled but it didn't smile any more than did the doughboys and gobs when they sat down at 6 o'clock to the feed provided for them at the Village Inn. The parade, which was the first feature of the program started shortly after 2 o'clock at Burdick street with Captain Donald Armstrong as marshal, and passed through the principal streets of the village. It included Manlius Band, Village Officials, G. A. R., Veterans and members of the local Chapter Red Cross in automobiles, returned soldiers and sailors, boy scouts and pupils of the school. After the parade Principal L. T. Wilcox gave a short but stirring address from the postoffice steps in which he welcomed the boys, and spoke of their grand showing in the war. He commended the work and purpose of the American Legion and favored the League of Nations. 'Of what use,' he said 'would have been all the sacrifice, made by these young men and their fellow soldiers if we were not to be insured against further war and the spirit of altruism which president Wilson had carried to the peace table be perpetuated.' After the address bronze medals, given by the village, were pinned on 42 returned service men by Commander D. P. Babcock of R. B. Hayes Post, G. A. R. Gold medals were given the families of those who died in the service. These were Charles Skinner, Harold Perry, Floyd Stanard and Clarence Dennis. After the exercises the army team sunk the navy at Burhans field 10 to 1. Ambrose Osborn twirled for the navy while Louis Kimball of the Fort Slocum team struck out the sailors as fast as they came up to bat. There was a large attendance of representative citizens at the reception for the men in the evening at Everingham hall...During the dinner the boys sang Democracy, the new patriotic song by Mrs. Della M. Perkins, while Miss Harriette Palmer dressed in costume acted the lines," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/10/1919.

"A camouflaged army train with a corps of 91 men passed through Fayetteville Sunday en route from Buffalo to New Jersey. The men had been doing recruiting work at Buffalo and the work will be continued in the southern states this winter. The train included an army kitchen, a complete machine shop on wheels, several French guns and carried a complete electric lighting outfit. The men had broken camp early in the morning and were served with sandwiches and coffee at the Village Inn," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 10/24/1919.

"On Memorial Day we took part in more patriotic exercises than has been the custom heretofore. This was due to the fact that there was a monument dedicated in the village and we also had one of our own to dedicate informally. At nine-thirty the Battalion formed on the Manlius-Oran road and, led by the band, marched to the village where we awaited our turn to fall into line with the rest of the parade. This consisted of the veterans of all our wars, the Boy Scouts, the Girl Scouts, school children, and the fire department. We marched through the village up the hill to the quaint old cemetery and were there halted while prayers were said and wreaths placed over the graves of the dead. Our buglers sounded taps and then our firing squad fired a volley over the graves, in salute. From the cemetery we were marched to the park and speakers' stand and were present at the dedication of the memorial to the five Manlius village men who died on the battlefields of France. The ceremony was very solemn and formal, commencing with a prayer, in which all paid silent tribute with bowed heads to the dead. After this prayer the Battalion was called to attention, presented arms, and the band played the national anthem while the monument was unveiled by raising the flag which covered it, to the top of the new pole. Order was then given to stand at ease. Walter W. Cheney, Jr., gave a short talk on the purpose of the monument and pointed out that it was through the efforts of Mr. Frank P. Sass, detailed by the government, and in charge of the ordnance of the school, that the necessary funds were raised and the monument erected. The townsfolk responded to this call for funds in the same spirit that they sent forth their sons to war and for this reason the memorial was a success. He then introduced Mr. Harry H. Skerritt of Syracuse, the main speaker for the dedication, and a better and more eloquent speaker could not have been desired for the occasion. He delivered a very excellent speech and the audience was at all times with him and he held their attention like a magnet. He brought forth the fact that the village had outdone themselves to answer the call to arms, and had even gone over their quota, and it was now everyone's duty to 'carry on' in the same spirit with which the boys fought, and finish the job. He complimented the mothers of the men who died on their bravery in accepting the news and new scheme of life with a smile that covered the gap in their hearts. He finally set forth four ideas that should be uppermost in every true American's mind today--the American idea of business, the American idea of religion, the American idea of Education, and the American idea of politics. He defined briefly each one of these ideas and showed how the American people should make good and finish the job that they started and had sent their sons forth to promote. In conclusion, he quoted McCrea's poem, 'In Flanders Fields,' and showed how it expresses our duty to the dead who lie buried in France. His talk, to summarize, was very appropriate and well selected, and he 'put it across' in fine shape. The last man to take the stand was our chaplain, Dr. Jung, who gave a short benedictory prayer. The ceremonies concluded, all those present were cordially invited to attend the informal dedication at the school. After being marched up to the site of our own monument, the companies formed, flanking the monument and forming an aisle from the road directly up the terrace to the monument. Patriotic hymns were played by the band and at high noon one shot of the cannon was fired as salute and the band broke into the 'Star Spangled Banner,' while the Battalion stood at present arms. Order arms was given and Colonel Verbeck gave a short talk. He made a short speech of dedication, stating the reason for having only an informal dedication at this time, the date of the formal dedication, and describing the monument as it will look upon completion. He then went on to say how many St. John's men had been in service, and the willingness of the cadets as a body to go to summer training camps the summer following the declaration of war and many other little details that shed a great deal of light on the conduct of the school in a crisis, details which did not reach the ears of the public at the time. He explained that from now on we will have a formal ceremony on Decoration Day for the purpose of placing a wreath on the monument. At the conclusion of his talk, the major and four captains carried and escorted a huge wreath up the terrace between the lines of khaki and laid it at the foot of the memorial. Dr. Jung again said a short prayer and the companies were marched off to be dismissed--a holiday for the rest of the day," The Wind Mill, June 1922, pp. 33-34.

"On Memorial Day, there was a short ceremony at the partly completed Saint John's War Memorial on our Campus. The battalion returned from the village and formed around the monument. Colonel Verbeck gave a short address followed by a prayer by Doctor Jung. A beautiful wreath of black leaves and red roses was laid on the monument by the company commanders. This ceremony will be repeated each year on Memorial Day. On Thursday, June fifteenth at one-thirty P. M., the formal dedication will take place. The dedication address will be made by the Assistant Secretary of War, The Honorable J. Mayhew Wainright," The Wind Mill, June 1922, p. 45.

"IN GRATEFUL MEMORY OF Jay Cross, Henry Tyler, Eric Coan, Archie Van Patten, Waite Cross, killed in action in the World War, 1917-1918. This stone, taken from the hills of Manlius, typifying strength and spirit of her youth, is here placed as a tribute of affection and honor by their comrades of the American Legion and the citizens of the community, May 30, 1922. (This) is the inscription on the bronze memorial which will be unveiled in Academy Park in Manlius on Memorial Day. The tablet is 24x16 inches and is embedded in the huge boulder weighing six tons, which was brought from the Nixon farm near Eagle Village. The boulder is set in a foundation of cobble stones, artistically laid in cement. Back of the boulder is an iron flag staff from which the stars and stripes will float everyday during the summer. The unveiling of the tablet will take place immediately after the exercises at the cemetery...the graves of seventy-seven heroes of the Civil War and five of the World War in Manlius cemetery will be decorated," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 5/26/1922. (This monument is now located at Manlius Village Centre.)

Memorial Day, Manlius..."At the cemetery school girls assisted in decorating the graves. At the grave of Eric Coan, hero of the late war, three volleys were fired and taps were sounded by the cadets. The parade then proceeded to Academy Park where the exercises were held near the Memorial boulder," The Fayetteville Bulletin, 6/1/1923.

"Residents of Minoa yesterday unveiled a huge boulder at East avenue and Main street, in honor of young men who fought in land and sea forces during the world war. It stands in a triangular plot which in the future will be called Memorial park. Names of all former service men have been inscribed on a bronze tablet attached to the stone. A feature of the day was a parade preceding the unveiling ceremonies. Minoa and East Syracuse fire departments were represented in the procession as was nearly every church, lodge and fraternal organization in the village. There were many floats covered with flags and banners. Music was furnished by Walter Herrick's East Syracuse band and Goodfellow's North Syracuse fife and drum corps. It was estimated fully 300 residents either marched or rode in the parade...A total of 41 Minoa young men served in the war," scrapbook, n.d. (There are 50 names on the boulder).

10 November 1997