WORLD WAR II HONOR ROLL

Town of Manlius and Adjacent Postal Areas

Part I of III

Submitted by Kathy Crowell

The following World War II service list is restricted to those whose postal address was in the town of Manlius prior to V-J Day, September 2, 1945. Some of these people actually resided outside the town limits. Where this is known to occur, the residence follows the postal address in parentheses. A question mark precedes a name when original residence is unclear.

While it is true that others serving during World War II moved into the town after this date, they are not part of this collection, nor are most of the more than 900 graduates of The Manlius Military School who participated in the War.

As we do not consider this list complete, if you know a missing name, find incorrect data or want to add information, please contact us so that this record can be as accurate as possible. Compiled by Kathy Crowell and Sue Goodfellow, 1997. E-mail: LCrow10101@aol.com. Snail mail: Manlius Historical Society, 109 Pleasant St., Manlius, NY 13104.

We wish to thank Norma Jenner and Bob Kinsella of Minoa, Ella Dunn of Kirkville, Darothy DeAngelo of Oran, and numerous war veterans for their assistance with this project.

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In Their Honor

Robert L. Agan, k-i-a over India 4/15/1945, formerly Fayetteville

Carl A. Alexander, m-i-a over Schweinfurt, Germany10/14/1943; official date of death 8/14/1945, Manlius

Leonard Gordon Andres, death in service, November 1944, Kirkville

Franklin Harley Brown, k-i-a on Okinawa May 4, 1945, Fayetteville

Burr Thompson Cole, killed in an airplane crash near Alvin, TX 7/24/1943, Minoa

Charles L. Cox killed in an airplane crash in east central U.S. 9/22/1944, former Manlius School cadet, Manlius

John D. Cummins, k-i-a over the Ploiesti oil fields in Romania, 8/1/1943, formerly Fayetteville

William A. Dailey, killed in an airplane crash into Tampa Bay, FL 10/8/1943, Manlius

James L. Denig, killed by a hand grenade on Namur Island in the Marshall Islands group, either late January or early February, 1944, former Manlius School Cadet, Manlius

Omar E. DeRycke, k-i-a, according to War Department, Manlius

Albert J. Desormeau (Besormeau), reported deceased by12/7/1943, Kirkville

Edward D. Doxsee, killed in an airplane accident, Miami, FL 10/29/1944, Fayetteville

Edwin A. Fairbank, k-i-a on the Anzio beachhead 2/21/1944, Fayetteville P.O., town of Dewitt

Gilbert G. Fox, name appears with a star on the Oran Honor Roll, Manlius P.O.

Mason C. Gaffney, died of natural causes at Rochester, NY, May 8, 1944, formerly Manlius

Richard A. Gallagher, k-i-a in France 7/6/1944, formerly Fayetteville

Robert A. Greenwood, k-i-a over Germany 5/12/1944, formerly Fayetteville

William Hanbidge, died in an airplane crash near Point Pleasant, W. Va. 3/8/1945, Fayetteville

Robert J. Jewson, died from wounds received in France, 6/7/1944, Fayetteville

Kenneth E. Johnson, k-i-a Mediterranean area 7/10/1943, Kirkville

Edwin H. Kiddle, k-i-a over Schweinfurt, Germany 10/14/1943, Minoa

Robert E. Kingsley, k-i-a over France 5/27/1944, Kirkville

Glenn Stafford Knapp, k-i-a on Saipan Island 7/1944, Manlius

Theodore Lamprecht, killed in an airplane collision over the Everglades of FL 4/1944, Fayetteville

Everett W. Leland, killed in airplane accident at Corpus Christi, TX 9/1942, former Manlius School cadet, Manlius

John E. Mapstone, killed in an airplane crash near Faceville, GA 3/12/1944, Fayetteville

Clarence E. McIntyre, k-i-a on a torpedoed ship in the North Atlantic 2/3/1943, Fayetteville

Parnell McCarthy, killed while on duty in South America 9/11/1943, Manlius P.O., town of Pompey

John J. McTiernan, Jr., died of wounds suffered in the Italian campaign 9/17/1944, former Manlius School instructor, Manlius

Carl W. Meigs, killed while being transferred as a prisoner of war 12/31/1944, former Manlius School cadet, Manlius

Donald Moon, k-i-a on Palau Island 9/29/1944, formerly Fayetteville

John F. Morley, k-i-a in Belgium 1/9/1945, Manlius

Harold Moth, hit and killed by a train at Minoa, N.Y. 4/3/1945 while on furlough, Kirkville

Emile Motquin, k-i-a in Indo-China May 3, 1945, Fayetteville

Leo Chester Oeinck, shot down over Kyushu Bay 5/1945, Fayetteville

William Mace Peckham, k-i-a in Germany Dec. 20, 1944, Fayetteville

John F. Phelan, Jr., k-i-a in France 8/10/1944, former Manlius School cadet, Manlius

William C. Piguet, Jr., died from a non-battle gunshot wound in Czechoslovakia, July 1945, formerly Minoa.

Paul K. Piquet, k-i-a in France 12/27/1944, Kirkville

Hobart E. Pitts, k-i-a in Germany 3/2/1945, Manlius P.O., Oran

Elmer H. Plopper, k-i-a in Luxembourg 12/22/1944, graduate of Fayetteville High School

Frederick W. Ralph, k-i-a in aerial assault on Dortmund, Germany 5/24/1943, Fayetteville P.O., town of Dewitt

John Rooney, killed in an airplane crash near Cayuga Lake, N.Y. while on furlough 6/3/1941, Fayetteville

Andrew Ryfun, k-i-a at Bougainville, South Pacific 3/10/1944, Minoa

Eugene Shearer, k-i-a in Germany 10/1944, formerly Manlius

Simon William Shore, k-i-a off the shores of Okinawa 3/26/1945, Fayetteville

Norbert F. Simon, k-i-a in France, 6/10/1944, Minoa P.O., East Syracuse RD

Coburn Snook, killed in an airplane crash at Harlington Field, TX 3/1943, Fayetteville

Raymond E. Straub, killed in an airplane crash near the Deland, FL naval air station 8/1944, Fayetteville

Charles A. Tallon, k-i-a in Germany 5/5/1945, Manlius

Richard V. Mack Thompson k-i-a in Italy 11/5/1944, Manlius

Edward Towe, Jr. k-i-a off the coast of Iwo Jima February 22,1945, formerly Fayetteville

Harold L. Verdow, died from battle wounds in Germany 11/23/1944, Manlius

William Wade, m-i-a over Holland 9/17/1944; presumed dead 9/1944 Fayetteville

Nelson M. Walker - k-i-a Normandy, 71944, former Manlius School instructor, Manlius

William L. Walters, k-i-a 6/12/1944, Kirkville

Alfred H. Wescott, k-i-a in Germany 2/21/1945, Manlius P.O., Oran

Francis J. Wolven - m-i-a 2/1942; finding of death 1945, Manlius

Service Record

Abert, Everett P. Formerly Fayetteville. "Everett P. Abert, who has enlisted in the army, is the third son...to enter the armed forces...Everett who has applied for enlistment Monday attended Nottingham high school and was graduated from Antwerp high school...The Post Standard, 6/4/1942. "...Everett P. Abert enlisted in June and is in the signal corps at MacDill field, Tampa, Fla.," The Post-Standard, 9/8/1942. "Sgt. Everett Paul Abert and his wife will return today to Venice, Fla., after a furlo with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Abert of 119 Niven St...," The Post-Standard, 3/30/1944. "Sgt. Everett P. Abert, is with the signal corps at Venice Army air base in Florida. Col. Abert is expected home in the near future. His father is critically ill at his Syracuse home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "James N. Abert, a former resident of this village, died Monday at his home, 119 Niven street, Syracuse, after a long illness. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Lena Ulrich Abert; a daughter, Mrs. William Wallace; four sons, Lt. Col. George C. Abert, John Abert, Staff Sgt. Howard B. Abert, stationed at the Army air base, Florida, and Everett Abert; two sisters and five grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944.

Abert, George C. Formerly Fayetteville. "More than 30 hours after the first savage Japanese onslaught blasted the island of Oahu, principal defense bastion of the Hawaiian islands, Mr. and Mrs. James Abert of 119 Niven st., were waiting anxiously last night for information about their son and daughter-in-law, Capt. and Mrs. George C. Abert. Capt. Abert, a graduate of the Untied States Military academy in 1938, has been stationed at Schofield Barracks, army encampment on the outskirts of Honolulu, since 1940. He married Miss Marjorie Ryan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen B. Ryan of 157 Broad st., Plattsburg, Oct. 17, 1939, and they sailed for Hawaii the following June 29. Abert was graduated from Fayetteville high school and attended Colgate university two years before receiving is appointment to West point. After being graduated from the military academy he was stationed at Plattsburg for several months before being transferred to the Pacific outpost with the quartermaster corps. He was promoted to captain on his second wedding anniversary, last Oct. 17. The small island of Oahu, also the site of the powerful Untied States' naval base of Pearl Harbor, bore the brunt of the unheralded Japanese attacks in the far-flung Pacific," The Post-Standard, 12/9/1941. "Eight days after the initial Japanese attack was unleashed on Hawaii, word was received last night of the well being of Capt. George C. Abert and his wife by his parents...The terse telegram received by the parents said simply, 'Safe and well.' It was signed, 'Marge and George.'..." The Post-Standard, 12/16/1941. "...Maj. George C. Abert, is in the Southwest Pacific," The Post-Standard, 3/30/1944. "It was...learned that Lieut. George Abert...who is located at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, will be promoted to the rank of captain in June," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/22/1941. "George C. Abert, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Abert...former Fayetteville residents, now stationed in Honolulu, has been promoted to the rank of major in the U. S. Army. Maj. Abert was graduated from Fayetteville High School, attended Colgate University for two years and was graduated from U. S. Military Academy in 1939. After his graduation from West Point he was stationed at Plattsburg, where he met and married Miss Marjorie Ryan in 1939. He was promoted to captain last October. In Hawaii he has been serving as post quartermaster. Mrs. Abert was evacuated from the islands shortly after Dec. 7 last year, and has been living with her parents, in Plattsburg," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "George C. Abert, U. S. A., stationed somewhere in the Southwest Pacific, has been promoted from the rank of major to lieutenant-colonel...He was serving as post quartermaster in Hawaii at the time of the Japanese attack... S/Sgt. Howard B. Abert, a brother, is stationed at the Syracuse Army Air Base after spending two years in China and India. Another brother, Sgt. Everett P. Abert, is with the signal corps at Venice Army air base in Florida...The Post-Standard, 3/30/1944. "James N. Abert, a former resident of this village, died Monday at his home, 119 Niven street, Syracuse, after a long illness. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Lena Ulrich Abert; a daughter, Mrs. William Wallace; four sons, Lt. Col. George C. Abert, John Abert, Staff Sgt. Howard B. Abert, stationed at the Army air base, Florida, and Everett Abert; two sisters and five grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944.

Abert, Howard. Formerly Fayetteville. "Word has been received that Howard Abert, a former resident of this village, who is now stationed at Shanute Field, Alabama, with the 17th squadron, will soon be transferred to the Flying Cadet Corps at Rantoul, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/22/1941. Howard Abert, a flying cadet at Turner Field, Albany, Ga., who has been home on a furlough was to have been his brother's (Jack) best man, but was called back to duty at the flying field on Tuesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/28/1941. "A letter this week from India to Mr. and Mrs. James Abert of 119 Niven st., Syracuse revealed that their son Howard is now a corporal. He enlisted a year ago in March and has been in India for about six months with the ground crew of the air corps..." The Post-Standard, 9/8/1942. "S/Sgt. Howard Abert, who was home from the China-India-Burma theater, has left for Atlantic City..." The Post-Standard, 3/30/1944. S/Sgt. Howard B. Abert...is stationed at the Syracuse Army Air Base after spending two years in China and India. "James N. Abert, a former resident of this village, died Monday at his home, 119 Niven street, Syracuse, after a long illness. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Lena Ulrich Abert; a daughter, Mrs. William Wallace; four sons, Lt. Col. George C. Abert, John Abert, Staff Sgt. Howard B. Abert, stationed at the Army air base, Florida, and Everett Abert; two sisters and five grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. Formerly Fayetteville.

Abert, John. Formerly Fayetteville. "Another trainee, who was leaving Syracuse on the same train (as Edward McIntyre), was Jack Abert, a former Fayetteville boy, who incidentally went to Fort Dix, having enlisted in another division of the United States Flying Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/20/1941. "At a dinner held at Tubbert's Thursday Jack Abert of Syracuse, formerly of this village, was awarded the Green Lake Golf Championship trophy. Mr. Abert has been an enthusiastic golfer for several years and began his career as a caddie at the Onondaga Golf and Country Club... (the) marriage will take place December 6. His bride will be Miss Virginia Fairfield...West Palm Beach, Fla. Howard Abert, a flying cadet at Turner Field, Albany, Ga., who has been home on a furlough was to have been his brother's best man, but was called back to duty at the flying field on Tuesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/28/1941. "James N. Abert, a former resident of this village, died Monday at his home, 119 Niven street, Syracuse, after a long illness. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Lena Ulrich Abert; a daughter, Mrs. William Wallace; four sons, Lt. Col. George C. Abert, John Abert, Staff Sgt. Howard B. Abert, stationed at the Army air base, Florida, and Everett Abert; two sisters and five grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. Formerly Fayetteville.

Abbott, Nicholas. Manlius. "Corp. Nicholas Abbott of Camp Wesley, R. I., spent the week-end with his family in Pleasant street. He expects soon to be transferred to Ohio," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943.

Adams, Dorothy Ann Calista. Kirkville. (Adams Rd., town of Madison). "July 3, 1945 appointed dietitian in the Medical Department of the Army, with the relative rank of Second Lieutenant. "5 July 43 - Reported and assigned to duty at Walter Reed General Hospital, Washington, D. C. per auth. par 20, SO #183, War Dept., Washington, D.C. dtd 2 July 43. 12 July 43 - Reported and assigned to duty 304th Sta Hosp.; 30 Aug 43 - Left Camp Edwards, Mass. per auth. Secret Order. 15 Sept 1943 - Arrived in the United Kingdom per auth. Secret Order. Located at APO #526. 10 Mar 1945. Reported for duty at 188th (US) General Hospital APO #63, N.Y. 21 Jun 1945 On temporary duty to 304th and 306th Sta. Hosps. 10 Jul 1845 on temporary duty 7 to 9 Jul 45 at 91st Gen Hosp. APO 518 for the purpose of attending conference of Hospital Dietitians, per par 1, SO #167, Hq 188th (US) General Hospital. 19 Jul 1945. On temporary duty 17 & 19 Jul 45 to London, England per par 1, SO #180. 28 July 1945 on temporary duty 23 to 28 Jul 1945, at Balliol College, Oxford University," personal papers of Dorothy Adams, deceased; Manlius Historical Society archives. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Adams, Philip L. Kirkville. "Second Lt. Philip L. Adams has written his mother, Mrs. Caryl W. Adams of R.D. 2, Kirkville, that he received his commission as a first lieutenant last month. Lt. Adams was employed by Central New York Power Corp. before he entered the army in February, 1941," The Post-Standard, 3/8/1943. "Philip L. Adams, son of Mrs. Caryl W. Adams...has been promoted from first lieutenant to captain in the coast artillery command. Capt. Adams is a battery officer with a Caribbean area coast artillery unit. He has been stationed with the armed forces guarding the Panama canal since December, 1943," The Post-Standard, 4/11/1944. "The following officers and enlisted men have been honorably discharged from the army at Fort Dix, N. J....Capt. Philip L. Adams, Kirkville, RD. 2," The Post-Standard, 10/16/1945. Kirkville P.O. according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Adcook, Kenneth Leland. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Ensign Kenneth L. Adcook, U. S. Naval Reserve, of Huntleigh Ave., has done to Washington, D. C., where he will take an instruction course in finance at the National University. Mr. Adcook has been a member of the U. S. Navy for five years, and spent two years on a training ship as a member of the New York State Nautical School. He is expected to remain in Washington for an indefinite period. Mr. Adcook, paymaster in the Naval Supply Corps, is due for a promotion in February to the rank of lieutenant, junior grade," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1941. "Kenneth Leland Adcook, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel L. Adcock of East Syracuse, and former resident of Huntleigh drive, Fayetteville, has been promoted from the rank of ensign to that of lieutenant, junior grade, in the United States Navy. Adcook graduated May 27 from National University School for supply officers, Naval Reserve. He was graduated from the College of Business Administration at Syracuse University in 1932," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1941. "Lt. (jg) Kenneth L. Adcook, formerly of Fayetteville, has sent a cablegram from Australia to his wife who is with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Conine of 213 Kinne St., East Syracuse. It said: "In port; well and safe." Lt. Adcook, who was in the naval reserve several years, has been in service since January 1941. This was the first word Mrs. Adcook has received from him since March 6. He is a graduate of Syracuse University, Post-Standard, 4/28/1942. "Mrs. Samuel L. Adcook of East Syracuse has received a cablegram from her son, Lieut. Kenneth L. Adcook, stating that he was fine, and hoped she was the same. He also extended greeting on Mother's Day. Lieut. Adcook, a former resident of this village (Fayetteville), was called into service last year having been in the Naval Reserve for seven years. He is a paymaster on an American ship in the Pacific," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/15/1942.

Agan, Elizabeth. Formerly Fayetteville. "Mrs. William W. Snook of Spring street has received word that her nephew, Lt. Robert L. Agan, attached to the Air Transport Command in India, was killed in action over the middle-eastern area on April 15. A telegram from the war department to his wife in Binghamton, the former Mary Jane Norton, notified them of Lt. Agan's death. The 26-year-old Binghamton officer was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Agan, of Binghamton, former residents of this village (Fayetteville)...Besides his wife and father, Frederick Agan, Lt. Agan is survived by one brother Miles G. Agan; two sisters, Mrs. Ramon W. Lord, of Binghamton, and Miss Betty M. Agan, S 1/c, serving with the WAVEs at Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. Lord's husband was killed in action in the last Belgian drive. Lt. Agan is known to many in this village, as he lived with his aunt Mrs. Snook when he was a young boy, and has been a frequent visitor here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Agan, Franklin A. Fayetteville/Oran. Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "The local draft 473 listed a group of young men who will report on Thursday for induction...Franklin A. Agan, 400 South Manlius street, Fayetteville...," The Eagle Bulletin, 4/10/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Agan have received a letter from their son, Frank, stationed in St. Louis, Mo., telling them that he had been promoted to Pfc., having the highest rating in his class in a recent test. He has also spent some time at Fort Bliss, Texas. Pfc. Agan further states that he expects to come north for advanced training after which he will be assigned as an instructor," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Frank Agan of the Army Air Corps has gone to Texas after spending a few days with his wife and parents here. He was previously stationed at Baltimore, Md.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Mrs. Hattie Worden Agan, wife of Arthur C. Agan, died Wednesday in the Syracuse Memorial hospital after a long illness...Surviving, besides her husband, are two sons, Hiram Agan, of No. Syracuse, and Cpl. Franklin Agan, serving with the armed forces overseas; a sister, Mrs. Robert Dunlop, of Fayetteville; one grandson, and several nieces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "Word was received from Sgt. Franklin Arthur Agan that his company was officially cited for participation in the Normandy invasion with the light corps, and awarded the bronze star by army headquarters. Sgt. Agan has been overseas a year and is now located in Holland," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944. "Funeral services for Arthur C. Agan, who died Sunday after a long illness, were held Wednesday afternoon at his late home in South Manlius street. Rev. Roy L. Smith, pastor of Fayetteville Methodist church officiated...Surviving are two sons Hiram C. Agan, of North Syracuse, and Franklyn Agan, who is with the armed forces in Berlin, Germany; one grandson, Hiram C. Agan, Jr., one nephew, Arthur W. Agan, of Syracuse; three nieces, Mrs. Herbert Cornett and Mrs. John Wells, of this village (Fayetteville), and Mrs. Hannah Kuhry, of Syracuse; a brother-in-law, Prof. William J. Gorse, of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Arthur Agan, Once Noted Ball Player, Dies at Fayetteville. First man ever to throw an overcast drop curve, Arthur C. Agan, 77, once prominent in local baseball circles and for a number of years Fayetteville postmaster, died Sunday at his home, 400 S. Manlius st., Fayetteville. A star pitcher in his prime, Mr. Agan first played for Sandy Griffin of the Syracuse Stars, later going to New Orleans in the southern league. He also played in the Eastern league and was the man who taught John (Muggsy) McGraw, veteran manager of the New York Giants, 'all that he ever knew about baseball,' according to relatives...Mr. Agan is survived by ...T/Sgt. Franklin A. Agan, with the army in Germany..."The Post-Standard, 7/24/1945. "Units of the 36th division are aboard the following ships at Newport News: Haymon Soomon, Francis Lee, Excelsior, Wooster Victory, Frederick Lykes...T/4 Franklin A. Agan, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/22/1945. "Honorably discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N. J. Wednesday...T/4 Franklin A. Agan, 400 Manlius st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 1/4/1946.

Agan, Robert L. Formerly Fayetteville. "Mrs. William W. Snook of Spring street has received word that her nephew, Lt. Robert L. Agan, attached to the Air Transport Command in India, was killed in action over the middle-eastern area on April 15. A telegram from the war department to his wife in Binghamton, the former Mary Jane Norton, notified them of Lt. Agan's death. The 26-year-old Binghamton officer was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Agan, of Binghamton, former residents of this village (Fayetteville)...Besides his wife and father, Frederick Agan, Lt. Agan is survived by one brother Miles G. Agan; two sisters, Mrs. Ramon W. Lord, of Binghamton, and Miss Betty M. Agan, S 1/c, serving with the WAVEs at Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. Lord's husband was killed in action in the last Belgian drive. Lt. Agan is known to many in this village, as he lived with his aunt Mrs. Snook when he was a young boy, and has been a frequent visitor here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Albanese, Adamo. Manlius. "The list of inductees from board 473...Army...Adamo Albanese, 103 North st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943. "Five Members of Manlius Family in Armed Service / The three Albanese brothers, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Albanese of 126 W. Seneca street, were inducted on Friday into the armed forces. A sister, Corp. Eva Albanese, is serving as a WAAC in California, and is at home for a brief furlough. Adama is 38 and enlisted in the Army; Angelo, 19, and Louis 18, joined the Navy. Another brother, Michael, has been in the navy for a year. Mr. and Mrs. Albanese have 14 children, five of them boys. All of the boys, except Vannie, former football star, are in the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Sgt. Eva Albanese, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Albanese of 126 W. Seneca st., is the ninth member of her family to serve in the armed forces. The WAC sergeant, who observed her second anniversary last month, is backing up five brothers and two brothers-in-law in the army, navy and marines. Another brother-in-law, Pvt. John Maphey, was killed on the Anzio beachhead. Those in her family serving at various stations include EM 2/c Louis Albanese, somewhere in France; TM 3/c Michael Albanese, Jr., in the South Pacific; S 1/c Angelo Albanese, on the high seas; Pvt. Vannie Albanese, former noted fullback for Syracuse university in 1937, Camp Wheeler, Ga.; Pvt. Adamo Albanese; Charleston (S.C.), army air field; Pvt. Vincent Wychules, San Diego marine base, and Corp. Ray Nichols, somewhere in England. At Stockton Field, Calif., where Sgt. Albanese has been stationed since April, 1943, she is a radio operator and mechanic. A graduate of the Midland army radio school at Kansas City, Mo., she works with soldier-mechanics inspecting airplane radios and making minor repairs on two-engine training ships, which come into the hangar for inspections. Sgt. Albanese is a graduate of Manlius high school where she was captain of the girls' basketball and volleyball teams," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944.

Albanese, Angelo Firpo. Manlius. (See also Albanese, Adama). "The list of inductees from board 473...Navy...Angelo Firpo Albanese, 126 W. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943. "Honorably discharged from the separation center at Sampson...Angelo P. Albanese, GM 3/c, 112 Fayette st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 1/2/1946. "The Manlius A. C. Baseball squad won both games scheduled at Suburban Park last Saturday...Al Miller of Manlius was in complete command at all times...Tink Hapeman started the A. C. Rally of hits, followed by Bob Costello...Angie Albanese covered first base in place of George Dailey who was injured in Saturday's game," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/30/1946.

Albanese, Eva. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. (See also Albanese, Adama). "Eva V. Albanese, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Albanese of Manlius, has been promoted to the rank of corporal in the WACs. She is stationed at the Army Air Forces advance flying school, Stockton Field, Calif., where she is assigned to the communications section," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "At Stockton Field where she has been stationed since last April, Sgt. Eva is a radio operator and mechanic. A graduate of the Midland Army Radio School at Kansas City, Mo., Sgt. Albanese works with the soldier-mechanics inspecting airplane radios and making minor repairs when the two-engine training ships come into the hangar for 50-hour, 100-hour and 200-hour inspections," The Post-Standard, 2/16/1944. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces: WACS--Eva V. Albanese, Manlius..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Sgt. Eva Albanese, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Albanese of 126 W. Seneca st., is the ninth member of her family to serve in the armed forces. The WAC sergeant, who observed her second anniversary last month...At Stockton Field, Calif., where Sgt. Albanese has been stationed since April, 1943, she is a radio operator and mechanic. A graduate of the Midland army radio school at Kansas City, Mo., she works with soldier-mechanics inspecting airplane radios and making minor repairs on two-engine training ships, which come into the hangar for inspections. Sgt. Albanese is a graduate of Manlius high school where she was captain of the girls' basketball and volley ball teams," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944.

Albanese, John. Minoa. "John Albanese and Philip Hobb left for Army service on Wednesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1942.

Albanese, Louis. Manlius. (See Albanese, Adamo for information). "The list of inductees from board 473...Navy...Louie Albanese, 126 W. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943.

Albanese, Michael. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. (See also Albanese, Adama). "George A. Burghard, S 1/c, (F.O.M.), in a recent letter to his parents Mr. and Mrs. George Burghard of West Seneca street, told of a chance meeting of two Manlius boys now in service and all are stationed on Guam. Charles Bond, S.M. 3/c, came into the room where Burghard was standing to make inquiry about the payroll, and instantly they recognized each other and later Michael Albanese, of the Shore Patrol, discovered the two Manlius boys. The trio had much in common to talk about and it was a happy reunion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Albanese, Michael, 106 Elm Street, Minoa, N.Y."

Albanese, Nick. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Albanese, 106 Elm Street, Minoa, N.Y."

Albanese, Vannie. Manlius. (See Albanese, Adamo for information).

Alesch, Ray. Formerly Fayetteville. "Ray Alesch, a former resident of this village (Fayetteville) has answered the call to service and is at the reception center at Ft. Niagara, after which he will go to officers' candidate school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943.

Alexander, Carl. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "First Lt. Carl A. Alexander has been missing since the raid on Schweinfurt, Bavaria, in which 60 Flying Fortresses were lost, the war department has notified the officer's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Alexander of 116 Academy st., Manlius. The telegram reached Mr. and Mrs. Alexander on the 22d birthday of their son, a navigator on a Flying Fortress stationed in England since early last January. The name of the bomber on which Lt. Alexander was serving was never mentioned in his letters to his parents. He was a graduate of Manlius high school and was a sophomore at Cortland State Teachers college when he enlisted in the air corps in January, 1942. After training at San Antonio, Tex., he was sent to the Selman Field Navigation school at Monroe, La., and was commissioned a second lieutenant at graduation. His promotion to first lieutenant was announced in a letter received by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander from England last August," The Post-Standard, 10/18/1943. "Missing in action over Germany since Oct. 14, 1943, and now held to be dead by the war department, the will of Carl A. Alexander, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Alexander of this village (Manlius), was offered for probate in surrogate's court in Syracuse last Saturday...Murphy, Young & Parsons representing the petitioning parents, revealed that the Order of the Purple Heart has been awarded the young Manlius man posthumously. It bore the signature of President Truman. The notice from the war department that their son has been held dead following official inquiry into all of the circumstances, was received by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander last week, ending 22 months of uncertainty and a hope that he might be a prisoner of war. The official notice was accompanied by a personal letter of condolence lauding the heroism of their son and extending the appreciation of the nation for the great service rendered and of the extreme sacrifice made. The notice stated that Alexander was a member of a B-17 bomber crew whose mission was to bomb Schweinfurt. The big bomber was last seen near the target and it is assumed that it was shot down by anti-aircraft fire. The official inquiry conducted after the usual lapse of one year did not produce further details. The will which bequeaths the entire estate of the testator to his mother, Mrs. Marion Alexander, was executed at a Kansas air base in March, 1943, and witnessed by three army officers. The date of death was officially stated to be Aug. 14, 1945. The value of the estate, all personal property, was not revealed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945. "There will be a memorial service for Lt. Carl A. Alexander...Oct. 21, in the Manlius Baptist Church...Lieutenant Alexander was reported as missing over Schweinfurt, Germany, October 14, 1943, while on his 22nd mission. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Alexander of this village (Manlius), received a notice from the War Department on Aug. 14, 1945, that their son was presumed to be dead... In December, 1942, he was graduated from navigator's school at Selman Field, Monroe, La. and sent overseas in April, 1943. Alexander had been awarded the Air medal with three oak leaf clusters and the Purple Heart was awarded posthumously to his parents. The memorial service has been arranged by the Archie Van Patten Post, 141, of American Legion. Besides his parents, Lieutenant Alexander is survived by a brother, Harold Alexander, Jr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945.

Alexander, William. Fayetteville. "...William W. Alexander, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Alexander, 209 Warren st., Fayetteville (has)...been graduated as marine second lieutenant from the third platoon commanders' class, Quantico, Va...Lt. Alexander was a member of Delta Upsilon at the University of Michigan where he was graduated as a mechanical engineer," The Post-Standard, 4/24/1945. "Lt. William W. Alexander, U.S.M.C.R., left by plane last Sunday for Ocean Side, Calif., after spending a ten-day leave at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Alexander, 209 Warren street. Lt. Alexander was commissioned in April and has since completed his training as an officer in the Marine Field Artillery," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945.

Allen, David. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Allen, John Vincent. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "George Bacel, Clinton Landers and Howard Landers spent the week-end at Camp Edwards, Mass., visiting J. Vincent Allen, who is stationed there. They also toured Boston and the vicinity," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1941. "Pvt. J. Vincent Allen of the 102nd Separate Battalion C. A. (A. A.) Camp Edwards, Mass., is spending a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Allen, before leaving for southern maneuvers," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/18/1941. "A cablegram has been received by relatives that PFC John V. Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Allen, 408 So. Manlius street, this village, who is serving with the American forces in Australia, has been promoted to Corporal in the Coast Artillery. He has been in the army since April, 1941. Better known as Vincent, he was graduated from Fayetteville High School with the class of 1938. He played baseball and with championship basketball teams while in high school. He was employed at the Precision Castings Co. at the time of his induction," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1942. "Another visitor on our office (The Eagle-Bulletin) one day last week was Cpl. Vincent Allen...who arrived home only recently after serving 41 months in the Pacific area. Corporal Allen saw plenty of action with the armed forces in Australia, New Guinea and the Philippines. He participated in air-borne action in the islands in the final period of his service, being assigned to a glider invasion force. Corporal Allen enlisted for service in February, 1941, and has been given an honorable discharge under the point system. Asked what his plans were for the future, he said that he hadn't made up his mind but he thought he would just enjoy being a civilian for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945.

Alley, James. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Alspaugh, Ralph. Manlius School. "Ralph W. Alspaugh, 6 year old son of Lt. Col. and Mrs. Ralph Alspaugh, was taken to the Crouse-Irving hospital Wednesday after where he was treated for lacerations about the face, hands and knee, suffered when he was knocked down by an automobile at the corner where the road turn to the Manlius School and Suburban Park. Lt. Col. Alspaugh is professor of military science and tactics in the Manlius School and was formerly at Cornell University," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945.

Amman, John. Eagle Village. Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Anderson, Harold N. Formerly Manlius. "Harold N. Anderson, who enlisted for service last October has been stationed at Signal Corps School, Paul Smiths, N. Y. Mr. Anderson resigned his position as commercial teacher in the Mayville Centralized School and left Nov. 22 to begin his study in preparation for army service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Harold Anderson, who has been studying at Signal Corps Training school at Paul Smith's will complete the course Feb. 19 and will go to New York for continued studies," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Harold N. Anderson visited over the week-end with his mother and sister. He is enroute from New York to his home in Mayville for a two week's furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Harold Anderson, who has been stationed at Camp Dix for several days expects to leave this week for Camp Edison, Sea Girt, N. J.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Letters From Our Boys In Service / The following letter was written by Pvt. Harold Anderson, a member of the Chautauqua Service Men's Club. Pvt. Anderson was a former resident of Manlius. / Although my address is Fort Monmouth, I am 17 miles from there, at Camp Edison. It is a small camp, on the coast, and everyone here is of the opinion that it is one of the country's nicest. I have attended school ever since I left Mayville and there is a lot more to come. It seems that I cannot get away from schools. Looking over the camps that I have been in, with the eyes of a member of the Service Club I have found answers to some of the points we used to discuss. The men are much more interested in mail than mess call, although food runs second. In my opinion the local news is the best service offered. Toilet articles, candy, gum, cigarettes, towels, etc., are always available at the PX at greatly reduced prices. Nearly every man eats more than he did in civilian life, and the mess does a good job of taking care of their needs. I imagine we have much more butter, meat, potatoes, ice cream, etc., than we would get at home but just before 'lights out,' nothing can take the place of home-made cookies and maple sugar. One of my former pupils is in the next barracks. Keep up the good work being done on the home front, as we enjoy and appreciate everything you are doing," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Mrs. J. Anderson received a letter on Saturday from her son, Harold, who left the States in September and is now stationed in Greenland. He writes that there is plenty of ice and snow, but the country is delightful," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Tech. Sgt. Harold N. Anderson, who has been stationed in Greenland for 10 months with a signal service unit, has written this week that they have had two months of warm days, but indications were that cold days were near. Recently, they have enjoyed programs of orchestral music and soloists from the united States. The base is fully equipped with everything for their comfort and their food is excellent, Anderson reported," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/1/1944. "T/5 Harold Anderson of the 23rd Signal Service Company, who has been stationed for 18 months in Greenland, has written that for two weeks they had been enjoying beautiful weather. The winter, while severe, was mild compared with former years. Life continues the same, month after month, with a good movie now and then, basketball twice each week, and the radio. 'We enjoy ourselves surprisingly well in spite of Greenland, the world's largest island, composed of ice, rocks and fjords,' writes Anderson," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "T/5 Harold Anderson of the 23rd Signal Service Co., who has been stationed in Greenland for 18 months has returned to the States and is passing his furlough with his wife at their home in Mayville, and will visit his mother and sister in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "T/5 Harold Anderson and Mrs. Anderson, of Mayville, N.Y., enroute to Lake Placid where he will be reassigned, will spend the week end with his mother and sister in Moulter street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945. "T/5 Harold Anderson, of Crowder, Mo., is passing a two weeks furlough with Mrs. Anderson at their home in Mayville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945. "T/5 Harold Anderson, formerly located in Greenland, is now stationed at Camp Shanks, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Harold Anderson, who recently received an honorable discharge from the Army following three years of service, two of which were spent in Greenland, has returned to his home in Mayville, N. Y., and is now teaching in the commercial department at Mayville Central school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Andres, Leonard Gordon. Kirkville. "The death in service of Leonard Gordon Andres, 19, F 2/c USNR, son of Mrs. Ernest Cathy, RD 2, Kirkville, was announced yesterday by the navy department in a telegram to Mrs. Cathy. No details of the death were given in the telegram, which stated that more information will be forwarded as soon as it is available. After training at Sampson naval station after he entered service in Sept. 1943, Andres was stationed at several naval bases along the Atlantic coast. He was transferred to sea duty in January. A pupil at Cortland high school, he was employed by the Syracuse Rendering Co. before entering service," The Post-Standard, 12/1/1944. Kirkville P.O. according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Andrews, Robert. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Robert Andrews, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Andrews of the Manlius-Cazenovia rd., has written his parents from Japan. He was expecting a visit from Billy Fausold, who was soon to return to the States, having completed his time in service. Robert has been promoted to T/5," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/4/1946.

Archer, Russell. Formerly Manlius. "Major Russell Archer, a former Manlius resident, left Providence, R. I. for overseas. Mrs. Archer and their son, Sidney, have been visiting Mr. Archer's mother in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943.

Arciszewski, Chester F. Kirkville. "Three Onondaga county soldiers have been graduated as aerial gunners from the Harlingen flexible gunnery school at Harlingen army air field, Tex., and have been awarded silver wings. Unless retained at Harlingen as instructors, they will join combat bomber crews after receiving delays to visit relatives. They are...Chester F. Arciszewski, son of Mrs. Augusta Arciszewski of Kirkville RD 2," The Post-Standard, 1/3/1944. Kirkville P.O. according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Armstrong, Collin, 3rd. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Collin Armstrong, 3rd..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Pvt. Collin Armstrong, Jr., has been discharged from the Miami Beach Hospital and is now with the 36th Technical School Sqd. at Seymour-Johnson Field, in North Carolina..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Collin Armstrong will leave on Friday to spend Christmas with their son, Pvt. Collin Armstrong, 3rd, at Seymour Johnson Field, North Carolina, where he is training for aircraft technician," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Seymour Johnson Field, N. C. --Completing airplane mechanics' school here this week, Pvt. Collin Armstrong, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Collin Armstrong, Sr., 532 Genesee street, Fayetteville, was honored as high man of his graduating class at this station of the Army air forces training command," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "Pvt. Collin Armstrong, Jr., has been spending a couple of weeks with his parents, after completing a four-week course at a P-47 School at Farmingdale, L. I. At the expiration of his furlough, he reported to a base in Dover, Del.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Pvt. Collin Armstrong returned to Dover, Del., Monday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "Pvt. Collin Armstrong, of the Army Air Base Unit at Dover, Del., spent the week end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Pvt. Collin Armstrong, 3rd, has returned to his base in Dover, Del.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Cpl. Collin Armstrong, Jr., stationed at Dover, N. J., A.A.B., is passing a short furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/26/1945. "Cpl. Collin Armstrong has returned to Dover, Del.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945. Army release...Corp. Collin Armstrong, Jr., 532 Genesee st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 2/21/1946.

Armstrong, Donald. Fayetteville. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Donald Armstrong..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Aronson, Richard. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included...Lt. Richard Aronson...all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Ashworth, George. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. George Ashworth of North Carolina recently spent a furlough with his mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "Three sons of Mrs. Ethel Ashworth of 114 Elm St., Minoa, are serving in the Pacific, two in the army and one with the navy. George Ashworth, 24, has been promoted from private first class to staff sergeant after participating in the American invasion of Guam, where he is stationed. He married the sister of his army buddy, the former Miss Clara Byea of Wells, Me., in February, shortly before going overseas," The Post-Standard, 10/10/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Ashworth, George, 114 Elm Street, Minoa, N.Y."

Ashworth, James David. Minoa. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Gerald Shanahan and James Ashworth were inducted in U. S. Army October 6th," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/9/1942....James Ashworth...left for army service Tuesday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Three sons of Mrs. Ethel Ashworth of 114 Elm St., Minoa, are serving in the Pacific, two in the army and one with the navy...T/5 James Ashworth, Jr., has been in New Caledonia with the engineer corps for two years. All three brothers were formerly employed by the New York Central Railroad system. Their mother and sister, Miss Margaret Ashworth, 16, have been awarded service medals for airplane spotting by the aircraft warning service," The Post-Standard, 10/10/1944. "Discharged at Scott Field, Ill.: T/4 James D. Ashworth, 144 Elm st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 12/23/1945 (most records show 114 Elm st., Minoa). "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Ashworth, James, 114 Elm Street, Minoa, N.Y."

Ashworth, Lyman. Minoa. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Navy...Lyman H. Ashworth, 114 Elm st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "Three sons of Mrs. Ethel Ashworth of 114 Elm St., Minoa, are serving in the Pacific, two in the army and one with the navy...Lyman Ashworth, S 1/c, 20, is serving somewhere in the Southwest Pacific on an LST..." The Post-Standard, 10/10/1944. "The following enlisted personnel were discharged yesterday at the U. S. naval separation center, Sampson...Lyman H. Ashworth, coxswain, 114 Elm st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 11/16/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Ashworth, Lyman, 114 Elm Street, Minoa, N.Y."

Assimon, Peter G. Minoa. 323 S. Main, St., Minoa, inducted into the Marines, The Post-Standard, 11/6/1943. "PFC Peter G. Assimon, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Assimon of Minoa, has finished basic training at Parris Island, and is stationed at New River, N. C. He enlisted in the marine corps in November, 1943, after being graduated from Minoa high school," The Post-Standard, 5/21/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Assimon, Peter G., 323 South Main St., Minoa, N.Y.

Ayling, Frederick C. Fayetteville. "Frederick C. Ayling, Jr., of Woodchuck Hill rd., Fayetteville, has received his commission of second lieutenant in the army after graduation from the tank destroyer officer candidate school at Camp hood, Tex.," The Post-Standard, 9/22/1943.

Ayling, Kingsley. Fayetteville. "The following service men are arriving at east and west coast ports, according to The Associated Press. Aboard the Thomas Cresap at Newport News...Corp. Kingsley Ayling, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard 1/2/1946. Overseas return transport.

Ayling, Peter. Formerly Fayetteville. "Peter Ayling, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Ayling of St. Petersburg, Fla., former residents of this village (Fayetteville), was commissioned a second lieutenant and awarded his silver wings at Marfa Army Air Field, Texas, advanced two-engine pilot school, according to recent announcements," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944.

Bacel, George ("Pete"). Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Among the hundreds who are flocking to the recruiting station in Syracuse to join the nation's fighting forces since the attack on the United States by Japan and declaration of war by the Axis powers are many from the towns of Manlius and DeWitt. Enlisting from Fayetteville are:...Marines...Peter Bacel..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. "It is a small world after all. Two Fayetteville boys who entered the service a year ago and went their different ways met one day not so long ago on the Solomon Islands. George Goodfellow, son of Carl Goodfellow, and George (Pete) Bacel, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Bacel, enlisted December 8, 1941, and were assigned to different branches of service. Pfc. Goodfellow has seen service with the fleet marines doing coast guard and convoy duty, and is now in Guadalcanal. Pfc. Bacel is with the land combat and communication division and likewise was sent to Guadalcanal where they met. It was a happy moment for both boys. Goodfellow and Bacel have been lifelong friends and before entering the service had spent many hours hunting and fishing together. And so, according to the story, after preliminary greetings and salutations, their conversation immediately turned to fishing. However, they did not report whether they had any opportunities to fish in the blue Pacific for anything other than Japs," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Pfc. George Bacel, who was one of the first Marines to land on Guadalcanal, is now somewhere in Australia, according to word received by his parents...Although he has not been home on a furlough since his enlistment, Mr. and Mrs. Bacel visited him in Washington, D. C. last April. Pfc. Bacel received his boot training at Parris Island," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/5/1943. "George (Pete) Bacel, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Bacel of Fayetteville, had a broad smile of approval when (a) picture was taken of an Irish colleen and himself, somewhere in Europe (?, probably Australia). George is in the Marine service. Since this picture was taken word has been received from Lt. William Woznek stating that he met George in the Pacific area, both men were classmates at Fayetteville High School. Woznek says 'Pete' is the same old boy, only a little fatter and tougher, and like all our American boys over there, is anxious to get this thing over with," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Marines include George Bacel who participated in the invasion and taking of Guadalcanal..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. ""Pfc. George H. Bacel, who enlisted in the marines three days after the Pearl Harbor attack, is home on a 30-day furlo with his parents at 100 Washington st....After training at Parris Island, PFC Bacel landed on Guadalcanal Sept. 18, 1942 and was sent to Australia for a rest after four months. He then returned to duty and saw action in New Guinea, Cape Gloucester and Hill 660," The Post-Standard 9/28/1944. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Fred Norman of this village have announced the engagement of their daughter, Lorraine Clara Norman, to George H. Bacel, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Bacel of (Washington street) Fayetteville...Mr. Bacel is a graduate of Fayetteville high school, and served four years with the USMC, with 29 months in the South Pacific," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/3/1946. "On Saturday morning, May 25, at 9:30 o'clock in St. Patrick's Church in this village (Chittenango), Miss Lorraine Clara Norman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Norman, became the bride of George Henry Bacel, son of Mr. and Mrs. George P. Bacel of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/31/1946. "George Bacel, commander of American Legion Post 369, works on a memorial to be dedicated Sunday in the Fayetteville Cemetery...at 2 p.m. Sunday American Legion Post 369 in Fayetteville will dedicate a stone memorial honoring those who fell in battle. The 10-ton triangular chunk of local limestone sits on a cement pad just inside Fayetteville Cemetery on Route 257....the face of the stone (reads) 'To Those Who Served...' Post 369 Commander George Bacel said the dedication ceremony...will culminate two years of effort among local veterans to erect a memorial to their fallen comrades. Bacel, who claims to have been the first resident of Fayetteville to enlist in the armed services following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, said the monument reminds him of his Marine Corps buddies who never returned from the Guadalcanal campaign in 1942. However, Bacel, said, the monument also reminds him of something else: that the village of Fayetteville has (had) no monument to veterans who served in World War I and II, Korean and Vietnam," The Post-Standard, 5/16/1991.

Badley, Robert C. Fayetteville. "The following naval personnel have been discharged at the separation center at Sampson...Robert C. Badley, MM 2/c, N. Manlius st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/21/1945.

Bahouth, Edmond A. Fayetteville. "Local men were among the 56 accepted for services in the armed forces this week...Navy. Edmond A. Bahouth, 220 W. Genesee st., Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Twelve men from this area have completed basic training at Sampson and are on leave. All seamen second class, they are Edmond..." The Post Standard, 12/1/1943. "Eddie Bahouth, Yeoman 2/c, is home from the Pacific area and is passing a 30-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emil Bahouth, in West Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945. "S 1/c Eddie Bahouth, stationed in Brooklyn, visited his parents...over New Years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946.

Bahouth, Emil, Jr. Fayetteville. "Miss 'Bea' Havill of (Fayetteville) was instrumental in bringing two local boys together in the South Pacific through correspondence which she carried on with each of them. In a letter to Seaman 1/c Burle Whorrall of Manlius, she told him the number of the ship that Emil Bahouth, Jr., of Fayetteville, also a seaman 1/c, was on. Whorrall investigated and found that Bahouth's ship was in a bay about three miles from where his own was docked. A meeting was arranged and the boys, who were good friends at home, had a happy reunion. They said the meeting was short but worthwhile, and they are planning another get-together..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944.

Bahouth, Frank, Jr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Frank Bahouth, 22, who has been associated with his father in the shoe business, has joined the Air Corps, and left Monday for Fort Niagara, and expects to be assigned to the officers training school in Missouri. He wants to be a pilot," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. A good football and basketball player in his days at Fayetteville High School, Bahouth went to the American University at Beruit, Syria (Beirut, Lebanon) , for a year before he entered Syracuse University. He was graduated last June, his specialty being advertising and he has been with his father in the business since," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Corp. Frank Bahouth left Monday morning for Fort Wayne, Inc. after spending a few days furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bahouth. Corp. Bahouth will leave Fort Wayne soon to go to Miami, Fla., where he will take officer's training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/15/1943. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Nicholas Bahouth...Mr. Bahouth says his son, Nicky, is now in the mechanical division of the air service and is at present located at Miami, Fla. He says Nicky likes the summer weather there and also states that he expected to pay his brother, Frank, who is also stationed in Florida, a visit sometime this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Eleven Central New York men have been graduated from the officer candidate school of the technical training command at Miami Beach, Fla., and have received their commissions as second lieutenants in the army air forces...Frank Bahouth, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 4/28/1943. "Lt. Frank Bahouth, who has been stationed at Miami Beach, Fla., has been spending a week's furlough with his parents...He will go to a base in Pennsylvania upon his return," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Lt. Frank Bahouth has been spending a few days with his parents.." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943. "Lt. Frank Bahouth, stationed in Pennsylvania, spent the week-end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Announcement has been made of the engagement of Miss Marie Pietrafesa...to Lt. Frank W. Bahouth, Jr., U. S. A. A. F...Lt. Bahouth studied abroad and was graduated from Syracuse University. He recently graduated from the Army Air Force Intelligence School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "On Saturday, Aug. 14, at St. John's the Evangelist Church, Miss Ann Marie Pietrafessa, daughter of Mrs. Anthony Pietrafessa of Rugby Road, became the bride of Lt. Frank Bahouth, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bahouth of Fayetteville...Lt. Bahouth has been in the army for about two years, serving in the military intelligence branch, and is now stationed at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. The couple will live in Missouri," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Lt. Frank Bahouth spent a few days recently with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Frank Bahouth..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Headquarters, 13th AAF, Southwest Pacific.--the Air Medal has been presented to Lieut. Frank Bahouth, Jr., of Fayetteville, N. Y., officer in a 13th AAF Liberator squadron. The award, a citation accompanying the medal declared, was made for 'meritorious achievement while participating in sustained operational missions. The flights were of a hazardous nature in areas where enemy opposition was habitually encountered.' Lieutenant Bahouth...entered the Army as a private in January, 1942. He was commissioned in April, 1943. In November the same year, he was ordered to overseas duty with the 13th AAF, veteran air force that battled the Japs from Guadalcanal to Truk and then turned to assist in the Southwest Pacific drive. His wife, the former Ann Marie Pietrafessa, resides at 620 Rugby road, Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Headquarters, 13th AAF, Southwest Pacific--Over the long endless reaches of the Pacific, time and time again 'Bomber Barons,' a crack B-24 Liberator bombing unit of the 13th AAF in the Southwest Pacific, ranged out to spread death and destruction to the Japanese wherever they were. Lieut. Frank Bahouth, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bahouth, Sr., 507 E. Genesee street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has recently been promoted to the rank of First Lieutenant. Previously he had been awarded the Air Medal for 'meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flights on combat operational missions of a hazardous nature.' ...After studying at the Air Intelligence School, Harrisburg, Pa., Lieut. Bahouth embarked for overseas service in October, 1943," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "Headquarters, 13th A.A.F., Philippines--Three old friends, all of central Onondaga, were reunited in the Southwest Pacific, Captain William P. Andrews, First Lieutenant Thomas B. Cahill, and First Lieutenant Frank Bahouth, Jr., were all on the same tiny island for two months before they discovered each other with the help of a newspaper clipping sent to Lieutenant Cahill. Captain William P. Andrew, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Andrews, of 244 Ashdale Avenue, Syracuse, N.Y., and Lieutenant Thomas B. Cahill, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Cahill, of 313 Spring street, Fayetteville, N.Y. are both members of an Infantry unit that has battled the Japanese from Oro Bay, New Guinea, to the Moluccas Islands, Netherlands East Indies. Lieutenant Cahill, a graduate of Fayetteville high school and Niagara university, played a prominent part in sports at the latter institution. He attended Infantry Officers' Candidate School at Fort Benning, Georgia, and departed for overseas duty in February, 1944. Lieutenant Bahouth, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Bahouth, Sr., of 507 East Genesee street, Fayetteville, N.Y., is assigned to the 'Bomber Barons,' oldest heavy bombardment unit of the 13th AAF, veteran jungle Air Force that has battled the Japanese from Guadalcanal to Formosa..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945.

Bahouth, Nicholas. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Nicholas Bahouth...Mr. Bahouth says his son, Nicky, is now in the mechanical division of the air service and is at present located at Miami, Fla. He says Nicky likes the summer weather there and also states that he expected to pay his brother, Frank, who is also stationed in Florida, a visit some time this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Pvt. Nicholas Bahouth is passing a week's furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bahouth," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "Cpl. Nicholas Bahouth will leave today for Fort Myers, Fla., after spending two weeks with is parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bahouth," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Nicholas Bahouth in the army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Bailey, Lester. Kirkville P.O. according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bailey, Richard H. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O. according to list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Baker, Donald E. Fayetteville. "Discharged at Scott Field, Ill.: Donald E. Baker, 101 Feeder rd., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/23/1945.

Baker, Howard S. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) Among those sworn in at the induction center on Tuesday for military service were six local men. They were... Howard S. Baker of 14 Lynacres, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. Attended Fayetteville High School.

Baldwin, Kenneth. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Kenneth Baldwin has written his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Baldwin, of this village, that he is stationed for the present at Camp Upton, L. I. Enrolled with the army reserves at Syracuse University, he was called for active duty last week and left June 4, to spend a few days with his uncle in New Jersey before being assigned to camp. Baldwin completed his second year in chemical engineering at S. U. this year with the same high rating that he had maintained throughout his college career. He expects to continue in chemical engineering in the Army. A leader of Boy Scout Troop 51 for several years, Baldwin had acted as assistant scoutmaster under Scoutmaster Burtt and during the recent Camp-o-Ree held here had charge of the 125 scouts assembled for one night. He also put Troop 51 through their paces in the Memorial Day parade. At the District Court of Honor held May 30th he was presented with a gift from the Troop in recognition of his work with the Scouts," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Baldwin have received a communication from their son, Pvt. Kenneth Baldwin, that he has been transferred to Fort McClellan, Ala., for basic training, and is squad leader of the first platoon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Corp. Kenneth Baldwin left Tuesday to visit relatives in Vermont after passing a week with his parents...Corp. Baldwin has completed his course at Ft. Clairborne, La., and after his furlough will report to Ft. Belvoir, Va., for officer's training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Kenneth Baldwin..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Kenneth Baldwin...was graduated from officers' school at Camp Belvoir, Va., last week, where he received his gold bars and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the U. S. Army. He is on a furlough this week and is visiting his parents, after which he will go to Camp Breckenridge, Ky., where he has been assigned to the 2733 Light Equipment Co. special corps of training engineers for construction work. Lieut. Baldwin visited his sister, Mrs. Donald Delaney, at Alden, Pa., enroute home and plans to spend a couple of days with his brother, Guy Baldwin, in Buffalo on his way to Kentucky," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "Lt. Kenneth Baldwin, stationed at Shelby, Miss., arrived in town Sunday to spend a few days with his parents...He left Friday morning for Burlington, Vt., where he will visit relatives before returning to Shelby via New York City. "Kenneth Baldwin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Baldwin, has been promoted to First Lieutenant according to word received by his parents. Lt. Baldwin is officer in charge of all explosives in District X which is the entire territory around Manila. He has under his command 200 soldiers, 200 Filipinos, 20 G. I's and is responsible for 500 tons of dynamite. Lt. Baldwin's office was at one time only two blocks from General MacArthur's headquarters and he had often talked with the General, he states in his letters home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Morning Mail / Dear Editor: I thought you might be interested in what we here in the Philippines receive in the way of an Army newspaper, also a bit on life in general here.* Your family is certainly well represented in the service--a splendid record to be envied by others. I have been in Manila since the first of May, assigned to the Engineer Depots of Base X (Manila). Over a third of a million American troops are in the Manila area. It is a Mecca for men on pass, who are stationed in the Philippines, a source of many replacement depots, various headquarters, general hospitals, etc. The harbor, with its 15 piers, is among the busiest in the world. Manila was once a luxurious, thriving metropolis of 600,000 - clean, spacious, gay, beautiful, and modern - the Pearl of the Orient, the gem of the Far East - Upholding the standard of Christian democracy in this part of the globe, lighting a torch for the more less-enlightened peoples of this part of the world to follow. It contained industry, commerce, a fine harbor, the Capitol of the Philippine Commonwealth Government, the residence of the American High Commissioner, etc. The three long, arduous years of Japanese occupation stripped the land and people, too, so that goods of all kinds--food, clothing, shelter, etc., are at a premium, the cause of a flourishing black market-sinister, yet cunning in its activity. A quarter of every ship's cargo unloaded on the docks winds up in the black market. This process has cost the American people over two billion dollars. The Military Police do their best, but the problem is immense. When we arrived, the last of the dead bodies, unexploded bombs and booby traps. etc., were being cleared out. Sewage, garbage filth flowed like wine in the streets. The roads were blocked with rubble or filled with gaping holes. There was no municipal power--bridges were blown out, etc. Men, women and children clothed themselves in rags--looked for bits to eat, etc. Now the situation is greatly improved--many roads have been repaired, thousands of tons of rubble have been cleared away, six bridges have been constructed over the Pasig River, which splits the city in half, approximately on an eat-west line. The city itself is situated on the east coast of Manila Bay, northeast of Corregidor, Bataan and the entrance to the bay. Food is becoming more plentiful, municipal power is available, the water system is functioning, etc. Prices are still exorbitant, however. For example: A poor banana split is two peso ($1 American), a good dinner is 8 or 10, etc. The law of supply and demand is here in force--a small supply, a large demand, consequently the trend toward inflation. The best of luck. A toast to the day when we shall be able to meet and converse together again. Sincerely, Lt. Kenneth R. Baldwin. *We received a copy of the Manila army newspaper. Also a photo of Ken, the photo was rather dark or we would have printed it in the Eagle-Bulletin," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. "Lt. Kenneth Baldwin has been transferred to Bay of Batangus, about 100 miles south of Manila. His work is Engineers Depot Operation--loading and unloading, supervising the sorting and segregating of imports from American and neighboring islands. Loads from ships come in on trucks, boxes must be stacked, junk must be declared salvage or be destroyed; what crates are needed, what shipments to different encampments--these are questions to be answered by the 733rd Engineers Depot Co. There are 500 Filipinos and 2,000 Japanese prisoners of war where Lt. Baldwin is stationed. Lt. Baldwin is second ranking officer in charge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/10/1946. "Word comes from the U. S. Government to Mr. and Mrs. Bert Baldwin of the promotion of their son Lt. Kenneth Baldwin, stationed at the Bay of Batangas in the Philippines, 100 miles south of Manila. The letter stated that Lt. Baldwin had been advanced to Administrative Officer in charge of the U. S. Army forces Western Pacific Engineers Supply Depot. He will supervise and direct, receive, check and store all supplies from America and neighboring islands, for which the depot is responsible," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/23/1946. "Boy Scouts in this area may be interested in the work of one of their former scouts in the Philippines, Lt. Kenneth R. Baldwin has formed a troop of Filipino boys at the Bay of Batangas, the first troop ever formed in the Islands. Although hindered by lack of any experienced help, and limited in time, 45 boys are eager for any scout tactics which their leader can furnish. Troop No. l, Batangas offers a challenge to Troop 51 in Fayetteville in knot tying, merit badges and increased membership. Other boys 'sharp as a whip' are awaiting a chance. Although of different beliefs, there is no friction since one of the scout laws calls for 'freedom of worship,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/20/1946.

Ball, J. Donald. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Ballantyne, Reginald, Jr. Manlius. "Second Lt. Reginald M. Ballantyne, 21, is serving in the infantry in Italy, where he arrived Easter Sunday. He is a son of the late Dr. Reginald M. B. Ballantyne of Manlius and Mrs. Ballantyne, now living in Garden City, L. I. A graduate of the Manlius school, Lt. Ballantyne entered service two years ago after attending military school at Plattsburg. His uncle, twin brother of his father, is Col. Lloyd W. Ballantyne, head surgeon at Westover Field regional hospital, Mass. Both Col. Ballantyne and the late Dr. Ballantyne served in world war one. They are graduates of the Medical College, Syracuse university," The Post-Standard, 7/2/1944."2nd Lieutenant Reginald Ballantyne, Jr...is back on combat duty after being wounded in action and hospitalized in Italy. He has been awarded the Purple Heart. His unit was one of the first to enter Rome and was in all the battles from Anzio to Rome and beyond," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/15/1944. "Lt. Reginald B. Ballantyne, Jr....has been awarded the Bronze Star for heroic achievement in action in Italy on the Fifth Army front. He is a member of the 34th 'Red Bull' Division of the 133rd Infantry Regiment. His wife, Mrs. Constance Ballantyne, resides in Brooklyn," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945.

Ballard, Harold. Manlius. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included...Lt. Harold Ballard, of Manlius, all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Ballou, Murray, Jr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Murray Ballou of Highbridge street enlisted at the naval recruiting office last Friday. He expects to become a deep-sea diver. Ballou, drummer in the Fayetteville High School band, told recruiting officers he had made many underwater trips in Green Lake and Limestone Creek in a homemade diving helmet," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/4/1941. "Several local boys who joined the Navy this year have been passing a ten-day furlough with their parents. Murray Ballou and Almerian Dykeman, home for the first time since their enlistment are passing their ten days with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Ballou, Sr., and Mr. and Mrs. Dykeman," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1941. "Murray Ballou, Jr., had a 72-hour leave over the week end and hitch-hiked from his camp in Virginia and spent Saturday night and Sunday with his parents...He returned via train Sunday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/30/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Murray Ballou received a letter from their son Murray, Jr., who is in the United States navy, stating that he is en route to Trinidad. His plane stopped in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where he met Dick Coughlin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Coughlin of Salt Springs road and a former pal of his, and spent the night in a bunk next to Dick's," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/13/1942. "Murray Ballou, Jr., of the U. S. navy, spent a 48-hour furlough with his mother, Mrs. Murray Ballou and sister, Jean, at their home in Highbridge street the first of the week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "Seaman lst Class Murray Ballou, Jr., has been passing a five-day furlough with his mother...and attended the graduation of his sister, Jeanne, Tuesday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Murray Ballou, Jr., seaman 1/c, spent a few days recently with his mother and sister at their home on Highbridge street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include Murray Ballou, Pacific fleet..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Ballou, Murray Ballou, Sr. Fayetteville. "Murray Ballou, Sr., of the 22nd armored division, stationed at Fort Knox, Ky., spent a few days recently at his home in Highbridge street. Mr. Ballou and his son, Murray, Jr., are believed to be the only father and son combination from the area who are serving in the armed forces at this time. The senior Ballou is a veteran of the first world war and enlisted for service in March of this year. Murray, Jr., who has been in the Navy since April, 1941, is now chief radar operator on the U. S. S. Callahan. He was stationed in Trinidad for twelve months of this time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/19/1943.

Barr, William T. Formerly Manlius. "William T. Barr of Buffalo, formerly of Manlius has received orders to report Aug. 30 to the U. S. Naval Reserve Officers Training School at Notre Dame," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Lt. William Barr, USNR...returned from Pacific duty on Wednesday and was met by Mrs. Barr who resides at 135 Redfield Place, Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945.

Bates, Edward. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Bateson, James J. Minoa. "The following registrants with their order numbers in selective service district 473, comprising the towns of Dewitt, Manlius and Salina, will be inducted into the army today: ...James J. Bateson, 232 DeSilva st., Minoa..." The Post Standard, 3/19/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. James Bateson of Fort Knox, Kentucky, visited his parents last weekend," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Pvt. James Bateson of Fort Knox, Kentucky has been spending a ten-day furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "...He is a former employee of the New York Central railroad," The Post-Standard, 8/21/1942. "Pvt. James Bateson of Fort Knox, Ky., spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Bateson,"The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Pvt. James Bateson of Fort Knox, Kentucky visited his parents for a few days this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Cpl. James Bateson of Fort Knox, Kentucky, spent a few days last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Bateson," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Bateson, James, 409 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Bateson, Wesley E. Minoa. Seven 17-year-olds from Syracuse and eight others from this area were sworn into the navy yesterday...at the Cahill building recruiting station. They are:...Wesley E. Bateson, 232 DeSilva st., Minoa..." The Post-Standard, 10/24/1944.

Battle, Anthony. Fayetteville. "Camp Lejeune, N.C. -- Marine Sergeant Anthony Battle, husband of Mrs. Catherine Battle of 800 N. Geddes street, Syracuse, N. Y. recently was named Commandant of the New River Detachment Marine Corps League, at the annual election of officers at the Jacksonville USO. Sergeant Battle, who is attached to the Service Battalion at this Marine Base, was one of the 13 charter members of the New River Detachment when it was founded here last June. A membership drive was held during October and the detachment now has over 100 members, including a large number of women marines. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, Battle was employed by a construction company in Syracuse before his enlistment in the Marine Corps in December, 1942. He is the son of Mrs. Stella Battle, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944.

Beacham, Howard F., Jr. Fayetteville. "Howard F. Beacham, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Beacham of Huntleigh Drive, left July 25 for the Great Lakes Naval Training Station at Chicago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Beattie, Henry Crawford. Fayetteville. "QM 2/c Henry Crawford Beattie of the U. S. S. Ambercrombie, arrived at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Beattie, on the Syracuse Road for a 30-day leave after having been in service with the Pacific fleet," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945.

Beauchat, Herman. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Inducted by Board 473, Herman R. Beauchat, 207 Spring st., Fayetteville. "2d Lt. Herman Beauchat, son of Mr. and Mrs. Justin Beauchat, 137 West Corning Avenue (Syracuse)...(was) among Flying Fortress pilots graduated from the Army Air Forces School, Hendricks Field, Sebring, Fla. Both Syracusans won their Army wings and commissions on May 28, Beauchat at Turner Field, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 9/7/1943.

Beauchat, Jack. Formerly Fayetteville. "Jack Beauchat of the U. S. Army, who has been spending a furlough with his family in Cazenovia, visited friends in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Jack Beauchat of Cazenovia, formerly of Fayetteville, left Tuesday morning for Albany where he was called to report for duty in the U. S. navy. Mrs. Beauchat and daughters, Ellen and Frances, will remain in Cazenovia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943.

Beebe, Ernest. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Pvt.. Ernest (Larry) Beebe, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Beebe of Maple dr., Fayetteville, has arrived at the finance replacement training center, Fort Benjamin training center, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., to begin basic training. Prior to his induction, Dec. 9, 1942, at Erie, Pa., he was a timekeeper in the war department's Keystone ordnance works, Geneva, Pa.," The Post-Standard, 3/28/1943.

Belge, Walter. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "T/5 Walter Belge of 108 E. Genesee Street, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Belge, of Jamesville, who has served four years with the 35th U. S. Engineers has been honorably discharged from the service, and is again enjoying life in the good old U. S. A., a cause for which so many of our boys have sacrificed their all. T/5 Belge put in 10 months with the Engineers on the AlCan Highway, and the rest of the time in different sectors of the European war theater. He had 118 points to his credit for services rendered," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1943.

Belkowitz, Samuel, Dr. Formerly Fayetteville. "Capt. Samuel Belkowitz, formerly of DeWitt, has been selected to attend an advanced course in medicine, it has been announced at his present station, Great Falls army air base, Great Falls, Mont. He will go to the Mayo foundation in Rochester, Minn., where he will receive specialized training in internal medicine for 12 weeks. Capt. Belkowitz will take his family to Rochester and after completion of the course, they will return to Great Falls," The Post-Standard, 3/29/1943. "Capt. Samuel Belkowitz, 303 Ambergate rd., Dewitt, is on active duty with the army air forces at Geiger Field, Spokane, Wash. He entered the army Oct. 14, 1942, and was formerly a physician," The Post-Standard, 7/15/1943. "Dr. Samuel Belkowitz of DeWitt and Syracuse, and formerly of Fayetteville, will leave Oct. 14 to become a member of the United States Air Corps Medical Division where he will rank as captain. He will be stationed at Miami Beach, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Capt. Samuel Belkowitz is home on furlough with his son, Martin, are visiting relatives in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943.

Bellefeuille, Edward C. Manlius. "Arrival on the U.S.S. Croatan due January 9, T/5 Edward C. Bellefeuille, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 1/10/1946.

Bender, Charles. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Charles Bender has already gone into ground school service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Mrs. Margaret Bender has received word that her son, Charles Bender, with the U. S. forces abroad, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant. Sgt. Bender is with the army air force ground crew," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/30/1942. "Capt. T. L. Keese and S/Sgt. Charles Bender, serving with the armed forces in the European Theater, are stationed within a few miles of each other, but only became aware of the fact a sort time ago. They made contact and had the opportunity of spending a day together reminiscing on the old home town and according to both men, the meeting was far better than medicine to them. Sgt. Bender, who has been overseas 21 months, has five stars on his campaign ribbon, denoting action in five major campaigns. Capt. Keese is with the Battalion Mobile Division and has been overseas about 18 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944. "Sgt. Charles Bender is home after 26 months overseas and for the first time in two and a half years since he entered the service. He is on 'delay enroute.' He has been serving with the Air Force Ground Crew and was last stationed in Italy. He also saw action in Africa and Sicily, and was stationed in England for a time. Sgt. Bender will report to Lincoln, Neb. for reassignment following his 21-day leave which he is spending with his mother...and his aunt, Mrs. Mabel Devereau,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "...Pfc. Earl Courtwright...is home on leave after having been wounded in Italy June 3. Pfc. Courtwright came over on the same boat with Sgt. Charles Bender..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Miss Lillian Beston, of East Syracuse, was feted...(and) will become the bride of Mrs. (Margaret) Bender's son, S/Sgt. Charles Bender, in the near future. Miss Beston left last night for Idaho where her marriage to Sgt. Bender will take place. Sgt. Bender is stationed at Gowen Field, after spending two and a half years overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944. "Mrs. Margaret Bender accompanied Miss Lillian Beston to Boise, Idaho, where this week Miss Beston will become the bride of...S/Sgt. Charles Bender, who is stationed at Gowen Field. They left Thursday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "The marriage of Miss Lillian Beston, daughter of Mrs. Frances Beston, of East Syracuse, and S/Sgt. Charles Bender, son of Mrs. Margaret Bender of this village (Fayetteville) and the late Claude Bender, was solemnized with a mass at the Army Air Base Chapel at Cowan Field, Boise, Idaho, at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning, Nov. 1...S/Sgt. and Mrs. Bender will live at 1111 Hayes st., Boise, Idaho, while the bridegroom is stationed at Gowen Field. Both the best man, S/Sgt. Verne Wright and the organist, Sgt. George Kennitz were buddies of Mr. Bender while they were serving overseas. Mrs. Margaret Bender returned to Fayetteville Monday after passing two weeks in Boise," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/10/1944. "S/Sgt. and Mrs. Charles Bender, of Boise City, Idaho, are visiting Sgt. Bender's mother...and aunt...in Fayetteville, and Mrs. Bender's mother...in East Syracuse this week. Dinners and parties have been given in their honor," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/16/1945. "Sergeant and Mrs. Charles Bender (Lillian Beston) are the parents of a son born Tuesday, Aug. 14 in Syracuse General hospital. Sgt. Bender is stationed in Boise, Idaho. The baby will be christened Charles Louis Bender, Jr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/17/1945. "S/Sgt. Charles Bender, who has been stationed at Boise City, Idaho, for the past year, is spending a week with his wife and son in East Syracuse and his mother, Mrs. Claude Bender, of Brooklea Drive. After his leave he will report to Fort Dix for his discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Bender, George. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "George Bender, who was inducted a few weeks ago is now stationed at Fort Belvoir, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/4/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Bender were hosts last Thursday night to a large party of friends when they entertained in honor of their son, Sgt. George Bender, home on leave, and their nephew Charles Bender recently discharged from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Bender, Harold C. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Harold C. Bender, of Fayetteville....Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942.

Bender, Robert F. Manlius. "Robert F. Bender...former Cornell student, is stationed at Syracuse university as an air crew student with the 65th college training detachment. He enlisted in the army air corps in August, 1942," The Post-Standard, 8/1943. "Lt. Robert F. Bender, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morton Bender, Manlius RD 1, is at Lincoln, Neb., with a Liberator bomber crew. He received his pilot's wings and commission in August at Spence Field, Augusta, Ga. He later trained at Panama City, Fla. Lt. Bender began his training in the AAF at Syracuse university where he was a pre-flight cadet. He is a graduate of Jamesville high school and attended Cornell university two years before entering service in August, 1942," The Post-Standard, 10/28/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Howard L. Cross, of Green Lake Road, announce the engagement of their daughter, Beverly, to Lt. Robert F. Bender, U. S. A. A. F., son of Mr. and Mrs. Morton Bender of Manlius...Lt. Bender was a student...when he enlisted in the Air Corps. He is on a 30-day leave at home, following four months as co-pilot on a B-24 Liberator Bomber with the 15th air force in Italy. He wears a European campaign ribbon, the Air Medal, and one star for combat missions," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945. "Second Lt. Robert F. Bender,...has reported to the AAF redistribution station 1 at Atlantic city, N. J., after four months of service in the European theater of operations. He was a pilot on a B-24 and engaged in nine combat missions. Lt. Bender wears the air medal...he went overseas Jan. 26, 1945," The Post-Standard, 7/14/1945. "On Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the United Church in this village, Miss Beverly Cross...became the bride of Lt. Robert Frank Bender, A.A.C.... Rev. Dr. Edwin T. Dahlberg, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Syracuse officiated at the double ring Episcopal ceremony...Lt. Bender and his bride left Sunday for Mentor Field, Calif., where he is to be an instructor for the Army Air Corps...He recently returned from overseas where he was a pilot with the 15th Air Force and engaged in nine combat missions. He wears the Air Medal with two stars," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. Honorably discharged...Second Lt. Robert F. Bender, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 10/10/1945. "Lt. and Mrs. Robert F. Bender will arrive Saturday from California to spend a few weeks with Mrs. Bender's parents...Lt. Bender is receiving an honorable discharge from the Army and will resume his studies at Cornell this fall, and after Nov. 1 the couple will reside at Ithaca, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Benedict, Alfred Morrell. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Morrell Benedict, who has enlisted in the U. S. Service, was honor guest at a party Sunday night at the home of Miss Aleyne Hayden in Manlius. On Monday night a farewell party was given at the home of his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Morrell Benedict...is another who has joined the service to be a flying cadet," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Pvt. Morrell Benedict, stationed at Camp Fort Wayne, in Indiana, is passing a ten-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "The announcement is made by Mrs. Duane C. Hayden of the Fayetteville-Manlius Road of the engagement of her daughter, Miss Aleyne V. Hayden to Pvt. Morrell Benedict, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Benedict of North Manlius street...Pvt. Benedict is a graduate of Fayetteville High School, and prior to his enlistment in the Army Air Corps, in January, he was employed by the A. & P. Co. He is now stationed in Indiana," The Eagle Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Pvt. Morrell Benedict of Bear Field, Ind., spent a few days recently with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/19/1943. "Sgt. Morrell Benedict of Fort Wayne, Ind., has been spending a five-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Sgt. Morrell Benedict from Baer Field, Indiana, spent three days recently with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Mrs. Duane C. Hayden of 107 Cleveland Blvd., Fayetteville, announces the approaching marriage of her daughter, Aleyne V. Hayden, to A/C Morrell Benedict, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Benedict, of Green Lake Road, Fayetteville. The wedding will take place on June 10th at Sherman, Texas, where the groom is now stationed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Perrin Field, Texas--Aviation Cadet Alfred M. Benedict, 26 ...has arrived at this AAF Training Command station for the basic flight stage of his training to become a pilot. During his ten weeks here, Cadet Benedict will learn aerial combat maneuvers and instrument flying at the controls of a 450-horsepower trainer plane," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Miss Aleyne V. Hayden, daughter of Mrs. Duane C. Hayden and the late Mr. Hayden formerly of Fayetteville, N.Y. and Syracuse, N. Y., became the bride of A/C A. Morrell Benedict...in the Post Chapel at Perrin Field, Sherman, Texas, at 8:00 p.m. June 10," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Mrs. Morrell Benedict and Mrs. D. C. Hayden...former residents of Fayetteville, have moved from Denison, Texas, to Houston, Texas, as A/S A. Morrell Benedict is now stationed at Ellington Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Sgt. Alfred M. Benedict, classification and file clerk for the Air Base Squadron, has been accepted for Air Cadet training, and has left for Keesler Field, at Biloxi, Miss. Sgt. Benedict...attended Fayetteville high school, from where he was graduated in 1934, and has been stationed at Baer Field, Ind., for the past 16 months. "Ellington Field, Tex.--More pilots are on their way to deal with enemies of the United Nations; this station's Advanced Pilot School, a unit of the Army Air Forces Training Command, has graduated another class of aviation cadet and students. Most of the trainees have received their bars as second lieutenants or flight officers, and their wings as pilots of twin-engined planes. Aviation students previously commissioned have received wings or--in the case of some who already were fliers--have taken the course for transition training to multi-engined aircraft. Members of the class included Lt. Alfred M. Benedict, 27, of Fayetteville...His wife...made her home in Houston while Lt. Benedict was completing his advanced training..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/15/1944. "...Lt. Benedict...was at one time employed by the Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., Syracuse," The Post-Standard, 9/15/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. Morrell Benedict and Mrs. D. C. Hayden have returned from Houston, Texas, for a short visit, as Lt. Benedict just received his commission and wings at Ellington Field, and is on a 15-day furlough before going on to Monroe, La. Mrs. Benedict will accompany her husband to Louisiana and Mrs. Hayden will go to Livingston, N. J. to visit her daughter, Mrs. R. B. Kimber," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944.

Benedict, Claude M., Jr. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Morley of Smith street, announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Morley, to Private Claude M. Benedict...Private Benedict is stationed at Fort Bragg, N. C. No date has been set for the wedding," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "A. W. Morley of Norfolk, Va., was at home over the week-end, coming to attend the wedding of his daughter, Mary Morley and Pvt. Claude Benedict," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1942. "Pvt. Claude Benedict is passing some time at home on a furlough, while recovering from a back injury," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1942. "Private Claude C. Benedict has returned to active duty somewhere in the South Pacific after having been confined to the hospital with a fever," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Cpl. Claude M. Benedict, Jr., 23, is the veteran of five South Pacific campaigns, including Guadalcanal, Rendova Island and New Georgia. He has been overseas 17 months and is serving with the field artillery in communications. He is the husband of Mrs. Mary Benedict of Manlius and the son of Supervisor and Mrs. Claude Benedict of Eagle Village. Before entering service two years ago he was employed at his father's store. His brother, Pfc. Harrison B. Benedict, 20, is an ordnance inspector at Camp Pickett, Va. Both boys were graduated from Manlius High School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944. "Honorably discharged Wednesday, Pfc. Claude M. Benedict, Manlius, RD," The Post-Standard, 10/12/1945.

Benedict, Harold. Manlius. "Harold Benedict, S 2/c, of the Sampson Naval Base, is spending a 7-day furlough at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Benedict," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945.

Benedict, Harrison B. Manlius. "Pfc. Harrison B. Benedict, 20, is an ordnance inspector at Camp Pickett, Va. Both boys (see Benedict, Claude) were graduated from Manlius High School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944. Benedict "worked for Monarch Liquor Co. before entering the army a year ago," The Post-Standard, 2/23/1944. "With U.S. Forces in France--" 'We fix anything' may be a boastful motto, but it is true of an Ordnance Heavy Maintenance (tank) company in Brittany, which repairs everything from tanks and self-propelled 155 mm. guns to wrist watches. Composed of all skilled technicians...the company has received three commendations for its work in the United States and overseas. Among the members of the unit is Pvt. Robert D. Benedict, of 113 Mechanic street, Fayetteville, and Pfc. Harrison B. Benedict, of Route 1, Manlius. The company maintained the caliber of its work overseas and received a commendation for their job of preparing vehicles for the invasion, which they followed a few weeks later," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Riley announce the marriage of their daughter, Dorothy Mae, to T/5 Harrison Benedict, U. S. A., son of Supervisor and Mrs. Claude B. Benedict of Eagle Village. The ceremony took place August 29th at the Methodist parsonage...The bridegroom was formerly employed by the Monarch Liquor Co. in Syracuse until his enlistment. After serving 16 months in the European theater of war, he is now stationed at Camp Bowie, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Benedict, Robert D. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pvt. Robert D. Benedict of Fort Slocum, N. Y., spent the week-end with his mother, Mrs. Allen Snook," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "Robert D. Benedict, son of Mrs. Allen Snook, has received his second promotion within a few weeks and now has rating of sergeant. Sgt. Benedict entered the service in April, 1942, and received his basic training at Fort Bragg, N. C. He was transferred to the Ordnance Dept. about a year ago, after which his company was sent to Greenland, where he is still stationed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "S/Sgt. Robert Benedict, home of furlough, spent the week-end with friends in Buffalo, N. Y., The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "S/Sgt. Robert Benedict has returned to Camp Pickett, Va., after spending three days with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Mrs. Allen Snook has received word of the safe arrival of her son, Pfc. Robert Benedict in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Allen N. Snook died Saturday morning after an illness of several years with a heart ailment. He had not, however, been confined to his bed, and his death was unexpected at this time...Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Pearl Paddock Snook, of Fayetteville; a step-daughter, Mrs. Arthur Carpenter, of Chittenango; a step-son, Sgt. Robert Benedict, who is with the armed forces in France; a brother, Harry Snook, of Manlius, and several cousins," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/15/1944. "With U.S. Forces in France--" 'We fix anything' may be a boastful motto, but it is true of an Ordnance Heavy Maintenance (tank) company in Brittany, which repairs everything from tanks and self-propelled 155 mm. guns to wrist watches. Composed of all skilled technicians...the company has received three commendations for its work in the United States and overseas. Among the members of the unit is Pvt. Robert D. Benedict, of 113 Mechanic street, Fayetteville, and Pfc. Harrison B. Benedict, of Route 1, Manlius. The company maintained the caliber of its work overseas and received a commendation for their job of preparing vehicles for the invasion, which they followed a few weeks later," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944. "Mrs. Allen Snook received word Monday night from her son, Pfc. Robert Benedict, that he had arrived in Boston and expected to be home the last of this week. Entering the service in April, 1942, he spent a year with the ordnance department in Greenland and has been in Europe for 19 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. "Miss Dorothy Elmer of Towanda, Pa. and Robert Benedict, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Benedict, former residents of Pompey Hollow, were married Nov. 14. Pvt. Benedict enlisted in the Army Air Corps in May and is now stationed at Fort Dix," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. "The following officers and enlisted men have been discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N.J...Pfc. Robert D. Benedict, 113 Mechanic st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/11/1945. "Robert Benedict arrived at his home in Mechanic street last Sunday, being honorably discharged from the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. "Robert Benedict arrived at his home...last Sunday, being honorably discharged from the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Robert Benedict...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Benson, Daniel. Fayetteville. "Sgt. Daniel Benson, who is stationed with the 15th Special Service Company at Yuma, Arizona, is spending a 15-day furlo with his mother, Mrs. Gladys Benson, of Warren street. Mrs. Proctor Fifield of Syracuse is also visiting at the home of her mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "T/Sgt. Daniel Benson is passing 30 days with his mother, Mrs. F. M. Benson, having returned from overseas last week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945.

Benson, Raymond W. Manlius. "Sgt. Raymond W. Benson...has been promoted to staff sergeant at an air bomber repair base in England, where he is a member of the maintenance division. S/Sgt. Benson...has been overseas since April, 1942, "The Post-Standard, 1/24/1945. "S/Sgt. Raymond W. Benson, son of Mrs. Charles Maxwell of Pompey Center road is a member of the maintenance division at an Eighth Air Force service command station in England where battle-damaged B-17 Flying Fortresses are repaired. He was graduated from Rockaway, N.J. high school in 1930 and New York State College of Forestry in 1939. He entered the service on Jan. 11, 1942, and has been stationed in the European theater of operations since April, 1942. Prior to entering the service he was assistant forest ranger at Medicine Bow National Forest, Laramie, Wyo.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945.

Bentley, Edward W. Manlius, 119 Academy st. Accepted into the Navy, "The Post-Standard, 12/4/1943.

Bertrand, Jack W. Formerly Manlius. "Jack W. Bertrand, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Bertrand of North Syracuse and formerly of Manlius, has been promoted to sergeant at Langley Field, Virginia, where he is stationed with U. S. Army aviation ground crew. Bertrand was the first man to be enlisted during a radio broadcast in Syracuse on April 3, 1939. He was subsequently stationed at West Point where he was a first class private, and at Mitchell Field, where he became a corporal. At Langley he is a member of the 22nd bombardment group," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/7/1941.

Bettinger, Eldred. Fayetteville. "Mrs. Eola Elizabeth Bettinger died at her home in South Burdick street, Friday, Oct. 20...Surviving are her husband, Asa Bettinger; one son, Eldred, U. S. Army; and one granddaughter," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Bex, Ellis E. (Bud). Manlius. "Ellis Bex, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bex of West Seneca street, left for Buffalo, N. Y. last week. He will soon begin his boot training at Sampson Naval base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Ellis E. Bex, S 2/c, is spending a nine day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bex, Sr. He will return to duty on Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "...Seaman 2/c Ellis Bex, a brother of Kenneth, is somewhere in the Southwest Pacific on the U.S.S. Oklahoma City," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Ellis E. Bex, S 2/c serving aboard the light cruiser Oklahoma City, of the Third Fleet, has moved from Tokyo Bay to Eniwetok, one of the Marshall group, for a well-earned rest period. On the trip the ship encountered a severe typhoon. 'Bud' enlisted on Sept. 6, 1944," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945.

Bex, Kenneth L. Manlius. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday...Those inducted from Manlius were...Kenneth L. Bex..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Kenneth Bex, Jr., of 106 West Seneca street, has been advanced in rating from apprentice seaman to pharmacist mate 3/c at U. S. naval training station, Sampson, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "Ph.M. 3/c Kenneth L. Bex, Jr., has returned to Sampson Navy Base after spending a 21-day furlough with his wife, Elsie Ferguson Bex, and parents. While home he received his diploma from Michigan State College, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree, and carried a B average for his 4 years at college. He was a member of Phi Delta Pi, and physical education fraternities," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/10/1944. "A son (Donald Ellis) was born to Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Bex, at Crouse-Irving hospital, Jan. 25. Mr. Bex is now in the Philippines," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945. "Pfc. Henry Morley of the Signal Heavy Command Battalion and Pharm. Mate 2/c Kenneth Bex, both from Manlius, N.Y., had a great handshake, and exchanged experiences when they met at Guam, recently. Both are graduates of Manlius High School, and had not seen each other for over two and a half years. The reunion was brought about by 'letters from home.' Bex's wife learned that Morley was stationed on Guam and immediately wrote, giving the details. After three weeks the service men finally met. Morley has seen 2 1/2 years of service and Bex has been in the Navy 1 1 /2 years and is at present stationed at a Fleet Hospital on Guam...Seaman 2/c Ellis Bex, a brother of Kenneth, is somewhere in the Southwest Pacific on the U.S.S. Oklahoma City. Pharm. Mate Bex has a son whom he has not yet seen, but with a big smile on her face, Mrs. Bex says the baby is well and happy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. Navy release...Kenneth L. Bex, PhM 2/c, 104 W. Seneca, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 2/7/1946.

Bex, Milton King, Jr. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton Bex had the pleasure of talking with their son, Corp. Milton K. Bex, by long distance on Wednesday night at 7:30 p. m. Arrangements had been made for last week, but a storm at sea prevented," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex, Sr., have received word from their son, Sgt. Milton K. Bex, Jr., station hospital, medical detachment somewhere in Puerto Rico that all furloughs have been canceled. Milton planned to spend September with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "S/Sgt. Milton K. Bex, Jr., of the medical division, Air Field Hospital, who has been stationed for 3 1/2 years in Puerto Rico, arrived last Friday for a visit with his parents...Sgt. Bex expects to return on Jan. 13 to New York where he will receive new assignment. While stationed at Puerto Rico he visited Brazil, Cuba, Virgin Islands and other countries while on maneuvers," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Max Bex of Manlius..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "S/Sgt. Milton K. Bex Jr. of an infantry medical detachment at Camp Shelby, Miss., has returned to duty after a 10-day furlough visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex, Sr., of 201 Fayette street, Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex, Sr., have received word that...S/Sgt. Milton K. Bex, Jr., has arrived overseas, and is attached to a medical bn. U. S. infantry hospital in France. Milton served in a field hospital in Puerto Rico, and one year in Camp Shelby hospital. He enlisted in the service Sept. 20, 1940," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/16/1945. "Staff. Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr. is convalescing in a hospital in Austria(?) having been injured June 6. Sgt. Bex is a member of the lst Medical section of the 260th Infantry and he hopes to return to the States by July 1," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945. "S/Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., who has been confined to a hospital in Australia(?) recovering from wounds, is expected to arrive soon in New York and will then be hospitalized for several months while convalescing," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "S/Sgt. Milton K. Bex, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex, who has been convalescing in a U. S. Army hospital in southern France(?), has arrived safely in this country according to a telegram received by his parents Wednesday. He was seriously wounded May 5 in Austria with his unit, the 360th Inf. Field Hospital. Sgt. Bex is now resting at a veterans' hospital in New Hampshire before continuing to New York. On account of the hurricane storm in the Atlantic early this week the ship changed its course and landed in Newfoundland then following the coastline down to New Hampshire. S/Sgt. Bex enlisted Sept. 20, 1940, serving 3 1/2 years in a Station Hospital at Barlinquen field in Puerto Rico, then to Camp Shelby, to the 365th Inf. Hospital and went overseas in January, 1945. He has received the Presidential Citation and four battle stars," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex spent several days during the past week with...Sgt. Milton K. Bex, Jr., who is slowly convalescing from a major operation performed Wednesday at Rhoades General hospital in Utica. Sgt. Bex returned to the States on Sept. 17 from a U. S. hospital in France," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton Bex spent Thanksgiving Day with...Milton at Rhoads General Hospital in Utica. They also visited their son on Sunday. Milton is improving but will be confined to his bed for some time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. E. C. LaPointe, Mary Louise, Betty, and Francis, Mrs. F. Battle, Sr., Delmar Snee, Mrs. F. Battle Sr., and S/Sgt. James Couden were recent visitors of S/Sgt. Milton Bex at Rhoads General Hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex, Sr., spent Christmas and New Year's Day with...S/Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., who is a patient in Rhoads General Hospital, Utica," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946. "Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Bex, Sr. visited...Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., last Sunday, who underwent another major operation Wednesday at Rhoads Hospital, Utica," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. "Corp. Milton Bex, Jr., who has been a patient in Rhoads General Hospital, is expecting to be brought home this week-end for a brief visit. It is hoped that the change will be beneficial and strengthen Milton for the operation he will soon undergo at the hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946. "Milton Bex, Jr...is expecting to be able to be brought to his home for a rest of several days. He has been confined to his bed for nine months, recovering from a shattered hip injury, also a broken ankle and knee injury," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/8/1946. "Staff Sgt. Milton K. Bex, Jr., spent three days at his home in Manlius, returning Sunday to Rhoads General hospital...and on Monday he underwent a foot operation and today an abdominal operation, and it is expected that conditions now are favorable for a recovery," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/22/1946. "Staff Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., who has been a patient for nearly a year in Rhoads General hospital, spent the week-end at home. He is improving satisfactorily, but will be confined to the hospital for some time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946. "Staff Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr...is expecting to be transferred from Rhoads to Walter Reed hospital in Washington, D.C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946. "Staff Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., has been transferred from Rhoads General Hospital to Tilton General Hospital, Ft. Dix, N.J. for treatment and later will go to the Veterans Hospital at Battle Creek, Mich., where he will remain until he receives his medical discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/21/1946. "S/Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., a patient in Tilton General Hospital, N.J. is at home for a 45-day leave of absence, coming to attend the funeral of his grandmother, Mrs. Frank Battle, Sr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/2/1946. "Mr. and Mrs. M. K. Bex, Sr., and son S/Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., have returned from spending their two weeks vacation at their summer cottage 'Bexleyhill' at Manitou Beach, Devils Lake, Mich. Sgt. Bex returned to Tilton General Hospital at Fort Dix, Sept. l, The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/30/1946. "S/Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., who has been at home on vacation during August, returned Sunday to Tilton General Hospital for special treatment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/13/1946. "S/Sgt. Milton Bex, Jr., a patient in Tilton General Hospital, New Jersey, will spend Thanksgiving recess with friends in Philadelphia, Pa.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/29/1946. "Staff. Sgt. Milton Bex Jr., will arrive Saturday to pass a 30-day furlough with his parents and will then return to Tilton General Hospital to receive his medical discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/19/1946.

Biddison, John Samuel. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Samuel Biddison, WO of the U. S. Air Corps, stationed in Pratt, Kansas, spent a few days last week with his foster-father, Damon Bettinger, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Neider," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Funeral services for Damon D. Bettinger were held Monday...Mr. Bettinger, a former resident of this village (Fayetteville) died in the Crouse-Irving hospital in Syracuse last Friday at the age of 79 years. Surviving is one son, Warrant Office John S. Biddison, U. S. Army, also one brother and several nieces and nephews," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945.

Bielec, Anthony, Jr. Kirkville. "...and Pfc. Anthony Bielec, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Bielec, Kirkville, RD 1, have reported at the armored force school, Fort Knox, Ky., to take a special course in the wheeled vehicle department," The Post-Standard, 4/21/1943. "Pfc. Anthony Bielec, Jr...was recently graduated from an intensive 45-day course in maintenance and repair of peeps, jeeps, scout cars and trucks at armored force school, Fort Knox, Ky.," The Post-Standard, 7/15/1943. Kirkville P.O. according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bielec, Edward. Kirkville. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors, five of them are Kirkville men. They are...Edward Bielec...selected for the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943.

Bigelow, Frank. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pvt. Frank Bigelow of the U. S. Army has been spending a few days with his family at their home in Clinton street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Lt. Frank Bigelow has returned to Salina, Kans., after spending several days with his family here. Mrs. Bigelow and daughter, Judy, have gone to Rhinebeck, N. Y., to spend sometime with Lt. Bigelow's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Bigelow, Sr., "The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "A telegram received last week by Mrs. Eleanor Burton Bigelow from the War Department, bore a message to the effect that her husband, Lt. Frank M. Bigelow, had been listed as missing since August 1. Lt. Bigelow was flying as a bombardier aboard a four-motored fortress on the day Naples and other ports in Southern Italy were smashed by the Allies, from the air. Mrs. Bigelow had received a letter from her husband shortly before she got the telegram, dated July 31, in which he said he had been taking part in the air raids over Sicily and Italy. Entering the Air Forces as an aviation cadet in May, 1942, he trained at Maxwell Field, Ala., Blythe Field, Tex., and at Santa Ana, Calif., and received his wings and commission last December. Lt. Bigelow visited his home in Fayetteville last April and saw his little four months old daughter, Judy, for the first time. After that he was transferred to South America and from there went to Africa. He had lived in Fayetteville about ten years and was graduated from the local high school and later was employed by the Atlantic Refining Co. His parents...and a sister, reside in Rhinebeck, N.Y., and his brother, Bayard, Jr., live in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Mrs. Frank M. Bigelow has received word through the Red Cross that her husband, a bombardier in the U. S. Air Force, who was reported missing in action, is a prisoner in Italy. Lt. Bigelow was listed missing August 1, while on a bombing mission in the Mediterranean area, and this information was sent to Mrs. Bigelow about ten days ago. The telegram, stating that he was a war prisoner, also said that a letter, giving further details, would follow," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "First Lt. John C. (Jack) Goodfellow, 25, is home on leave after 50 runs as pilot of a B-17 Flying Fortress out of American bases in Africa and Italy to bomb France, Austria, Italy and Greece. Decorated with the air medal and nine oak leaf clusters to the medal, each signifying five bombing missions, Lt. Goodfellow relates that on only one of the 50 trips was anyone in his crew injured. On the 41st mission, the Fortress was attacked and one engine knocked out. The co-pilot was struck in the right knee by a 22 mm. shell and had to be taken to a hospital in Sardinia to have his leg removed before the plane returned to its base. Another member of the crew injured on that trip was Tech. Sgt. William R. Underhill of Rochester, radio operator, who was hit in the hand...Other Central New York men in the same group were...Frank Bigelow of Fayetteville, who is a prisoner of war after being shot down over Naples; Lt. George Coe, a bombardier, from Fayetteville..." Vail scrapbook, 1/14/1944, newspaper source unknown. "The main office of the Irving Air Chute Co., Inc., of Buffalo, has received word from its British subsidiary regarding the emergency parachute jump made by Lieut. Frank Bigelow, on August 1, 1943. He escaped from his disabled aircraft by means of his parachute, and was later taken prisoner of war by the enemy. This incident entitles him to membership in the Caterpillar Club, an international organization composed solely of those who have saved their lives by means of parachutes. New members of the Caterpillar Club receive a small gold pin in the form of a caterpillar, with his name and the date of his emergency jump engraved therein. Lt. Bigelow, who is a prisoner of war in Germany, requested that the pin be sent to his wife who lives at 208 Clinton street, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "Lieut. Frank Bigelow arrived at his home in Clinton street Wednesday morning after an absence of 30 months, 21 of which were spent in a German prison camp. Lieutenant Bigelow was a bombardier on a flying fortress when his plane was shot down over German territory on August 1, 1943, and he was taken prisoner. According to reports, he does not say too much about the treatment in the camp but he is reported to be looking and feeling very well. One of his biggest home-coming thrills was meeting his little daughter Judy, who was only four months old when her daddy was last home and she is now nearly three. Mrs. Bigelow says she is just about the happiest person on earth, unless it is her husband," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Lt. and Mrs. Frank Bigelow and their little daughter Judy are visiting Lt.. Bigelow's parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. Bigelow in Rhinebeck, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945. "Lieut. Frank Bigelow, who arrived home three weeks ago, after being liberated from Stalag 7-A where he was a prisoner of war for 21 months, dropped in at The Eagle-Bulletin office one day last week, and we would say that he did not look too bad as a result of his experiences. He said that since coming home he had learned that Sgt. George Gregg was in the same camp but that neither knew of the other's confinement in the same prison camp. By comparing notes, they decided that a part of the time they were just across the road from each other," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Frank Bigelow, liberated a few months ago from a German prison camp, has been given an honorable discharge from the army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945.

Birdseye, Mortimer B. Formerly Fayetteville. "Col. Mortimer B. Birdseye of Washington, D. C. called on friends in Fayetteville last Saturday evening," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1941. Also served in World War I.

Bishop, Edward. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Bishop, Lester. Formerly Fayetteville. "Lester Bishop, a former resident of Fayetteville has been given a medical discharge from the Army. He has been in service two years and spent more than a year overseas. He returned last week to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bishop of East Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944.

Bishop, Thomas E. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: Honor Roll - Village of Manlius Only: ...Bishop, Thomas E., 245 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Bjork, Carl. Manlius. (Buellville, town of Pompey) Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Carl Bjork left Tuesday for Sampson Naval Base where he will take his boot training in the U. S. Navy. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Bjork, of Buellville, and was graduated from Manlius high school with the class of '44," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944.

Black, Howard Neal. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "T/4 Howard Neal Black, formerly of Lyndon rd., Fayetteville, has been assigned to the army's Philadelphia cargo port of embarkation, Philadelphia, Pa. A graduate of Syracuse university, T/4 Black served in the Asiatic-Pacific theater from December, 1941, to November, 1944. He is residing with his wife, Norma L. Black, at 1819 N. 57th st., Philadelphia," The Post-Standard, 3/23/1945. Discharged from the U.S. army through the separation center at Fort Dix...T/4 Howard N. Black, Lyndon rd., Fayetteville.

Blackman, Clarence. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara...Clarence Blackman...from Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942.

Blanchard, Arthur. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following registrants with their order numbers in selective service district 473, comprising the towns of Dewitt, Manlius and Salina, will be inducted into the army today: ...Arthur E. Blanchard, 512 S. Manlius St., Fayetteville..." The Post Standard, 3/19/1942.

Blaney, Robert F. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Robert Blaney has enlisted in the U. S. Navy and will report next week to the Newport training base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1942. "Robert Blaney, a trainee in the service of the U. S. Navy, has been spending a short furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Mrs. Harry Blaney and Miss Dorothy Yard were in Chicago, Ill., recently where they attended the graduation of Mrs. Blaney's son, Robert, from the Great Lakes Naval Base. Bob has been transferred to Jacksonville, Fla. for further training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Robert Blaney, aviation machinist, 3/c, U. S. N., arrived Wednesday night to spend a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Blaney, of Spring st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Robert F. Blaney, 24...was promoted this month to aviation machinist's mate, flight engineer, second class in the U. S. naval reserve. He is completing his 17th month of overseas duty in the Atlantic fleet. Blaney volunteered for service in August, 1942. He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school..." The Post-Standard, 3/25/1945. "United States Atlantic Fleet Air Force--Robert F. Blaney, 24,...was this month promoted to the rate of aviation machinist's mate, flight engineer, second class, in the United States Naval Reserve. He is at present completing his seventeenth month of overseas duty in the Atlantic Fleet. Blaney volunteered for service in the Navy in August, 1942...Before joining the Navy he was employed as a metal plater by the L. C. Smith Typewriter Co., Syracuse, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "Robert Blaney, AMM 2/c, is passing a 30-day leave with his parents...He has been overseas with the Atlantic Fleet for 17 months and this is his first visit home in 19 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Robert Blaney has been honorably discharged from the Navy, and arrived in Fayetteville in time to spend the holidays with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/25/1945.

Blankmeyer, Richard. Fayetteville. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...Richard Blankmeyer...of Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Richard O. Blankmeyer, who was inducted April 16, will leave today for Fort Niagara. A former resident of Toledo, O., Mr. Blankmeyer served until his induction as manager of Durkee's Famous Foods Co. His wife will remain at their home, 211 Ledyard dr., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 4/23/1943. "Pfc. Richard O. Blankmeyer...has been graduated from the army air forces school at Chanute Field, Ill., where he received instruction in teletype maintenance," The Post-Standard, 9/22/1943. "Fifth Air Force, Southwest Pacific--Teletype operator with the flying Jolly Rogers, first Liberator unit in the Pacific and first to strike Borneo and the Philippines by day, is Corporal Richard O. Blankmeyer of Fayetteville, N. Y. In civilian life a district representative in upper New York State for Durkee Famous Foods, the 36-year-old serviceman has been a part of the Jolly Roger heavy bombardment outfit's communications system nearly a year and a half, almost all of his 18 months in service. He has been with the Southwest Pacific air drive from the British New Guinea days until now when it stands at the verge of the direct assault on the Jap homelands. The veteran campaigner's wife Mildred remains at their Fayetteville residence, 211 Ledyard drive. His mother is Mrs. E. E. Blankmeyer of 2436 West Central avenue, Toledo, Ohio," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Pearl Harbor, T. H.--S/Sgt. Richard O. Blankmeyer...is on his way home. Blankmeyer is one of 2,444 high-point Army veterans whom the 'Magic Carpet' is bringing back to the States aboard the U. S. S. Hanover. The U. S. S. Hanover-one of more than 250 carriers, battleships, cruisers, and attack transports in the Navy's famed 'Magic Carpet' fleet--left Okinawa, Dec. 3, and was scheduled to arrive in Seattle about Dec. 15. Passengers will go directly to the Separation Centers nearest their homes to complete formalities of obtaining their discharges before returning to civilian life," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/28/1945.

Blick, Frederick C., Jr. Kirkville. "The following officers and enlisted men have been discharged from the army at Fort Dix...T/5 Frederick C. Blick, Jr., Kirkville RD 2," The Post-Standard, 12/23/1945.

Bloss, Merle F. Kirkville. "Merle Bloss left Friday morning for training camp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/1/1941. "Merle Bloss, who left a little over a week ago for training camp is stationed at 102nd C AAA headquarters, Battery, Camp Edwards, Mass., in the 102nd Coast Artillery (AA)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1941. "Merle F. Bloss will receive the Eagle-Bulletin each week while in training camp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1941. "Merle Bloss of Camps Devens, Mass., spent the week-end with his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Bloss," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1941. "Merle Bloss is home from the U. S. army on a 10-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Honorable discharge from army at Fort Dix, Corp. Merle F. Bloss, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 7/28/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bond, Charles. Fayetteville. "Seaman 2/c Charles Bond, who has been stationed at Sampson Naval Base for boot training, has been spending a week with his mother, Mrs. Ethel Bond at her home in Redfield avenue," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Mrs. C. Arthur Bond spent the week end in Sampson, N. Y. and attended the graduation exercises at which time her son Charles was advanced to Seaman, First Class, after four months of intensive training. Seaman Bond is now on his way to Ocean Side, Calif., where he will undergo three more months of training to become a petty officer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "George A. Burghard, S 1/c, (F.O.M.), in a recent letter to his parents Mr. and Mrs. George Burghard of West Seneca street, told of a chance meeting of two Manlius boys now in service and all are stationed on Guam. Charles Bond, S.M. 3/c, came into the room where Burghard was standing to make inquiry about the payroll, and instantly they recognized each other and later Michael Albanese, of the Shore Patrol, discovered the two Manlius boys. The trio had much in common to talk about and it was a happy reunion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Bostwick, David. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Gordon Judge has accepted a position at the Bank of Manlius, succeeding David Bostwick, who has entered the service of his country," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Lt. David Bostwick, who has been passing a 11-day furlough with his mother...has returned to Camp Lee," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/12/1943. "Lt. David R. Bostwick, who has been visiting his mother...has left for New Orleans, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Mrs. H. L. Bostwick received a telephone greeting on her birthday anniversary from her son, Lt. David Bostwick, stationed in Panama," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "Lieut. David Bostwick, of Panama, is passing a 30-day furlough with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "The wedding of Miss Adele Littledyke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold C. Littledyke, of Castile, N. Y., and Lieut. David Bostwick, son of Mrs. Hiram L. Bostwick of Washington street, Manlius, took place on Saturday, Sept. 30 at 1:30 p.m. at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Fausold in Pleasant street...The groom is a graduate of Manlius high school and Powelson School of Accounting, and before enlisting for service, was employed at the Bank of Manlius. Lieut. Bostwick will return to his base in Panama Nov. 1, and Mrs. Bostwick will resume her teaching in the high school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "Mrs. David R. Bostwick left on Tuesday to join her husband, Capt. Bostwick, now located in the Canal Zone. She left by train to Miami, Fla., and will fly from there to Panama. Mrs. Bostwick has taught history at the Manlius high school since her graduation from Syracuse university in 1938, resigning this position Feb. 1. Capt. Bostwick enlisted in the Army Jan. 1942. He took his officers' training at Camp Lee, Virginia and was immediately sent to Panama. At the end of his terminal furlough, he is accepting a position with the U. S. Government, and will be located at Quarry heights, Canal Zone," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/1/1946.

Bottrill, Warren Edwin. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Botts, Dewitt K. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

?Bottum, Edward. Fayetteville. "Mrs. Edward Bottum has gone to Texas to join her husband, who is stationed with the M. P. Division near El Paso," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Corp. and Mrs. Ned Bottum, who have been in Texas for the past several weeks, have been guests of Mrs. Bottum's mother, Mrs. Anne Benedict, after which Corp. Bottum will go to Louisiana. Mrs. Bottum will remain with her mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "A son was born January 5th to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bottum (Rita Benedict). Mrs. Bottum is living with her mother in East Genesee street, while her husband is serving with the U. S. Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "Cpl. Ned Bottum has returned to Camp Beauregard, La., after passing several days with his wife and infant son at the home of Mrs. Bottum's mother, Mrs. Anne Benedict," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Cpl. Ned Bottum, who has been stationed at Ft. Custer, Mich., has returned to his post after spending a few days with his wife, the former Rita Benedict, and their little son," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. Mrs. Edward Bottum and son, Wynn, who have been living with her mother for the past two years have left for Glens Falls to join Mr. Bottum, recently discharged from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946.

Bowers, Donald. Manlius. "Mrs. Lloyd Pickston and Mrs. Donald Bowers left Wednesday to join their husbands, who are now stationed at Camp Clairborne, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/17/1943. "Donald R. Bowers, son of Mr. John Bowers of W. Seneca street, Manlius, has been promoted from the grade of private to that of corporal, at the Engineer Unit Training Center, an Army Service Forces installation here, commanded by Brig. Gen. John W. N. Schulz, Camp Clairborne, La., At the time of his promotion, Cpl. Bowers was serving in the headquarters Company of the engineer unit training center, under the command of Capt. Chas. D. Henderson,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "S/Sgt. and Mrs. Donald Bowers of Louisiana, have arrived in town to pass Christmas with Mrs. Bowers' parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Cathers in Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944.

Bracken, Joseph. Fayetteville. "Apprentice Seaman Joseph Bracken returned to Sampson Naval Base at Geneva today after spending a week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "Joseph Bracken, stationed at the Sampson Naval Base, spent Sunday with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Apprentice Seaman Joseph Bracken of Sampson naval base, spent Sunday with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bracken, of Warren street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "Seaman Joseph Bracken underwent an emergency appendectomy at Sampson Naval Base at Geneva, last Wednesday. He is reported to be gaining satisfactorily," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/23/1943. "Joseph Bracken, stationed at the Sampson Naval Base, spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Joseph Bracken, USN., who has been in the Pacific area for the past two years, is spending a furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Bradley, Beverly Jane Hope. Fayetteville. "Beverly Jane Hope Bradley of Fayetteville Road has been sent her active duty orders, and reported to the U. S. naval training school, Hunter College, Bronx, N. Y., for WAVE training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. Enrollment in the naval Training School for storekeepers on the Indiana University campus at Bloomington, Ind., has started Woman Reservist Beverly Jane Hope Bradley, 20, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Bradley, Fayetteville Road, in her specialty career as a naval storekeeper. Past civilian experience and 'boot training' aptitude tests are the basis for selection to the school. At Indiana she will receive expert instruction in storing, recording, reporting, requisitioning and invoicing stocks. Advancement to the petty officer rate of storekeeper third class awaits the Woman Reservist upon graduation from the Indiana campus," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...WAVES--Beverly Jane Bradley, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Bradley, George Raymond. Manlius. Private. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942.

Bradshaw, Harry C. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Bradt, Benjamin. Manlius. "Several Manlius men who are in the armed service are at home on a brief leave, among them are Benjamin Bradt..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943.

Bradt, Lee. Manlius. "Lee Bradt, now in the U. S. Navy, would like information on the whereabouts of his black satin basketball jacket with his name on back. Lee loaned the jacket to one of the high school basketeers, and now needs it to wear under his uniform for extra warmth. Kindly notify his mother, Mrs. Rose Bradt," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944.

Bradt, Vernon. Manlius. "Arrival on the Henry Herbert in New York Saturday...Corp. Vernon Bradt, Manlius," The Post-Standard, 1/24/1946.

Brand, Alonzo E., Dr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Dr. Alonzo F. Brand of 105 E. Genesee street has passed the examination for senior surgeon in the U. S. Public Health Service and is expected to receive a call any day for service with the regular Army rank of lieutenant colonel. He will be assigned to training for four to six weeks at the National Institute of Health, Washington, D. C. He has passed his physical examination at the Marine Hospital, Buffalo, and is now waiting for orders. A graduate of Syracuse University Medical College, Dr. Brand continued his education in 1937 with special research work at Johns Hopkins university. While there he became a Fellow in the American College of Physicians. His commission comes directly from the President, and the government has solicited his services for the last two months. It is likely that he will be assigned to clinical diagnostic or research work, as that was his field at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Brand was in the World War No. 1 and he is a member of the American Legion. He has been a resident of Fayetteville for 20 years and has a large practice. He is making provision to have his practice taken over during his absence, and his technician, Mrs. Frances Jennings, will continue in the office service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/16/1942. "Dr. Harriet Maxwell Quackenbos, a native of Hartford, Conn., is taking over Dr. Brand's practice during his absence. He has practiced in England the past 18 years up to last fall, when he was bombed out of his home and practice there by aircraft invasion from Germany. So as one goes to war, another comes to take his place after a bitter taste of it," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Dr. Alonzo F. Brand, who recently received a commission of Lt. Col. from President Roosevelt, and has been in Washington for training at the National Institute of Health for the past few weeks, spent the weekend in Fayetteville with his family, prior to going to San Antonio, Texas, where he will be stationed. Mrs. Brand accompanied Dr. Brand on his trip to Texas and they left by motor Tuesday morning. It is expected it will take them five or six days to make the trip. Mrs. Brand will return to Fayetteville via train after seeing the Doctor settled in his new quarters," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/13/1942. "Lt. Col. Dr. Alonzo F. Brand who is stationed at San Antonio, Texas will be in Fayetteville to attend the commencement exercises at Fayetteville High School, when his daughter, Marilyn, will be graduated," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Lt.-Col. Dr. A. F. Brand is in town this week, completing arrangements for Mrs. Brand and their daughters, Marilynn, Sylvia and Dorothy to return to San Antonio with him, where they expect to remain for the duration. The Brands live at 280 E. Fair Oaks St., Sylvan Hills, a suburb of San Antonio. In addition to his regular line of duty, Lt.-Col. Brand will teach public health in the Incarnate Word College in San Antonio during the coming semester. Marilynn will enter Hock-a-day School, which is a junior college, in September, and Sylvia and Dorothy will attend a day school. Mrs. Brand's mother, Mrs. Mary Donaldson, will remain at the Brand home in Fayetteville, and it is expected that a physician will arrive soon to carry on Dr. Brand's practice during his absence," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Lieut. Col. Alonzo F. Brand had the sordid task of doing something about the soldiers in the Army bases in Texas from venereal disease. He is doing an excellent job at San Antonio, one of the worst places in the country for venereal disease. When Dr. Brand left Fayetteville to serve Uncle Sam he was not sent to Texas to fight any moral or social battles. He went as a man of medicine to curb a disease undermining the physical fitness of the Army's fighting men...The number of soldiers who contracted the disease there and the high percentage of draftees who were found to have syphilis and gonorrhea was cause for alarm. Dr. Brand rolled up his sleeves and went to work...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Lt. Col. A. F. Brand of San Antonio, Texas, paid a brief visit to his home here last week-end. Dr. Brand was one of eight physicians throughout the country selected for a special course at the University of Michigan in new methods of treatment for the men of the Army. He returned to San Antonio Monday morning, where he will resume his army duties," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Fayetteville--The following letter was received by Mayor Kessler from Lt. Col. A. F. Brand, who is serving as senior surgeon in the U. S. public Health Service in San Antonio, Texas: Dear Mr. Kessler: Thank you for your kind letter of Oct. 25. It was mis-sent to Seattle and when it finally did arrive I was in Mexico. hearing from old friends is very pleasant indeed. I was particularly glad to hear that conditions in Fayetteville are satisfactory, despite the many changes which everyone has been called upon to make. The WAC is truly a great and useful organization. Being here in San Antonio, in the center of the largest concentration of army and air force installations in the country, has given me ample opportunity to see how this branch of the Army functions. My work calls for frequent visits to all of the camps in this area, and I have observed these girls hard at work doing exactly the same jobs which men were doing only a few months ago. They are not only doing the same work but having a good time doing it. At a time like this it surely is our duty to do what we can for our country. I cannot too strongly urge the girls of Fayetteville to consider serving with the WAC if they are eligible. I can assure them, from personal experience, that the satisfaction derived from service to the country will be greater than any which they have ever experienced before. With my very best wishes to you and to all of my good friends in Fayetteville, I am Sincerely yours, Alonzo F. Grand, Lt. Col., N. S. P. H. S., Director-Division of V. D. Control, San Antonio, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/26/1943. "Mrs. Alonzo Brand and daughters Marilyn, Sylvia and Dorothy of Memphis, Tenn. are visiting relatives in Syracuse, awaiting the arrival of Dr. Brand, after which they will spend two weeks at their camp at Thousand Islands," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "According to word received here Lt.-Col. Alonzo F. Brand has been transferred from Camp Shelby, Tenn., to Manila where he will direct the treatment of venereal diseases. Col. Brand has bee in charge of the venereal disease control division of the Public Health Department at Memphis and Camp Shelby since January, 1942,. He originated the entire venereal disease control program at San Antonio, Texas, his first post after entering the service, and also established clinics at Mobile, Ala. His efficiency has been highly commended. A graduate of Syracuse University, Col. Brand came to Fayetteville to practice 24 years ago and expected to return here after the war. After going into service and assuming his first post at San Antonio, Mrs. Brand and their three daughters joined him there and also accompanied him to Memphis. Col. Brand will report January 14 at San Francisco and sail for Manila soon afterward," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/28/1945. "Dr. A. F. Brand was in town for about an hour one day last week and called on a few old friends. He was enroute to his home in California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/27/1946.

Brandt, Chase. Manlius. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara...Chase Brandt...from Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942.

Brandt, Donald. Kirkville. "Seaman Donald Brandt, stationed with the Merchant Marines in Brooklyn, spent the week end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Brandt," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Brandt, Ralph C. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Ralph Brandt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brandt...is expecting to leave Aug. 5 with other selects for Ft. Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Pvt. Ralph C. Brandt...is stationed in Madison, Wis., attending a radio operators' school. Pvt. Brandt, who attended Manlius high school, was inducted into the army on Aug. 5," The Post-Standard, 10/12/1942. "Mrs. Ruth Brandt recently spent the weekend with her son Pvt. Ralph Brandt, who is stationed at Madison, Wis.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Pvt. Ralph C. Brandt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brandt of 304 North Street, Manlius, is stationed in Madison Wis., attending a radio operators' school. He formerly attended Manlius High School and was inducted last Aug. 5," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Pvt. Ralph C. Brandt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brandt, has graduated from the Radio Operators School in Madison, Wisconsin, and has been assigned to the 52nd Ferrying Squadron at the Long Beach Army Air Field at Long Beach, Ca., according to word received by his parents recently," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/15/1943. "Corp. Ralph C. Brandt...has returned to his base in Long Beach, Calif., after graduating from the T.W.A. school in Kansas City, Mo., where he attended an advanced radio specialist unit. Corp. Brandt is a flight radio operator in the Army Air Forces Ferrying Command," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Corp. Ralph C. Brandt...has returned to his base at Long Beach, Calif., after being graduated from TWA school at Kansas City, Mo..." The Post-Standard, 6/27/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brandt of North street entertained at a family dinner party last Sunday in honor of their son, Corp. Ralph Brandt of Long Beach, Calif., who is at home on a 15-day furlough. On Wednesday night Mr. and Mrs. Fred Robbins gave a dinner in honor of their grandnephew, and Thursday Mr. and Mrs. Floyd entertained in their nephew's honor. Ralph is passing his spare time hunting in the fields and woods. He expects to return to his base on Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Wesley E. Fowler of West Seneca street announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Jean Fowler, to Corp. Ralph C. Brandt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brandt of North street. Corp. Brandt is now stationed in Texas with the Air Transport Command," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Sgt. Ralph C. Brandt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brandt, 311 Fayette Street, Manlius, was promoted to his present rank at an A.A.F. base in India. He is in the Air Force traffic control and has been in service 27 months, 11 of which he has spent overseas," The Post-Standard, 11/28/1944.

Brang, Donald J. Fayetteville. "The 826th Convalescent Center, England.--Now fully recovered from shrapnel wounds received on January 16, 1945 during the action near Bech, Belgium, Sgt. Donald J. Brang, 28, of Green Lake Park, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been released from this United States Army convalescent center in England. He will return to active duty. While at this center he participated in a rehabilitation program consisting of military training and expert medical care. Member of an infantry unit, he entered the Army on April 8, 1942. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank N. Brang, live at the above address," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/18/1945. "Assembly Area Command, France, (Delayed) -- A staff of 16 battle veterans, forming the Administrative Section of the Engineer's office, have been assigned the important work of supervising the maintenance of roads, water supply, electrical power, and buildings at Camp Chicago, one of the 17 installations in the Assembly Area Command. Included in Camp Chicago's Engineer's section is Sgt. Donald Brang, of Green Lake Park, Fayetteville. Located in northeastern France, near the cathedral city of Reims, the Assembly Area Command is geared to redeploy 300,000 men a month to the U. S. and the Pacific according to Major General Royal B. Lord, commanding general. At the end of hostilities in Europe, most of these combat men were stationed in Germany. They were brought here to help with the speedy transfer of military personnel from the European theater of operations--to the Pacific or to the United States for duty, additional training, or discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945. The following men are expected to arrive at United States ports from overseas...on the Rock Hill Victory due New York Friday...Sgt. Donald J. Brang, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/30/1945.

Breed, Deyerne L. Kirkville. Honorably discharged from Ft. Dix...T/5 Deyerne L. Breed, Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 6/14/1946.

Brentlinger, Carroll C. Kirkville. "Pvt. Carroll C. Brentlinger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Brentlinger of this village (Kirkville) has completed a course in radio operator mechanics at the army air force technical school, Sioux Falls, S. D., according to word received here. Pvt. Brentlinger was graduated from Fayetteville High School in 1939 and was inducted into service on June 4, "The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Brentlinger, Eugene. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Briggs, George. Manlius. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...George Briggs (R.D. 2) of Manlius..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Elmer J. Briggs, aged 52 years, died Thursday, Dec. 31 at his home in West Seneca st. Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Maude Frye Briggs, three daughters, Mrs. Thomas Scott, Mrs. Ray Millard, and Mrs. Howard Wager, two sons, Pvt. George E. Briggs and Allen C. Griggs; two brothers, three sisters, his mother, and seven grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1943. "Sgt. Briggs of W. Seneca st., has been at home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943.

Broad, William L. Fayetteville. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Army...William L. Broad, 302 Elm st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "Pvt. William L. Broad, stationed at Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio, passed a three-day furlough this week with his wife and daughter at their home in Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin 7/30/1943. "Pvt. William Broad is spending a few days at his home in Elm street before going to Ann Arbor, Mich., where he has been transferred," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "William L. Broad, 302 Elm st., Fayetteville...formerly associated with the law firm of Mackenzie, Smith & Mitchell in Syracuse is training for commission at the judge advocate general's school, Ann Arbor, Mich....Broad attended Princeton university and Harvard Law school," The Post-Standard, 10/25/1943. "Mrs. William Broad and little daughter, Sally, who left Fayetteville a couple of months ago, has gone to join her husband, Corp. Broad at Ann Arbor, Mich., after spending a few weeks with relatives in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944.

Brooks, Edward H. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey) Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Onondaga county men inducted were...Army...Edward H. Brooks, Manlius, RD 2," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943. "Pvt. Edward H. Brooks, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Brooks of Manlius, R. D., recently enjoyed a 14-day furlough at home. He is stationed at Camp Pickett, Va., attending medical school, having left Manlius School on March 12 to join the armed forces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943.

Brown, Donald C. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: Honor Roll - Village of Minoa only...Brown, Donald C., 140 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Brown, Franklin Harley. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Franklin Harley Brown, son of Clarence Brown of 104 North Burdick street, Fayetteville...was sworn into the fighting Leathernecks by Maj. H. Colvocoresses, U.S.M.C., (retd.) officer in charge of the Central New York recruiting districts. The young...(man) left immediately for Parris Island, S.C., eastern Marine training station, for six weeks of comprehensive military instruction, including firing of all types of modern weapons, use of the bayonet and fundamentals of combat," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Pfc. Franklin Brown, who has been with the U. S. Marines in Jamaica, West Indies, is passing a furlough with his parents" The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Word has been received at the Eagle-Bulletin office from an Atlantic Base that Pvt. Franklin H. Brown, U.S.M.C...was recently promoted to private first class. Pfc. Brown enlisted in the Marine Corps at Syracuse in July, 1942. He received his preliminary training at Parris Island, S. C. and Camp Lejeune, N. C., and has been stationed at bases in the Atlantic for the past ten months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Mrs. Clarence Brown has received the Purple Heart awarded her son Pfc. Franklin Brown who was injured in enemy action in the Caroline Islands on Sept. 15, 1944. Pfc. Brown has been in service since February, 1943, and has been overseas for over a year. He is with the First Marine Division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "Official word has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brown of 204 East Genesee street that their son Pfc. Franklin H. Brown, was killed in action on Okinawa, May 4. A telegram received last Thursday night from the war department notified Mr. and Mrs. Brown of their son's death. Pfc. Brown enlisted in the Marine Corps in July, 1942, and received his basic training at Parris Island and was for a time stationed at Jamaica in the British West Indies. Frank attended Fayetteville high school, and prior to his enlistment he worked in the Stanton & Brown grocery store. He was last home on furlough in January, 1944, and went overseas about a month later. Injured in action against the enemy in September 29, 1944, Pfc. Brown had been awarded the Purple Heart. Besides his parents, the Marine is survived by five sisters, Mrs. John LaTante of Fulton, Mrs. Earl Sherwood and Mrs. Alfred Bontello of Syracuse, Mrs. Donald Aldrich and Miss Margaret Brown of Fayetteville; and four brothers, Herbert, Ellis and Dwight Brown of Fayetteville, and Richard of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "Military rites for Pfc. Franklin Harley Brown, U.S.M.S., 27, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brown of 204 E. Genesee st., Fayetteville, were held this afternoon in Fayetteville Cemetery. Fayetteville post 369, American Legion, conducted rites at the grave, following services at 2 p.m. in the home. Pfc. Brown was killed in action May 4, 1945 in Okinawa. He was attached to the First Division and served in the Pacific theater," Minoa scrapbook n.d.

Brown, Mary Edwards. Minoa. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...Nurses:... Mary Edwards Brown, Minoa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Brown, Robert Joseph. Fayetteville. "Onondaga county men inducted were...Army...Robert J. Brown, 113 Chapel st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Robert Joseph Brown," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943.

Brown, Robert O. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Baptist Church service flag, The Eagle Bulletin, 2/27/1942. "Pvt. Robert Brown, of Camp Pickett, Va., who has been spending a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Brown in Syracuse, called on friends in Fayetteville this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943.

Brown, William W. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Brownell, Gordon. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Brownell, Harold. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Brownell, William L. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Brownrigg, Arthur J. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Arthur J. Brownrigg, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Brownrigg of West Seneca street, is at present stationed with the U. S. armed forces in England. Their son-in-law Corp. A. J. Gillani, has also gone overseas with his division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Honorably discharged from U.S. army at Fort Dix...Pfc. Arthur W. Brownrigg, 144 W. Seneca St., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 8/19/1945.

Brunotte, Emmett H. Kirkville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...Emmett Brunotte...of Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. Navigation cadet at Ellington Field, Tex., Emmett H. Brunotte, Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 2/27/1943. "Emmett H. Brunotte, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard B. Brunotte of Kirkville, Rd 1...has returned from service overseas and is at the AAF redistribution station at Miami Beach, Fla...Staff Sgt. Brunotte, a Flying Fortress gunner on 31 missions in the European theater during five months..."The Post-Standard 9/27/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bruton, Fred. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bubnack, Donald. Kirkville. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bubnack of Minoa have five sons and one grandson in the armed services, and one son has been honorably discharged...Able Seaman Donald Bubnack enlisted in the Naval Reserve, entered service after graduating from high school in June, and is now in training at Sampson..." Minoa Scrapbook, n.d. "Four men from Syracuse and vicinity have completed recruit training at Sampson and have been granted leaves. They are...Donald Bubnack, S 2/c, of Kirkville, RD 3," The Post-Standard, 9/23/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bubnack, Frank. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bubnack of Minoa have five sons and one grandson in the armed services, and one son has been honorably discharged...Corp. Frank Bubnack, who enlisted in February, 1942, trained at Fort Benning and went overseas last January, is with the infantry in France..." Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Honorably discharged, Corp. Frank Bubnack, Kirkville. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bubnack, Joseph. Kirkville. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bubnack of Minoa have five sons and one grandson in the armed services, and one son has been honorably discharged...Sgt. Joseph Bubnack has just returned to Louisiana after a 15-day furlough with his wife and parents. He entered service in April, 1943, and is now awaiting transfer overseas..." Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bubnack, Michael. Kirkville. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bubnack of Minoa have five sons and one grandson in the armed services, and one son has been honorably discharged...Pvt. Michael Bubnack, now with the Armored Command and assigned to overseas duty, joined the Army in December, 1943..." Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bubnack, Peter. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bubnack of Minoa have five sons and one grandson in the armed services, and one son has been honorably discharged. Sgt. Peter Bubnack, serving with the Air Forces in Panama since he enlisted in March, 1940, recently passed a 23-day furlough at his parents' home before going to Atlantic City for reassignment..." Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Bubnack, Stephen. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bubnack of Minoa have five sons and one grandson in the armed services, and one son has been honorably discharged...Stephen Bubnack, another son who served with a medical detachment in Virginia, was honorably discharged recently, Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Buckland, Jack C. Fayetteville. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station. Among the selectees was Jack C. Buckland of Fayetteville, former Syracuse radio singer and an attorney...Army..." The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943.

Bullard, Alfred A. Manlius. "Seven sailors from this area have been granted leaves following completion of basic training at the U. S. naval training station at Sampson. They are:...Alfred James Bullard...of Manlius," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Alfred A. Bullard, C 3/c of Long Beach, spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bullard, of Hillside drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Three of the four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick G. Bullard of this village, who are in the service of their country, are home on furlough and enjoying a reunion after a separation of many months. They are: S/Sgt. Frederick Bullard...Alfred, who joined the Navy in July, 1943, and has just returned from France where he served on board an LCT craft on D-Day, his ship being hit twice during the invasion, and Charles Bullard. Robert Bullard, fireman 2/c, is with the Merchant Marine in the Pacific. Addison, who is 16 and still in school, is anxious to get into the service. Alfred went overseas in February and while in Europe he met two Manlius boys, George Fellows and Louis Albanese," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944. "Alfred James Bullard has been granted leave following completion of basic training at the naval training station at Sampson," The Post-Standard, 9/5/1945. "Alfred J. Bullard, boatswain's mate, second class, of 417 East Seneca street, has reported for duty aboard the U.S.S. Fargo, a light cruiser soon to be commissioned....Bullard has served a total of 19 months overseas aboard amphibious craft and wears the American, Asiatic-Pacific, and European-Middle Eastern campaign ribbons. He participated in the invasion of Normandy on D-day," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. "...Arthur Bullard is with the army in Japan. Pfc. Robert Bullard is in the army. Charles Bullard is coxswain in the navy..." The Post-Standard, 12/2/1945. Navy discharge, Lido Beach...Alfred J. Bullard, 417 E. Seneca st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 3/24/1946.

Bullard, Charles. Manlius. "Three of the four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick G. Bullard of this village, who are in the service of their country, are home on furlough and enjoying a reunion after a separation of many months. They are: S/Sgt. Frederick Bullard...Alfred...and Charles Bullard, who joined the Navy in July, 1944, and has been training at Sampson. Robert Bullard, fireman 2/c, is with the Merchant Marine in the Pacific. Addison, who is 16 and still in school, is anxious to get into the service...The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944. "Three of the four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Bullard who are in the service have visited their parents recently at their home in East Seneca street. Charles H. Bullard, S 1/c, home from Pensacola, Fla., was taken seriously during his leave and had to be removed to Sampson Base Hospital by ambulance. He is reported to be slightly gaining. Lt. Frederick A. Bullard has been home on a 72-hour furlough, after which he reported to Camp Roberts, Calif., for overseas duty. Alfred J. Bullard, B.M. 2/c, was home on a week-end leave from duty at Newport, R. I. The fourth son in the service is Pvt. Robert L. Bullard and he is stationed with the Infantry at Camp Croft in South Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. ...Charles Bullard, coxswain in the Navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945.

Bullard, Frederick Arthur. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Frederick A. Bullard...of Manlius...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Letters From Our Boys in Service / Hello, Major Durston and all the Members of Post 141. I thank you very much for keeping up my membership in the Sons of the American Legion. It sure makes me feel good to know that those at home are behind each and every one of us in the armed services. You of the last war, know, as we do now, that it is a privilege as well as an honor to serve in the Army of the United States. We have the best of food, best of medical care, the best of clothing, the best of shelter, the cream of the officers, and most of all, the highest morale of any armed force on the face of the earth. If you don't mind, I'll give you an idea as to where I've been in the past few months. As you know, I went from Ft. Niagara to St. Petersburg, Fla. for my basic training. Then I was good enough to become a platoon leader right off the bat, thanks to the drill team of the American Legion formed a few years ago, for it was Ralph Fox, Bill Sweet, Maj. Durston and others who taught me the Manual of Arms and drill formations. Well, from St. Petersburg I qualified as a volunteer for the suicide squad (aerial gunnery). I passed the flying physical and left for Tyndall Field, Fla. There I started my class in aerial gunnery. The second day there the War Department declared that school under the West Point Cadet system. I was in Squadron B at the time, the best outfit in the place. Along with six other men, I was called before the 'Old Man' and on my military bearing, courtesy, and experience as well as ability to perform the movements capable of a soldier, I was appointed Cadet Squadron Commander, and had charge of the entire squadron of 1,500 men and sir, that was a job big enough, let alone the school work and studying. Well that came out all right in the end. I graduated Feb. 3, 1943 with the highest honors of the class. Maintaining a 98% theory average, as well as expert with the 50 and 30 caliber machine guns in air to air firing from At-6's and B-24 and B-25 bombers (turret and waist gun). From there I was sent to radio school, here at Scott Field, Ill. This, I must say, is heaven. We also have a Cadet system, and it is really on the ball, you know what I mean. Well, the highest a man can get here in office is barrack captain, and that holds a lot of water, too. I have the distinction of having the cleanest barrack in the squadron. My men are right on the ball. Well, Major, I'm up to date now. I have five more weeks of school here and then off to another school, so my orders read. But I sure would give anything to get my hands on a pair of 50 calibers right soon. Thanks again for all you have done, and wish you all the luck and success in the world. Write soon. I enjoy hearing from all of you. Sincerely yours, Frederick Bullard, Flying Sgt. A. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Sgt. Frederick A. Bullard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Bullard, Sr., of Hillside Drive, Manlius, was recently graduated from the radio school of the air forces at Scott Field, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Flight Sgt. Frederick A. Bullard...is home on furlough after a year's service in three war theaters, during which he served aboard American heavy bombers around the globe. Sgt. Bullard, who wears bombardier's wings in addition to service ribbons of the Pacific, European and American war theaters, and the good conduct ribbon, entered the army Oct. 19, 1942, leaving unfinished his sophomore year at Syracuse university. At various times, he has been radio operator, waist gunner and aerial photographer, aboard a B-26 Marauder bomber. He was injured in July, but not seriously. Sgt. Bullard will report to Lakeland when his furlough ends Oct. 28, there to begin training as an aviation cadet," The Post-Standard, 10/23/1943. "S/Sgt. Frederick A. Bullard...has passed qualifications for air cadet. He is at present stationed at Miami Beach, Fla., waiting assignment to air college," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Three of the four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick G. Bullard of this village, who are in the service of their country, are home on furlough and enjoying a reunion after a separation of many months. They are: S/Sgt. Frederick Bullard, 22, who joined the Army two years ago and is with the Air Forces at Scott Field, St. Louis, Mo., where he is taking a refresher course after serving as a radio operator and gunner on a B-26 Marauder in the Caribbean, South America and the South Atlantic areas. Alfred...and Charles... Robert Bullard, fireman 2/c, is with the Merchant Marine in the Pacific. Addison, who is 16 and still in school, is anxious to get into the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944. "Lt. Frederick A. Bullard...is spending a short furlough at the home of his parents afar receiving his commission at Ft. Benning, Georgia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Alfred J. Bullard, boatswain's mate, second class has three brothers in the service. Lt. Arthur Bullard, with the Army in Japan; Pfc. Robert Bullard, in the Army, and Charles Bullard, coxswain in the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. "Son of a World War I hero, Sergt. Frederick Arthur Bullard, former Manlius high School athlete, is attending a school for radio technicians at Scott field, Ill...Entering the service Nov. 2, 1942, Sergeant Bullard had basic training at St. Petersburg, Fla., and then went to Tyndall Field, Panama City, Fla., where he took a course qualifying him as an aerial gunner. He was sent to his present station following completion of the gunnery course. While attending Manlius High School, Sergeant Bullard was a member of the cross-country track team there and he won the Class B. Championship in cross-country at a New York State scholastic meet in New York City. He completed his high school course at Cleveland High School, Cleveland, graduating as valedictorian of his class. He was also awarded a scholarship at Syracuse University. His father was a sergeant in the Ninth Infantry, Second Division shock troops, in World War I and was awarded the Purple Heart decoration with double oak leaf clusters for having been wounded in action three times. He also won a victory medal with five bars and five stripes, denoting service in five major actions, and the French Fourraguerre," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d.

Bullard, Robert L. Manlius. "Sheepshead Bay, N. Y. - Now in training at the U. S. Maritime Service Training Station here, is Robert L. Bullard, 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bullard of Hillside Drive, Manlius, N. Y. Before enrolling he was a high school student. Apprentice Seaman Bullard will receive six weeks of basic training, including lifeboat work, fire fighting, breeches buoy, mess, sea rules and traditions. After completing 'boot' training he will specialize in deck or engine training, including three weeks of practical experience aboard a training ship at sea," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "Three of the four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick G. Bullard of this village, who are in the service of their country, are home on furlough and enjoying a reunion after a separation of many months. They are: S/Sgt. Frederick Bullard...Alfred and Charles Bullard. Robert Bullard, fireman 2/c, is with the Merchant Marine in the Pacific. Addison, who is 16 and still in school, is anxious to get into the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944. "Morning Mail. / Dear Editor, I just finished reading the Eagle-Bulletin and I thought I would drop a line and thank you for sending me the paper. It's a pleasure to read the news from home and those that are away. Now it is more pleasure than ever as I read of those that are being discharged instead of wounded or killed. I expect to be home on a 30-day leave, but since I've enlisted for three more years in the Army, I'll come home in January. I'll be transferred soon to my permanent camp. Here is a poem I saw in the camp paper two weeks ago. I thought you would like it. I have never forgotten a word of it and it has a true meaning: 'Those little white crosses/So silent and still,/That stand by a woodside/In a beachhead hill./They each mark a symbol/Of some Mother's son,/Who has given his life/That this war may be won./So when you pass by/Give a salute and a Prayer,/And thank God in heaven/Your cross isn't there.' Well, I guess this is about all for now, but I will be seeing you all before long, I hope. So until then, thanks a million and best of everything to you,. Sincerely yours, Pfc. Robert Bullard, Co. B. 37th Inf. Bn, Camp Croft, So. Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "Alfred J. Bullard, boatswain's mate, second class has three brothers in the service. Lt. Arthur Bullard, with the Army in Japan; Pfc. Robert Bullard, in the Army, and Charles Bullard, coxswain in the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945.

Bullis, William. Kirkville P.O., according to the World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Burden, Oliver D., Jr. Fayetteville. "Capt. Hugh L. Walker of 204 Clinton st., Fayetteville, and Lt. Oliver D. Burden, Jr., of Highbridge rd., Fayetteville, have completed a six-week course of military instruction and physical conditioning at the air forces officer training school at Miami Beach, Fla.," The Post-Standard, 4/27/1943. "Captain Oliver D. Burden, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver D. Burden of Orchard Brook, Highbridge road, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been elected one of six governors of the Wright Field, (Ohio) Officers' Club, it was announced here today. Capt. Burden, a graduate of Cornell university, is deputy administrative assistant to Brigadier General Orval R. Cook, chief of the Procurement Division of the Air Technical Service Command. In his work, Capt. Burden aids in administrative direction of the Army Air Forces organization which buys AAF airplanes and supervises their production. He fills his new post with the officers' club in addition to his chief duties. An alumnus of Williams college and the University of Wisconsin as well as Cornell, Capt. Burden is a member of Psi Upsilon fraternity, the University Club, Technology Club, and the Masons," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "Wright Field, Ohio--Promotion of Oliver D. Burden, Jr., of Syracuse, N. Y., to major was announced here today by Colonel Bryant L. Boatner, acting chief of the procurement Division, Air Technical Service Command. Major Burden...is deputy administrative assistant to Colonel Boatner. He is in charge of personnel matters for the 3,000 officers, enlisted men, and civilians who carry on the Procurement Division's functions of buying aircraft and equipment for the Army Air Forces and supervising their production and inspection. In addition, Major Burden assists in reviewing and publishing Division policies and conducts special administrative projects. Major Burden has been stationed at Wright Field since May, 1943, beginning as chief of administration for the aircraft modification section. Three months later he was selected as personnel officer for the production division of the former Materiel Command, a position he held until the Air Technical Service Command was formed last September, when he was appointed to his present assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945.

Burghard, George A. Manlius. "George A. Burghard, son of Mr. and Mrs. George J. Burghard of 135 West Seneca st. enlisted in the U. S. navy and was sworn in last Friday afternoon on the Empire theater stage in Syracuse during the Navy Day observance ceremonies. George will leave within the next few days for training at Sampson Naval Base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "Members of the class of '44 of Manlius high school, held a surprise farewell party Monday night at the home of Charles Hapeman in honor of George Burghard who is soon to leave for the Navy. Games were played and ice cream and cake served. Later in the evening, President John Heinz presented George with a service kit in behalf of the class," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "George A. Burghard, seaman 2/c, has completed his boot training at Sampson Naval base. He returned to his base last Wednesday after a short leave with his parents...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/26/1945. "George A. Burghard, S 1/c, (F.O.M.), in a recent letter to his parents, told of a chance meeting of two Manlius boys now in service and all are stationed on Guam. Charles Bond, S.M. 3/c, came into the room where Burghard was standing to make inquiry about the payroll, and instantly they recognized each other and later Michael Albanese, of the Shore Patrol, discovered the two Manlius boys. The trio had much in common to talk about and it was a happy reunion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Mrs. Jacob Burghard and mother of George Burghard of West Seneca street, Manlius, died Nov. 5 at her home in Kenwood Ave., Syracuse" (grandmother of George A.), The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945. "George Burghard, S. 1/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Burghard of West Seneca street, received a new rating on his 19th birthday, Dec. 11. He is now SoM 3/c, and he is also the appointed ships barber, on the U. S. S. Chowanoc A. T. F. 100," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946. "So. M 3/c George Burghard, of the U. S. S. Chowanoc, enjoyed a long distance phone conversation with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Burghard, Sr., Sunday evening, speaking from Pearl Harbor," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946. "So.M 3/c George Burghard, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Burkhart of West Seneca street, has received an honorable discharge at Terminal Island, San Pedro, Calif., following two years of oversea duty and has returned to the home of his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/12/1946.

Burke, Thomas. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

?Burlingame, Lewis A. Kirkville. "The navy department released casualty list No. 19 today, comprising names reported to next of kin from Dec. 1 to Dec. 15. Among the men listed were...Pvt. Lewis A. Burlingame, marine corps, brother of Mrs. Genevieve Cooper of Kirkville," Post-Standard, 12/31/1942.

Burnes, Robert. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Burt, George T. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "S/Sgt. George T. Burt, son of Mrs. Clara Burt of 134 Washington st., Manlius, has been promoted to that rank at Fort Jackson, S.C., where he is with headquarters battery of the 180th field artillery battalion, 26th 'Yankee' division. Before entering service he was employed by Oneida Ltd., Sherrill," The Post-Standard, 5/17/1944.

Burt, John R. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Burt, Leslie M. Manlius, 134 Washington St. Inducted at Syracuse armory, The Post-Standard, 9/2/1943.

Burtt, Clayton. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. Ed Burtt visited their son, Clayton Burtt, who is in the U. S. Army and stationed in Brunswick, Maine, over last week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Pvt. Clayton Burtt, who has recently graduated from School of Meterology at Borden College in Maine, is passing a week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Burtt of East Genesee street. Miss Marietta Johnson of Brunswick, Me., is also a guest at the Burtt home. Pvt. Burtt will leave on Sunday to be stationed at Mitchell Field on Long Island," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944.

Cahill, James B. Formerly Manlius. "Mrs. Maria Cahill, mother of T. J. Cahill of this village, died Sunday at her home in Syracuse. She was a former resident of Manlius and a native of Pompey. She is survived by her son here and another son James B. Cahill with the armed forces; five daughters, Mrs. James L. Kelly, Mrs. Carl Enders and Miss Emma A. Cahill, of Buffalo, Miss Theresa Cahill and Miss Mabel Cahill of Syracuse; and a sister, Mrs. Fred Patterson, of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945. Uncle of Robert and Thomas B. Cahill.

Cahill, Robert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The local draft board 473 listed a group of young men who will report on Thursday for induction...Robert Cahill, 313 Spring street, Fayetteville...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1941. "Private Robert J. Cahill, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Cahill of Spring street, who is stationed at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, spent five days furlough this week at the home of his parents. Private Cahill is stationed with the headquarters Company of the Communication Division. He returned to camp on Thursday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1941. "Private Robert Cahill is home from Fort Jackson on a furlough and expects to remain until after Christmas with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Cahill have received word that their son, P.F.C. Robert Cahill has left Fort Jackson, South Carolina where he has been stationed for the past year and will take a three months course in Officers Training School at Fort Benning, Ga., after which he will receive a commission of Second Lieutenant," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. "Lieut. Robert J. Cahill made a short visit to his home in this village last week while enroute to an undisclosed destination from Ft. Benning, Ga. He was graduated from Officer's Training School July 6 as second lieutenant," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Lt. Robert Cahill has been passing a few days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/19/1943. "Among promotions recently announced by the War Department, was that of Robert J. Cahill...promoted from second to first lieutenant in the Infantry," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Lt. Robert Cahill, who has been stationed in Greenland is passing a furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "Lt. Robert Cahill, who has been stationed in Newfoundland, is spending his furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Lt. Robert Cahill left last week to return to his base in Newfoundland after passing a furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "On Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Miss Marjorie Ferris, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Ferris, will become the bride of Lt. Robert Cahill...Lt. Cahill has been stationed in Newfoundland for the past two years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "On Sunday afternoon, March 11, Miss Marjorie Belle Ferris, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Ferris of North Manlius street, and Lt. Robert Cahill...were united in marriage in a double ring ceremony at the Church of the Immaculate Conception...Lt. Cahill and his bride left for a short honeymoon in New York City before going to Columbia, Ga., where he will have two months of further training in the communications division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945. "Lt. and Mrs. Robert Cahill spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Selden Tubbs, in Buffalo, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945. "Lieut. Robert Cahill, home on furlough, made the presentation" at the Memorial Day Celebration, May 1945, The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945. "Lt. Robert Cahill, who has been spending the past few weeks with relatives here has gone to Camp Butner, North Carolina. His wife will remain with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. Ferris," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "Lt. Robert Cahill is passing a 30-day leave with his wife and parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945. "Lieutenant and Mrs. Robert Cahill are spending two weeks in camp at Fourth Lake," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/20/1945. "Lt. Robert Cahill has been given an honorable discharge from the Army and has returned to his home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945. "Robert Cahill has completed a course at the IBM in Johnson City. Mrs. Cahill attended the graduation after which they went to New York City, where a group of IBM men attended a conference," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/8/1946.

Cahill, Thomas Bernard. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Mrs. T. J. Cahill, Miss Mary Elizabeth Cahill, Miss Marguerite Cathers, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bunnell of this village and Miss Virginia Stevens of Syracuse were in Buffalo and Niagara Falls over the week-end, where they visited friends and relatives and attended the graduation Sunday of Thomas Cahill at Niagara University. Mr. Cahill returned home with them and is spending some time with his parents before going to Officers Training School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/22/1942. "Thomas B. Cahill, who recently received his B.S. degree and was graduated cum laude from Niagara University, was also the recipient of the Niagara Medal which is the highest honor the University can bestow upon a student. This medal is presented for extraordinary loyalty, personality, character and success in studies, and is voted upon by the student body and faculty of the university," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Thomas B. Cahill has completed his course in officers' training at Fort Bragg, Ky., and has been commissioned second lieutenant in the U. S. Army. After passing a week's furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Cahill of Spring street, he will report to a camp in Tennessee," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Lt. Thomas Cahill, who is stationed in Mississippi, is spending a short furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Cahill. Miss Bonnie Brown of New York City arrived Tuesday night to be the guest of Lt. Cahill at the home of his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/15/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. John Everett Brown of St. Albans, N. Y., announce the marriage of their daughter, Marie Joan to Lt. Thomas Bernard Cahill, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Cahill...Lt. and Mrs. Cahill left for a honeymoon trip to New York City. They will reside for the present at Hattiesburg, Miss., near where the bridegroom is stationed. ...Lt. Cahill is a graduate of Fayetteville School and Niagara University, class of 1942. He received his commission at Fort Shelby, Miss., February, 1943. Mrs. T. J. Cahill spent the weekend in New York and attended the wedding. Thomas J. Kinsella, uncle of the bridegroom, also attended the wedding," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. Thomas B. Cahill have returned to Victoria, Va., after spending a few days at the home of Lt. Cahill's parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Headquarters, 13th A.A.F., Philippines--Three old friends, all of central Onondaga, were reunited in the Southwest Pacific, Captain William P. Andrews, First Lieutenant Thomas B. Cahill and First Lieutenant Frank Bahouth, Jr., were all on the same tiny island for two months before they discovered each other with the help of a newspaper clipping sent to Lieutenant Cahill. Captain William P. Andrew, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Andrews, of 244 Ashdale Avenue, Syracuse, N.Y., and Lieutenant Thomas B. Cahill, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Cahill, of 313 Spring street, Fayetteville, N.Y. are both members of an Infantry unit that has battled the Japanese from Oro Bay, New Guinea, to the Moluccas Islands, Netherlands East Indies (Indonesia). Lieutenant Cahill...attended Infantry Officers' Candidate School at Fort Benning, Georgia, and departed for overseas duty in February, 1944. Lieutenant Bahouth, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Bahouth, Sr., of 507 East Genesee street, Fayetteville, N.Y., is assigned to the 'Bomber Barons,' oldest heavy bombardment unit of the 13th AAF, veteran jungle Air Force that has battled the Japanese from Guadalcanal to Formosa. After attending Fayetteville high school, and Syracuse university, he entered the AAF in January, 1941. He joined his present overseas organization in October, 1943..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "Lt. and Mrs. Thomas Cahill are guests of the former's parents...Lt. Cahill recently returned from two years in the Pacific area with the Infantry," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946. "Capt. Thomas Cahill, who has been spending a week with his parents...left today for his new assignment at Ft. McClellan, Ala.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/3/1946.

Calder, Alexander William, II. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. William Knust of Maplewood, N. J., announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Marilyn Knust, to Pvt. Alexaander William Calder II, Army Air Force, son of Mr. and Mrs. Brooke James Calder of Fayetteville, N.Y....Pvt. Calder was graduated from Western Reserve Academy in Ohio and attended Middlebury College, where he was a member of Chi Psi fraternity. He is at Syracuse University in the College of Training Detachment, Air Crew," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Hondo Army Air Field, Hondo, Texas--navigation Cadet Alexander W. Calder, II, has been appointed Cadet Captain, a high ranking office in his class of navigation cadets at the Hondo Field. Calder is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Brooke J. Calder, 519 Genesee street, Fayetteville. He will receive his silver navigator's wings and his commission when his class graduates here March 18," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/10/1944. "Hondo Army Air Field, Hondo, Tex.--Hundreds of youthful American navigation cadets after 18 weeks of strenuous training pinned on their silver navigator wings at commencement exercises at this installation of the AAF Training Command. Among the graduates of this class was 2nd Lt. Alexander W. Calder, II, 20 ..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/24/1944. "Second Lt. Alexander W. Calder II...is now overseas and has participated in a course designed to bridge the gap between training in the States and soldiering in an active theater of war. At one of the Air Service Command Stations known as Control Depots, Lt. Calder was carefully processed by classification experts who make certain that he was well fitted for the job assigned to him. Security training, personal hygiene, a talk by a Special Service Officer informing him of facilities for healthful recreation and a lecture by the chaplain are all in turn a part of the soldier's preparation for duties overseas. His next station will be one from which America's fighting planes take off to smash the Nazi war machine. Before entering the Army Lt. Calder was a student at Middlebury College," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Calder have received a cable from their son, lst Lt. A. W. Calder, 20, telling of his safe return to allied lines in France. He had been reported missing 16 days over Nazi held territory in that country, when the bomber on which he was navigator failed to return to its base. He is the only member of his crew that has been heard from. Lt. Calder, who has been overseas since May has received the air medal, three oak leaf clusters, and his group has also been awarded the presidential citation. When he rejoined his outfit his First Lieutenant commission was awaiting him," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944 "First Lt. Alexander Calder, who dived from a burning bomber over occupied Europe and was subsequently reported missing in action, is home visiting his parents...His family and friends would like to know the name of the country in which he landed and how he got back to England without detection by the Germans, but since there are many more in similar positions and the Nazis are interested, too, Lt. Calder could not reveal any details of his escape. Lt. Calder is credited with 25 missions. He has the air medal with three oak leaf clusters, the distinguished flying cross, and the presidential unit citation. He was reported missing on Aug. 13, and was back in England some time before Sept. 10, when he met his plane's tail gunner...who had also bailed out. Two other crew members are safe at home, the other five are still missing...Lt. Calder is 20 years old. He was a junior at Middlebury college, Vt., when he entered the army in February, 1943. He took basic training at Atlantic City, was at Syracuse university in a college training detachment for seven weeks, took pre-flight training at Houston, Tex., gunnery training at Harlingen, Tex., and received his wings at Hondo, Tex. The crew was assembled at Sioux City before going overseas in May," The Post-Standard, 10/20/1944.

Camp, Richard W. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Marine First Lt. Richard W. Camp, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hill Camp of Maple dr., Fayetteville, has returned from the South Pacific where he served as a construction officer with a First marine air wing group on the New Hebrides, Russell islands, and Bougainville. He underwent Jap shelling of airstrips on Bougainville in March, 1944. A graduate of Nottingham high school and Syracuse university in 1940, Lt. Camp worked for the Standard Vacuum Oil Co. as engineer in China, Malaya, Singapore, Burma and India before enlisting in November, 1942. He received his commission in February, 1943, and was promoted to first lieutenant in February, 1944," The Post-Standard, 1/21/1945. (Town of Dewitt)

Campbell, Paul T. Fayetteville. "Onondaga county men accepted...Army...Paul T. Campbell, 307 Salt Springs st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 4/3/1943.

Cannavino, Anthony. Manlius. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday...Those inducted from Manlius were...Anthony Cannavino for the Navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Honorably discharged from the separation center at Sampson...Anthony Cannavino, S 2/c, 124 Washington St.., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 1/2/1946.

Cannavino, George. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "George Cannavino, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Cannavino, of Manlius, is stationed at the naval dispensary at Farragut, Ida. He enlisted in the Navy last June and trained at Newport, R. I., and Great Lakes Naval Station, Ill. He was employed by the Precision Die Castings Company of Fayetteville before enlisting, Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Funeral services were held Thursday morning at 9:30 at St. Ann's Church, when a Solemn High Mass was conducted for Michael Cannavino, following a service at his late home in Washington street. Mr. Cannavino was 57 years old. Surviving are two sons, Anthony, of Manlius, and George Cannavino, P-C Service in the Pacific; four daughters, Mrs. Anthony Demascoli, Mrs. Joseph Messenzio, Mrs. Leo DiBello and Mrs. Peter Brigandi, all of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943.

Caragol, Peter B. Manlius. "Board 473 is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Navy...Peter B. Caragol, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944.

Carhart, Ernest Henry. Minoa/Kirkville. "The list of inductees from board 473...Army...Ernest Henry Carhart, 8 Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Carhart, Robert Leo. Minoa/Kirkville. "The list of inductees from board 473...Robert Leo Carhart, S. Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943. "Robert L. Carhart, seaman 2/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Carhart of Minoa, completed boot training at Sampson in September and is attending signalman school there. He is a graduate of Minoa high school and entered the navy in July," The Post-Standard, 10/29/1943. "Robert L. Carhart, signalman, third class, U.S.N.R., of South Main Street, Minoa, is on duty aboard an infantry landing craft, in the English channel," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Carner, Richard L. Manlius. Robert Carner "has a brother, Pfc. Richard L. Carner, in the Army Air Corps with a troop carrier group, "The Post-Standard, 1/17/1944. "...Pfc. Richard L. Carner, is serving with the Army Air Forces in France, "The Herald Journal, 11/16/1944.

Carner, Robert W. Manlius. "...Bob Carner...left last Thursday for Ft. Niagara..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. "Second Lt. Robert W. Carner of 117 Smith street, has received his pilot's silver wings from Moore Army Air Field, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "Lt. Robert W. Carner, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leland T. Carner, of Smith Street, Manlius, has been graduated from the Army Air Forces Advanced Flying School, Moore Field, Texas, receiving his pilot's wings and commission as second lieutenant. Lt. Carner is a graduate of Manlius High School, class of 1942, where he was a four letter athlete in baseball, football, basketball and track. He entered the service Jan. 21, 1943. He has a brother, Pfc. Richard L. Carner, in the Army Air Corps with a troop carrier group, "The Herald-Journal, 1/17/1944. "Robert W. Carner...was among the 36 New York State men to graduate from Advanced Pilot School of the Army Air Force Training Command in the first graduating classes of the New Year. These men received their silver wings and were commissioned second lieutenants. Lt. Carner will serve as a pilot fighter," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Lt. Robert W. Carner, 20, Army Air Forces fighter pilot, has been missing in flight over China since Oct. 28, according to notice received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leland T. Carner...No further details are available. Lt. Carner was graduated in 1942 from Manlius high School, a four-letter athlete. He entered the service in January, 1943, and one year later was graduated from the Army Air Forces Advanced Flying School, Moore Field, Texas. He has been in the China-India-Burma area since July. His brother, Pfc. Richard L. Carner, is serving with the Army Air Forces in France, "The Herald Journal, 11/16/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Leland T. Carner ...received word from their son, Lt. Robert W. Carner, on Monday after he was reported missing in a flight over China. The message said that he is well and safe. Mr. and Mrs. Carner are overjoyed at the glad news. Lieutenant Carner graduated from Manlius high school, class of '42, and entered the services in January, 1943, and one year later was graduated from the Army Air Forces Advanced Flying School, Moore Field, Texas. He has been in the China-India-Burma area since July. The good news of his safety is being shared by his many Manlius friends," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944. "St. Ann's Church in this village (Manlius) was the scene, on Aug. 1 of the wedding of Miss Carol Ramona Lorimer, 513 East Seneca street, Manlius, and Richard L. Carner, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leland T. Carner...Mr. and Mrs. Carner are graduates of Manlius high school. Mr. Carner served two years in the European theatre with the Troop Carrier Command and is now enrolled in the School of Journalism at Syracuse university," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Carr, Christopher C. Fayetteville/Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Among those who left Monday for Fort Benning, Georgia, with the 101st anti-tank battalion of New York National Guard, was Christopher C. Carr, son of Mrs. C. C. Carr of this village. Sergeant Carr was a graduate of Fayetteville High School and attended Syracuse University. In February, 1933, he enlisted in the Navy and after six months training in the Naval Hospital at Norfolk, Va., he was transferred to the Medical Corps at Philadelphia Naval Hospital, where he served until his discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/16/1941. "First Sgt. Christopher C. Carr, Jr., Co. C, 801 Tank Destroyer Battalion of Camp Sutton, N. C., accompanied Corp. Irving C. Ludwig, Jr., to Syracuse from Camp Sutton Friday for his marriage to Miss Eleanor Larend, which took place Monday morning...visits mother in Manlius," The Eagle Bulletin, 4/24/1942. "Lt. Christopher C. Carr is spending a short leave with his wife in Syracuse and mother in Manlius, after graduating New Year's eve from Tank Destroyer School in Texas. Lt. Carr is a graduate of Fayetteville High School, a member of Troop K 121st Cavalry of Syracuse and went into service with that outfit in January, 1941. During his two years of service he has held every office from private to master sergeant. Lt. Carr will return to Camp Hood on Friday for his assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1943.

?Carroll, Frederick. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Carroll of Brooklea Drive have had as their guests, their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Carroll, and sons Harris, Paul and Pat, of Southwest Oswego. Frederick Carroll, storekeeper 1/c, has recently been discharged from the U. S. Navy after serving in the Marianas loading L.S.T. boats, submarines and gun boat destroyers. The Carroll's had their Thanksgiving dinner last Saturday, enjoying the turkey which Mr. Carrol, Sr., won at the dinner last Thursday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Carveth, Charles. Kirkville. "...Charles Carveth of Kirkville...(is)...among the recruits who are undergoing preliminary training at the Marine Corps barracks at Parris Island, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Pvt. Charles Carveth, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Carveth of Kirkville RD 2, has returned to his base at New River, N. C., after passing a six-day leave with his parents. Pvt. Carveth enlisted with the United States marine corps," The Post-Standard, 9/18/1942. "Miss Nancy Naatz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Allan Naatz of this village (Kirkville) became the bride of Pvt. Charles Carveth, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Carveth, also of Kirkville, Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon at the Kirkville Methodist Church...Both the bride and the bridegroom were graduated from Minoa high school...Mr. Carveth enlisted in the Marine Corps shortly after graduation and spent three years in the Pacific area where he was in several major combats. After 30 days furlough, Pvt. Carveth will be stationed in Boston, Mass., where his bride will join him," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945. "Pfc. Charles Carveth and Mrs. Carveth left Sunday for Squantum where he is stationed with the Marines. Squantum is situated on the Atlantic coast about five miles from Boston. For the present they will reside in Quincy, Mass., but they are first on the list for an apartment on the army base at Squantum. Each apartment is furnished with gas stove and refrigerator, but they are otherwise unfurnished. We have asked Mrs. Carveth (Nancy Naatz) to write and give us an interesting description," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Case, Jack. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse as John F. Case (44,283)

Case, Robert. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Case, Robert H. Formerly Fayetteville. "Robert H. Case, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Case of Wolcott, N. Y., formerly of this village (Fayetteville), left Tuesday, Nov. 10 for Columbus, O., to begin active duty in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "Robert H. Case of Wolcott, N. Y., and a former Fayetteville boy, received his commission as second lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps, Aug. 26, upon successfully completing the Officer Candidate Course at the Anti-aircraft Artillery School at Camp Davis, N. C., according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Case of East Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "2nd Lt. Robert Case has returned to his base at Ft. Eustis, Va., after passing a few days with his parents...and relatives and friends in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Lt. Robert H. Case has returned to Fort Eustis, Va., after spending a few days leave with his parents...and with relatives and friends in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Crocker left Tuesday afternoon for Richmond, Va., to spend Christmas with their son, Robert H. Crocker and family. Lt. Robert H. Case, a former resident of this village, who is stationed at Fort Eustis, Va., will also be a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Crocker for Christmas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Lt. Robert Case has returned to Camp Ritchie, Md. after spending a few days with his parents...and relatives and friends in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Lt. Robert H. Case has returned to Camp Ritchie after spending a few days with his parents...and friends and relatives in Fayetteville. While home he received word of promotion to his present rank," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. George Case, former residents of Fayetteville, have moved from 110 East Ave., East Syracuse to their farm at Wolcott, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Robert H. Case, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Case of Wolcott, N.Y., has returned home after 3 1/2 years in the army. The Case family were former residents of Fayetteville, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/24/1946.

Case, Seymour. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942.

Cash, Harold. Kirkville. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Army...Harold C. Cash, Kirkville, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943.

Pfc. Harold Cash, is stationed at Camp Shanks and is expected home soon," The Post-Standard, 10/13/1943 "S/Sgt. Harold Cash is stationed at Camp Shanks. He is expected home soon on furlo. Accompanying will be his wife and infant son who are with his wife's parents at Seneca Falls," The Post-Standard, 5/14/1945. Brother of Raymond Cash. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Cash, Raymond. Kirkville. "Pvt. Raymond Cash has been home on a three-day pass from Fort Myers, Fla., visiting his mother...He was accompanied by his wife...Recently, Pvt. Cash was a guard at the Third war loan drive show in Washington. His brother, Pfc. Harold Cash, is stationed at Camp Shanks and is expected home soon," The Post-Standard, 10/13/1943. "PFC Raymond Cash, son of Mrs. Zara Cash of Kirkville, has been sent to the Pacific area from Fort Lewis, Wash. He is with a hospital unit and has trained at Denver, Colo., Auburn, Calif., and Fort Lewis, Wash. His wife, the former Betty Conway, will return to Syracuse," The Post-Standard, 5/14/1945. Brother of Harold Cash.

Casler, Donald R. Minoa. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Donald R. Casler...of Minoa...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. Honorable discharge, army...Sgt. Donald R. Casler, Minoa, The Post-Standard, 4/5/1946. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Casler, Donald R., 309 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Casler, Edwin C. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Casler, Edwin C., 408 Hulburt St., Minoa, N.Y.

Casler, Jack R. Minoa. "The war department announced today thru The Associated Press the names of 1,601 soldiers wounded in action, including these with next of kin in New York: European area...Pvt. Jack R. Casler, son, Mrs. Johanna Casler, 408 Hulbert st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 2/26/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Casler, Jack R., 408 Hulburt St., Minoa, N.Y."

Cathers, Donald. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Enlisted in the navy 12/5/1945, Donald J. Cathers, 309 Spring st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 12/16/1945. "Among the hundreds who are flocking to the recruiting station in Syracuse to join the nation's fighting forces since the attack on the United States by Japan and declaration of war by the Axis powers are many from the towns of Manlius and DeWitt. Enlisting from Fayetteville are...Donald Cathers..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. "Donald Cathers of the U. S. Navy has been spending a few days furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cathers at their home in Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Donald Cathers of the U. S. Navy has been spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cathers," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1942. "Donald Cathers of the U. S. Navy has been passing a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cathers," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Donald Cathers of the U. S. Navy is passing a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cathers," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/19/1943. "Donald Cathers, a fire controlman third class in the U. S. Navy, is enjoying a five-day furlo at the home of his parents...He told his parents and friends of the tremendous thrill that he enjoyed when reviewed by president Roosevelt at Casablanca. The president reviewed the entire fleet ashore in the North African town. Cathers, on duty aboard a destroyer, has crossed the ocean 10 or 12 times during his 15 months as a sailor. His craft was credited with sinking two destroyers and silencing one shore battery during the North African invasion," The Post-Standard, 2/20/1943. "Donald Cathers of the U. S. Navy spent a few days last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cathers in Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "The marriage of Elizabeth Ann Eddy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merrill R. Eddy of Hunt Drive, and Petty Officer Donald J. Cathers, U. S. N., son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred J. Cathers of Spring street, was solemnized at the First Methodist Church in Syracuse Wednesday evening...Following the termination of his nine-day leave, petty Office Cathers will report for duty and Mrs. Cathers will remain with her parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include...Donald Cathers..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Cathers, George R. Manlius. (Oran, Town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Mr. and Mrs. Geo. R. Cathers and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Agan gave a farewell party last Tuesday evening for their son and brother, George R. Cathers, Jr., who recently enlisted in the aviation mechanics division of the Navy Reserves. Twenty-seven guests were present and the table was decorated in the Navy colors. Cathers is now stationed at the Great Lakes Training School in Illinois," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942.

Cathers, John S. Manlius. (Oran, Town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Catterino, Joseph (now Joe Cato). Manlius. "Joseph A. Catterino, pharmacists mate third class is home on a 15-day leave after a year's service in the Caribbean area, visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Catterino of Manlius. A graduate of Manlius high school, he enlisted in the navy in February, 1943. His sister, Theresa Catterino, is an apprentice seaman in the WAVES, training at Hunter College," The Post-Standard, 6/27/1944.

Catterino, Teresa. Manlius. "Miss Teresa Caterina has enlisted in the Waves and will go to Rochester next week to be inducted. She expects to enter Hunter College for training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving: WACS: Madeline Schlosser, Fayetteville. Nurse: Leola Hirsch and Joan McNally, Fayetteville; Elizabeth Hale, Manlius. WAVES: Betty Jane LaPoint, Teresa Caterina (Catterino) of Manlius, and Christine Hutchins, Kirkville. Marines: Margaret Taylor, Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944.

Center, Charles S. Fayetteville/Town of Dewitt. "Headquarters Army Air Forces Central Flying Training Command, Randolph Field, Tex.--New York ranked fifth among the nation's pilot-producing states today as thousands of combat flyers received their wings in simultaneous graduation ceremonies at the eleven Southwestern advanced flying schools of the AAF Training command. Among the new pilots recently graduated from Frederick Field, Frederick, Oklahoma, was Charles S. Center of Maple Drive, Fayetteville, N. Y. From New York came 170 of the young pilots who formed the largest graduating class in the history of the Central Flying Training Command. The record graduation ceremonies were held today for fighter pilots at Eagle Pass, at Aloe and Foster fields in Victoria, and at Moore Field at Mission, all in Texas. Bomber pilots were graduated at Frederick and Altus in Oklahoma, at the Texas army air fields at Lubbock, and Pamper, at Ellington Field of Houston, Brooks at San Antonio, and Blackland at Waco," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/24/1944. "Honorably discharged, Second Lt. Charles S. Center, 831 Oakwood st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 10/13/1945.

Chamberlin, Jacques. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Mrs. Stanley Smith has received word that her son, Technical Sergeant Jacques Chamberlain has arrived safely overseas. His wife has come from St. Louis to live with Mr. and Mrs. Smith for the duration," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/16/1942. "Tech. Sgt. Jacques Chamberlain, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Smith of this village (Fayetteville), is with the radio section of an allied force signal regiment in Italy. The regiment took 400 tons of radio equipment to Italy shortly after the Salerno landings. They set up within the German artillery range and sent the first direct radio message from Hitler's European fortress to the United States," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Air Force Headquarters, Italy--T/Sgt. Jacques Chamberlin is a radio repair and maintenance man with an Army radio station somewhere in the Mediterranean theater. He is the son of Mrs. S. T. Smith, 100 Salt Springs street, Fayetteville, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Chandler, Charles B. Manlius. (Watervale, town of Pompey) Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Sgt. Charles B. Chandler, who enlisted in the army May 9, 1941, is overseas. He was formerly employed by the Thomas Brass foundry in East Syracuse," The Post-Standard, 7/15/1943. "Sergeant Charles Chandler, who is now stationed in California, is expecting to leave soon for overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/16/1942. "Word has been received from Charles Chandler that he is expected to arrive home soon on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Sgt. Chandler and Mrs. Chandler are spending some time with Mr. and Mrs. Dorrance Stephens. Sgt. Chandler has recently returned from Germany and is having a 30-day furlough. Name also appears on the Watervale, town of Pompey, list.

Chapman, Dwight C. Manlius. (Watervale, town of Pompey) "Pvt. Dwight C. Chapman of Manlius, leader of the Reconnaissance Section of Headquarters Battery, 495th armored field artillery, 12th armored division, has just been promoted to acting corporal. Corp. Chapman, 21, has been in the army just one month, after having left Michigan State Normal college, where he completed one and a half years. The newly appointed corporal has a brother, Staff Sgt. Raymond Chapman, who has been in the army for two years and who is now in Honolulu," Post-Standard, 11/30/1942. "Pvt. Dwight C. Chapman, leader of Reconnaisance of Headquarters Battery 495th armored field artillery, has just been promoted to corporal. Corp. Chapman, has been in the Army one month, after leaving Michigan State Normal College. His brother, S/Sgt. Raymond Chapman has been in the Army two years and is now stationed in Honolulu," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Corp. Dwight Chapman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Chapman, has returned to his base in Texas after passing a furlough at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. Arrival on the Betty Zane due in New York today, Corp. Dwight C. Chapman, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 2/4/1946. Name also appears on the Watervale, town of Pompey list.

Chapman, Lawrence R. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Oran Honor roll.

Chapman, Raymond C. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Baptist Church service flag, The Eagle Bulletin, 2/27/1942. "Private Raymond Chapman has recently been made corporal and in a recent letter to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Chapman, stated that he was in good health," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1942. "Mrs. Charles Chapman received a telegram on Mother's Day from her son Corp. Raymond Chapman of Honolulu," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/15/1942. "Pvt. Dwight C. Chapman of Manlius, leader of the Reconnaissance Section of Headquarters Battery, 495th armored field artillery, 12th armored division, has just been promoted to acting corporal. Corp. Chapman, 21, has been in the army just one month, after having left Michigan State Normal college, where he completed one and a half years. The newly appointed corporal has a brother, Staff Sgt. Raymond Chapman, who has been in the army for two years and who is now in Honolulu," Post-Standard, 11/30/1942. "Staff Sergeant Raymond Chapman, who returned from Hawaii, has been visited his parents...Sgt. Chapman left for Fort Sill, Okla., where he is enrolled in Officers Candidate School. He has written his parents of his safe arrival at Fort Sill," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Lt. Raymond Chapman, has returned to Ft. Sill, Okla., after a 10-day furlough at the home of his parents...Brickyard Falls Road. Lt. Chapman is in the Artillery," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Raymond Chapman, who has been spending a ten-day leave with his parents...has returned to his base in Oklahoma," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "Second Lt. Raymond Chapman...has left for Fort Sill, Okla., after a 10-day leave at home. He was graduated from Pittsburgh, Kan., as liaison pilot and completed advanced training at Fort Sill," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/31/1944. "Lieut. Raymond Chapman, located somewhere in the South Pacific, remembered his mother with flowers on Mother's Day," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Lt. Raymond Chapman, artillery liaison pilot in the 43rd (Winged Victory) Division, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Chapman, of Manlius, R. D., and Miss Evelyn Green, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Leslie W. Farnsworth, of Mottville, N. Y., were married June 6 in the United Church in Manila, P. I. The bride is an army nurse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "The following officers and enlisted men were honorably discharged Thursday from the Army of the United States at Fort Dix, N.J...First Lt. Raymond C. Chapman, Manlius," The Post-Standard, 12/15/1945. Name also appears on the Watervale, town of Pompey list.

?Chappell, E. Joyce Newman. Manlius, formerly Liverpool, England. "Announcement has been made of the marriage of E. Joyce Newman, W.R.N.S. Royal Navy, daughter of Mrs. M. Oversen of Liverpool, England and Petty Officer Raymond C. Chappell...at Elhorn, Md., on August 26..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Chappell entertained at a family reunion on Christmas Day. The guests of honor are their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Chappell, both in the service of their country. Raymond Chappell 2/c Petty Officer, has been in the U.S. navy for three years and has returned to active duty. Mrs. Chappell is stationed at Mineola, L. I., The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945. "Raymond C. Chappell...In September, 1944, he was assigned to this new ship and returned to active duty. His wife, Joyce Newman Chappell, to whom he was married on Aug. 26, 1944, is a member of the Woman's Royal Navy Service now stationed at Roosevelt Field, Mineola, L. I.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Petty Officer Raymond C. Chappel of the U.S.S. Guam, and Mrs. Chappell of Philadelphia, spent the week end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Chappell and their sister, Mrs. Albert T. Hepp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/13/1946. Raymond Chappell's residence following his marriage was at 107 Franklin St., Manlius. Whether Joyce ever resided here is not clear as both were at different assignments during their service.

Chappell, Edward A. Manlius. "...Onondaga County men accepted yesterday were...Edward A. Chappell, R.D. 1, Manlius..." Post-Standard, 11/19/1942. "Pfc. Edward Chappell of Manlius, who served two years in the European theater of operations with the 28th infantry division, has been discharged from Fort Dix, N. J. He arrived in New York on the Queen Mary on Sept. 28. PFC Chappell was in service four years," The Post-Standard, 10/12/1945.

Chappell, Raymond C. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Raymond C. Chappell, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Chappell has enlisted in the U. S. Navy for a term of six years beginning October 13, 1941. Address Company No. 75, U. S. Naval Training Station, Newport, R. I.," The Eagle Bulletin, 10/31/1941. "Pvt. Raymond Chappell is passing a furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/12/1941. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Raymond Chappel, who was at home on a ten-day leave has returned to the West Coast," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Raymond Chappell, S.F 2/c, who has been in combat duty on the Pacific is at his home in Manlius on leave, and will return for a new assignment on Feb. 1," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Announcement has been made of the marriage of E. Joyce Newman, W.R.N.S. Royal Navy, daughter of Mrs. M. Oversen of Liverpool, England and Petty Officer Raymond C. Chappell...at Elhorn, Md., on August 26..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Chappell entertained at a family reunion on Christmas Day. The guests of honor are their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Chappell, both in the service of their country. Raymond Chappell 2/c Petty Officer, has been in the U.S. navy for three years and has returned to active duty. Mrs. Chappell is stationed at Mineola, L. I., The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945. "Aboard a New U. C. Cruiser Somewhere in Pacific (Delayed).--Raymond C. Chappell, 24, shipfitter, second class, whose parents live on Seneca street, Manlius, N. Y., helped take a new U. S. Cruiser into battle for the first time today against the Japanese. Her guns sent two Japanese bombers crashing into the sea not far from Japan, and the carriers she defended so well are free to launch their planes against the enemy. Today, shortly after dawn, when the first Jap 'Betty' stole through a curtain of ack-ack and let loose its bombs, the men knew there was a difference from yesterday when 'business as usual' was the plan of the day, and outwardly the officers and men carried on as if they had no notion of the imminence of battle. But they all knew that just over the horizon lay the mainland of Japan. The next plane did not get through; it dissolved in the focal fire of a barrage from the ships of the task force. A third one, intent on sowing destruction on the deck of a carrier, broke through, but it was riddled with flack and diverted. Other planes came in to meet the fierce anti-aircraft fire of this cruiser and other ships of the force, but they were repelled. The carriers moved on toward their goal. This evening the Captain of this newly-baptized cruiser spoke from his station on the bridge to the men at their battle stations. The planes of returning U. S. airmen speckled the sky as they maneuvered for landings. The Captain's words were proud: 'Objective realized...losses of task force aircraft light...damage to the enemy severe. For this ship, two Jap planes; one probable. For you of the crew, well done, shipmates.' Chappell enlisted in the navy in October, 1941, and was assigned to combat duty on the U.S.S. New Mexico in December, 1941. He was seriously injured in the Gilbert Island campaign in November, 1943, and after being hospitalized for a few months was returned to the States and assigned to Philadelphia, Pa. for rehabilitation and further training in February, 1944. Chappell wore eight battle stars, and has since taken part in the Okinawa invasion. In September, 1944, he was assigned to this new ship and returned to active duty. His wife, Joyce Newman Chappell, to whom he was married on Aug. 26, 1944, is a member of the Woman's Royal Navy Service now stationed at Roosevelt Field, Mineola, L. I. A cousin, Lt. Arthur I. Chappell, is with the U. S. Marine Corps Reserves, 5th Marine Div. and spent 35 days in combat on Iwo Jima. He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school and Syracuse university, and a former resident of Manlius. Another cousin, Pvt. Eugene Shearer, also a former resident of Manlius, was killed in Germany last October," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Raymond C. Chappell, 24, shipfitter 2/c, USNR, of 107 Franklin st., Manlius, served aboard the USS Guam, battle cruiser, while she was proving her worth during six months of combat from Okinawa to the fringes of Japan's inland sea. The Guam made her battle debut on the morning of March 18, during the historic two-day air strike against the Ryukyus and the inland sea area of Japan," The Post-Standard, 7/29/1945. "Aboard the U.S.S. Guam in the Pacific.--Raymond C. Chappell, 24, shipfitter, second class, U.S.N.R., 107 Franklin street, Manlius, N.Y., served aboard this unique battle cruiser while she was proving her worth during nearly six months of combat from Okinawa to the fringes of Japan's Inland Sea. The Guam, under the command of Capt. Leland P. Lovette, U.S.N., made her battle debut on the morning of March 18, during the now historic two-day air strike against the Ryukyus and the Inland Sea area of Japan. Guns of the big battle cruiser were credited with shooting down two Jap planes as they attempted suicide dives of a nearby aircraft carrier. In addition, she is credited with assists on six attacking enemy planes, while her 12-inch guns have poured tons of steel on two Jap-held islands. The Guam, the American version of the pocket battleship and a comparatively recent addition to the Pacific Fleet, cruised with her task force off Japanese shores for 61 days. In recent operations, supporting the Okinawa invasion, she protected carriers of her escort in a series of battles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Raymond C. Chappell, 24, shipfitter 2/c, USNR...is serving aboard the USS Guam, battle cruiser, in the Pacific. He enlisted in the navy Oct. 17, 1941. After boot training, completed Dec. 6, 1941, he was assigned to combat duty aboard the USS Mexico, right after pearl harbor. He was seriously injured during the Gilbert island campaign in November, 1943. After being hospitalized several weeks, he was sent to Philadelphia for rehabilitation and further training. He returned to active duty in September, 1944. Chappell has eight battle stars and has taken part in the invasion of Okinawa. On Aug. 26, 1944, he married Joyce Newman of the women's royal navy service, stationed at Roosevelt field, Mineola, L. I. Chappell has a cousin, Lt. Arthur I. Chappell, USMC, with the Fifth marines who spent 35 days in combat on Iwo Jima. He is a graduate of Syracuse university. Another cousin, Eugene Shearer, Nedrow, in the army, was killed in action in Germany last October," The Post-Standard, 8/20/1945. "On the U.S.S. Guam in the Pacific.--Raymond C. Chappell, 25, shipfitter, 2/c, USN, 107 Franklin street, Manlius, N. Y., served on this battle cruiser, flagship of Rear Admiral F. S. Low, USN, when she led a task force of more than 50 ships into Jinsen, Korea, Sept. 8 to liberate the country from the Japanese. About 15,000 American sailors and soldiers steamed ashore to occupy the capital city of Keijo, 23 miles away, to the cheers of the natives. A crowd estimated at 100,000 gathered in the vicinity of the capitol to watch the lowering of the Jap flag and the raising of the Stars and Stripes. Thousands of American prisoners of war, many listed missing, were assembled, identified and headed for home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945. "Petty Officer Raymond C. Chappel of the U.S.S. Guam, and Mrs. Chappell of Philadelphia, spent the week end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Chappell and their sister, Mrs. Albert T. Hepp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/13/1946.

Chappell, Robert W. Manlius. "Pvt. Robert Chappelle, stationed at Drew Field Fla., and son of Mrs. Carmen Chappelle, 415 East Seneca Street, Manlius, had to leave his two pet dogs, Sandy and Pal, home. His mother brought them to Syracuse recently when she came to visit another son, Clifford Parsons...Both Sandy, a collie, and Pal, a brown dog, have disappeared. Mrs. Chappelle hopes to find the dogs before her son, due on furlough soon, gets home," Bond scrapbook, n.d. On Fayetteville Victory due in New York on October 24, T/5 Robert W. Chappell, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 10/26/1945. "T/5 Robert W. Chappell has been honorably discharged and returned to the home of his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945.

Cheney, John P., Jr. Manlius. "Pvt. John P. Cheney, Jr., returned last Wednesday to Ft. Niagara after passing a 14-day furlough with his parents in Academy st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Pvt. John P. Cheney arrived Monday to pass several days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John P. Cheney, Sr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Several Manlius men who are in the armed service are at home on a brief leave, among them are...John Cheney," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943.

Cheney, Robert G. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Robert Cheney an aviation cadet at San Antonio, Texas was called home by the death of his father, William D. Cheney. Miss Ruth Cheney of Utica, was also home," The Eagle Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "A huge class of Aviation Cadets completed the aerial gunnery course here this week and included in the group was AV/C Robert G. Cheney, son of Mrs. Florence Cheney of 110 Walnut street, Fayetteville. He came here (Harlingen Army Air Field, Texas) and won his aerial gunner's wings after pre-flight training at one of the Central Flying Training Command's bombardier or navigator schools, spending six weeks at intensive training in every phase of aerial warfare in order to learn how to 'double in lead.' From here he will go to an advanced school to complete his training and give up his aviation cadet standing for a second lieutenant's commission and another pair of wings," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "Sgt. Robert Cheney is home on a short furlough, following completion of an advanced radio gunnery course at Scott Field, Ill., and will return to Midwestern Air Base to await assignment to a heavy bombardment unit," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "15th AAF in Italy--Robert G. Cheney, 28, of 105 Walnut street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been promoted from corporal to a sergeant. He is a radio operator-gunner in a B-17 Flying Fortress, operating from a 15th Air Force bomber base in Italy...He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school and Syracuse university, B.A., 1939. His mother, Mrs. W. D. Cheney, lives at the Fayetteville address," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/26/1945 "Mrs. William D. Cheney has received word from the War Department that her son, S/Sgt. Robert G. Cheney, was reported missing in action on Jan. 21, over Yugoslavia. On January 22 official word to the Eagle-Bulletin from the 15th AAF in Italy stated that Bob had been promoted from corporal to sergeant. He was a radio operator-gunner in a B-17 Flying Fortress, operating from a 15th Air Force bomber base in Italy. Sgt. Cheney joined the Army on Nov. 21, 1942, and received his gunners wings at Harlingen Field his radio operators training at Scott field, Ill. in October, 1943. Sgt. Cheney went overseas in November, 1944, and flew his first combat mission over Munich, Germany," The Post-Standard, 2/15/1945. "A letter dated Feb. 18, was received by Mrs. William Cheney on Tuesday from her son, S/Sgt. Robert G. Cheney, who was reported as missing in action on January 21, stating that at that time he was well and happy to be back at his base after an absence of nearly a month. He gave no further details of what happened. Another communication received by Mrs. Cheney on Wednesday from the War Department gave out the information that Bob had failed to return from a combat mission over Yugoslavia to his base in Austria. The letter further stated that the radio operator on the B-17 Flying Fortress on which Bob was radio-gunner had sent a message that their oxygen supply was about exhausted and that it was necessary for them to leave the formation and fly at a lower altitude, and that the crew and plane were missing," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "T/Sgt. Robert Cheney arrived home Monday for 30-days leave. He will then report to Greensboro Field in North Carolina. Sgt. Cheney is a radio operator-gunner and had been based in Italy since going over seas last November He is visiting his mother Mrs. William Cheney," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945.

Cheney, William A. Manlius. "William A. Cheney, son of Mrs. W. W. Cheney, Jr., was commissioned Monday as second lieutenant in the U. S. Infantry at the Manlius School of which he was a graduate in 1942. He was sworn in by Lt.-Col. William H. Collette, professor of military science and tactics. Lt. Cheney, who is 18 years old, was a student in the Manlius School for five years, attaining the rank of cadet office in Company C. He was active in sports, a leading member of the ski team and tennis team. He was enrolled at Kenyon College, Gambier, O., where he studied during the last semester. Lt. Cheney has not received his orders for duty as yet," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/22/1943. "Lieut. William A. Cheney, son of Mrs. Margaret Cheney, of 410 East Seneca street, is taking a pilot training course on a B-17 flying fortress at Columbus, Ohio. A former student at Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio. Lieut. Cheney was commissioned in the infantry Feb. 2, 1943, and won his wings May 23," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/14/1944. Army release...lst Lt. William A. Cheney, 410 E. Manlius st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 4/18/1946.

Chrisman, George F. Manlius. "Board 473, East Syracuse, sent...four into the navy...George F. Chrisman, 105 Smith st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945.

Cirtwell, Robert J. Kirkville. "Robert J. Cirtwell of Kirkville formerly employed at the Halcomb plant, Crucible Steel Co. of America is stationed at the marine corps base at Parris Island, South Carolina," The Post-Standard, 8/1/1942.

Clark, Arthur Lisle. Fayetteville. "The Fayetteville firemen gave a farewell party last night in the club rooms for Lisle Clark and George Schleich, who leave next week for training, having enlisted in the Sea Bees of the U. S. Navy. Each was presented with a gift. This makes six members of the department who have joined the colors," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. Inducted, Arthur L. Clark, 212 W. Genesee st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 6/4/1943. "Mrs. Lisle Clark left today to spend several days with her husband, who is stationed with the Sea Bees in Rhode Island," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Spending a ten-day furlough at their respective homes here are Fireman 1/c Lisle Clark, Machinist Mate...all members of the Seabees, stationed at Providence, R. I., " The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Lisle Clark of the U. S. Seabees, has attained the rank of machinist mate 2/c. He was given the rating on Thanksgiving Day at Gulfport, Miss., according to word received by his wife," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. ....Another meeting...was...on Feb. 4, of George Ebeling, S 1/c, U.S.N., with George Schleich, M.M. l/c and Lisle Clark, M.M. l/c of the U.S. Seabees, on Leyte Island. According to the story, Ebeling came ashore on Leyte on Feb. 3 and asked about the battalion with which Schleich and Clark were serving, only to learn that they had left for Samar. In some way the message reached the two Seabees and they either walked, ran or swam back to Leyte where they met Ebeling for a half hour the next day. Whether Ebeling say his brother-in-law, Charles Moynihan, who is also serving in the same battalion with Clark and Schleich, has not been learned," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Mrs. A. Lisle Clark was in Baldwinsville last week being called there by the death of her mother-in-law, Mrs. Mabel Clark, whose funeral was held last Tuesday. A. Lisle Clark, MM 2/c, is with the Seabees in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "Mrs. Lisle Clark and Mrs. George Schleich left Tuesday for New York City where on Wednesday they met their husbands who have just been released from the Seabees with which they have served for the past three years. They will return to Fayetteville the last of the week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Clark, Judson W. Fayetteville. "On the West Point, which arrived at Newport News Tuesday...T/5 Judson W. Clark, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/6/1945.

Clemons, Elmer E. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Private Elmer E. Clemons, son of Mrs. Minnie Clemons, 110 North street, Manlius, N. Y., recently began the Airplane Mechanics course at the Army Air Base at Lincoln. Upon graduation, Pvt. Clemons will be rated as a fully qualified airplane mechanic and will be assigned to a permanent air force squadron for active duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Leonard entertained at a family dinner last Wednesday in honor of Elmer Clemons, who was passing a two weeks' furlough with his mother, Mrs. Minnie Clemons," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Mrs. Minnie Clemons is a patient in Crouse-Irving hospital, recovering from an operation performed on Wednesday. Pvt. Elmer Clemons of New Jersey is at home on furlough during his mother's illness," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Elmer E. Clemons has been promoted from the grade of corporal to that of sergeant, according to announcements made by the U. S. Eighth Fighter Command. Sgt. Clemons is 'somewhere in England.' Clemons, a graduate of Manlius Military School, in 1916, also attended Airplane Mechanic School at Lincoln Air Base, Lincoln, Neb., and Electrical School at Chanute Field, Rantoul, Ill. He is now assigned as an electrical specialist in the Eighth AAF Thunderbolt Squadron. The P-47 Thunderbolts which take off from the runways of this English airfield escort the heavy American bombers that are blasting the enemy...Sgt. Clemons was employed as a machine operator for the Precision Castings Co. prior to enlisting for service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Word has been received from S/Sgt. Elmer Clemons, who has been in England for a year, that he is now in France. Gertrude Leonard received some French money from Sgt. Clemons," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "S/Sgt. Elmer Clemons who recently received an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army is receiving treatment at Batavia hospital for an ear condition," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "S/Sgt. Elmer Clemons is reported as making a satisfactory recovery from ear trouble at the Veterans' hospital in Bath," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

?Clyne, William. Fayetteville. "Mrs. William Clyne has gone to Los Angeles, Cal., to spend some time with her husband who is in the U. S. armed forces. Mrs. Clyne was formerly Anne Spencer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "T/5 William Clyne, who is stationed at Camp Barkley, Texas, with the 12th Armored Division, is visiting Mrs. Clyne and their infant son, Michael, at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Spencer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944.

Coates, Frank. Fayetteville. Arrivals on the J. Breckinridge, due in Newport News Tuesday, Pfc. Frank Coates, 150 Burdick st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 10/27/1945.

Coe, George Alfred. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Stanley Hoag and George Coe expect to leave this week end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "George Coe, son of Mr. Norman Nichols of Elm street has been transferred from Santa Ana, Calif. to a Bombardier School in New Mexico," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/22/1942. "Mrs. Norman Nichols has received word that her son, George Coe, will graduate from west coast air force training center, Advanced Bombardier School at Albuquerque, N. M. on July 25. He will receive his wings and become a second lieutenant. Coe was graduated from Fayetteville High School in 1939 and enlisted in service in January of this year," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Lt. George Coe who recently graduated from Bombardier School in Albuquerque, N. M., has been spending a few days with his mother, prior to going to South Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Announcement has been made of the marriage of Lieut. George Coe...of this village to Miss Mary Conzett of Albuquerque, N. M. at Columbia, So. Carolina...The couple will reside in Columbia, where Lt. Coe is an instructor at an Army air base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1842. "Announcement has been made of the promotion of George Coe...from 2nd to 1st lieutenant. Lt. Coe is a bombardier in the U. S. flying corps and is stationed overseas..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/26/1943. "...Lt. George Coe, is serving overseas," The Eagle Bulletin, 3/19/1943. Mrs. Nichols has also just received the first word in three months from her son, 1st Lt. George Coe, bombardier. He writes that he has arrived in Italy from Africa and has hope of coming home, as he has completed his 50th successful mission," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "First Lt. John C. (Jack) Goodfellow, 25, is home on leave after 50 runs as pilot of a B-17 Flying Fortress out of American bases in Africa and Italy to bomb France, Austria, Italy and Greece. Decorated with the air medal and nine oak leaf clusters to the medal, each signifying five bombing missions, Lt. Goodfellow relates that on only one of the 50 trips was anyone in his crew injured. On the 41st mission, the Fortress was attacked and one engine knocked out. The co-pilot was struck in the right knee by a 22 mm. shell and had to be taken to a hospital in Sardinia to have his leg removed before the plane returned to its base. Another member of the crew injured on that trip was Tech. Sgt. William R. Underhill of Rochester, radio operator, who was hit in the hand...Other Central New York me in the same group were...Frank Bigelow of Fayetteville, who is a prisoner of war after being shot down over Naples; Lt. George Coe, a bombardier, from Fayetteville..." Vail scrapbook, 1/14/1944, newspaper not mentioned. "Lt. George A. Coe, a bombardier in the U. S. Air Force, who has completed his 50th mission in service in the European Theater and recently returned to the States, is spending three weeks with his parents...This is the first time home since August, 1942. Like all good bombardiers, Lt. Coe would make little comment on his experiences, merely stating that he was one of the lucky ones so far, and sure was glad to be back in Fayetteville for a while. His wife has come from Albuquerque, N. M. to join him at his parent's home. Following his stay here, he will report to Atlantic City, N. J. for further orders," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Lt. George Coe spent a few days last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nichols, of Elm St., The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Lt. George Coe and Lt. Stewart Coe...spent a recent week end together in Dallas, Texas, after not having seen each other for over two years. Lt. George Coe, a bombardier, who completed his missions and returned to the states a few months ago, is now receiving pilot training at the Bonham Air Field in Texas. His brother, a pilot, is stationed at Deming Air Field in Deming, New Mexico, where he pilots planes for bombardier trainees. The brothers contacted each other by telephone and made the appointment for the week end, which, according to letters received by their mother, was a most enjoyable occasion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Lst Lt. George Alfred Coe, son of Mrs. N. S. Nichols, 205 Elm st., Fayetteville, has been graduated as a pilot from Aloe army airfield, Victoria, Texas," The Post-Standard, 3/19/1945. "Lt. George Coe has completed his training at Aloe Army Air Field in Texas and is spending a 15-day leave with his parents...He will report to Childress, Texas, for assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Lieut. George Coe, of Childress, Texas, is passing a two week leave with his parents...at their home in Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945. "George Coe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nichols of Elm street, has been promoted from First Lieutenant to Captain according to word received by his mother. The promotion was given him on his birthday, Oct. 22, at Childress, Texas. He has been appointed director of instrument flying, having been one of the two...men who was selected to train for this work at a school at Bryan, Texas...Capt. Coe, who plans to make this work his career, entered the service four years and two weeks ago today," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Coe, Stewart. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Stewart Coe..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Announcement has been made of the promotion of George Coe...from 2nd to 1st lieutenant. Lt. Coe is a bombardier in the U. S. flying corps and is stationed overseas. Pvt. Stewart Coe, another son of Mrs. Nichols is receiving his basic training in Nashville, Tenn." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/26/1943. "A/C Stewart Coe has been classified as a pilot in the U. S. Air Corps and has been transferred to Santa Ana, Cal., for further training. His brother, Lt. George Coe, is serving overseas," The Eagle Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Aviation Cadet Stewart H. Coe, 205 Elm St., Fayetteville, has completed his basic flying training at Pecos Army Air Field, Texas, and will now proceed to another station for advanced flight instruction," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "The West Coast Training Center has announced the graduation of Stewart Coe, son of Mrs. Norman S. Nichols of 205 Elm street, Fayetteville, from Air Force Advanced Flying School, at Stockton Field, California on Dec. 5. He received his commission as second lieutenant and his pilot's silver wings at graduation. Lt. Coe is now flying home on leave. Mrs. Nichols has also just received the first word in three months from her son, 1st Lt. George Coe, bombardier. He writes that he has arrived in Italy from Africa and has hope of coming home, as he has completed his 50th successful mission," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Lt. Stewart H. Coe stopped enroute to Denton, New Mexico, at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nichols of Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17, 1943. "2/Lt. Stewart Coe...is a pilot in the Army Air Force Bombardier School at Deming, N. M.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Lt. George Coe and Lt. Stewart Coe, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nichols of this village (Fayetteville), spent a recent week end together in Dallas, Texas, after not having seen each other for over two years. Lt. George Coe, a bombardier, who completed his missions and returned to the states a few months ago, is now receiving pilot training at the Bonham Air Field in Texas. His brother, a pilot, is stationed at Deming Air Field in Deming, New Mexico, where he pilots planes for bombardier trainees. The brothers contacted each other by telephone and made the appointment for the week end, which, according to letters received by their mother, was a most enjoyable occasion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "After spending the night with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nichols, Lt. Stewart Coe saluted Fayetteville from the air, causing many local people, especially in the vicinity of Elm street, to wonder what was 'coming off.' Lt. Coe, with three others from the Deming Air Base in New Mexico, were on a cross country flight when they stopped at the Syracuse Air Base Monday night. Mrs. Nichols accompanied her son to the Air Base, Tuesday, from where they left for their next stop in New Jersey. However, Lt. Coe had promised his father that he would 'drop by' and say good bye and he sure did make people sit up and take notice when he swooped low over the village and banked his B-17, circling the north side of the village and in the vicinity of his home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Lt. Stewart Coe has returned to Deming, N. M., after spending two weeks with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Nichols in Elm St.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Lt. Stuart Coe, who has been stationed at Hobbs, New Mexico, for the past several months, is spending a short leave with his parents...At the conclusion of his leave Lt. Coe will go to Lincoln, Neb.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Lt. Stewart Coe has been spending a few days with his parents...while delayed enroute to his new post. Lt. Coe is being transferred from Clovis, New Mexico to Alamogordo, New Mexico where the new atomic bombs are being made. Formerly with the B-17's, Lt. Coe will operate with the B-29 Super Fortresses at his new base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945. "...Mr. and Mrs. Nichols learned from their...son, Stewart Coe, that he had been promoted from second to first lieutenant at Alamogordo, N. M., and is now awaiting assignment..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Cole, Burr Thompson. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Aviation Cadet Burr Thompson Cole, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cole of Minoa has completed nine weeks of basic flight training at Majors field, Greenville, Texas. He will receive advanced instruction at Ellington field, Houston, Texas," The Post-Standard, 6/30/1943. "Burr T. Cole, 24, son of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Cole, Sr., of Minoa, was killed yesterday when a twin engine training plane crashed seven miles west of Alvin, Tex., according to The Associated Press. Cole's wife, the former Marion Maxwell of Minoa, told Minoa relatives early this morning that the body will be brought to Minoa for burial. Cole, an aviation cadet detachment pilot, was based at Ellington field, Tex. He was inducted in May, 1942, and attended Minoa high school. Besides his parents and wife, survivors are two brothers, William R. Cole, Jr. of Baldwinsville, and George, a midshipman training at Columbia university; four sisters, Mrs. Charles Garnett of Norfolk, Va., Mrs. Austin Morley, and the Misses Helen and Barbara, all of Minoa; and two nieces," The Post-Standard, 7/25/1943. "Last rites for Air Cadet Burr T. Cole, 24, of Minoa, will be conducted at 2:30 P.M. Thursday at the Russell H. Shepp funeral home and at 3 P.M. in Minoa Methodist Church by the Rev. Frank A. Boyd. He was killed Saturday in the crash of a twin-motored training plane at Ellington Field, Tex. Cadet Cole was to have received his wings and commission as a second lieutenant on Aug. 31. Soldiers from the Army Air Base will conduct military rites. Burial will be in Minoa Methodist Cemetery," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Cole, Burr, 133 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y.--deceased."

Cole, George. Minoa. "Appearing in the proverbial pink of physical condition, Lt. Lou Gregory of the Navy arrived back in Syracuse en route to New York City for the Navy Day program yesterday after 18 months in the Pacific. He has been in service two and one-half years. A winner of many national amateur distance running events, Lt. Gregory had praise for Lt. George Cole of Minoa, with whom he ran on a victorious relay team in Hawaii. Cole was a protege of Gregory when the latter coached Manlius High School to a State class championship in cross-country. Lt. Cole also arrived home for a visit. Lt. Cole matriculated at Michigan State after graduating from Manlius. He served a year and a half on an LST boat in the Pacific, and kept in condition by running up and down on his comparatively small craft in off duty hours. When he arrived in Pearl Harbor, he had only two weeks training before engaging in the long relay run with Gregory. Lts. Gregory and Cole were on an eight-man Navy relay team which won a 36.6 mile race through Pali Pass in Hawaii. Seven of the eight runners set record times for their legs of the relay. The course was covered in three hours, 34 minutes and 30 seconds. Captaining and coaching the All-Navy team in Hawaii, Lt. Gregory led his charges to an 80-54 running meet victory over the All-Army team on the island," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Cole, George, 133 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y."

Cole, Remsen I. Formerly town of Manlius. "A graduate of Manlius school, Capt. Remsen I. Cole, marine corps reserves, of New Haven, Conn., is back in the region of his cadet schooling as public relations officer of the eastern recruiting district. A former newspaperman, he explained at the Syracuse district office that his present task is to stimulate enlistment of youths in the reserves and regular forces of the marine corps and officers training school. The Syracuse district established a record enlistment in August," The Post Standard, 9/8/1941.

Cole, Robert Spencer. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Inductees from this village (Fayetteville) who left for the reception center at Fort Niagara last Friday were...Robert Cole..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Robert S. Cole...has been graduated from the naval air training center, Corpus Christi, Tex., and commissioned an ensign in the naval reserve. He received preliminary flight instruction at the Olathe, Kan., reserve air base," The Post-Standard, 9/22/1943. "Lieutenant (jg) Robert S. Cole, U.S.N.R., of Knollwood road, Fayetteville, has returned from a tour of combat duty in the Pacific, where he flew a fighter plane based on one of the navy's baby carriers. Attached to Composite Squadron 20, Lieut. Cole piloted a Wildcat. He inflicted considerable damage on Japanese trucks and shore installations and strafed a battleship and destroyer during the Second Battle of the Philippine Sea. In addition, he participated in the invasion of Palau, Leyte, Mindoro and Luzon. He has flown a total of 75 combat missions. The navy flier is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Cole, and was educated at Fayetteville High School. During a seven-month tour of duty in the Pacific, the fighter and torpedo planes of Composite 20 damaged two Jap battleships, four cruisers and two destroyers. Three other destroyers probably were sunk. Eighteen enemy planes were shot down and eight others damaged. In addition, the squadron's aircraft took a heavy toll of artillery emplacements, anti-aircraft positions, fuel dumps, pillboxes and trucks," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "Lt. (jg) Robert Spencer Cole, USNR...was awarded the distinguished flying cross for 'heroism and extraordinary achievement' in action against an enemy surface force in the battle of Samar island. The award was made at the navy air base at King City, Calif., just before Cole reported aboard his carrier for what he supposed was further combat duty in the Pacific. The news of Japan's surrender reached his ship at Pearl Harbor. Cole was home on 30-day leave in April, after completing a 14-month tour of duty in the Pacific, during which time he participated in five major battles, as pilot of an FM-2 Wildcat fighter plane. A graduate of Fayetteville high school in 1942, Cole enlisted in the Syracuse Avenger squadron, and received training at Chapel Hill, N. C., and Corpus Christi, Tex. He was commissioned Sept. 1, 1943, and promoted to lieutenant, junior grade, last December," The Post-Standard, 8/26/1945.

Collette, William. Manlius. "Second Lt. William Collette of Manlius, has been assigned to an officers' course in airways communications at Chanute Field, Ill. He is a graduate of Lake Forest high school in Illinois, received his commission with the infantry in July, 1943, and went thru the army air force pilot training program. He will be qualified as communications officer on completion of the present course," The Post-Standard, 2/1/1945. "First Lt. William E. Collette, 25, of Manlius has been appointed assistant base communications officer at the advanced twin-engine flying school at Columbus Field, Miss. After studying engineering for three and a half years at the University of Michigan and a year at Syracuse university, he entered the army July 27, 1943, as a second lieutenant from the reserve officers training corps. He trained at Camp Croft, S. C., and Fort Benning, Ga., and then became a unit officer at Camp Croft before taking up flying training. He won his wings at CAAF last November and on Jan. 23 went to Chanute Field, Ill., to take a communications course, which he completed at Scott Field, Aug. 11. He went to Columbus Field Aug. 12," The Post-Standard, 8/26/1945.

Collins, Robert. Fayetteville. "Robert Collins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanford Collins of Walnut st. has been accepted in the U. S. navy and will leave in a fortnight to take his boot training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Robert Collins...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Collins, Samford R. Fayetteville/Oran. Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Samford Collins, S 1/c, is spending a 15-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samford Collins of Walnut street...at the conclusion of his leave he will return to Orange, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946. "Samford Collins, Jr. has been honorably discharged from service after serving about one year. He has returned to the home of his parents in Walnut street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/19/1946. Resided in Oran and Fayetteville.

Colvin, Albert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Combs, Donald. Manlius. "Frank Combs, 39, a Manlius barber, has closed his shop in East Seneca street and enlisted in the Navy with his son, Donald, 17. Mr. and Mrs. Combs have four children besides Donald," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "Donald S. Combs, S 2/c, of 305 Seneca street, Manlius, has completed his recruit training at Sampson Naval Station and has been granted a leave. Upon his return he will be eligible for further assignment which may qualify him for a petty officer rating," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944.

Combs, Frank. Manlius. "Two 39-year-old fathers and their 17-year-old sons who volunteered for service in the Navy were sworn in after passing physical examination. They are...Frank Combs, barber, and his son, Donald S., of 305 East Seneca Street, Manlius...A barber for 22 years, Mr. Combs has closed his shop for the duration, feeling he can do more for the war effort by enlisting. He is the father of four other children ranging in age from four to 15," The Post-Standard, 1/7/1944. "Frank Combs, 39, a Manlius barber, has closed his shop in East Seneca street and enlisted in the Navy with his son, Donald, 17. Mr. and Mrs. Combs have four children besides Donald," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944.

Conde, Cornelius S. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Twenty-five men were inducted into military service from selective service board, 473, located in the municipal building, East Syracuse Friday...Navy...Cornelius S. Conde, Jr., Maple dr., Fayetteville... " The Post-Standard, 7/30/1945. (Town of Dewitt).

Conley, John F. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Men enlisted here yesterday are as follows: Army. John F. Conley, Fayetteville, "The Post-Standard, 12/17/1941. "Among the hundreds who are flocking to the recruiting station in Syracuse to join the nation's fighting forces since the attack on the United States by Japan and declaration of war by the Axis powers are many from the towns of Manlius and DeWitt. Enlisting from Fayetteville are: John F. Conley, Army..."Lt. Jack Conley, who has been in Florida, is the guest of his parents...for ten days after which he will leave for a base in the West," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. Jack Conley spent several days with the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William E. Conley of Huntleigh Park, enroute from Chicago to Tennessee where Lt. Conley will be stationed for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. William Conley...have returned from South Carolina where they visited their son Lt. Jack Conley. They drove Lt. Conley's car to South Carolina where they left it for their son and returned on the train," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Lt. Jack Conley, of Greenville, S. C., is visiting his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. "Lt. Jack Conley spent a couple of days last week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. Jack Conley, who have been visiting Mr. Conley's parents...have gone to Chicago to visit Mrs. Conley's parents, before going to California where Lt. Conley has a new assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946.

Conley, Thomas. Fayetteville. "Lt. Thomas Conley, U.S.N.A.C., has been spending a week's leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Conley in Huntleigh Park," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Lt. Thomas Conley, U.S.N., is expected to arrive soon to spend a few days with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/15/1944. "Lt. Thomas Conley will arrive soon from Corpus Christi, Texas, to spend a 30-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. Thomas Conley are guests of Lt. Conley's parents...Lt. Conley is in the naval Air Force and his wife comes from Schenectady," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Lt. Thomas Conley, who has been overseas, arrived in the States this week and paid a visit to his parents...Lt. Conley will also visit his wife in Schenectady," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945. "Lt. Thomas Conley has left for the west coast after spending a furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Lt. Thomas Conley, recently discharged from the service, has entered Syracuse University. His wife, who is a teacher in Schenectady, expects to return here in the near future," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/18/1946.

Conner, Edward Hyde. Fayetteville. "Second Lt. Edward H. Conner of Fayetteville, former builder and owner of Conner Brothers (is) stationed at the army air forces officer training school in Miami Beach, Fla. Upon completion of a six weeks course in military instruction and physical conditioning, he will be prepared to take over executive duties in air forces maintenance. Lt. Conner's wife, Mrs. Elizabeth H. Conner, lives at 216 Redfield ave., Fayetteville..." The Post-Standard, 7/14/1942. "Five officers from Syracuse and vicinity have completed a six-weeks course of military instruction and physical conditioning at the air forces officer training school at Miami Beach, Fla. and have been graduated from the school. Each man will take over executive duties in air forces maintenance. They are...Edward Hyde Conner of 216 Redfield ave.," The Post-Standard, 8/14/1942. "Lt. Edward H. Conner...has been promoted to first lieutenant at the Rome air depot, where he is assigned to duty as assistant to the utilities officer. A graduate of the University of California, where he was a member of Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, Lt. Conner was in the real estate business before being called into active service in June. His wife is the former Elizabeth Henry of San Francisco," The Post-Standard, 1/31/1943. "Lt. Edward Hyde Conner has been promoted to captain," The Post-Standard, 9/10/1943. "Edward H. Connor, 216 Redfield Ave., Fayetteville, has been promoted from first lieutenant to captain in the Air Service Command of the Army Air Forces, it was announced here today by Brig. Gen. C. P. Kane, commanding general, Rome Air Service Command. Capt. Connor, assigned to the engineering section, received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of California, where he was a member of Alpha Delta Phi, a social fraternity, and Beta Gamma Sigma, an honorary fraternity. He reported for active duty in June, 1942, at Miami Beach, Fla., and was assigned here to duty in August, last year. Capt. Connor is married to the former Elizabeth Henry of San Francisco," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Capt. and Mrs. Edward Conners, of Rome, N.Y., former residents of this village (Fayetteville), called on friends in town recently," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Capt. Edward H. Conner, developer of real estate in Fayetteville, until he entered active duty as a second lieutenant June 25, 1942, has been promoted to major at Newark army air field, headquarters of the Atlantic overseas air technical service command. Maj. Conner is area engineer for the command, which ships fighter planes and other air force supplies to our fighting men overseas. In civilian life he was a partner in and manager of Conner Bros. of Fayetteville. He is a graduate of the University of California. He and Mrs. Conner are now living in East Orange, N. J.," The Post-Standard, 11/26/1944.

Connor (Conner), Donald. Formerly Fayetteville. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Donald Connors..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Mrs. Arthur Conner, of Syracuse, and her son Pvt. Donald Connor, home on furlough, visited friends in Fayetteville Tuesday. The Connors were former residents of this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944.

Connor (Conner), Holly. "Sgt. Holly Connor, stationed at Greiner Field, Mass., who has been spending a furlough with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Connor in Syracuse, called on friends here last Sunday. The Connor family were former residents of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944.

Connor, Robert F. Formerly town of Manlius. "Completing his missions over enemy territory in the European theater of operations, S/Sgt. Robert F. Connor, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Connor, 236 Harding Street, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Sgt. Connor, serving with the Eighth Army Air Force in England, is radio operator and ball turret gunner on a B-17 Flying Fortress. He went overseas last August after completing courses at the Radio School at Scott Field, Ill., and the Flexible Gunnery School at Fort Meyers, Fla. He attended Christian Brothers' Academy, was graduated from the Manlius School in 1939 and received a degree from Bryant college, Providence, R. I., in 1942," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "S/Sgt. Robert F. Connor of the army air forces, is home on furlo visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William J. Connor of 236 Harding st., Syracuse, after having completed 25 combat missions over Europe. He was overseas 10 months with the Eighth air force in Britain. He was awarded the air medal with three oak leaf clusters, the distinguished flying cross and a citation from his commanding officer after the raid on Scheinfurt, Germany. At the expiration of his furlo he will report to the air force redistribution center at Atlantic City, N. J. Sgt. Connor is a 1939 graduate of Manlius school. He attended Christian Brothers academy and received a degree from Bryant college, Providence, in 1942," The Post-Standard, 5/14/1944.

Conway, George T. Minoa. "Local men were among the 56 accepted for services in the armed forces this week. Army. George T. Conway, 114 N. Main st., Minoa..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Conway, George, 114 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Cook, Harry James, Jr. Kirkville. "Aviation Cadet Harry James Cook, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Cook of Kirkville, will be graduated tomorrow from the advanced twin-engine pilot school at Fort Sumner, N.M., and will be awarded the wings of a flying officer," The Post-Standard, 2/7/1944. "Lt. Harry J. Cook, Jr....has completed training as co-pilot in a heavy bombardment unit at Ardmore, Okla. He entered service Nov. 4, 1942, and received his commission Feb. 8, 1944. Before entering service, he was a pupil at Fayetteville high school," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1944. "The war department has notified Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Cook, Sr., of Kirkville that their son, Second Lt. Harry J. Cook was returned to military control April 29. No direct word has yet been received from Lt. Cook, co-pilot of a Flying Fortress which was shot down over Germany, Aug. 15, 1944. The last letter from him was written the first of the year and asked his family to make a contribution to the Red Cross for him," The Post-Standard, 5/24/1945. "Honorably discharged from Fort Dix, N.J. Friday from the army...Second Lt. Harry J. Cook, Jr., Main st., Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 8/12/1945. "Second Lt. Harry J. Cook of Main st., Kirkville, served as pilot on a B-17 and engaged in seven combat missions. He was overseas 10 months. Lt. Cook is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Cook of Kirkville. Entering service Nov. 4, 1942, he went overseas June 30, 1944," The Post-Standard, 8/3/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Cook, Lester L. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Conway, George, 212 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Cookhouse, Clinton L. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Frederick A. Cookhouse...his younger brother Pvt. Clinton L. Cookhouse, entered service July 11, 1944, and has received basic training at Sheppard Field, Tex. He is stationed at Macaroon Field, Ls..." The Post-Standard, 11/17/1944.

Cookhouse, Frederick. Manlius (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "PFC Frederick A. Cookhouse, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Cookhouse of Manlius RD 1, is spending a 30-day recuperation period with his parents in Norwich. He entered service April 3, 1942, and trained at Camp Croft, S. C. He has spent 26 months overseas and after his furlo will return to his station in the British West Indies. Before entering service, he was employed at the Manlius school and Suburban park. His younger brother Pvt. Clinton L. Cookhouse, entered service July 11, 1944..." The Post-Standard, 11/17/1944.

Cooper, John. Formerly Manlius. "Corp. John Cooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Cooper of Syracuse, former residents of Manlius is now located somewhere in England. John will be remembered as a former high school student and faithful newspaper carrier," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/22/1943.

Costello, David. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Costello, Francis E. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private Francis Costello of Camp Musterfield, Mass., spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1942. "Pvt. Francis Costello of Camp Musterfield, Mass., recently spent a few days with his mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Mrs. Mary Costello, widow of Michael Costello, and mother of Mayor William E. Costello, died Tuesday night...Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Norbert Carhart and Mrs. Britton Vannauker; four sons, Mayor Costello, James J. and Geo. T. Costello, all of Minoa, and Francis Costello of the U. S. Army, stationed at Kansas City, Mo.; also six grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "Pvt. Francis Costello visited his relatives here, recently," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. Honorably discharged, Pvt. Francis E. Costello, 215 N. Main st., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 12/7/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Costello, Francis E., 217 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y." Address discrepancy.

Costello, Glenn D. North Manlius. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private Glen Costello of Fort Wayne, Indiana, recently spent a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Vance Costello of North Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1941. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Costello, Gordon C. Minoa/Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private Gordon Costello of South Carolina, spent a furlough, visiting his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Miss Alice Cummings recently visited Pvt. Gordon Costello of North Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Members of the United States Army station hospital unit operating a hospital captured by Canadian forces in Northern France include...Gordon C. Costello of Minoa..." The Post-Standard, 12/26/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Costello, Paul W. Manlius. Inducted into the Navy, The Post-Standard, 11/6/1943.

Couden, James H., Jr. Manlius. Manlius Honor Roll. "Private James Couden arrived Monday to spend the holiday at home. He will return today to Frederickstown, N. J., where he is stationed with the 51st Ordnance," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1940. "Private James Couden, Jr., has written this week from his location, Approving Grounds, at Aberdeen, Md.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/15/1941. "The promotion of Private 1st class James Couden to the grade of Corporal has been announced by Colonel Byron T. Burt, Commanding Officer of Geiger Field, Washington. Corporal Couden is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Couden of 108 Scoville avenue, Manlius. He is a graduate of the Manlius High School. Corporal Couden entered the service in February, 1940," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Baptist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1942. "Letters From Our Boys in Service / Dear Editor: I think it's a swell idea of yours to publish letters from men in the service as it means a lot to not only the men themselves, but also the folks back home that read them. As one of those men, I extend my sincere thanks. / Thank you, T/Sgt. James H. Couden, Jr., and congratulations to the young man in Manlius who merits such an outstanding letter.--Ed. / To whom it may concern: The reason for writing this letter back home originated last December when I was back there on furlough. Most of the fellows I had known were in the service, either in the country or overseas, so the old town looked pretty dead. However, one fellow in particular was left behind, due to a childhood affliction over which he had no control. I had the honor of going through school with him and know him perhaps more intimately than most anyone else. He is one of the squarest fellows I've ever met. I had an idea how much he regretted not being able to go with us, but I didn't know to what extent he would go to make up for this tough break of his. I found out when I got home. He has an accurate record of every man who has left Manlius to serve our country, and on a map hung in his room are labeled pins denoting the approximately destinations of each one. This, however, is the least part of his job. He also has a filing cabinet in this room in which he kept filed, in alphabetical order, each man's name and the letters he has written. This fellow, who was left behind, corresponds regularly with almost every man that has left town, making out all letters in duplicate so that one may be kept on file under the man's name. This is not a once a week or 'whenever-you-get-to-it' occurrence, but it goes on almost every night and must necessarily be a tedious job, especially when it is done on his own time after having worked all day in one of our defense plants in Syracuse. But, speaking for all the boys who have gone, I don't know of any way that the morale of the soldier can be lifted more than by newsy letters from home, and it is with this in mind that he keeps up this writing. For all who are interested, this young man lives directly across the street from the High School on Pleasant street, and I believe he would welcome the opportunity to show and explain the work he has done and is doing. At least a sincere word of thanks from all concerned would certainly repay him in part for his efforts. His keeping in constant touch with us is as important in a way as being out on the front lines. If people at home, not only in Manlius, but every other community in the country, would get behind their men 100 percent in this war, we would be over with it a whale of a lot sooner. One way to help is in writing to the fellows. You don't have to know the man intimately in order to write A few words of news from home are the best builders of morale in the world, and furnish a man with that extra bit of incentive needed to stay in there and fight to get this mess over with. Don't feel hurt if your letters aren't answered. He may be too busy, either in training or fighting to reply. He'll thank you from the bottom of his heart when he gets back. T/Sgt. James H. Couden, Jr., 55th Air Force Band," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. E. C. LaPointe, Mary Louise, Betty, and Francis, Mrs. F. Battle, Sr., Delmar Snee, Mrs. F. Battle Sr., and S/Sgt. James Couden were recent visitors of S/Sgt. Milton Bex at Rhoads General Hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946.

Coughlin, Bennett. Fayetteville. "Enlisted...was Bennett F. Coughlin, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Coughlin of Fayetteville. Coughlin has played reserve tackle all season (Syracuse University)...The Post-Standard, 11/21/1944. "Bennett Coughlin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Coughlin of Salt Springs road and James Kinsella, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella have enlisted in the U. S. Navy and left this week for their boot training at Sampson Naval Base. Both Coughlin and Kinsella are graduates of Fayetteville high school, class of '44, and had been attending Syracuse university where Coughlin was a member of the Orange football squad..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944. "Mrs. James Couden, Jr., and little daughter Linda, age 9 months, and her mother, Mrs. Howard Kirby of Lucania, No. Carolina, have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. James Couden, Sr. T/Sgt. James Couden, Jr. is now stationed at Okinawa and in a recent letter to his parents he expressed his hope of being able to return to the States for Christmas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Coughlin, Philip Richard. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Mr. and Mrs. Murray Ballou received a letter from their son Murray, Jr., who is in the United States navy, stating that he is en route to Trinidad. His plane stopped in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where he met Dick Coughlin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Coughlin...and a former pal of his, and spent the night in a bunk next to Dick's," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/13/1942. "Proof of the superiority of the American fighters' equipment over that of the Japanese soldiers arrived in Fayetteville yesterday when Mr. and Mrs. Philip Coughlin, of 403 Salt Springs street, received a captured Japanese .31 caliber rifle from their son, Philip (Dick) Coughlin, 20, aviation metalsmith 2/c who is serving on a large battleship in the Pacific area. Carrying $7.06 postage, the gun, a bolt action rifle, a repeater, firing four or five shells, was cased in a wooden box. It was probably used by a Jap sniper, the Coughlins believe, since it is relatively light as those used in jungle fighting, and has a telescopic sight, judged the best part of the weapon...Commenting on the superiority of American munitions in the Pacific, Coughlin wrote that he had seen the Japanese badly beaten with his own eyes and he had seen them actually afraid to meet the American forces. Word was received also yesterday from Jim Hartley, pharmacists mate 1/c, by his mother, Mrs. Alma Hartley of 110 Edwards street, that he had met and talked for a couple of hours with Coughlin somewhere in the Pacific. The boys enlisted in the Navy together and left May 9, 1941. Coughlin, who also holds an aerial gunner's rating, trained at Newport, R. I., Jacksonville, Fla., and Floyd Bennett air field before going overseas. He was in England with the Navy when the war was declared and after that served in the North African theater before being transferred to the Pacific theater. He wears the defense ribbon for service previous to Pearl Harbor, the Atlantic theater, North African theater ribbon and the Pacific theater ribbon with stars for participation in major battles. He was last home in November," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include...Richard Coughlin..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Coulter, Leroy. Fayetteville. "Pvt. and Mrs. Leroy Coulter (Eleanor Havill) are the parents of a son, born Wednesday, May 12. Pvt. Coulter has been passing a ten-day furlough with his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Corp. Leroy Coulter, U. S. A., Camp Campbell, Ky., spent the week-end with his wife and son at their home in the Eaton Block. Mr. and Mrs. Coulter observed their first wedding anniversary Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Mrs. Leroy Coulter received a telephone call from her husband on Tuesday night from California. Cpl. Coulter arrived in the States Tuesday morning with the 43rd division after 19 months overseas. He has not seen his family in 22 months, at which time his little son John was seven months old," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Coulter, Roy. Manlius. "Corp. Technician Roy Coulter has returned to camp after spending several days with his wife, at their home in the Eaton Block," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943.

Courtwright, Earl. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Mrs. Earl Courtright has received official word from the war department that her husband was seriously wounded in action in Italy on June 3 and is confined to a hospital there. One injury is in his right arm and he is unable to write, but dictates letters to a buddy who helps him to keep up correspondence with his wife and parents here. Pfc. Courtright is serving with the infantry and has been overseas for the past seven months. A brother, Harold Courtright, also with the infantry, is in the South Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1944. "...wounded in action in the European and Mediterranean areas...PFC Earl J. Courtwright, son of Mrs. Pearl Courtwright, Highbridge rd., Fayetteville..." The Post-Standard, 8/1/1944. "A small sheet of German propaganda addressed to American soldiers is one of the most cherished possessions of Pfc. Earl Courtwright who is home on leave after having been wounded in Italy June 3. Pfc. Courtwright came over on the same boat with Sgt. Charles Bender and was confined to McGuire General hospital in Virginia before being transferred to a Veterans' Hospital in Utica. Courtwright found the leaflet in an evacuated Italian town during the push toward Rome. On one side is what is intended to be the stirring scene of a young man and woman embracing. They are blurred against a gray sky to indicate it is a dream, for beneath them in bold black print is a grave with a wooden cross topped by a helmet. Opposite the couple is written 'Happy Days' and below the grave "Gone' is printed in bold face type. On the reverse side is the message to American soldiers, 'American Soldiers: Remember those happy days when you stepped out with your girl going places and doing things? No matter whether you were enjoying a nice, juicy steak at some tony restaurant or watching a movie or dancing to a swing band you were happy. What is left of all of this? Nothing but a plain wooden cross in foreign soil.' Pfc. Courtwright spent the week end here with his wife and children and then went to the Utica hospital for further treatment. He was injured by the shrapnel from an 88 cannon when it fell four yards away, while engaged in a major battle. He had 10 pieces of shell in his arm, foot, head and left leg. Now he is completely well except for the leg injury, thanks to efficient medical units with the boys at the front. Shrapnel from the same shell which injured Courtwright killed the boy directly in front of him, and he also saw three others killed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944.

Courtright, Harold. Fayetteville. Pfc. (Earl) Courtright is serving with the infantry and has been overseas for the past seven months. A brother, Harold Courtright, also with the infantry, is in the South Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1944.

Cowan, Ralph Howard. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Robert S. Dunt, Robert H. Schermerhorn of Syracuse road, and R. Howard Cowan of Woodchuck Hill road, members of Draft Board 473, were among the 24 Onondaga County young men who underwent final examinations Monday before being sent to Camp Upton, Long Island," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1941. "Howard Cowan, a member of the Coast Artillery at Fort Hancock, New Jersey, spent a few days recently with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Guy Cowan of Woodchuck Hill road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/29/1941. "Miss Carolyn Cowan spent the weekend with her brother, Lt. Howard Cowan, at Boston, Mass.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Capt. R. Howard Cowan is spending a ten-day furlough with his parents...after completion of an advanced training course in coast defense at Fort Monroe, Va. He will return to his station in the coast artillery at Fort Banks, Mass.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1943. "Capt. and Mrs. Howard Cowan have been spending a few days with Capt. Cowan's parents...Capt. Cowan is stationed in the Boston, Mass. area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Capt. Ralph H. Cowan...is attending the Anti-aircraft Artillery School at Camp Davis, N. C., according to word received from the AAA School at Camp Davis," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "The following officers and enlisted men were discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N.J.:...Capt. Ralph H. Cowan, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 1/22/1946.

Cowle, William. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "William Cowle, who has just finished training school and made a lieutenant in the U. S. Army is passing a five-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Cowle, Sr. He will leave Friday for Georgia where he will take up duties," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/24/1942. "It has been learned through an item in the Post Standard that Bill Cowle, an officer in the U. S. Army has recently married an Australian nurse in London, England. Bill was a former student in Fayetteville high school and his parents reside in the Gifford Manor section just west of Dewitt," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943.

Cowmeadow, John F. Fayetteville. "Four men from this area have been granted leaves following completion of basic training at the U.S. Naval station, Sampson...John F. Cowmeadow, son of Mrs. Charlotte V. Cowmeadow and the late Frank W. Cowmeadow of Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 6/8/1843.

Cox, Charles L. Formerly town of Manlius. "Corp. Charles L. Cox, 24, was killed Sept. 22 in an airplane crash in the east central section of the United States, according to word received by his sister, Mrs. Theresa Tackley of 148 Furman Street. No details of the accident were given. A native of Syracuse, Corp. Cox joined the 27th division of the National Guard four years ago, later transferring to the Air Corps. For a time he was employed at the Douglas Aircraft Company at Los Angeles. He received his basic training in the Air Corps at Victorville, Calif., and Goldsboro, N. C. Corp. Cox attended Roosevelt Junior High School, Central High School and the Manlius School. Also surviving is his mother, Mrs. Bertha A. Cox of Los Angeles," The Post-Standard 10/2/1944. "...A letter from the war department stated that the accident occurred near Bahrain, on the north coast of Arabia. The plane, a transport, was believed to have crashed in shallow water shortly after taking off..." The Post-Standard, 12/15/1944.

Cox, Joseph. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Crahan, Donald. Kirkville. "Donald Crahan of Kirkville enlisted in the U. S. Marines this past Monday. He was accepted and unless unexpected emergencies arise he will not leave for duty until March," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/6/1942.

Crandall, Nelson Bauer. Fayetteville. "Naval Aviation cadet Nelson B. Crandall...has completed the 11-week course at the navy pre-flight school, Chapel Hill, N. C. He has been promoted to primary flight training at the naval air station at Glenview, Ill. Cadet Crandall attended Syracuse university, class of '42," The Post-Standard, 8/1/1943. "Nelson Bauer Crandall, naval aviation cadet...has been transferred to Corpus Christi, Tex., after successful completion of the primary flight training course at the naval air station, Glenview, Ill. He is a graduate of Eastwood high school and attended Syracuse university. Cadet Crandall received preflight training at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C., The Post-Standard," 10/28/1943. "Miss Marcia Joan Kepler, daughter of Mrs. Julian Wood and the late Milton O. Kepler, will become the bride of Ens. Nelson B. Crandall, USNR, son of Mrs. J. C. Ellis of the Syracuse Road and the late Kurnell L. Crandall on Saturday, Oct. 20...at Trinity Church. Ens. Crandall has recently returned from nine months overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945. "At four o'clock last Saturday afternoon in Trinity Episcopal Church, Miss Marcia Jean Kepler...became the bride of Ens. Nelson B. Crandall...whose home was in Syracuse...Ensign Frank Chiavetta, USNR, of New York City, was best man. The ushers were Lt. (jg) Robert Hegeman, Lt. Ralph Deisemeyer, USAAF, and Milton O. Kepler, the bride's brother...The bridegroom was graduated from Eastwood high school and attended Syracuse university. He joined the naval air corps in 1942 and received his commission in June, 1944. He recently returned from overseas and has the Distinguished Flying Cross and two medals," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945. Resided in Fayetteville close to the end of the duration, per Cady Kepler, brother.

Crane, Glenn W. Manlius. Honorably discharged...T/4 Glenn W. Crane, Manlius, RD 2, The Post-Standard, 10/8/1945.

Craver, Walter R. Minoa. "Wounded in action...T/5 Walter L. Craver, Mrs. Bernadine E. Craver, wife, N. Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1945. Honorably discharged at Fort Dix, N.J...T/4 Walter L. Craver, N. Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 10/16/1945.

Cretaro, Frank J. Kirkville. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Army...Frank J. Cretaro, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "Announcement is made by Mrs. Lillian Townsend of this village (Kirkville) of the betrothal of her daughter, Miss Erla Jane Townsend to Pfc. Frank J. Cretaro, U. S. A. A. C., son of Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Cretaro, also of Kirkville...Pfc. Cretaro, who is stationed in the South Pacific area...attended Minoa high school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "Frank Cretaro, son of Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Cretaro, who served 24 months overseas, has been honorably discharged and returned to his home last week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Cretaro, Michael. Kirkville. "Mr. and Mrs. Createro (sic) and family spent Sunday in Schenectady visiting with their son Michael, who is in the U. S. Army and on leave for a short time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Mike Cretaro, son of Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Cretaro, who is stationed at Okinawa, has been on the waiting list for a month, expecting to receive orders to return home. He expects to be discharged up his arrival," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "Michael Cretora (sic), son of Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Cretora, has been honorably discharged from the service. He served in Europe," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Crobar, Donald. Kirkville. "Donald Crobar, who was stationed at Fort McClennan, Ala., has been transferred to Fort Bragg, N.C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Crobar motored to Philadelphia Thursday to meet their son, Donald, who arrived in Philadelphia Thursday to meet their son, Donald, who arrived in Philadelphia from Fort Bragg on a week-end furlough. They arrived home Friday night and Donald spent the remainder of the week-end visiting friends. He left for camp Sunday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/15/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "PFC Donald Ray Crobar, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Crobar of Kirkville, is home on sick leave after an operation. Before enlisting in the army, he was an elevator operator in the Syracuse-Kemper building. He is bugler of his company at Fort Bragg, N.C.," The Post-Standard, 9/24/1942. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other former band boys in uniform are...Donald Crowbar (sic)..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Crobar, Floyd F. Minoa/Kirkville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Floyd F. Crobar of Minoa...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Crobar, Floyd F., 202 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Crobar, Francis. Kirkville. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Crocker, Robert H. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Crocker left Tuesday afternoon for Richmond, Va., to spend Christmas with their son, Robert H. Crocker and family. Lt. Robert H. Case, a former resident of this village, who is stationed at Fort Eustis, Va., will also be a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Crocker for Christmas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943.

Cronin, Patrick. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Cronin, Thomas. Kirkville. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Crossley, Janet. Fayetteville. "Lt. Janet Crossley, Fayetteville, N. Y., is on her way home to become a civilian again. She is one of the thousands going through this Naval demobilization center headed for the States. She is the daughter of Mrs. Clara Crossley of 118 Cleveland Blvd. Lt. Crossley has served 24 months in the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Crouch, Ralph. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men of this vicinity have been called before Selective Service Board 473 for tests at the Induction Center...Ralph Crouch, 309 Clinton street...These men take the places of those sent to the induction station and disqualified...men not sent by their local boards owing to the fact that they reported too late and had enlisted in the Army, Navy or the Marine Corps. This is the second group of young men who have been sent before the Selective Service Board from this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/7/1941. "Sergeant and Mrs. Ralph N. Crouch spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. William Hogan at their home in Clinton street (Fayetteville)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/22/1942. "S/Sgt. and Mrs. Ralph Crouch and daughter Margaret spent a few days last week with Mr. and Mrs. Robert Robinson in Spring street. Mr. Crouch, home on leave, was a former resident of this village. Mrs. Crouch is living with her parents in East Syracuse for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944.

Crowe, Lester Mason. Manlius. "...Word received this week stated that Mason Crowe had already left Ft. Niagara..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. "Pvt. lst class Mason Crowe has been transferred from Miami, Fla., to Chicago where he has been stationed for three weeks at the Naval Aviation training camp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943. "Pfc. Mason Crowe, who is stationed at Chicago, is passing a brief furlough at home. He expects to return on Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Pfc. Mason Crowe, who is stationed at Chicago, is passing a brief furlough at home. He expects to return on Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Pfc. Lester M. Crowe reported for duty at the Carlsbad army air field, Carlsbad, N.M., formerly at Santa Ana, Ca.," The Post-Standard, 9/16/1943. "Mrs. Lester Crowe and daughter, Miss Betty Crowe and son, Robert, of Fayette street, are visiting their son and brother, Mason Crowe, who is stationed at Chicago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "Pfc. Mason Crowe has graduated from Radio School, Chicago, with an average of the sixth highest in the class. He is now stationed at Santa Ana, Calif.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Pfc. Mason Crowe has returned to Carlsbad, N. M., after passing a 15-day leave at his home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Mason and Robert Crowe of the U. S. Army are passing a furlough at their home on the Manlius-Fayetteville road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Pfc. Lester M. Crowe, of 410 Fayette street, has been authorized to wear the aviation badge, 'Air Crew Member' at Peno Army Air Base. This signifies he is one of two enlisted men in a five-man crew operating a C-46, largest two-engine cargo plane in the world. He received his advanced training as an air crew member at the Reno ferrying division installation. Pfc. Crowe is also a graduate of the Army Air Force Technical School in Chicago in 1943. He is the son of Mrs. Mary E. Crowe of Manlius, and has a brother, Pfc. Robert V. Crowe, with the 972nd Eng. Maintenance company now overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Pfc. Lester Crowe, of Manlius, a radio operator, was one of a specially selected crew chosen to fly from India to the United States with a 5-man crew operating a C-46, largest two-engine cargo plane in the world. Pfc. Crowe has a brother, Pvt. Robert Crowe, with an engineers' maintenance company somewhere in the Pacific area. They are sons of Mrs. M. Elizabeth Crowe of Fayette street, Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Corporal Robert V. Crowe...has a brother, Pfc. Lester Crowe, stationed in India..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "William J. Crowe...has enlisted in the navy and left for training station at Sampson, June 13. He has two brothers in the service, Pfc. Lester M. Crow is stationed in India, and has been awarded the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross and Oak leaf Cluster. He is a radio operator. Cpl. Robert Crowe has returned from action in the Philippines and has been enjoying a short leave at home. He returns Sunday to the Tilton General Hospital at Fort Dix, N.J.," The Eagle Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Air Transport Command Base, India.--Pfc. Lester M. Crowe, aerial radio operator, of 410 Fayette street, Manlius, N. Y., has been awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster to his Distinguished Flying Cross, it was announced by Brig. Gen. William H. Tunner, commanding general of the India China Division, Air Transport Command. The award was made upon completion of 600 hours of operational flight in transport aircraft over the dangerous and difficult India-China air routes, where enemy interception and attack was probable and expected. It was made for the period of service from Oct. 7, 1944 to March 20, 1945," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945. "Corp. Lester M. Crowe, aerial radio operator in the A.T.C., landed in Miami Beach by A.T.C. and is at his home, 410 Fayette street, Manlius on a 30-day furlough, after 12 months in the China-Burma-India theatre. He was awarded the air medal and also the Distinguished Flying Cross and three Oak Leaf Clusters. He made 115 trips over the 'Hump' in transport aircraft over the dangerous and difficult India-China air routes. The air-trail over the 'Hump', famed route through the towering peaks of the Himalayan mountains, blazed by the A.T.C. is recognized by airmen as the world's toughest flying by night as well as by day..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945. "Miss Margaret Elizabeth Crowe, aged 27 years, died last Sunday in Crouse-Irving hospital after a long illness. She was the daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Crowe of this village (Manlius). ..Surviving besides her mother, are four brothers, Mason, John and Robert, of Manlius, and William J. Crowe of the U.S. Navy, stationed in the Philippines," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946.

Crowe, Robert V. Manlius. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors...Manlius boys who will go into different branches of the Army are Robert Crowe of Fayette street..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Mason and Robert Crowe of the U. S. Army are passing a furlough at their home on the Manlius-Fayetteville road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Pfc. Lester M. Crowe...has a brother, Pfc. Robert V. Crowe, with the 972nd Eng. Maintenance company now overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Pfc. Lester M. Crowe...has a brother, Pfc. Robert V. Crowe, with the 972nd Eng. Maintenance company now overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "...Pvt. Robert Crowe, with an engineers' maintenance company somewhere in the Pacific area..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Corporal Robert V. Crowe of 410 Fayette street, Manlius, was promoted to his present rank in service with the Army Engineers in the South Pacific. He has a brother, Pfc. Lester Crowe, stationed in India..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "C.P.O. Paul Davis of the U. S. Merchant Marine, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davis of Fayetteville, and Corp. Robert Crowe, U.S.A., son of Mrs. Mary Crowe of Manlius, had a chance meeting in the Pacific area recently according to letters received by Mrs. Crowe. Davis is on the steamship R. P. Warner and they were transporting men from New Guinea to the Philippines, and Crowe was among the troops aboard. While the boys knew each other only slightly while at home, they said they found plenty to talk about 'out there' and the meeting gave them a breath of the old home towns," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "William J. Crowe...has two brothers in the service, Pfc. Lester M. Crow is stationed in India...Cpl. Robert Crowe has returned from action in the Philippines and has been enjoying a short leave at home..." The Eagle Bulletin, 6/15/1945."Miss Margaret Elizabeth Crowe, aged 27 years, died last Sunday in Crouse-Irving hospital after a long illness. She was the daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Crowe of this village (Manlius). ..Surviving besides her mother, are four brothers, Mason, John and Robert, of Manlius, and William J. Crowe of the U.S. Navy, stationed in the Philippines," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946.

Crowe, William J. Manlius. "William J. Crowe, son of Mrs. Mary E. Crowe of 410 Fayette street, Manlius, has enlisted in the navy and left for training station at Sampson, June 13. He has two brothers in the service, Pfc. Lester M. Crow is stationed in India...and...Cpl. Robert Crowe has returned from action in the Philippines and has been enjoying a short leave at home. He (William) returns Sunday to the Tilton General Hospital at Fort Dix, N.J.," The Eagle Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Miss Margaret Elizabeth Crowe, aged 27 years, died last Sunday in Crouse-Irving hospital after a long illness. She was the daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Crowe of this village (Manlius). ..Surviving besides her mother, are four brothers, Mason, John and Robert, of Manlius, and William J. Crowe of the U.S. Navy, stationed in the Philippines," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946.

Cruz, Benjamin. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Cummins, John D. Formerly Fayetteville. "Two more local boys, serving Uncle Sam, have met by chance in foreign lands. They are Lt. John C. Goodfellow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow, and John Cummins, both of the Army Air Corps. Information of this meeting was received by Mrs. Goodfellow in a letter from her son. Lt. Goodfellow is a pilot and Cummins is a radio operator on a bomber, and were in North Africa at the time of their meeting. Lt. Goodfellow states that he is still traveling, destination unknown," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Mrs. George King of John street has received word from her sister, Mrs. W. E. Cummins of Little Falls, N. Y., to the effect that her son T/Sgt. John Cummins, is reported as missing in action in the Middle East area, since August 1. Sgt. Cummins was a radio man attached to one of the U. S. Liberator bombers, and had been overseas since April of this year. He entered service in April, 1942. Only the day before the telegram from the War Department, notifying them that John was missing, Mr. and Mrs. Cummins had received a letter from their son, telling them that he had received an air medal for his work, and that he had been grounded for several days for medical reasons, but was again ready for action. Sgt. Cummins was born in Little Falls, but came to Fayetteville with his parents when a small boy. He was graduated from Fayetteville high school, and was an active athlete during his entire school career, being outstanding in football. The family returned to Little Falls about five years ago, where he entered the employ of Hansen's Laboratory and remained until entering service. Bill Cummins, the youngest of the three Crimmins boys, is serving overseas with the U. S. Marines, and Bobby, also in service, is stationed in this country," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "The grim realities of war and the part some of our local boys are taking begin to appear as communications report on some of the heroic parts being taken by them on the fighting fronts. Only recently word was received by Mrs. W. E. Cummins of Little Falls, N. Y., to the effect that her son T/Sgt. John Crimmins was reported missing in action. Another communication has been addressed to Mrs. Cimmins from the War Department, which explained the gallantry and courage of her son in the battle of Ploiesti, where he was reported as missing. It was in this sector which was bombed so thoroughly, that the Nazis lost about two-thirds of their oil supply which has weakened their air power considerably. The letter sent to Mrs. Cummins was in part as follows: 'Forgive me for not writing sooner. I want you to know the wonderful contribution T/Sgt. John D. Cummins has made toward winning the war. I want you to know of his gallantry, devotion to duty and steadfastness of purpose in accomplishing the most difficult mission ever assigned to our Air Force. T/Sgt. Crimmins is one of the great heroes of this war, his name has been indelibly written in our country's history. I am the proudest Commander in the world, no Commander has had a braver, more efficient force than the one which bombed the Romanian Oil Refineries on August 1, 1943. Any new information which may be received will be transmitted to you by the War Department or directly from the Group Commander. I have made a recommendation for an award for T/Sgt. Cummins' deeds which has been approved by Gen. Brereton. You will hear more of this at a future date. Sincerely, U. G. ENT, Brig.-Gen. USA, Commanding. (The crew of two of the Liberator bombers deliberately sacrificed their lives by diving their planes into Ploiesti oil field targets...the two planes, almost out of control, were aimed at vital targets in a suicide dive by their pilots, who made the sacrifice 'to shorten the war.' One plane hit and destroyed a refinery and the other shattered an important cracking plant, said Sgt. Frank Kozak of Carbondale, Pa., The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/24/1943.) "A year ago this month, Mr. and Mrs. W. Eugene Cummins, of Little Falls, former residents of Fayetteville, received a communication from the war department that their son Tech. Sgt. John D. Cummins was missing in action in the Middle Eastern Area but no further details were given at that time, except that the plane and crew, of which he was a member, was missing after a raid on Nazi oil refineries in Romania. Last week they received a letter from the war department in which it was state that their son must now be presumed to be dead, and gave such details as appears on their records in connection with his death. It also stated that the department had entertained hope that he had survived the crash of the big Liberator Bomber on which Cummins was radioman, and that information would be revealed dispelling the uncertainty surrounding his absence. The letter explained further that on Aug. 1, 1943, he participated in a bombing attack on the oil refineries at Ploiesti, and that his plane and another in close formation entered a cloud on the return flight and both were then seen falling to earth as though they had collided with each other. Johnny Cummins was a native of Little Falls, but the family lived in Fayetteville for some time while he was 'growing up.' He was graduated from Fayetteville high school and was active in athletics during his school year. After returning to Little Falls six years ago, he entered the employ of Char. Hansen's laboratory, serving in the sales department. He entered service in April, 1942, and left this country for foreign duty in April, 1943. Mr. and Mrs. Cummins have two other sons serving their country. They are Corp. William Cummins with the Marines, and Robert in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/1/1944.

Cummins, Robert. Formerly Fayetteville. "Bill Cummins, the youngest of the three Cummins boys, is serving overseas with the U. S. Marines, and Bobby, also in service, is stationed in this country," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943.

Cummins, William. Formerly Fayetteville. "Bill Cummins, the youngest of the three Cummins boys, is serving overseas with the U. S. Marines..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Corp. William (Bill) Cummins visited his aunt, Mrs. George King recently enroute to his home in Little Falls, N. Y. from California. Bill is on a 30-day leave after spending 17 months in the Pacific war zone with the U. S. Marines, after which he will report to Cherry Point, N. C. This is his first leave from the battle zone. The Cummins family are former residents of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/1/1944.

Cunningham, Charles W. Manlius. "Following physical examinations Tuesday, four local men were accepted for army service. Inductees under new regulations are now permitted to choose between immediate entrance into service or following a two-week leave. The inductees are...Charles W. Cunningham of Manlius," The Eagle Bulletin, 5/21/1943.

?Cunningham, William. Minoa. "Pvt. William Cunningham, the husband of Mrs. Phyllis Cunningham of Minoa, and son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cunningham of Canastota, is stationed at Rosecrans field, St. Joseph, Mo., with an army air corps transport transition squadron. He entered service Jan. 12," The Post-Standard, 9/4/1943. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Curran, Louis. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Currie, William W. Formerly town of Manlius. "William W. Currie, son off Mr. and Mrs. William H. Currie of Tully, RD 1. and Francis M. Egan...are home on leave after six week's boot training at Sampson. Currie, a graduate of Tully high school, attended Manlius school and Syracuse university before enlisting.." The Post-Standard 1/30/1944.

Cuykendall, Mark Denton Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Local Draft Board 473 called up 19 men for induction this week. They will be examined by the board of which Jesse W. Clarke is chairman and Collin Armstrong and Matthew F. O'Brien. The group called from this vicinity are as follows: ...Mark D. Cuykendall, R. D. 1, Manlius...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. "Staff Sgt. Mark D. Cuykendall has returned to his duties at Fort Bragg, N. C. after spending a short furlo with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Cuykendall of Manlius RD 1," The Post-Standard, 5/20/1942. "S/Sgt. Mark D. Cuykendall returned to his post at Camp Pickett, Va., Sunday, after spending a three-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mark S. Cuykendall of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Sgt. Mark D. Cuykendall has written his parents...of his safe arrival in Africa and of his promotion to technical sergeant," The Post-Standard, 1/5/1943. "Master Sgt. Denton Cuykendall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Cuykendall, has returned from Italy and will spend the remainder of the month at home, expecting to leave July 4 for South Carolina for a new assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944.

Dacey, Thomas E. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

D'Agostino, Phillip. Kirkville. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors, five of them are Kirkville men. They are...Phillip D'Agostino...selected for the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Pvt. Phillip M. D'Agostino, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carmen D'Agostino of Kirkville, was home on an eight-day furlo and celebrated his 19th birthday, March 29, at home. A graduate of Minoa high school in 1943, he entered service Nov. 24, 1943," The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "Pvt. Philip M. D'Agostino...has arrived in England for army engineer maintenance work, according to a letter received by his parents. He entered service Nov. 24, 1943, after graduating from Minoa high school and was trained at Camp MacCain, Miss.," The Post-Standard, 8/5/1944.

Daignault, Albert J. Manlius. Manlius Honor Roll. Inducted into the service Albert J. Daignault, 132 1/2 W. Seneca st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 5/9/1941. "Three veterans fly home from Europe...Pfc. Albert J. Daignault, 25, 132 W. Seneca, Manlius, quartermaster corps, 36 months in Italy," The Post-Standard, 7/28/1945. "Miami, Fla.-- It would be the unusual at Air Transport Command's Miami Air Field if at least a few New Yorkers were not flown into this ATC Caribbean Division hub from overseas on any single day. Today was no exception -- they were clearing ATC's Miami Army Air Field for Camp Blanding, Fla. From there they will be sent to reception centers nearer home for separation from the service or furloughs prior to reassignment under the Army's redeployment plan. Included among the latest New York arrivals was Pfc. Albert J. Daignault, 25, of 132 West Seneca street, Manlius. He was in the Quartermaster Corps and spent 36 months in Italy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Daignault, Victor W. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Dailey, William. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Bill Dailey, stationed at Tampa, Fla., spent the week-end recently with M/Sgt. and Mrs. Gerald Jones of Orlando, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/5/1943. "Pvt. William Dailey has returned to Myrtle Beach, So. Carolina, after spending a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence R. Dailey," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "Sgt. William Dailey arrived last Saturday night by plane from Fort Knox to spend a 24-hour furlough with his parents...Other guests at the Dailey home on Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Daily and two children, of Chittenango, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wall and infant son, William Robert, of Lacona," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/24/1943. "Sgt. William A. Dailey, 26, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Dailey...was one of the four Army fliers killed when their medium bomber crashed into the bay at Tampa, Fla., last Friday. Sgt. Dailey's parents were informed of their son's death on Sunday morning by an official telegram from Goodman Field, Ky...The body has been brought to Manlius where funeral services and burial will take place," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "The funeral of Sgt. William Dailey...who was one of four Army fliers killed Oct. 8, when their medium bomber crashed into the bay at Tampa, Fla., will be conducted at 2:30 P.M. Saturday in Manlius Methodist Church by the Rev. Arthur Morey. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Dailey of Tripp Avenue, Manlius, he is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. Douglas Cummings of Syracuse and Mrs. Joseph W. Wall of Lacona; and four brothers, Curtiss R. Dailey of Sherrill, Herbert L. of Chittenango and Donald and George Dailey of Manlius. Burial will be in Manlius," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d.

Danforth, Donald. Fayetteville. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Marines include...Donald Danforth..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Donald Danforth of the U. S. Marines spent a few days last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt Danforth at their home in Clinton street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Mrs. DeWitt Danforth received a letter last week from her son Pfc. Donald Danforth and after reading it about halfway through the handwriting changed, and after close observance she recognized it as being the writing of another son Pfc. William Danforth. When the story was pieced together, it disclosed that Don and Bill, who are twins, had accidentally met in the Philippines. Don is serving with the 341st Marine Bomb. Sqd. in the Philippines and Bill has been with the 152nd Trans. Sqd. stationed in the Solomons. They told their mother that they were in hopes of meeting a third brother, Robert Danforth, who is also in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/18/1945. "...Corp. William and Corp. Donald Danforth, two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Danforth, are stationed in Taingtao, China, with the 1st Marine Air Wing Division. They have been in that area for the past 15 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946.

Danforth, Robert C. Fayetteville. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday. From Fayetteville are...Robert Danforth...picked for the Navy. Inducted into the service 1/2/1944, The Post-Standard, 1/3/1944. "Robert Danforth, U.S.N., spent the week end with his wife and parents at their homes in Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944. "Mrs. DeWitt Danforth received a letter last week from her son Pfc. Donald Danforth and after reading it about halfway through the handwriting changed, and after close observance she recognized it as being the writing of another son Pfc. William Danforth. When the story was pieced together, it disclosed that Don and Bill, who are twins, had accidentally met in the Philippines. Don is serving with the 341st Marine Bomb. Sqd. in the Philippines and Bill has been with the 152nd Trans. Sqd. stationed in the Solomons. They told their mother that they were in hopes of meeting a third brother, Robert Danforth, who is also in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/18/1945. "Robert Danforth, who served two years as Qm. 2/c in the Navy with the fleet of the Pacific has been honorably discharged, and with his wife is living with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt Danforth. Corp. William and Corp. Donald Danforth, two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Danforth, are stationed in Taingtao, China, with the 1st Marine Air Wing Division. They have been in that area for the past 15 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946.

Danforth, William. Fayetteville. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Marines include...William and Donald Danforth..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Mrs. DeWitt Danforth received a letter last week from her son Pfc. Donald Danforth and after reading it about halfway through the handwriting changed, and after close observance she recognized it as being the writing of another son Pfc. William Danforth. When the story was pieced together, it disclosed that Don and Bill, who are twins, had accidentally met in the Philippines. Don is serving with the 341st Marine Bomb. Sqd. in the Philippines and Bill has been with the 152nd Trans. Sqd. stationed in the Solomons. They told their mother that they were in hopes of meeting a third brother, Robert Danforth, who is also in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/18/1945. "...Corp. William and Corp. Donald Danforth, two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Danforth, are stationed in Taingtao, China, with the 1st Marine Air Wing Division. They have been in that area for the past 15 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946.

Davies, Beryl Raymond. Manlius. "Franklin Harley Brown, son of Clarence Brown of 104 North Burdick street, Fayetteville and Beryl Raymond Davies, son of William P. Davies of R.D. 2, Manlius, enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps last Thursday at Syracuse, and were sworn into the fighting Leathernecks by Maj. H. Colvocoresses, U.S.M.C., (retd.) officer in charge of the Central New York recruiting districts. The young men left immediately for Parris Island, S.C., eastern Marine training station, for six weeks of comprehensive military instruction, including firing of all types of modern weapons, use of the bayonet and fundamentals of combat," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942.

Davis, David. Formerly town of Manlius. "A former Manlius school student, David Davis, 601 S. Warren St., will be inducted today with a group of selectees from board 468. His Manlius school training makes him a fair prospect for the officer candidate school altho it is several years since he attended the military school which has produced a number of high ranking officers," The Post-Standard, 3/16/1942.

Davis, Paul. Fayetteville. "C.P.O. Paul Davis of the U. S. Merchant Marine, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davis of Fayetteville, and Corp. Robert Crowe, U.S.A., son of Mrs. Mary Crowe of Manlius, had a chance meeting in the Pacific area recently according to letters received by Mrs. Crowe. Davis is on the steamship R. P. Warner and they were transporting men from New Guinea to the Philippines, and Crowe was among the troops aboard. While the boys knew each other only slightly while at home, they said they found plenty to talk about 'out there' and the meeting gave them a breath of the old home towns," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945.

Davis, Thomas A. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included...Lt. Thomas A. Davis...all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Davis, Thomas Paul. Fayetteville. "Mrs. Thomas A. Davis left last week for Hollywood, Calif., where she will spend a few weeks with her son and daughter-in-law, Chief Petty Officer and Mrs. Paul Davis, and their children Brenda and Tommy. Tommy, the latest addition to the family, was born March 24. C.P.O. Davis, who is serving with the merchant marine, has been aboard the RP No. 1 and has been in the Philippines and India areas for the past year. He is now home on leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945. "S 2/c Thomas Paul Davis is spending a 30-day furlough with his wife at their home in East Genesee st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Day, George R. Fayetteville. "Yokosuka, Japan--George R. Day fireman 1/c, 305 Chapel street, Fayetteville, N.Y., has none of the worries about housing that now plague his buddies who have returned to the States. The navy towed a floating hotel all the way from the West Coast to Tokyo Bay to provide a home for him and other navy personnel stationed at the Yokosuka naval base. Though from the outside she looks something like Noah's Ark, the USS APL 31 has a modern dental laboratory and a sick bay supplied with the finest surgical equipment. She has no means of self propulsion, because all available space is used to feed and quarter her crew and passengers. Costing more than a million dollars, the APL comes as close to a modern hotel as the navy can make her. Whenever their work calls the personnel of the APL to another port, it will be necessary only to engage a tug to take them there, hotel and all," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Decker, George L. Minoa. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...George L. Decker of Minoa...Decker will see service in the U. S. navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. Navy release, Sampson...George L. Decker, Sp (Q) 1/c, 432 E. Ave., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 3/4/1946. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Decker, George, 432 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Decker, Richard. Minoa. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Navy...Richard Decker, 432 East ave., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Decker, Richard, 432 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

DeForest, Oliver. Manlius. "Sgt. Oliver DeForest has received an honorable discharge from the Army, having served in Africa, Sicily, England and France and has returned to his former work in the local foundry," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/17/1945.

DeLand, Howard. Formerly Fayetteville. "Mrs. Mildred G. DeLand entertained at a farewell party for her son, Howard, who left last Friday for Army training at Camp Dix," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Howard DeLand of Syracuse, formerly of Fayetteville, a brother of Mrs. Paul Wheeler, Chapel street, was inducted into the Army on April 8. He left for training at Camp Dix," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Wheeler entertained at a family gathering on Sunday in honor of Mrs. Wheeler's brother, Pvt. Howard DeLand, who is on a ten-day furlough from Camp Croft, S.C. Those who attended, besides Pvt. DeLand and the hosts, were his wife and young son, of Syracuse, his mother, Mrs. Mildred DeLand, his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Cordie DeLand, all of Manlius, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hefferden and daughter Frances, of Dewitt, and Robert Dennis, of Onondaga Hill," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/1/1944. "Mrs. Mildred DeLand entertained at a...dinner last Saturday evening in honor of her son Pvt. Howard DeLand who has been home from Camp Croft for 10 days...At the end of his furlough, Pvt. DeLand will report to Fort Meade for assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. "Announcement has been made of the birth of a son to Private and Mrs. Howard DeLand on January 14," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Mrs. Paul C. Wheeler has received word from the War Department that her brother, Pvt. Howard DeLand, was seriously wounded January 2, somewhere in France. This is the second time that Pvt. DeLand has been in the hospital. He was hospitalized last November for an ear ailment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/26/1945. "Pvt. Howard F. DeLand, 31, son of Mrs. Mildred DeLand of Manlius, was wounded seriously in action in France Jan. 2, according to word received by his wife, Mrs. Virginia DeLand, of 112 1/2 Jackson st. He was serving with the Seventh army when he received a head injury. Before entering service 11 months ago, he was employed by General Electric Co. He had been overseas six months. His wife has received his purple heart medal. Pvt. DeLand is the father of two sons, Howard F. DeLand, Jr., 6 years old, and Dennis Michael DeLand, 2 months, whom he has never seen," The Post-Standard, 3/10/1945. "Mrs. Mildred DeLand entertained at a family gathering last Sunday for her youngest son, Pvt. Howard DeLand, who was recently honorably discharged from the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Pvt. Howard DeLand, of Syracuse and formerly of Fayetteville, a brother of Mrs. Paul C. Wheeler of Chapel street, has been recently given an honorable discharge from the army. He has been in the service for 15 months. Pvt. DeLand was seriously wounded on New Year's Eve and after spending four months in hospitals in France he was transferred to England General Hospital where he remained until the middle of July. After coming to this country he was sent to the Veteran's Hospital at Batavia from where he was discharged Pvt. DeLand is reported to be looking fine and as to the future, he says he is yet undecided but wants to enjoy his safe return and family for a time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Howard DeLand, younger brother of Mrs. Paul Wheeler and a former resident of Fayetteville, underwent a very delicate brain operation last Monday. He was wounded about a year and a half ago in Germany at which time he suffered a head wound. In face of the seriousness of the operation, doctors report that he is improving satisfactorily. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wheeler and Cordis DeLand were blood donors for their brother. He is the son of Mrs. Mildred DeLand of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/27/1946. "Pvt. Howard De Land, 112 1/2 Jackson st. (Syracuse), who was seriously disabled in the fighting in France, sits in a wheelchair as he receives the State's Conspicuous Service Medal from Col. F. A. Thiessen (photo), The Post-Standard, 10/20/1946. "Pvt. Howard F. DeLand, 31, of the infantry was seriously wounded in action in France Jan. 2, suffering a head injury, his wife, Mrs. Virginia De Land, 112 1/2 Jackson Street, has been notified by the War Department. He was serving with the Seventh Army when wounded. An employee of the General Electric Co., before going into service, 11 months ago, Pvt. De Land has been overseas six months. He is the son of Mrs. Mildred De Land of Manlius and the father of two sons, Howard F. DeLand, Jr., six years old, and Denis Michael DeLand, two months, whom he has never seen. His wife has received his Purple Heart Medal," Bond scrapbook, n.d.

DeMay, Gifford H. Formerly Minoa. "Pvt. Gifford H. DeMay, formerly of Minoa, is spending a 10-day furlo with his grandmother, Mrs. Newton Vreeland of Mountain View. Pvt. Gifford is a cook in Boca Raton club at Boca Raton field, Fla.," Post-Standard, 11/2/1942. "Pvt.. Gifford H. DeMay, formerly of Minoa, is spending a 10-day furlo with his grandmother, Mrs. Newton Vreeland of Mountain View. Pvt. DeMay is a cook in Boca Raton club at Boca Raton field, Fla.," The Post-Standard, 12/2/1942.

Dempsey, James. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men of this vicinity have been called before Selective Service Board 473 for tests at the Induction Center...James Dempsey, 105 Warren street. These men take the places of those sent to the induction station and disqualified there or men not sent by their local boards owing to the fact that they reported too late and had enlisted in the Army, Navy or the Marine Corps. This is the second group of young men who have been sent before the Selective Service Board from this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/7/1941. "T/Sgt. James Dempsey, who has been with the U.S. armed forces in the Pacific area for the past three years returned to the States about a month ago and called on old friends in Fayetteville last week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945.

Denig, James L. Formerly town of Manlius. "Capt. James L. Denig, 24-year-old graduate of Manlius school, was burned fatally when a Jap tossed a hand grenade inside one of the three tanks he was commanding as marine tank men mopped up Namur Island in the Marshalls last week, The Associated Press reported last night. Death of the marine tank company commander, who was the son of Brig.-Gen. Robert L. Denig, marine public relations director, was disclosed Sunday by the navy department. No details were released until Al Dopking filed the wire story yesterday. Japanese resisted the tank mop-up, he wrote, by climbing on the tanks and trying to flip hand grenades into their turrets. As tank commander, Capt. Denig was riding in one of three tanks which were to sweep half of the island. His tank became lost. 'Fighting grew hot,' the AP dispatch continued. 'Six Japanese jumped his tank. One tossed a hand grenade inside, setting the tank afire. Infantrymen following the tank filled all six Japs. But Capt. Denig was burned fatally before he was pulled out by Corp. William Taylor. He lived for about 15 minutes.' Another member of his crew also was burned to death. The young captain completed a reserve officers training course at Manlius and also was a graduate of the University of New Hampshire," The Post-Standard, 2/9/1944.

Dennis, Warren A. Manlius. "Selective service board 473, East Syracuse, has accepted a total of 40 men for army and navy duty who will report at Fort Dix, N.J. and at Buffalo reception center respectively Wednesday for final induction. They are...Army. Warren A. Dennis, St. John's Ave., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 2/16/1944. "Pvt. Warren Dennis, son of Mrs. Marion Dennis, 210 Fayette st., Manlius, has made 'expert' on the machine gun, one of the highest scores in his company at the armored replacement training center, Fort Knox, Ky. Pvt. Dennis, who is 19 years old, entered the army March 8," The Post-Standard, 6/12/1944.

Denny, Richard M. Manlius. "Pfc. Richard M. Denny, son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Denny of St. John avenue, was graduated from the A.A.F. flexible gunnery school, Laredo Army Air Field, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Richard Denny, stationed at Gowen Field, Boise City, Idaho, has been promoted to corporal. Mrs. Denny is now visiting her husband in Idaho," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945.

DeRosia, Francis. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on Oran Honor Roll. "In the Cyclone Division, now stationed at Camp Shelby, Miss.,...Mr. Herbert Haith is another one of these 'young fellows' who is overcoming the handicaps of labor shortage, doing his bit on his 130 acre farm with the help of his daughter, Mrs. Francis DeRosia. The two have just finished threshing, and say the silos are yet to be filled. Mr. Haith said crops have been very good in this section of the State. He has a fine herd of Guernseys and raises all his own grain for their care during the winter. He has just made the second cutting of alfalfa, and is bewildered as to where to store it. His daughter, a former school teacher, is his best 'man' on the farm, the two of them doing practically all the work this year so the menfolk can help Uncle Sam harvest the Japs. Mr. Haith is an officer in the Onondaga County Patrons Fire Relief Association and a member of the Dairymen's League which he joined in 1921. He says he will keep things rolling on the farm until his son-in-law comes back to take over. Mrs. Haith is camera shy and said 'no' when asked to be photographer. She has a hobby all her own on the farm, raising chickens and turkeys occupy her spare time. She told an Eagle-Bulletin reporter she has raised as many as 200 turkeys in one season. She did not go by the scientific method of raising them on screens, but let the birds run in the alfalfa fields, and anyone who has been her flocks must admit she knew her turkeys," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942.

DeRycke, Archie J. Manlius. "Pfc. Archie J. DeRyke (sic), 31, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alois DeRyke, Manlius, N.Y., served 29 months in India with the air corps," cleared Air Transport Command Miami Army Air Field and enroute home" The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse as Achiel DeRycke.

DeRycke, Emil. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll as DeRycke.

DeRycke, Omar E. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll as DeRycke. "Three Gold Star mothers were present at the dedication (of the flag presented by the Archie Van Patten Post American Legion at the Honor Roll plaque in East Seneca street, Manlius), two from Minoa and one from Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. DeRyke (sic), whose son was reported missing in action, attended the exercises and was presented with a small flag from the Memorial wreath. Mrs. Wolven was not present, but a similar flag was reserved for her," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943. Killed in action, preliminary list produced by the War Department dated January 31, 1946.

Desormeau (Besormeau), Albert J. Kirkville. "Among the hundreds who are flocking to the recruiting station in Syracuse to join the nation's fighting forces since the attack on the United States by Japan and declaration of war by the Axis powers are many from the towns of Manlius and DeWitt. Enlisting from...Kirkville: Albert J. Besormeau (sic), Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. R. D. 2. Private. "A total of 392 known war casualties in which Onondagans were the victims has been rolled up since...Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, two years ago Tuesday...The known dead number 142, or more than one-third of the casualties...The 'Roll of Honor' (the death list) follows: Army...Pvt. Albert Desormeau (sic), R.D. 2, Kirkville," from an article entitled "County War Dead 142 Since Japs Hit Hawaii," The Post-Standard, 12/9/1943.

Devine, Mary G. Fayetteville. "Miss Mary G. Devine of Fayetteville, daughter of the late Frank H. and Elizabeth Meagher Devine of Canastota, and Harold O. Beach, of Utica, son of Mrs. Hattie Beach of Dundee, N.Y. were united in marriage December 28 in the Church of the Immaculate Conception (Fayetteville)...The bride was a member of the Army Nurse Corps and recently separated from the service. She was graduated from Fayetteville high school and St. Joseph's school of nursing, and also attended Columbia and Syracuse universities. The bridegroom was given an honorable discharge from the Army after 32 months overseas. He is a graduate of Colgate University and Syracuse Law School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946.

Devoy, George. Fayetteville. An Eighth AAF Composition Station, England--Corporal George Devoy, 110 West Genesee street, Fayetteville, N. Y. is a member of the ground crew of a P-38 Lightning used by fighter pilots for advanced tactical instruction at his base. Corporal Devoy, the son of Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Devoy, of Fayetteville, is kept busy with daily and pre-night checks, engine changes, and general maintenance work, along with the other two members of his crew. He has spent all of the 29 months he has been on active duty doing aircraft mechanical work; aircraft engine work being his favorite part of the job. Recently, Cpl. Devoy met an old friend, 2nd Lt. Jack Klinck, a pilot, who is taking advanced training at this station," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/14/1944. "Cpl. George Devoy arrived early Wednesday morning to pass 45 days with his parents...Cpl. Devoy has been stationed in England for the past three years and is serving with the ground crew of the air forces. Pvt. Joseph Devoy has completed his training at Fort Blanding, Fla., and is also home on leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "Cpl. George Devoy has returned from Fort Dix to pass another two weeks with his parents...before being reassigned to duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "George Devoy, Jr., has been given an honorable discharge from the army and has returned to the home of his parents...He was in service four years, three of which were spent overseas with the ground crew of the Eighth Air Force," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Devoy, Joseph. Fayetteville. "...Joseph Devoy, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Devoy of West Genesee street and Bert Hurst, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hurst also of West Genesee street, recently inducted, went to the induction center in Syracuse Wednesday morning for assignment. Both Devoy and Hurst attended Fayetteville high school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944. "...Pvt. Joseph Devoy has completed his training at Fort Blanding, Fla., and is...home on leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "Pfc. Joseph Devoy, 20, ...has been honorably discharged from service and arrived home last Friday. Devoy, a veteran of the Luzon campaign, was inducted into the Army at Fort Dix, N. J., in Nov. 1944. After receiving his infantry basic training at Camp Blanding, Florida, he joined the 11th Airborne Division on Luzon in May, 1945, and within a month qualified as a gliderman. Having served in the Pacific Theater, Devoy has the following awards to his credit: the Asiatic Pacific ribbon with one battle star, the Philippine Liberation ribbon with one star, the Japanese Occupation ribbon, the Good Conduct medal and the Victory medal, in addition to his glider wings," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/11/1946.

Dewey, Robert W. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Deyo, Charles J. Minoa. "The following officers and enlisted men have been discharged from the army at Fort Dix...Pfc. Charles J. Deyo, Minoa," The Post-Standard, 12/23/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Deyo, Charles J., 110 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Digney, Harold. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Dillon, John J., Jr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Miss Mary Lucille Honors, daughter of Mrs. John Honors of Fayetteville, and Corp. John L. Dillon, Jr., of Fayetteville, were married Tuesday evening...Mr. Dillon is in the U. S. Army tank corps, located at Fort Knox, Kentucky. He has made a fine record in that branch of the service. He will return to army duty this week. Until the time of entering the U. S. service last summer Mr. Dillon was advertising manager of the Eagle-Bulletin in Fayetteville, and he is well known throughout this area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1941. "Word has been received that John J. Dillon, Jr., formerly business manager of the Eagle-Bulletin has been transferred from Fort Knox, Kentucky, to the personnel department at Fort Meade, Md., he has the rank of corporal," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "John J. Dillon, Jr., a member of the Army Tank Corps at Fort Meade, Md., is home on a brief furlough this week visiting his wife and parents. 'Jack' as everyone knows him hereabouts, son of John J. Dillon, publisher of the Eagle-Bulletin, was formerly its business manager. One of two out of 120 to be chosen for an officer's training course, 'Jack' returns to Fort Meade Friday to be transferred to Fort Knox, Ky., where he will take a three-months course in the officers school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/22/1942. "Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr., has returned from a trip to Fort Knox, Ky., where she visited her husband, Corp. Dillon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1942. "John J. Dillon, Jr....has been graduated from the armored force officer candidate school with gold bars and (has) been commissioned second lieutenant," The Post-Standard, 8/26/1942. "Lieut. John J. Dillon arrived in Fayetteville Wednesday evening to spend a few days visiting relatives. Mr. Dillon graduated from officers training school last week. His wife and mother attended the graduation exercises. After spending a few days in Lexington, they stopped off at Erie, Pa., for a day to visit relatives in that city. Miss Betty Dillon, who had been spending the summer in Erie, returned home with the party. Lieut. Dillon will go to Pine Camp next Tuesday, where he expects to be stationed for a short period," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Lieut. John J. Dillon left Tuesday afternoon for Pine Camp, where he will be stationed for a short time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. John Dillon, Sr., and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dillon of Batavia spent Sunday at Pine Camp..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr., has returned from Watertown, N.Y. where she has been spending the past month while her husband Lieut. Dillon, was stationed at Pine Camp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr., returned home last week after spending two weeks with her husband in Nashville, Tenn.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr. is on a trip to California, where she is visiting her husband, Lt. Dillon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr., has returned from California, where she has been spending the past three months with her husband, Lt. Dillon. She arrived home Sunday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Lt. John J. Dillon, Jr., of Camp Bowie, Texas, and Pvt. Thomas Dillon, stationed in New York, were home this week for a visit with their wives and relatives. 'Tommy' returns to his duties tonight, 'Jack' leaves for San Antonio, Texas, Sunday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "A daughter was born Wednesday night, Dec. 15, to Lt. and Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr., at the Memorial Hospital in Syracuse..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Home on a 10-day leave after 18 months service in the Southwest Pacific, WT/2c William Dillon, of the U. S. Navy, met his brother, Pvt. Thomas Dillon, stationed at Fort Custer, who is also home on a short furlough, for the first time in two years, at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Dillon, 100 Haffenden Road, Syracuse. Another brother, Lt. John J. Dillon, Jr., is serving in the Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr., spent the week-end with her husband, Lt. Dillon in Springfield, Mass.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "Three men from this area received commissions and wings as bombardier-navigators in the last graduation class of the West Texas bombardier quadrangle...Lt. John J. Dillon, Jr., 203 Brooklea, Fayetteville...received only his bombardier wings at Big Spring field, because he had been commissioned previously," The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "Lt. John J. Dillon, Jr., who has been stationed at Chatham Field, Ga., is spending two week's leave with his wife and little daughter at their home in Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "The commanding officer of the 15th Air Squadron based in Italy pins the Bronze Air Medal on Lieut. John J. Dillon, Jr. The medal was awarded for meritorious achievement in flights over German territory. Lieutenant Dillon is bombardier and navigator on a B-24 Liberator and has been in action in that war theater since last Fall (photo)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Capt. John J. Dillon, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dillon of 100 Haffenden Road, Syracuse, arrived in the United States last Thursday from Naples, Italy. His wife and little daughter Karylle reside on Brooklea Drive...Capt. Dillon served in Africa and Italy with the 15th Air Force and has 53 combat missions to his credit. He wears the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters and the Presidential Citation with one Oak Leaf Cluster. He was scheduled to leave for home with the 15th Air Force shortly after V-E Day but just two days before sailing time he became ill and was confined to a hospital in Bari, Italy, and was later transferred to a hospital in Naples. He is now undergoing a final physical check-up before being discharged as a medical patient and before beginning his 30-day leave which starts Monday. Following his furlough, Capt. Dillon will report for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Capt. and Mrs. John J. Dillon, Jr., are spending several days at the farm home of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. White at Altamont, N.Y," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/17/1945.

Dillon, Thomas. Fayetteville. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are Thomas Dillon...of Fayetteville...in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "When Thomas E. Dillon of Brooklea Drive reports to Ft. Niagara today with the contingent of draftees from Board 473, he will add the third star to the service flag of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Dillon, Sr., of 303 East Genesee st. He was inducted into the services at Syracuse a week ago. Leaving two small sons, Thomas Edward, Jr., 1 1/2 years, Richard Gerald, 7 months, he joins two brothers who are already serving their country in the armed services. They are F/l/c William E. Dillon, who is aboard the U. S. S. Washington and who has been in uniform since February, 1941, and 2nd Lieut. J. J. Dillon, Jr., of the 51st Armored Infantry, who has been in service since August of 1941. Mrs. Dillon gave a dinner for her third military son Sunday at her home which was attended by the members of the immediate families. Thomas Dillon was also honor guest at a dinner and dance given in Syracuse Tuesday night by Miss Gerald Dillon, a sister, and Mrs. Harvey Kasso, and he received a furlough bag filled with appropriate military gifts. The affair was attended by nine guests. Mrs. Jeanette Dillon will continue to reside at their home on Brooklea Drive with her two children while her husband is in the Army. He was employed in the Die Shop of the Precision Castings Co....as a machinist, and expects to make good use of his experience in the maintenance branch of the Army Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Private Thomas Dillon of Fayetteville who was inducted into the Army at Fort Niagara two weeks ago is now stationed at Pine Camp, Watertown, N.Y. Tom states that army life is not so tough after the first few days and says the chow is excellent, and that he is feeling fine," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Pvt. Thomas E. Dillon, stationed at Pine Camp, spent the week-end with Mrs. Dillon and their two little sons, Tommy, Jr., and Dick, at their home in Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "Pvt. Thomas Dillon, stationed at Corona, N. Y., spent a three-day leave with his family at their home on Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Lt. John J. Dillon, Jr., of Camp Bowie, Texas, and Pvt. Thomas Dillon, stationed in New York, were home this week for a visit with their wives and relatives. 'Tommy' returns to his duties tonight, 'Jack' leaves for San Antonio, Texas, Sunday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Letters received by relatives here tells of the meeting in a USO Club in Illinois of Pvt. Thomas Dillon and Pfc. Joseph Pezzati...Pvt. Dillon, whose wife and two sons reside in Brooklea Drive, has been in service since last April and was recently transferred from New York City to Camp Ellis, Ill. Both men are in the Engineers' Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/24/1943. "Pvt. Thomas Dillon, who has been stationed at Camp Ellis, Ill., is passing a 15-day furlough with his wife and children at their home in Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Mrs. John J. Dillon and Mrs. Thomas Dillon left for Chicago Thursday night where they will visit Pvt. Thomas Dillon, who is stationed at Ft. Sheridan, Illinois," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Home on a 10-day leave after 18 months service in the Southwest Pacific, WT/2c William Dillon, of the U. S. Navy, met his brother, Pvt. Thomas Dillon, stationed at Fort Custer, who is also home on a short furlough, for the first time in two years, at the home of their parents...Another brother, Lt. John J. Dillon, Jr., is serving in the Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "Without getting the 'break' all GI's in the European theatre looked forward to Pfc. Thomas E. Dillon, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dillon, Sr., of 100 Haffenden Road, Syracuse, just this week wrote that he arrived safely in the Pacific after having been deployed there directly from Europe. He entered the service in April, 1943, and has been overseas since April, 1944. He was attached to an M. P. battalion and saw service in England, France, Belgium and Germany. Recently Pfc. Dillon was transferred to an engineering regiment, in which branch he has had schooling and training, and with the engineers he was sent to the Pacific war theater. His wife and two small sons Tommy and Dickie live at 127 Victoria Place, Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945.

Dillon, William E. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "William E. Dillon, son of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Dillon, of 303 East Genesee street, enlisted for a six-year term in the U. S. Navy. He left Tuesday for Albany, recruiting headquarters for upstate New York, where he was sworn into service. He left Albany Wednesday morning for the Naval training base at Newport, Rhode Island. Following his graduation from Fayetteville High School he had been employed at the Precision Castings Co. During his term of service in the Navy 'Bill' will study engineering or pharmacy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. "William Dillon, stationed on the U. S. S. Washington, was the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dillon, Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1941. "Billy Dillon, now stationed on the U. S. S. Washington, was home for a one-day visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dillon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. John J. Dillon and daughter, Betty, returned Monday night from a three-day trip to Philadelphia, Pa., where they visited their son, William Dillon, who is stationed on the U. S. S. Washington, at League Island. During their stay Mr. and Mrs. Dillon visited the Navy yards and viewed the battleship Washington," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1941. "After several months service in foreign water, William Dillon, U. S. N., spent two days with his parents...'Billy' returned to his ship Saturday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Home on a 10-day leave after 18 months service in the Southwest Pacific, WT/2c William Dillon, of the U. S. Navy, met his brother, Pvt. Thomas Dillon, stationed at Fort Custer, who is also home on a short furlough, for the first time in two years, at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Dillon, 100 Haffenden Road, Syracuse. Another brother, Lt. John J. Dillon, Jr., is serving in the Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "William E. Dillon, WT 2/c, who has been 21 months' service in the South Pacific with U. S. naval forces, has been hospitalized here (Sampson, N.Y.) for the past 3 weeks, due to after effects of a fever contracted while serving in the war zones. Dillon was granted a 21-day leave to spend with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dillon...but after 3 days at his parents' home he became seriously ill and was immediately ordered to the Sampson Naval hospital. Bill reports that due to the excellent care of doctors and staff he is enjoying good health again. He expects to return to the West coast August 10 for assignment to duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Anne Isabel Munro, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. J. Wesley Munroe of 1244 West Onondaga street, Syracuse, and William Dillon, WT 2/c, U. S. N....The ceremony took place Sept. 15 in the Naval Chapel at Treasure Island, San Francisco. Mr.. and Mrs. Dillon are visiting their parents in Syracuse for a few days enroute to Philadelphia, Pa., where Mr. Dillon has been transferred to an advanced training school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "After being a patient in the U. S. naval hospital in Philadelphia, Pa., for the past five months, William E. Dillon, WT 1/c, was transferred to the hospital at the Sampson Naval Base last Saturday for further observation and treatment. He...has been in the Navy since February, 1941. Dillon has served aboard the U.S.S. Washington on patrol and convoy duty in the Atlantic and Arctic areas for over a year and later his ship was sent to the Pacific where it saw action in many Pacific sea battles. He served in that area for 2 1/2 years before being sent back to the States for further schooling at the Philadelphia base. It was shortly after finishing his schooling that Dillon became ill with some ailment apparently of tropical origin, which has kept him in the hospital since that time. His condition is regarded as serious. His wife, Mrs. Anne Munro Dillon, is residing with her parents, Dr. and Mrs. J. Wesley Munro, of 1244 West Onondaga street, Syracuse," Thee Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945.

Dimmick, Jerry. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

DiVeronica, Francis. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...DiVeronica, Francis, 339 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

DiVeronica, Natalino. Minoa. Honorably discharged, Natalino DeVeronica (sic), 339 S. Main st., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 10/23/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...DiVeronica, Natalino, 339 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Dixon, Robert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Robert Dixon of Camp Livingston is passing a furlough with his aunts, the Misses Rhetta and Ethel Morrison," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Robert H. Dixon has received his honorable discharge from the Army and with his sister, Mrs. Foster R. Crocker, of Medina, N. Y., has been spending several days at the home of his aunts, the Misses Rhetta and Ethel Morrison, of Lincoln avenue," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945.

Doolittle, George. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Corp. George Doolittle of Camp Jordan, Johnston, Fla., is passing ten days furlough with Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Cornett at their home in East Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Cornett have received word of the safe arrival of Cpl. George Doolittle in England. Cpl. Doolittle, a former resident of this village, is with the amphibian forces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944.

Dougherty, Wilson H. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). "Onondaga county men accepted...army...Wilson H. Dougherty, Maple dr., Fayetteville, R.D. 3," The Post-Standard, 4/3/1943. "Wilson H. Dougherty, shipfitter, third class, husband of Mrs. Marie Dougherty, Maple Drive, Fayetteville, was recently promoted to that rating from seaman second class, at the U. S. Naval Section Base at Savannah," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "Shipfitter Second Class Wilson H. Dougherty, USNR, of Fayetteville, N. Y., was recently promoted to that rating from shipfitter third class at the U. S. naval Section Base, Savannah, Ga. Dougherty's wife, Marie, resides at Maple Drive, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Wilson Dougherty, shipfitter 2/c, was home on a seven-day leave from Cockspur Island, Savannah, Ga. visiting his wife...He is a son of Mrs. Charles Dougherty..." The Post-Standard, 5/24/1944. Navy discharge at Sampson, SF 1/c Wilson H. Dougherty, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 12/3/1945.

Doupe, Carlyle Bruce. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Carlyle Bruce Doupe...Carlyle Doupe is the third son of Charles Doupe of 112 North Burdick street, to enter the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Two youths from Fayetteville, N. Y. have reported to the Army Air Forces Pre-Flight School for Pilots at Maxwell Field, Alabama, to begin the third phase of their training as pilots in the U. S. Army Air Forces' expanding program. These aviation cadets are receiving nine weeks of intensive physical, military and academic instruction at Maxwell Field, Ala., preparatory to beginning their actual flight training at one of the many primary flying schools located in the Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command. These men are Aviation Cadets Carlyle B. Doupe, son of Mr. C. H. Doupe, 112 N. Burdick street, and John E. Mapstone..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss.--Pvt. Carlyle B. Doupe...has been rewarded for his excellent marks on Army mechanical aptitude tests with enrollment in Keesler Field's B-24 Liberator bomber mechanics school. Pvt. Doupe will undergo a rigid and comprehensive 17-week course at this unit of the Army Air Forces Training Command. He then will be qualified for active duty with one of the AAF's B-24 units, or will attend a factory or gunnery school. The Keesler Field airplane mechanics course includes instruction in B-24 fundamentals, structures, fuel and electrical systems, propellers, instruments, hydraulic systems, engine operation and airplane inspection," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944.

Doupe, Duncan. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Son of Charles H. Doupe. Worked at Precision Castings in 1940 before entering the service.

Doupe, Orval M. Formerly Fayetteville. An 8th Air Force Bomber Station, England--Sgt. Orval M. Doupe, 26, of Jamesville, N.Y., tail gunner on a B-17 Flying Fortress, has been awarded the Air Medal at this Eighth Air Force base in England. The presentation was made by his group commander, Col. Hunter Harris, Jr., of Athens, Ga. Sergeant Doupe is the son of Charles H. Doupe, of Fayetteville, N.Y. Prior to entering the Army Air Forces in March, 1942, Sgt. Doupe was employed as a brakeman by the New York Central railroad. He received his gunner's wings in November, 1943. The official citation read, 'For meritorious achievement while participating in heavy bombardment missions in the air offensive against the enemy over Continental Europe. The courage, coolness and skill displayed by Sgt. Doupe upon these occasions reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "An 8th Air Force Bomber Station, England--Staff Sergeant Orval M. Doupe, 26, of Jamesville, N.Y., tail gunner on a B-17 flying Fortress, has been awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster to the Air medal at this Eighth Air Force base in England. The presentation was made by his group commander, Lieutenant Colonel Wm. J. Wrigglesworth, of Eau Claire, Wis...The official citation read, 'For meritorious achievement while participating in heavy bombardment missions in the air offensive against the enemy over Continental Europe. The courage, coolness and skill displayed by Sgt. Doupe upon these occasions reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944. "Atlantic City, N.J.--S/Sgt. Orval M. Doupe of Jamesville, N. Y., has reported to the AAF Redistribution Station No. 1 here after 12 months of service overseas in the European theater of war. Sgt. Doupe served as a gunner on a bomber while overseas. He engaged in 32 combat missions. He wears the Air Medal with 4 oak leaf clusters, and European theater ribbon with 5 stars. Before he leaves the Redistribution Station for his next Air Force assignment, the sergeant will be examined by doctors and interviewed by personnel specialists, to determine where he can best fit in the AAF set-up and aid the war effort. While here, he will have an opportunity to go golfing, fishing, and horseback riding and indulge in many other sports and recreation activities. In these surroundings he relaxes easily after his overseas tour and leaves here in top shape for his next assignment ...Entering the service on March 19, 1942, the sergeant underwent training at Lowry Field, Colo., and Ft. Myers, Fla., prior to his shipment overseas on March 31, 1944.

Doust, Brewster W. Manlius. "The following named officers and enlisted men were honorably discharged from the army of the U. S. Monday at Fort Dix...Pfc. Brewster W. Doust, Manlius, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 12/13/1945.

Downing, Lawrence K. Manlius. "Many Central New York men were among those graduated last week from the airplane mechanics school at Keesler Field, Miss. They were:...Pvt. Lawrence K. Downing of Manlius..." Post-Standard, 12/7/1942.

Doxsee, Doris Jane. Fayetteville. "Miss Doris J. Doxsee, daughter of Mrs. Shada Doxsee of West Genesee street, Fayetteville, and Miss Lorena M. Goodelle of Kirkville were among the 46 nurses who left Syracuse last week for Fort Monmouth, N. J., for Army medical service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...Nurses--Doris Doxsee, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Lt. Jane Doxsee, U. S. Army nurse, is spending a 15-day leave with her mother Mrs. Shada Doxsee at their home in West Genesee street. Lt. Doxsee who served with the corps in England, underwent an appendectomy while there...Lt. Doxsee was given a medical furlough and returned to the States several weeks ago, and is now stationed at Rhoads Hospital in Utica, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944.

Doxsee, Edward D. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces...Edward Doxsee left with a group of Syracusans, Wednesday..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Aviation Cadet Edward D. Doxsee, 19, son of Mrs. H. H. Doxsee of 824 Oakwood Ave., Fayetteville, was recently transferred from the Naval Air Station, Bunker Hill, Ind., where he completed his primary flight training, to the Naval Air Training Center, Pensacola, Fla., for intermediate training. On completion of the intensive course at the 'Annapolis of the Air' Cadet Doxsee will receive his Navy 'Wings of Gold' with the designation of naval Aviator, and will be commissioned an Ensign in the naval Reserve or a 2nd Lieutenant in the Marine Corps Reserve," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Edward D. Doxsee, 19 ...received his navy 'Wings of gold' and was commissioned an Ensign in the Naval Reserve recently following completion of the prescribed flight training course at the Naval Air Training Bases, Pensacola, Fla., the 'Annapolis of the Air.' Having been designated a Naval Aviator, Ensign Doxsee will receive operational training before being assigned to a combat zone," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/15/1944. "Ensign Edward D. Doxsee, USNR, is now stationed at the United States naval air station, Miami...he was commissioned at Pensacola, Fla., Aug. 16, and received a designation as a dive bomber pilot. Ensign Doxsee is a graduate of Fayetteville high school and was a member of the Sky Chiefs, a group of aviation cadets sponsored by the Syracuse Aviation club and given their first training at Colgate university," The Post-Standard 9/28/1944. "Funeral services for Ensign Edward Doxsee, who was killed in the crash of a dive bomber at the Naval Air Station in Miami, Fla., last Sunday, will be held this afternoon at the home of his parents in Oakwood avenue. ..Ensign Doxsee is the sixth youthful flier in the service from this village to die in crashes in this country. The 20-year-old victim is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Horace E. A. Doxsee and came to this village to live when he was three years old. He attended Fayetteville high school and was graduated in 1942. While a high school student he was active in all athletics and took a leading part in all school activities. Ensign Doxsee was in his first semester at Syracuse university when he left to enlist in the Naval air service, and was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. Studying at Colgate university and the University of North Carolina, Ensign Doxsee then received his flight training at Peru, Ind. From there he was transferred to Pensacola, Fla., where he completed his training and on August 16 last he received his commission and wings of gold. Upon receipt of his commission, he was assigned to the Miami station. Dispatches from this station and from the Navy Department stated that Edward died instantly when his plane spun in and crashed in a practice landing on a carrier craft on the field landing strips. Surviving Ensign Doxsee, in addition to his parents, are one brother, Thomas Doxsee, his grandmothers, Mrs. Charles Hopkins, of Fayetteville, and Mrs. H. E. A. Doxsee, Sr., of Syracuse. Bearers at the funeral this afternoon will be James Hartley, Ph. M. 2/c, Reeves Baysinger, Oliver Gridley, Russell Chrisman, Stanley H. Hunt, of Fayetteville, and Aubrey Northrup, of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "...According to information received from Miami, Ensign Doxsee was alone in the ship at the time of the accident. He was taking operational training, prior to being sent for overseas service, and it is believed was on a routine training flight. A graduate of Fayetteville where he won letters in baseball, football and hockey, the ensign was in his first semester at Syracuse university when he enlisted in the naval air service in February, 1943. He studied at Colgate university and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and then entered primary training at Peru, Ind. He was commissioned Aug. 16 after advanced training at Pensacola, Fla., and received his pilot's wings and designation as a dive bomber pilot," The Post Standard 10/31/1944.

Doxtator, Geraldine. Fayetteville. "Miss Geraldine Doxtator, daughter of Mrs. Irving Doxtator of Salt Springs st., who enlisted in the WACs, recently, left Thursday for Camp Devens, Mass., where she will receive training. She enlisted for foreign service. Her co-workers at the Precision Castings Co. gave her a farewell party at Suburban Park last Thursday night and presented her with a fountain pen and pencil set, and a purse of money," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943. "One of several thousand American women to enlist in the armed forces this month, Auxiliary Geraldine M. Doxtator, has arrived at the Fourth WAC training center to begin her four weeks of basic training. Aux. Doxtator is the daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Doxtator of 235 Salt Springs street, Fayetteville. Following basic training, Aux. Doxtator will be assigned to a specialist's school or officer candidate school or to duty at an Army post. Now more than 60,000 strong, the Women's Army hopes to enroll an additional 90,000 by July 1 for active participation in this country's fight for freedom, here and overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. Auxiliary Geraldine Doxtator was home from Camp Devens over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "Pvt. Geraldine Doxtator, WAC, stationed at Ft. Stevens, Oregon, is passing the holidays with her mother, Mrs. Irving Doxtator, at the home of Miss Minnie Waters, 306 Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Fayetteville has five women serving their country...Geraldine Doxtator with the WACs," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...Geraldine Doxtator of Fayetteville served several months with the WACS, and was recently given a medical discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Drapikowski, Henry. Kirkville. "Selective service board 473 of East Syracuse sent 16 registrants into the armed forces last Monday...they are...Henry Drapikowski, Kirkville RD 1," The Post-Standard, 6/1/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Duane, John M. Minoa.. "Pfc. John M. Duane, Elm St., discharged Thursday from Fort Dix," The Post-Standard, 2/2/1946. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Duane, John, 113 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Dudley, John. Manlius. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Dudney, Victor Carlton. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Dudeney, of Newark, N.Y. were week-end guests of Mr. Dudeney's aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Willis Gage. Mr. Dudney has reenlisted in the U. S. Navy, having been one of the first in this vicinity to enlist in the World War. At the time of his first enlistment he was living at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Gage, and is well known in this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Signalman 1/c Carlton Dudney and wife spent Monday with their aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Willis Gage, at their home in Chapel st. Dudney has recently returned from Iceland, where he has spent several months, and is having a 20-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Chief Petty Officer Victor C. Dudney, U.S.N., home on leave, and Mrs. Dudney of Syracuse spent last Friday with their uncle and aunt..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. V. C. Dudney of Newark, N. Y., spent Friday with his aunt and uncle..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Duncan, Thomas. Fayetteville. Stationed with the 768th M. P. Bn. at Green Lake," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943.

Dunk, William C. Kirkville. "Sgt. William C. Dunk, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Dunk of Kirkville, has returned to Robins Field, Ga., after a 12-day furlo with his family at 116 Terry rd. Sgt. Dunk is an instructor at the army air forces medical training school. Mrs. Dunk is with her husband and is employed by the air service command at Robins Field," The Post-Standard, 3/28/1944.

Dunlay, Phillip. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "...Lt. Philip J. Dunlay, has been promoted to first lieutenant..." Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Captain Phil Dunlay, son of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Dunlay of this village (Manlius), was mentioned briefly in an overseas dispatch last Oct. 13, telling of the part men from the Syracuse area played in the history-making shelling of Aachen. Dunlay was with units of Gen. Courtney Hodge's First American Army when they laid down some of their heaviest shelling on the Nazi town. He was graduated from Cornell university in 1942 and had his first training at Fort Benning, Ga. Later he was stationed in Washington, D. C., with an Army Intelligence unit. A veteran of the fighting in Sicily, Dunlay is the winner of the Bronze Star for outstanding service. A recent letter received by his parents tells of his winning the Silver Star for gallantry in action. In the same letter he said he was 'fine' and everything was 'O.K.' ,"The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944.

Dunlay, Robert. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Lt. Robert W. Dunlay has been promoted to captain, according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Dunlay of Manlius. Capt. Dunlay is a graduate of Manlius high school and Syracuse university in 1941. His brother, Lt. Philip J. Dunlay, has been promoted to first lieutenant. He is a graduate of Manlius high school and Cornell university in 1942," Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Dunn, Dorothy. "Miss Dorothy Dunn, school nurse at Deposit, has resigned her position to join the Waves. Miss Dunn was a former member of the Manlius high school faculty. Her mother, Mrs. Dunn, who made her home with her daughter, died recently at Deposit," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944.

Dunt, Robert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Robert S. Dunt...members of Draft Board 473, were among the 24 Onondaga County young men who underwent final examinations Monday before being sent to Camp Upton, Long Island," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1941. "Private Robert Dunt of the 245th Coast Artillery, Fort Hancock, N. Y., spent the week-end at his home on the Syracuse road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1941. "Private Robert S. Dunt, son of Mrs. Maude Vowles, RD 1, Fayetteville, to the grade of Corporal, is announced by Battery E, 245th Coast Artillery, Ft. Hancock, N. J., according to word from the War Department Information office," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. "Corp. Robert Dunt of New Jersey had a thirty-hour leave last week and spent a few hours with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Vowles on the Syracuse road. On his return to camp he was transferred to Camp Pendleton in Virginia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/13/1942. "Corp. Robert Dunt has returned to his post in Pascalouga, Miss., after spending a furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Milan of Mississippi, announce the marriage of their daughter, Jacqueline, to T/Corp. Robert S. Dunt...The ceremony was performed August 13, at St. John's Episcopal Church in Pascagoula, Miss.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Honorably discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N. J....T/4 Robert S. Dunt, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1945. "Robert S. Dunt has been honorably discharged from the service, and is at his home in North Manlius street. He has been in the Army 58 months, 22 of which were spent in the Aleutian Islands," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Dykeman, Almerian. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "If many more local boys enlist in the United States Navy appeal should be made to Uncle Sam to at least name a battleship after the village or give the village an interest in the Navy. Three more local boys will soon don the blue sailor suit of the Navy....Al Dykeman, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Dykeman of Mill street, has 'joined up' and will leave Tuesday for Albany....Mr. and Mrs. William Hawkins, whose son, William Jr., went last week to the Great Lakes Base, entertained Tuesday night at their home in Thompson street at a farewell party for the three new 'sailors-to-be,' (Al Dykeman, James Kieley, Keene Sahm) " The Eagle Bulletin, 3/27/1941. "Several local boys who joined the Navy this year have been passing a ten-day furlough with their parents. Murray Ballou and Almerian Dykeman, home for the first time since their enlistment are passing their ten days with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Ballou, Sr., and Mr. and Mrs. Dykeman," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1941. "Mrs. George Dykeman and son James, of Mill Street, expect to leave Friday for Chicago, Ill., to spend a few days with Almerian Dykeman, who is stationed at Naval Reserve Armory and is attending aviation school there," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1941. "Almerian Dykeman of the U. S. Navy is passing a furlough at the home of his parents..., after spending the past several months in the South Pacific," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/12/1943. "James Dykeman is the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Dykeman of Mill street to enter the armed forces....the oldest son, Almerian, is with the Navy, having seen action in the Southern Pacific area. The Dykemans are believed to be the only family in Fayetteville who can display a four star service flag in their window," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman...have with them for a few weeks, their two sons, WT 2/c Almerian Dykeman, who has been on shipboard and is on 20-day leave; and S 1/c Martin Dykeman, who has been stationed at Key West, Fla., home for about 17 days. Almerian will go to Philadelphia, Pa. for advanced schooling at the expiration of his furlough...The Dykemans have two other sons in the service. James is with the U. S. Navy in the South Pacific, and Robert is with the A.A.F. stationed in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Mrs. Almerian Dykeman has joined her husband at Newport, R. I., where she will remain for several weeks. Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman accompanied her on the trip and visited their son over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Al Dykeman of Chickasha, Oklahoma, are proud parents of a baby boy, born Nov. 13. Mr. Dykeman is a son of Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman...Mrs. Dykeman was formerly Kay Richards of Oklahoma City. The baby has been named Gerald Allen," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/13/1946.

Dykeman, James G. Fayetteville. Accepted into the Navy, "The Post-Standard, 12/4/1943. "James Dykeman is the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Dykeman of 121 Mill street to enter the armed forces. Inducted last week, Jim will leave today for the reception center... Martin Dykeman was accepted in the Navy last month and is receiving basic training at Sampson Naval Base. Robert is serving with the Army, and the oldest son, Almerian, is with the Navy, having seen action in the Southern Pacific area. The Dykemans are believed to be the only family in Fayetteville who can display a four star service flag in their window," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "James Dykeman, seaman 2/c is on leave from Sampson Base, where he is taking his boot training. On his return he hopes to be assigned to sea duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "James Dykeman, fireman e/c, U.S.N., spent a few days with his parents, enroute from Boston to Virginia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include...James Dykeman..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman of Mill street have with them for a few weeks, their two sons, WT 2/c Almerian Dykeman, who has been on shipboard and is on 20-day leave; and S 1/c Martin Dykeman, who has been stationed at Key West, Fla., home for about 17 days...The Dykemans have two other sons in the service. James is with the U. S. Navy in the South Pacific, and Robert is with the A.A.F. stationed in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945.

Dykeman, Martin L. Fayetteville. "Martin L. Dykeman, son of Mr. and Mrs. George L. Dykeman, has enlisted in the U. S. Navy and left on Wednesday for the Naval induction center at Buffalo, N. Y. Martin joins his brother, Almerian, in serving Uncle Sam in the Naval forces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Letters From our Boys In Service / Hello Folks: How is everything in Fayetteville? Boy, I sure would like to receive the Eagle-Bulletin. I hear my brother is being inducted on December 3. He will probably be up here with me. I guess my mother will be the only four star mother in town, with four boys in the service. It must make a person feel proud to say that. I didn't like Navy life at first, but I do like it now. I suppose this is the same with everyone when they first go in. I hear quite a few of the boys are home. Just my luck when I am away. I hope the war will be over soon and we can all come home again, except those who met a brave death. It is quite cold here, but I probably won't be here long. Martin Dykeman, Co. 415, Unit F-8, Sampson Base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "James Dykeman is the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Dykeman of Mill street to enter the armed forces...Martin Dykeman was accepted in the Navy last month and is receiving basic training at Sampson Naval Base...The Dykemans are believed to be the only family in Fayetteville who can display a four star service flag in their window," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Martin L. Dykeman S 2/c, stationed at Sampson, N. Y., has completed his basic recruiting training and has been granted leave. Upon his return to Sampson, he will be eligible for further assignment which may qualify him for a petty officer rating," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "Martin Dykeman, U. S. N., is spending a ten-day leave with his parents...He is stationed at Key West, Florida," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include...Martin and James Dykeman..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman...have with them for a few weeks, their two sons, WT 2/c Almerian Dykeman, who has been on shipboard and is on 20-day leave; and S 1/c Martin Dykeman, who has been stationed at Key West, Fla., home for about 17 days...'Marty' will return to Key West. The Dykemans have two other sons in the service. James is with the U. S. Navy in the South Pacific, and Robert is with the A.A.F. stationed in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Morning Mail / Midway Islands. Dear Editor: Well I have not written you in quite a long time, so I figured I had better drop you a few lines to let you know how everything is going. We left Sasebo, Japan, on the 4th of April bound for Seattle, Wash. The first few nights out it was pretty rough and we ran into a fog, but everything seemed to go all right except for the fog horn which was blowing about every five minutes all night long, until about 3 o'clock in the morning. Then a few days later came some nice weather and we did not have much to do so we lay on deck in the day time and had sun baths. About the 12th of April we came about 15 feet from a mine which was first reported by the lookout as a box of groceries coming alongside. When they found out what it was, all gun crews were ordered to man their guns. Only one 20mm. worked as the rest of the guns were all greased up. They turned the ship around and fired at the mine but missed. After firing for about a half hour we were on our way again. The trip was really going nicely with no breakdowns, and we were making better time than we expected. Then on the sixteenth we really had our bad luck. The screwshaft broke and there we were adrift. We were about a hundred miles from Midway, so we radioed the base and told them we were broke down. About thirty-six hours later an ATA (sea going tug) came and towed us to Midway. We arrived here about the 20th and it looked to be a lot better place than I had expected it to be. We came into the inner harbor and tied up to a buoy. A couple of days later we were allowed to send a cablegram home for Easter. We had about 40 passengers on here and they sent a cablegram to the Red Cross in Pearl Harbor, the Time Magazine, Life Magazine, and also the commander of the Western Sea Frontier. They told them that they were passengers on this ship and that the ship was broken down and that they wanted to get home. So the next day they were on their way home by plane. I guess that is one way of getting something. I have been on liberty quite a few times now and I guess Midway is about the cleanest place I have ever seen in all my life. The men on the island have it pretty nice because those who are married have their wives here and they live in houses just like back home, only not as big. Sort of little bungalows like. The commodore of the base has a very nice house with a back lawn, etc. They have a bowling alley with about six alleys, a very nice movie theater, a ship's service where you can buy about anything you need. They also have a beach while is nice and sandy and the water is just right to swim in. They also have a picnic grounds, something like Green Lakes Park back home. We have about 50 guys in here with their points in and are awaiting transportation from here to the States. They will probably leave in a few days. If we stay here until the fifteenth or the twentieth, I will be on my way home. But, of course, we can't tell because there is a dry-dock coming here about the eighth of this month and whether it is coming here to repair us or not I don't know. But if we don't get repaired here we will probably get towed to Pearl and get repaired there. We have not had any mail since we left Sasebo but they say that some is coming from Pearl tomorrow or the next day. All of our mail is at Pearl. The water supply is not too good on the ship right now as we cannot get any water except that which we make, and that is not very much. They have no water barge here. So because of that we are limited to one shower a week, except the cooks and mess cooks. And that is where I am lucky because I am a mess cook and I hope I will stay on it as long as we are here. The other guys can go swimming about every day so that helps them out in keeping clean. But of course officers can have showers every day because they are considered better than we are. But, in my opinion, they are no better than I am. I don't know how things are back home but I probably will know when our mail gets here. One thing I am anxious to hear about is whether my brother Jim is home or not. I imagine he is by this time. At least I hope he is. Well, I guess this is about all for now. Bye for now and be good. As Ever, Martin L. Dykeman, S 1/c, U.S.S. Peter H. Burnett," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/17/1946. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Marty Dykeman...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Dykeman, Robert M. Formerly Fayetteville. "James Dykeman is the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Dykeman of Mill street to enter the armed forces...Robert is serving with the Army...The Dykemans are believed to be the only family in Fayetteville who can display a four star service flag in their window," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "A fighting crew member of the Army's powerful and best-known airplane is S/Sgt. Robert M. Dykeman, of East Syracuse, N. Y., who is completing his training here aboard a Flying Fortress and will soon head into combat with the rest of his ten-man crew. A graduate of the Army Air Force training schools, for the past several months he has been a member of the Second Air Force which trains heavy bombardment crews for aerial warfare. Husband of Mrs. Helen F. Dykeman of 203 Kinne St., East Syracuse, the sergeant is the radio operator aboard one of the army prize bombers. Already specialists in their jobs before entering the Second Air Force, pilots, radio operators, aerial engineers, gunners, navigators and bombardiers learn to work and fly together as a combat team. While at this Army Air Base, which is the farthest east in a chain of Second Air Force bases covering the West and Midwest, the flyer spends many hours in ground school and in the air with his 'teammates.' Each crew flies both night and day missions, practicing tactics, and studying the latest methods of precision bombing and fighting off intercepting planes under officers and men who have returned to this country after as many as 50 missions over enemy territory. Commanding officer of the Dyersburg Base is Colonel E. T. Kennedy, World War I pilot, who has been at this station since it was a huge West Tennessee cotton field a year ago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Navy men include...Robert Dykeman..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "T/Sgt. Robert M. Dykeman, of the Eighth Bomber Command, is enjoying a furlough with his wife, Mrs. Helen Dykeman, of East Syracuse, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman of Mill street, Fayetteville. Sgt. Dykeman has been overseas since October, 1943, and has completed 29 bombing missions over Europe. At the end of his furlough he will report for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944. "Laredo Army Air Field, Laredo, Texas--T/Sgt. Robert M. Dykeman...was graduated last week from the Army Air Forces Central Instructors School at Laredo Army Air Field, Laredo, Texas, a member of the AAF Training Command. He is now fully qualified to become an instructor at one of the nation's seven aerial gunnery schools. He was prepared for his instructing duties by completing a comprehensive six weeks' course in the most modern methods of instruction on aerial gunnery," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman...have with them for a few weeks, their two sons, WT 2/c Almerian Dykeman, who has been on shipboard and is on 20-day leave; and S 1/c Martin Dykeman, who has been stationed at Key West, Fla., home for about 17 days...The Dykemans have two other sons in the service. James is with the U. S. Navy in the South Pacific, and Robert is with the A.A.F. stationed in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Robert M. Dykeman, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Dykeman of Mill street, this village, was honorably discharged from the U. S. Army at Maxwell Field, Ala., last week and is now at home with his wife at East Syracuse. Robert was a member of the Eighth Air Force, serving as a gunner and radio operator on a B-17 fortress. He participated in 29 bombing missions over Germany and France. He holds the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Presidential Unit Citation and several oak leaf clusters. Since returning to the United States, he has served as an instructor in aerial gunnery at Yuma, Arizona, and Gyndall Field, Florida. Bob says it is great to be a civilian again and, best of all, to be home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945.

Earl, Alfred, Dr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Capt. C. A. Earl of 310 Highbridge street, now chief of the Orthopedic Section No. 3, station hospital, Fort Bragg, N. C. is on a detached service trip which made it possible for him to visit his home here and renew acquaintances. Dr. Earl was located here as a member of the department of surgery of the Aetna Life Insurance Co. About two years ago he joined the medical center at Jersey City in orthopedic surgery work. He was a reserve officer in the Army and last May went to camp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/13/1942.

Earl, Fred. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Frank Blackwell and Paul Farnham motored to Cape Cod last week-end to visit Private Fred Earl at Camp Edwards. The previous week-end Mr. and Mrs. A. Earl, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Earl and Miss Marjorie Earl visited their son and brother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1941. "Private Fred Earl of Camp Edward, Mass., was home for the holiday week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. A. Earl received a letter from their son, Fred Earl, who was expecting to leave the Pacific Coast in a few days," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Fred Earl, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Earl of High street, is at home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945.

Earl, Hubert Ray. Manlius. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Ebeling, George, Jr. Fayetteville. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Navy...George H. Ebeling, 104 N. Park st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "George Ebeling, Jr., who left last Friday to begin boot training in the Navy, is stationed at Sampson, N. Y. Prior to his departure Mr. Ebeling was feted at several parties. The officers of the County Volunteer Firemen and their wives gave a dinner, the Fayetteville firemen entertained at a party at the Rod and Gun Club, co-workers in the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., where Mr. Ebeling was employed also gave a party," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "George E. Ebeling, assessor for the Town of Manlius for 20 years, died Wednesday at his home in Walnut St...Surviving...are his wife, Mrs. Martha Simons Ebeling, two daughters, Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt and Mrs. James McDermott, one son, George Ebeling, S 2/c, stationed at Gulfport, Miss., four grandchildren, and a brother, F. H. Ebeling, Syracuse Merchant," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "George Ebeling, S 2/c, is home on leave, having been called here from Gulfport, Miss., by the death of his father, George E. Ebeling," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "....Another meeting which, no doubt, was equally enjoyed was that on Feb. 4, of George Ebeling, S 1/c, U.S.N., with George Schleich, M.M. l/c and Lisle Clark, M.M. l/c of the U.S. Seabees, on Leyte Island. According to the story, Ebeling came ashore on Leyte on Feb. 3 and asked about the battalion with which Schleich and Clark were serving, only to learn that they had left for Samar. In some way the message reached the two Seabees and they either walked, ran or swam back to Leyte where they met Ebeling for a half hour the next day. Whether Ebeling say his brother-in-law, Charles Moynihan, who is also serving in the same battalion with Clark and Schleich, has not been learned," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "From the Sampson navy separation center...QM 3/c George H. Ebeling, 502 Walnut st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/14/1945."George Ebeling was honorably discharged from the U. S. Navy Tuesday at Sampson naval Base after serving two and one half years. Mrs. Ebeling motored to Geneva to meet her husband and they arrived home late Tuesday night. George says he is going to enjoy being a civilian for a while," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. "George Ebeling, chief of the local fire department, was elected president of the Onondaga County volunteer Firemen's Association at the county meeting held at Minoa last Friday. Mr. Ebeling has been vice-president of the organization for two years, although inactive because of being in the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/19/1946.

Eddy, Allen M. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for Army service at the induction center Monday include...Allen M. Eddy...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Honorably discharged through the 1262d separation station, Ft. Dix, N.J...First Lt. Allan M. Eddy, 239 Salt Springs st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 10/5/1945.

Edlund, Bruce. Fayetteville. "Among graduates of the class of '43 from Fayetteville high school who have already gone into military training are Bruce Edlund, who...left last Thursday for Jefferson Barracks, Mo., where (he) will train as (an) air cadet..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "A card received at the Eagle-Bulletin office on Wednesday from Pfc. William Goodfellow, Scott Field, Ill., where he is being schooled in radio work, states that he made a trip to Jefferson Barracks last week and saw Bruce Edlund and Edward Paetow who entered the service about a month ago. According to Bill's card, Bruce and Eddie are going to aviation cadet school when they complete their basic training at Jefferson Barracks," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/23/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Carl Edlund have returned from Biloxi, Miss., where they spent Christmas and a few days with their son A/M Bruce Edlund, who is stationed with the Army Air Corps at Keesler Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945. "Pvt. Bruce Edlund has been transferred from Keesler Field, Miss., to Amarillo Field in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Amarillo Army Air Field, Amarillo, Texas--Pvt. Bruce A. Edlund, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Edlund of 305 Manlius street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has completed his course of studies as an Electrical Mechanic in this Army Air Forces Technical Training School and is rated an Electrical Specialist on a B-29 Super Fortress. His graduation from this technical school now fits him for electrical trouble-shooting while in flight. When qualified as a gunner he will become a crew member of a heavy bombardment organization. As a fully qualified crew member, gunner and electrical specialist he will help the Army Air Forces carry the war to the enemy's homelands. In addition to completion of the schedule of academic and practical studies as an aviation mechanic, he has been thoroughly drilled in military tactics and defense and a course of physical training that has conditioned him to meet all requirements of an American soldier," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "Cpl. Bruce Edlund, of Las Vegas, Nev., spent a few days last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Edlund in South Main street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. "Bruce Edlund has been honorably discharged from the army after serving 38 months. He received his discharge at Fort Dix last Friday and arrived home Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/19/1946.

Edlund, Paul. Formerly Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces...Leaving on Sunday for Atlantic City for training were...Paul Edlund..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Paul Edlund, a former resident of this village, has received his gunner's wings from Harlingen Gunnery School in Texas, and also received a medal for air firing. He is now stationed at Big Spring, Texas, for advanced training. Paul's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Birger Edlund, now reside in Lakewood, Ohio," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Lt. Paul Edlund, who has been spending a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Birger Edlund, in Cleveland, Ohio, and his father, have been spending a few days with the latter's brother, and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Edlund, and friends in Syracuse, after which Lt. Edlund left for Westover, Mass.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Friends here have received word of the safe arrival of Lt. Paul Edlund in Italy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Carl Edlund have received word that their nephew, Lt. Paul Edlund, was seriously injured when the plane on which he was a bombardier went down in the European theater on June 26. Lt. Edlund is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Birger Edlund of Lakewood, Ohio, and all are former residents of this village. Word came first to Fayetteville of Lt. Edlund's misfortune by way of a letter from William Lambert to friends in which he told of having visited Paul in a hospital in Italy. In the meantime, Carl Edlund had received a letter from his brother's family saying they had received a communication from Paul in which he stated that it had been necessary to amputate his left arm just below the elbow, and that he had suffered a serious leg injury. Lt. Edlund also told them that Jerry Stafford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stafford of Dewitt Park had aided in taking him from the wreckage of the plane. According to reports, Lt. Edlund, who has been overseas only about three months, had completed twelve successful missions. He visited relatives and friends here while stationed at Westover Field in Massachusetts, prior to going overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/14/1944. "Lt. Paul Edlund spent last week with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Edlund at their home in South Manlius street. Lt. Edlund, who was injured in action overseas, has been having treatment in hospitals in this country. After his visit here he went to Massachusetts to visit friends before returning to the hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "Paul Edlund, a student at Yale University, and a former resident of this village, was a recent guest of Joel Knapp at his home in Warren street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/13/1946.

Eible, Charles. Fayetteville. "When Pvt. Charles Eible of Peekskill, N. Y., stationed with the 768th M. P. Bn. at Green lake and Miss Eleanor Deitz also of Peekskill, made plans to get married they didn't let a little thing like being in the Army or having only a six-hour leave stand in their way. The bride-to-be, because she had a longer leave of absence, made the trip to Fayetteville to say 'I do.' Arrangements were made, and Rev. J. W. Woessner read the service which united the happy pair. The bride's sister who accompanied her here, and Pvt. Thomas Duncan, also stationed at Green Lake, attended the couple as bridesmaid and best man. Six hours after the 'knot' was tied Pvt. Eible was back in camp and Mrs. Eible was on her return to Peekskill. The bridegroom is waiting for the day when he can catch up with his belated honeymoon," scrapbook, n.d.

Eiler, Frank A. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Frank A. Eiler of Fayetteville entered the Army Administration school at Gainesville, Fla., on Oct. 26 as an officer candidate. Pvt. Eiler was formerly stationed at Camp Lee, Va. He is in the quartermaster corps," Post-Standard, 11/2/1942. "Pvt. Frank A. Eiler of Fayetteville has been graduated from the army administration school at University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., and commissioned a second lieutenant," The Post-Standard, 1/17/1943.

Elek, Benjamin. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Inductees from this village (Fayetteville) who left for the reception center at Fort Niagara last Friday were...Benjamin Elek," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942.

Eliason, E. J. Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Eliason and two children, John and Mary Jane, of Ballston Spa were guests in town over the week-end. Mrs. Eliason and children are expecting to come to Manlius on Friday for a three-months' residence during the time Capt. Eliason is in training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1940. "Capt. E. J. Eliason, who has been spending a brief furlough with his family in Smith street left Sunday night to return to duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/4/1941. "Capt. E. J. Eliason of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, is expecting to spend a week's furlough with Mrs. Eliason and their children...arriving today. Mr. and Mrs. Eliason and family expect to pass this week-end visiting friends at their former home in Ballston spa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/5/1941. "Mrs. Ada Wainwright Eliason has written this week from her home, at Fayetteville, N. C. Mrs. Eliason is teaching Bible in a colored pre-school and each Sunday teaches at the Post in one of the Chapels. Capt. Eliason and their children are enjoying good health," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Capt. E. J. Eliason, Mrs. Eliason and two children have been transferred from North Carolina to Seattle, Wash. In a letter written to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Wainwright last week, Mrs. Eliason described the trip as delightful," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "Mrs. Ada Eliason has written from Seattle, Wash., where Capt. Eliason and family are now stationed. She states she is leading a busy life, as superintendent of the Sunday school, taking a home nursing and Gray Ladies course, and gives one day each week sewing for the Red Cross. Their son, John, will graduate from grade school in June and expects to enter high school in September," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Word has been received here of the promotion of Captain E. J. Eliason...to the rank of major. John, son of Mr. and Mrs. Eliason, entered Puget Sound Naval Academy on June 14," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1843. "Mrs. E. J. Eliason has written...to her Manlius friends and states that Major Eliason is attending an officers transportation school in New Orleans. Their son, John, has completed his freshman year in high school and Mary Jane has finished a year of study at St. Nicholas Girls' school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Eliason and children...who have been making their home in Washington for several years, have arrived to spend the holiday and visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Wainwright. Mr. Eliason will return to his former position and will be located in Albany," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

?Elliott, Howard F. Manlius. "Morning Mail / Fort Barrancas, Florida. September 14, 1945. To the Editor: I understand that my subscription to The Eagle-Bulletin was a present, and it is to terminate with my release from the service. I hope to be separated from the service in a few days, in fact I will be. I wish to thank the ones responsible for making this present possible. It was always a pleasure to read the Suburban news. Wishing you success in post-war journalism. Howard F. Elliott, ASN r-1 213 972, Ft. Barrancas, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945.

Elliott, Michael M. Manlius. "Lieut. (jg) Michael M. Elliott, U.S.N., son of Maj. C. W. Elliott, former Manlius School instructor, was presented the bronze star medical by C. W. Nimitz, Fleet Admiral, for meritorious service in action as Plotting Officer in a U. S. submarine. His calm manner and accurate analysis of information disclosed by his equipment greatly assisted his commanding officer in conducting successful gun and torpedo attacks resulting in sinking more than 25,000 tons of enemy shipping. His conduct throughout was an inspiration to the officer and men and in keeping with the highest traditions of the U. S. Naval Service. Lieut. Elliott was born in Manlius in 1922 and attended Manlius high school through the first seven grades. He was graduated by The Manlius School in 1939 and by the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1943. After completing the course at the submarine school at New London, Con., he was sent to the South Pacific and assigned to a fleet submarine in which he has now made four war patrols," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "San Diego, Calif.--Mr. and Mrs. Charles Frederick Wilhelm of San Diego have announced the engagement of their daughter, Carolyn Isobel, to Lieut. (jg) Michael M. Elliott, U. S. N., son of Major and Mrs. Charles W. Elliott of San Diego, formerly of Manlius. Lieut. Elliott, who was born in Manlius and attended Manlius High School, was graduated at The Manlius School in 1939 and at the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, with the Class of 1944. He is a submarine officer and has been awarded both the Bronze Star and Silver Star for gallantry in action. He is at present Communications Officer of the submarine Queenfish, which has recently been ordered to Guam for station," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Emerick, Robert J. Manlius. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...Robert J. Emerick...from Manlius...in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Those accepted are...Army...Robert J. Emerick, 106 Franklin st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/17/1943. Honorably discharged...Pfc. Robert J. Emerick, 304 E. Seneca st., Manlius.

Emhoff, Ellsworth E. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Oran Honor Roll. "First Sgt. Ellsworth E. Emhoff has returned to his post at Camp Edwards, Mass., after spending three days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Emhoff of Manlius. Sgt. Emhoff, who enlisted two years ago last December, is with the second amphibian engineers command, headquarters company," The Post-Standard, 8/21/1942.

Enbody, David B. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Erb, Herman. Formerly Manlius. "Miss Clara Erb has written this week from Lakeland, Fla., where she is assistant secretary to the Dean of Women's College in that city. She writes that her mother and brother, Herman Erb, are with her. The brother received his honorable discharge from service on Thanksgiving Day. The Erb family were former residents of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Ernst, Walter. Manlius. Released from Ft. Dix...S/Sgt. Walter E. Ernst, 305 Pleasant st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 2/20/1946."S/Sgt. Walter Ernst, who has been stationed for two years in Europe, returned Monday morning to his home in Pleasant street, having received an honorable discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/22/1946.

Estabrook, Charles S., Jr.. Fayetteville. "Lt. and Mrs. Charles S. Estabrook returned home Sunday after a week's stay in New York City. Lt. Estabrook will report for duty with the USMC shortly after the first of the year," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/25/1942. "Mrs. Charles Estabrook has been spending a few days with her husband, Lt. Estabrook, in Washington, D. C. Lt. Estabrook is stationed in Quantico, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/26/1943. "Mrs. J. Evans Estabrook and son, John, have been visiting Lt. Estabrook at Quantico, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Mrs. Charles Estabrook, Jr., and children, Lee and Charles 3rd, have gone to Newport, R. I., to be with Lt. Estabrook, while he is stationed at that base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. George Ingalls entertained at dinner recently, having as their guests...Lt. and Mrs. Charles Estabrook, Jr...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Mrs. Charles Estabrook, Jr., has departed for San Diego, Calif., to meet her husband, Capt. Charles S. Estabrook, U. S. Marine Corps, who has returned from duty in the Pacific theater," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/17/1945.

Estabrook, Henry C. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). "Henry C. Estabrook, seaman 2/c of Ely dr., Fayetteville, completed boot training July 4 at Sampson and was granted leave," The Post-Standard 7/7/1944.

Estabrook, J. Evans. Fayetteville. "First Lt. J. E. Estabrook, U.S. marine corps, of Fayetteville, is on active duty at the marine corps officer training school, Quantico, Va., and recently qualified as pistol expert. Pistol expert is the highest pistol rating awarded by the marine corps," The Post-Standard, 1/14/1943. "Lt. Evans Estabrook has been passing a few days with his family at their home on the Syracuse Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/19/1943. "Mrs. Evans Estabrook spent a few days recently with her husband, Lt. Estabrook in New York City. Lt. Estabrook is stationed at Quoinset, R. I.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "J. Evans Estabrook, a Fayetteville man, and widely known figure in civic and war emergency organizations in Syracuse prior to his enlistment in service, has been promoted to the rank of captain in the Marine Corps. He is stationed at Cherry Point, N.C. A student pilot and first aid instructor in the Syracuse squadron of the civil air patrol before entering the Marine Corps, Capt. Estabrook is assigned to air force administrative duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Mrs. J. Evans Estabrook and children have left for Atlantic Beach, N. C. where they will make their home with Capt. Estabrook, who is stationed there," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Mrs. J. Evans Estabrook and children have returned to their home on the Syracuse Road from Cherry Point, N. C., where they have been residing since early in the Fall with Capt. Estabrook," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Between Japs in the air and rats on the ground, or rats in the air and -- sometimes Capt. J. Evans Estabrook, marine squadron intelligence officer somewhere in the Marianas, gets mixed up in his terminology. But rats or Japs, land or air, it's combat! Plagued by assaults of boldly foraging rats at his marine fighter base in the far Pacific islands, Capt. Estabrook, former news reporter and circulation director of The Post-Standard, offered to pay a dollar bounty for every rat eliminated, according to news received here from a marine corps combat correspondent. Marine fighter pilots of the squadron, flying hazardous missions over the Marianas, took him up. In fact, they went one better. Pestered by flies swarming over their camp area, they established a ratio of 10 flies as worth one rat, and offered to pay the captain 10 cents per annihilated insect. So far, Capt. Estabrook is one dollar down," The Post-Standard, 10/1/1944. "Marine Capt. J. Evans Estabrook of Fayetteville got 'back in the groove' when he launched a spiced version of the radio news at the opening of his squadron's new outdoor movie somewhere in the Marianas. Former reporter and later circulation director of The Post-Standard, the captain calls his program The Word: night fighter newspaper of the air, and his squadron mates get a kick out of his broadcasts. Chatty and informative, the program includes a humorous narration of the latest doings of Terry and the Pirates, popular Post-Standard comic strip. 'I get my dope for this from The Post-Standard comic section,' he reports. 'The strip is generally a month old when I see it, but the boys look forward to it all the same.' Commentator Estabrook originated the idea to fill in time between his duties as senior ground officer and chief censor for his night fighter squadron, among the first to land on the captured island and begin operations on the former Jap airfield. 'I like to keep busy,' he said. 'It helps time pass faster.' The boys describe his voice as 'a cross between President Roosevelt's and Gabriel Heatter's.' pilots waiting in the ready room for their turn on night patrol jokingly refer to Capt. Estabrook as The Word. They look to him for reading material and invariably he hands them the latest copy of The Post-Standard," The Post-Standard, 10/29/1944. "Capt. John Evans Estabrook of the U.S.M.C.R. returned last week from the Pacific area and is at his home on Knollwood Road with his wife and three children, John, Jr., Ann and Joan. Captain Estabrook went overseas in April, 1944, and served as staff officer of the First Marine Night Fighter Group on Guam since the invasion of that island in July, 1944. He saw action in New Hebrides, Kwajalein and Eniwetok. He was known to thousands of Leathernecks as their 'poet laureate' because of the many, many poems he wrote about them. At the end of each day he would sit down and write his 'thoughts for the day' verse. Formerly circulation manager for the Syracuse Post-Standard, Capt. Estabrook entered the Marine Corps in 1942. He attended Fayetteville high school, Derkshire Prep School and graduate from Cornell university in 1932," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "John Evans Estabrook...has joined General Electric's news bureau in Schenectady. Estabrook was formerly a circulation executive of The Post-Standard. He was recently discharged from the marine corps after having served for three years as a staff officer with an aviation unit. While in Syracuse Estabrook was active in numerous civic affairs. He is a past president of the junior chamber of commerce and was awarded the chamber's distinguished service medal in 1938. He also was a director of Syracuse YMCA and a member of the Onondaga Historical association and the Onondaga Health association," The Post-Standard, 1/3/1946.

Estabrook, William Sears, Jr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "William S. Estabrook, Jr., son of William S. Estabrook of the Syracuse Road is one of the nine lieutenants in the United States Navy from Central New York which were recently promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander. The announcement was made by the Navy that President Roosevelt had approved the recommendations of a selection board for the promotion of 463 officers of which young Estabrook was one. He was a graduate of the Naval academy at Annapolis," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/14/1941. "William S. Estabrook, Jr., son of William S. Estabrook of the Syracuse Road is one of the nine lieutenants in the United States Navy from Central New York which were recently promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander. The announcement was made by the Navy that President Roosevelt had approved the recommendations of a selection board for the promotion of 463 officers of which young Estabrook was one. He was a graduate of the Naval academy at Annapolis," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/14/1941. "Lt. Commander William Estabrook, of the U. S. Navy, visited his father William S. Estabrook during this week and also called at Fayetteville high school and on old friends in the village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "For heroism in action against the Japanese at Saipan, Commander William Sears Estabrook, Jr., U. S. Navy, of this village (Fayetteville) has been awarded the Bronze Star Medal, it was announced today by Third Naval District Headquarters. The citation accompany the award was signed for the President by Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal and reads as follows: For heroic achievements as Commanding Officer of a Close-in Fire Support Ship in action against enemy Japanese forces at Saipan Island on June 14-15, 1944. Operating under difficult navigational conditions and in the face of repeated heavy enemy gunfire, Commander Estabrook skillfully maneuvered his ship through dangerous waters and effectively directed accurate, concentrated fire against hostile shore batteries, contributing essentially to the success of our forces in the accomplishment of a vital mission. An expert seaman and brilliant leader, Commander Estabrook was a constant inspiration to the men under his command and his gallant fighting spirit throughout the fierce action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service." Commander Estabrook, who was born in Fayetteville on May 10, 1908, was graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1930. His father, William Sears Estabrook, also resides in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944.

Estay, F. Clark. Manlius. "Iwo Jima (Delayed).--F. Clark Estay, motor machinist's mate, 2/c, of Manlius, N. Y., is a member of the 31st Naval Construction Battalion on this island. The 31st came ashore with the Marines on Feb. 19 when Iwo was invaded and has been here ever since. In 19 days this Seabee unit constructed a two-lane highway with no greater grade than 10 per cent to the top of Mt. Suribachi, something the Japanese Imperial Engineers tried to do for 10 years. A Jap major called the construction 'the road that couldn't be built,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/28/1945.

Evans, J. Paul. Formerly Fayetteville. "J. Paul Evans of Washington, D. C., who has been stationed at the aviation cadet board in the federal building, received his commission yesterday as a first lieutenant. He came here May 12 from New York city to take up his present duties of recorder and will remain until July 15 when he expects to be transferred. Lt. Evans is the son of Mrs. A. Ward Evans of Washington, who is a former resident of Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 7/9/1942. "Lt. and Mrs. Paul Evans are visiting Mrs. Evans' parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Estabrook, Sr., having come from Ft. Benning, Ga.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943.

Everingham, Clinton. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Everingham, Donald Millard. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Mrs. Clinton Everingham and sons, Raymond and Laurence, of Honolulu, have arrived at the California coast, where they will spend a month with Mr. Everingham, U. S. Navy. Later Mrs. Everingham and sons will visit their aunt, Mrs. Ella Fisher, in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Millard Everingham received a letter this week from their son, Donald Everingham, now stationed in Oran, Africa. Mr. Everingham writes that at present he is doing night ward-duty. He is with the 48th Surgical Hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Donald Everingham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Millard Everingham, of Smith street, has been awarded the Purple Heart for bravery under fire. He was wounded in action. Commando Everingham enlisted in the Medical division, but transferred while in Africa. He has recovered from his injuries and will return to duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "After more than two and a half years overseas--most of it spent with the rugged First Ranger battalion--Donald M. Everingham, Manlius artist, is home, honorably discharged. And his immediate project is a book of prints, originals for which were made in the combat theaters. Not pictures of 'pretty-faced soldiers eating their C rations with relish,' he emphasizes, but, rather, the kind of GIs he saw. 'After you've seen a bit of service, the pretty pictures make you a little weary,' Everingham says. That 'bit of service' includes scrambling ashore in the original November, 1942, landing in North Africa and the Ranger invasions in Sicily and Italy, and, later, at Marseille, France. It includes, too, an incident, in North Africa, where the medical unit with which he was serving wasn't battle-experienced enough to black out its tent hospital perfectly; and a sniper drew a bead on a group crowded about an operating table and shot the patient. In there also was a period of 20 isolated days atop a mountain north of Salerno, after the Rangers had swept ashore and beyond the four miles, only to find themselves cut off without a supply line; fortunately, there were sheep there to kill to add to the slim 'iron rations.' And then the Manlius GI recalls Artena in Italy. That was after the Anzio landing, when the Ranger battalion was wiped out as a unit, a fate Everingham didn't share because he had been hospitalized for the first of two wounds he was to suffer in action. But at Artena, he was part of the now famous First Special Service Force, the initial Yank-Canadian outfit trained as paratroopers, ski and mountain troops, but utilized primarily as ground forces to spearhead attack. Though the Allied troops were entrenched on high ground with the Nazis below, the Germany heavy artillery was picking off the United Nations forces with bloody success. Everingham's unit, in which he was a corporal, had established a first aid station in a sewer. 'But it was a clean sewer,' he says. 'At that, tho, there wasn't much else to use and the Jerries' heavy stuff was raking away at everything that stuck up. Then they hit a water main uptown and an avalanche of a flood struck us. There wasn't anything to do but move the casualties, and most of them bad. So we went thru pretty tough fire to get them into a building that somehow stayed up.' For a part in the 20-day stand near Salerno, Everingham shared with his fellows in a presidential citation. In addition, he has earned a purple heart ribbon and an African theater bar with three campaign stars. The three years of service included training in the Southwest and duty in Iceland and the British Isles, adding more travel to a peace-time itinerary that had included a trip to Mexico and New Mexico a few years back. That artist's journey, part of which was reported in stories sent to The Post-Standard came after Everingham's graduation from Syracuse university's College of Fine Arts in 1937. The war-book project already has a beginning. Some 25 pen-and-ink drawings and watercolors were sent home from Italy and Sicily. The final batch of published work, he hopes, will run to 80 prints," The Post-Standard, 12/24/1944. "Millard Everingham, whose paintings appear in the current Harwood Foundation exhibition, has recently held a one-man show at the Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco, another at Syracuse University and one of his oil paintings of one of his neighbors at Ranchos de Taos has been added to the permanent collection of the Dallas, Texas Museum. Meantime Mr. Everingham is far from the field of art, but storing up impressions and making sketches for work in the future, as a member of a U. S. Army medical corps detachment in service in North Africa. From San Francisco comes a comment from Dr. Termayne MacAgy, acting director of the San Francisco Gallery, stating that the exhibition was one of the best one-man shows that we have ever had in this building, and everyone, young and old, conventional and modern, enjoyed it very much. Mr. Everingham does not deal in the spacious New Mexico of Peter Hurd or the romantic Indian world of the Taos and Santa Fe groups. It is said he divides his time between a ghost town called Pents Altos, the mining camp of Mogollon and Taos. Anyhow, what seems to fascinate him most is the shacks in the hills, the unpainted houses, the corrugated iron garages and the dusty mine buildings. These he presents through a crystal clear atmosphere in cool but rich color, in spacious sizable compositions. As Henry Rust, of the legion staff, remarked, 'He is master of straight honest-to-goodness drawing, he knows his craft, and he knows what he is about, but one of his major virtues is his refusal to go slick and tricky," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1945. "Donald Everingham of Mexico is passing a month visiting his parents Mr. and Mrs. Millard Everingham and other relatives and friends," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/11/1946.

Everly, William, Dr. Manlius. "Dr. Wm. P. Everly and wife have returned to Manlius after spending some time in Dansville, where he was associated with Dr. W. C. Buck in veterinary work. Dr. Everly is a graduate of the N. Y. State Veterinary College, and has been affiliated with E. R. Squibb & Sons, New Brunswick, New Jersey," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Dr. William P. Everly, veterinarian, who has been practicing in Manlius for the past several months, has received a commission of lieutenant in the U.S. Veterinarian Corps, and will leave Sunday for Brooklyn to begin active duty. Mrs. Everly will accompany her husband to Brooklyn," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. William Everly have returned to Boston, Mass., after spending several days in town, visiting relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "Officers of the medical department graduated from the medical field service school, Carlisle Barracks, Pa., today will be...First Lt. William P. Everly, veterinary corps, of Manlius, who received his DVM degree from Cornell university," The Post-Standard, 12/2/1943. "Mrs. William Everly is spending the summer with her parents Mr. and Mrs. John MacCrystal, in Academy street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Dr. William Everly and family came to Manlius to spend the holidays with their parents and other relatives and friends. Dr. Everly has returned to Oklahoma and will soon leave for his new station in California. Mrs. Everly and son, William, will join her husband later," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946.

Fairbank, Edwin A. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Member of an anti-aircraft battery in Italy, Pvt. Edwin A. Fairbank, 21, was killed in action Feb. 21, the War Department has informed his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Fairbank, of 111 Jamesville Rd. Dewitt. Pvt. Fairbank, overseas a year this month, had taken part in the North African invasion, landing at Casablanca, and in the Italian mainland invasion, landing at Salerno. From his last letter his parents believed he was stationed on the Anzio beachhead when he was killed. Pvt. Fairbank, native of Dewitt, was graduated from Fayetteville High School in 1940 and trained as an electrician at Apprentice Training School. Before entering service 17 months ago he was employed by the New York Telephone Company and had worked on telephone installations at Pine Camp and the Rome Air Base. The soldier was a member of the Order of DeMolay, and a parishioner of Dewitt Community Church. He served as a Herald-Journal carrier boy for five years," The Herald-Journal, 3/17/1944. "Killed in action in Italy, Pvt.. Edwin A. Fairbank...will be honored at a memorial service in the Dewitt community Church...His parents have received the Order of the Purple Heart, awarded to Pvt. Fairbank posthumously," The Post-Standard, 4/28/1944. (Town of Dewitt).

Falso, Gene. Manlius. "Gene Falso, who was recently inducted into the U. S. Navy has left for Albany," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/17/1943.

Farley, Charles. Fayetteville/Manlius. "Pvt. Charles M. Farley, son of Mrs. Dorothy Farley of Random Acres, Brickyard Falls Rd., was graduated from aerial photography school at Lowry Field, Col., on May 15, according to announcement from the Army Air Force Technical Training Command. Pvt. Farley was inducted into the Army, January 7 of this year and went to Lowry Field for training Feb. 20. He attended Manlius High School where he was active in football and baseball activities, and prior to induction in the army in January he was a draftsman at the Precision Castings Co. in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Charles Farley..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Eighth Air Force Bomber Station, England.--One man from Manlius and two from the Syracuse area climaxed a year of service D-day with the ground crew of the Eighth Air Force. Those contributing to the success of their B-17 Flying Fortress group which has flown nearly 200 bombing attacks against vital Nazi objectives stretching from the French coast to Romania include Corp. Charles M. Farley, 21, photographer, Random Acres, Manlius...Corp. Farley...had been a photographer for the U. S. engineering office at Oneida," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944. "An Eighth Air Force Bomber Station, England--Courage and high achievement displayed during major Eighth Air Force bombing attacks on vital German installations have won the Air Medal for Sergeant Charles M. Farley, 22-year old aerial photographer with the veteran 390th Bombardment Group, and the son of Mrs. Dorothy S. Farley, of Random Acres, Manlius, N. Y. Many aerial photographs taken by Sgt. Farley five miles above Germany, and showing B-17 Flying Fortresses in action have won prominence in release to the press. On Christmas Eve, the New York flyer, veteran of two years of service with the Eighth Air Force, braved savage enemy flack to photograph aerial action against transportation lines supplying Von Rundstedt's drive into Belgium. A graduate of Fayetteville high school in 1940, Sgt. Farley was formerly employed by the Precision Die Casting Company, Fayetteville. Previously he attended school in Oneida. Sgt. Farley's group has been cited by the President and shares in another distinguished unit citation for aiding in the Third Air Division's epic shuttle attack on Messerschmitt factories at Regensburg, Germany. The group holds a war record for the destruction of enemy aircraft by a lone group in a single engagement, having shot down 63 German fighters over Munster, Germany, on Oct. 10, 1943," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Sergeant Charles M. Farley...has arrived home for a 30-day furlough. Sgt. Farley has been stationed in England with the Eighth Air Force for two years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/20/1945. "Miss Pauline N. Angel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Angel, of Syracuse, formerly of Oneida, became the bride of Sergeant Charles M. Farley, U. S. Army, son of the late Charles Farley and Mrs. Farley, of Manlius, on Saturday afternoon in St. Paul's Evangelical Church...After a trip to the Adirondack Mountains, Sergeant and Mrs. Farley will spend the remainder of his 30-day furlough at Oneida Lake," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945.

Farley, Donald. Fayetteville/Manlius. Name appears on both the Fayetteville Honor Roll and Manlius Honor Roll. "Mrs. Dorothy Farley of Brickyard Falls Road and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Charles Stark of Manlius Center left Wednesday to visit Mrs. Farley's son, Donald, who is stationed at the Airport in Jacksonville, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Announcement has been made that Donald H. Farley...has been promoted to Sergeant in the Marine Corps. Sgt. Farley is flight captain in HQ, SQ, Flight Section, marine Fleet, West Coast, San Diego, Calif. He attended Fayetteville and Manlius High Schools, and has been in the Marine Corps since December 9, 1941. "Sgt. Donald Farley of the U. S. Army has returned to his base on the West Coast after spending a 15-day furlough with his mother...Sgt. Farley enlisted 20 months ago, and this was the first furlough that he has had at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Donald Farley is a marine bombardier..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "T/Sgt. Donald H. Farley of the Fourth Marine Airway in the South Pacific is at home on a 30-day leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "T/Sgt. Donald H. Farley, A.S.M.C., has just returned from the South Pacific and is spending a 30-day overseas leave with his wife and his mother...at Random Acres," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Farley, Leighton P. Manlius. "2nd Lieutenant Leighton P. Harvey, Mrs. Harvey and their two daughters, Hope and Diana, have been visiting his parents, Rev. and Mrs. E. L. Harvey at the home of Mrs. Dorothy Farley, Random Acres. Lt. Harvey has recently returned from active duty in France, Belgium and Germany," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/20/1945.

Farr, Herbert E. Manlius. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow...Army...Herbert E. Farr, 411 E. Seneca St., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944.

Fausold, William. Manlius "Robert Andrews, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Andrews of the Manlius-Cazenovia rd., has written his parents from Japan. He was expecting a visit from Billy Fausold, who was soon to return to the States, having completed his time in service..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/4/1946.

Fellows, George. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "George C. Fellows, seaman, second class, son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond S. Fellows, 215 East Seneca Street, Manlius, has completed his basic training at Sampson, and passed a furlough with his parents before reporting to the yeoman school at Newport, R.I.," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Alfred (Bullard) went overseas in February and while in Europe he met two Manlius boys, George Fellows and Louis Albanese," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944. "Anna Jane Volles "met her tragic death last Sunday morning when an automobile in which she was a passenger skidded in the highway in East Genesee street, crossed the road, went over the curb, struck two trees and crashed into a telephone...Other passengers in the car involved in the accident were Ph. M. James Hartley of Center street...and George Fellows, U.S.N....Both young men, stationed at Sampson, were home on leave...Fellows, who suffered numerous lacerations, has been taken to Sampson Naval Hospital from the University hospital, and Hartley was to have been removed there on Thursday. Hartley was said to have suffered forehead and cheek lacerations, a fractured skull and chest injuries...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "A $4,000 settlement on the death of Ann Jane Volles in an accident last July was approved by Surrogate Milford, Monday, The petition was made by Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Volles, parents of Ann Jane. The action was against two members of the motor party, Ph. M. James Hartley and S/1c George Fellows of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/28/1945.

Ferguson, Arnold A. Manlius. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday...Those inducted from Manlius were A. A. Ferguson...for the Navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Seaman Arnold Ferguson of Sampson, is home for a 14-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Arnold Ferguson, electrician's mate 3/c, husband of Mrs. Ruth Ferguson of 111 Seneca st., Manlius, is serving in the Pacific. In the navy since January, 1944, he trained in sound motion picture and electrician schools before going overseas. He has a son, James, three years old," The Post-Standard, 1/24/1945.

Ferguson, Donald. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Donald F. Ferguson of 204 Pleasant st., Manlius, has completed the intensive 13-week course for officer candidates at the quartermaster school, Camp Lee, Va., and has been commissioned a second lieutenant in the army," The Post-Standard, 7/23/1943. "Several Manlius men who are in the armed service are at home on a brief leave, among them are...Donald Ferguson..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943.

Ferguson, Emerson W. Formerly Manlius. "Funeral services for Mrs. Elizabeth Ferguson Welch of Rome...the former Betty Ferguson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Ferguson of Pleasant street...surviving are her husband, Emerson Welch...her parents...and five sisters; and one brother, now in the service, stationed in Wyoming," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942.

Ferguson, Kenneth G. Manlius. "Board 473, East Syracuse, sent 19 into the army...Kenneth G. Ferguson, 603 Pleasant st., Manlius..." The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945.

Ferguson, Paul B. Manlius. Inducted into the service, Paul B. Ferguson, 118 Mill st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 5/9/1941.

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Ferris, Richard A. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Richard A. Ferris...of Fayetteville...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Corp. Richard Ferris, stationed in Florida, has been spending a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Ferris," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Funeral services for Robert W. Ferris, 34, of Skaneateles, were held at 2 p. m. Tuesday afternoon at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ferris on North Manlius street, and at 3 o'clock at the Onondaga Valley Presbyterian Church...Besides his parents, he is survived by his wife, Mrs. Philomena Ferris; one daughter, Bonnie Glee Ferris; two sisters, Miss Marjorie Ferris and Mrs. Charles French, both of Fayetteville, and one brother, Pvt. Richard A. Ferris, A.U.S., stationed at Geneva, Neb., army air base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ferris of North Manlius street, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Cahill left Wednesday for Tacoma Park, Md. to attend the wedding of their son and brother, Richard Ferris, to Miss Lois Ferris on July 26th in Tacoma Park Presbyterian Church. George Bacel of this village (Fayetteville) will be best man," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/26/1946.

Ferris, Robert C. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Robert C. Ferris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ferris of the Manlius Center road, is in Brooks General hospital in Fort Sam Houston, Texas, according to word received by his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 101/3/1944. "N. Luzon, P. I.--Pvt. Robert C. Ferris, son of Mr. Louis Ferris of Fayetteville, N. Y., has been assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion of the 32nd (Red Arrow) Division's crack 126th Infantry. Pvt. Ferris entered the Army in July, 1944, and went overseas in April, 1945. He is now fighting with the veteran 'Red Arrow' Division in northern Luzon among the mile-high ridges of the Garaballo Mountains," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945.

Ferstler, Edward J. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "S/Sgt. Edward J. Ferstler, 36, of Kirkville RD 1...are among a group of infantrymen, who have seen action in North Africa, and are now in England helping train troops," The Post-Standard, 3/20/1944.

Fiesinger, Howard. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara: Clarence McIntyre, Otto Paul Kling, Charles Sweet, Warren George Meyer, Clarence Blackman and Howard Fiesinger from Fayetteville; Chase Brandt and Henry Templer from Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942.

Fischer, Katherine. Fayetteville. "Miss Katherine Fischer of the Woodchuck Hill Road is chairman of the Sigma Pi Rho party to be held at the Hotel Dewitt in Jamesville On Nov. 19. Miss Fischer is an apprentice seaman in the WAVES and leaves soon for Hunter College for boot training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943.

Fisher, Melvin. Fayetteville. "Melvin Fisher has been honorably discharged from the U. S. Army, and is at home with his family in Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 101//1943.

Fitzenberger, John L. Fayetteville. Arrival aboard D. W. Barch en route to Seattle from Alaska,...S/Sgt. John L. Fitzenberger, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 2/12/1946.

Fleegel, Carl. W., Jr. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Fleegel, Carl W., Jr., 205 Central Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Fleegel, Earl. Minoa. "The following registrants with their order numbers in selective service district 473, comprising the towns of Dewitt, Manlius and Salina, will be inducted into the army today: ...Earl W. Fleegel, 228 East ave., Minoa..." The Post Standard, 3/19/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private Vincent Hullar and Private Earl Fleigle of Pine Camp (Watertown) spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Private Vincent Hullar and Private Earl Fleigle of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Private Earl Fleigle and Private Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Pvt. Vincent Hullar and Earl Fleigle of Pine Camp visited relatives here over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1942. "Pvt. Vincent Hullar and Pvt. Earl Fleigle of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigle and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Private Earl Fleigel of Pine Camp spent the week-end visiting friends and relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine spent the week-end visiting relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel of Pine Camp spent the week-end with his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel, Pvt. Vincent Hullar and Pvt. Harold Pollard of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel of Pine Camp visited relatives over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigle has returned to California after spending a furlough with relatives," The Eagle Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "Corp. Earl W. Fleegel...has plunged into the intricacies of how to operate and maintain a radio set in rumbling dust-clouded tanks and half-tracks as he has started his training in the armored force school communication department at Fort Knox, Ky. 'Armoraiders' in a 14-week course undergo such varied training as learning how to transmit code from inside a bouncing tank with a sending key strapped to the leg," The Post-Standard, 2/2/1943. "Sgt. Earl W. Fleegel, son of Mrs. Anna Fleegel...was promoted to sergeant in Germany. He is a member of a reconnaissance unit of an armored corps. Entering the army three years ago, he has been overseas 17 months. Sgt. Fleegel was a railroad brakeman before joining the army," The Post-Standard, 3/3/1945. Honorably discharged Sgt. Earl W. Fleechel (sic), 217 Elm st., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 10/23/1945."Mr. and Mrs. George Gale, Jr., and family were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Fleigel in Minoa at dinner Thanksgiving Day. The gathering was in honor of Mrs. Gale's brother, Earl Fleigel, who has recently been discharged from the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Fleegel, Earl, 217 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Fleming, John W. Fayetteville. "Sgt. John W. Fleming, who served two years with the Signal Corps in the European theater has received his honorable discharge, and is at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Fleming, 109 East Genesee st. Lt. Malcolm H. Fleming, a navigator in the air corps, who has been serving in the Marianas, expects to be released from service about Jan. 15. He is also visiting his parents at present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Fleming, Malcolm H. Fayetteville. "Sgt. John W. Fleming, who served two years with the Signal Corps in the European theater has received his honorable discharge, and is at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Fleming, 109 East Genesee st. Lt. Malcolm H. Fleming, a navigator in the air corps, who has been serving in the Marianas, expects to be released from service about Jan. 15. He is also visiting his parents at present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Fletcher, Edward J. Kirkville. "Pvt. Edward Fletcher of Kirkville, who enlisted in the air corps last September, is now stationed at Gulfport Field, Miss., where he is attending a technical school for aviation mechanics. His father, Jerome Fletcher, lives in Minoa," The Post-Standard, 10/31/1942. "The following named officers and enlisted men were discharged at Fort Dix Wednesday...S/Sgt. Edward J. Fletcher, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 12/28/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Floyd, Thomas G. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll

Foote, Richard J. Manlius. "Aboard the U. S. S. Alabama in the Pacific.--Richard J. Foote, S 1/c USNR, son of Mr. and Mrs. German B. Foote, Manlius, N.Y., is serving aboard this battleship which in one month's time raided the Japanese mainland twice, bombarded a Jap-held island north of Okinawa and rode unscathed through a violent typhoon. Edward Gage, E.M. 1/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Willis M. Gage of 121 Chapel street, Fayetteville, is also a member of the Alabama's crew. One of the raids against the Nip homeland was uneventful, but during the other operation the 'Mighty A,' as the man-o-war is known to her crewmen, ran into a hornet's nest of Jap suicide pilots. Scores of the Kamikaze planes were shot down outside the task force formation, but at least four came in close enough to be splashed by the guns of this and other ships. The Alabama gunners claim credit for downing two of these planes and for assisting in destroying another. One Kamikaze, a 'Zeke'-type fighter, flew through the clouds of ack-ack before singling out this ship as his target, but as he turned to make his death run his plane was hit and crashed flaming, a scant 300 yards away. During her bombardment assignment, the Alabama turned loose her 5- and 16-inch guns to pulverize Jap shore installations. The typhoon the battleship experienced pounded the 35,000-ton vessel for hours, causing her to pitch and toss heavily, but she (incomplete)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945. "Among the reported 19 men from Onondaga County who were present at the signing of the surrender in Tokyo Bay were two local men, Edward Gage, E. M. 1/c son of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Gage of Chapel street, and Richard J. Foote, S 1/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Foote, of Manlius, who are serving aboard the battleship U.S.S. Alabama, had a distant view of the ceremonies. The Alabama was one of the five ships which escorted the U.S.S. Missouri aboard which the official documents were signed ending the Pacific war," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Ford, Franklin. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Franklin Ford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ford of Mycenae has returned to Fort Benning, Georgia, after spending a week's furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1941. "Pvt. F. C. Franklin F. Ford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Ford of Mycenae underwent an operation at Fort Ontario, Feb. 17, for hernia. Mr. and Mrs. Ford visited their son last Sunday and found him to be improving. Ford was at Fort Ontario training for Military Police," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1942.

Foringer, Richard. Fayetteville. "Other 17-year-olds sworn in Monday who will finish school before reporting for boot training are...Richard K. Foringer of 117 Walnut st., Fayetteville, as apprentice seamen..." The Post-Standard, 5/10/1944. "Fireman 1/c Richard Foringer, U.S.N., is spending a short leave with his parents, Mr. an Mrs. R. L. Foringer, on Walnut street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Fout, James R., Jr. Formerly Manlius. "S/Sgt. James R. Fout, Jr., a former resident of Manlius has recently returned from Iceland. He has been in the Army 2 1/2 years, joining after his graduation from Nottingham high school. He is in the signal corps and spent the last 16 months in Iceland. He will attend officers training school at Fort Riley, Kans.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1843. "Mrs. J. R. Fout and daughter-in-law, Mrs. J. R. Fout, Jr., of Waring road have returned from Columbus, S. C., where they spent 10 days visiting Lt. Fout, Jr., stationed there. The Fouts were former Manlius residents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944.

Fowler, Wesley Emery, Jr. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Wesley Fowler, Jr., who has been studying for the past three months at Syracuse University in preparation for Naval reserve pilot, left Wednesday night for New York for examinations, expecting to be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. or Texas. Wesley has made several solo flights over Manlius during the past month. He is a graduate of Manlius high school..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Naval Aviation Cadet...Wesley Emery Fowler, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Wesley E. Fowler of 149 West Seneca Street, Manlius, (has) been transferred to the Naval Air Training Center at Corpus Christi, Texas, after successful completion of the primary flight training course at the Naval Air Station at Glenview, Ill. After passing the advanced flight training course at Corpus Christi, Cadet...Fowler will pin on (his) wings as naval aviator and will be commissioned as ensign in the Naval Reserve or as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps Reserve...he began (his) aviation career at the Navy's pre-flight school at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C.," The Post-Standard, 10/22/1943. "Wesley Emery Fowler, Jr. ...was graduated last Wednesday from the naval air training center at Corpus Christi, Tex., and was commissioned an ensign in the naval reserve," The Post-Standard, 5/16/1944. "Olathe, Kans.--Ensign Wesley E. Fowler, Jr...has been released from Naval Air Transport Service Squadron 3, under the Navy demobilization program. Mr. Fowler entered active duty in the navy in November, 1942. After receiving his wings at Corpus Christi, Texas, he was assigned to duty with Air Rescue Squadron 3 and later to Air Evacuation Sqd. 2, which operated from the Marianas Island to Palau and Iwo Jima. Flying Douglas transports, the squadron evacuated wounded from Iwo, setting new marks by flying them to rear area hospitals within hours after they had been hit. Mr. Fowler has been awarded the Navy Letter of Commendation, and wears the American theatre, Asiatic-Pacific with two combat stars, and Victory medal ribbons. He plans to re-enter Syracuse University, where he was enrolled before entering the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Fox, Clinton. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Fox, Fordyce M. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Fordyce Fox, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fox, 156 Washington Street, Manlius, has returned to Camp Lee, Va., after a 10-day furlough. He plays the cornet in the band there, and is assistant conductor. His father was Sgt. Ralph Fox, who served overseas in World War I, and was a cornet player in a cavalry band," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Pvt. Fordyce M. Fox...has returned to duty at Camp Lee, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Pfc. Fordyce M. Fox has returned to Camp Lee, Va., after spending a 14-day leave with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Pfc. Fordyce Fox spent a three-day leave with his parents...returning to his base at Camp Lee, Va., The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Pfc. Fordyce Fox, who has been at home on furlough, returned Wednesday to Camp Lee, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/14/1944. "Corp. Fordyce Fox, of Camp Lee, Va., has been passing a 5-day furlough with his parents...Miss Marie Fry, of Jamestown, was a guest of Corp. Fox during his furlough in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fox had as their guests last week, their son and daughter-in-law, Sgt. and Mrs. F. M. Fox of Camp Lee, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945. "Fordyce Fox...will be graduated this month from the Music department of Fredonia Normal School. Mr. Fox has accepted a position as director of instrumental music in Mayville Centralized School, and Mrs. Fox will teach instrumental music at Chautauqua high school. They will make their home in Mayville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/7/1946.

Fox, Gilbert G. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Fox, Thomas. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Freidell, Goodard William. Manlius. Manlius Honor Roll. "Indiantown Gap, Pa.--Goodard W. Freidell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Freidell of R. D. 2, Manlius, N. Y., has been promoted to Technical Sergeant at the Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pa. Sgt. Freidell was inducted June, 1942. He was previously stationed at Camp Reynolds, Pa.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/18/1945.

French, Arthur. Fayetteville. "Archie E. French, son of Mr. and Mrs. William French of Highbridge, has been accepted for military service in the U. S. Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/25/1942. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Arthur French..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Lewis J. French, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. William French of Highbridge, died Sunday night in the Crouse-Irving Hospital after a two weeks' illness of double pneumonia. A native of Highbridge, he had lived there all his life. Surviving besides his parents are three sisters, Mrs. Lewis Spratt of Canastota, N. Y., Mrs. Leonard Hotaling of Fayetteville and Mrs. Chester Brand of East Syracuse; four brothers, Charles and Robert of Fayetteville, Donald of the U. S. Marines and Archie of the U. S. Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "...Archie French, is stationed at Orlando, Fla., with the Army Medical Dept.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. William French of the Highbridge road are fortunate in having two sons who are serving Uncle Sam at home on furlough at the same time. Sgt. Donald French of the Marine Corps who has served in three major engagements in the Pacific is on leave after two and a half years overseas. Pvt. Archie French serving with the ground crew at Orlando Field, Fla., has been in the service since December, 1942, stationed the entire time in Florida. He attended Fayetteville high school and was employed by S. Cheney & Son at Manlius before going into service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944.

French, Charles I. Fayetteville. "Charles I. French, aviation machinist's mate 2/C, whose wife and two children live at Fayetteville, is serving with utility squadron seven in the Hawaiian islands, where he awaits a transfer to the United States for his discharge under the navy's point system. Before entering the navy, he was a machine operator for Nestle's Chocolate Co.," The Post-Standard, 10/25/1945.

French, Donald. Fayetteville. Name appears on both the Fayetteville Honor Roll and Manlius Honor Roll. "Mr. and Mrs. William French of Fayetteville have been notified of the safe arrival on foreign shores of their son, PFC Donald L. French who enlisted in the USMC last January. After training at Parris Island and New River, he was sent to the west coast for six weeks of training," The Post Standard, 8/9/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. William French have received word from their son, Donald, who is with the armed forces somewhere in the South Pacific area, that he has been promoted from corporal to the rank of sergeant. Sgt. French enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps on January 16, 1942..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. William French of the Highbridge road are fortunate in having two sons who are serving Uncle Sam at home on furlough at the same time. Sgt. Donald French of the marine corps who has served in three major engagements in the Pacific is on leave after two and a half years overseas. Pvt. Archie French serving with the ground crew at Orlando Field, Fla., has been in the service since December, 1942, stationed the entire time in Florida. He attended Fayetteville high school and was employed by S. Cheney & Son at Manlius before going into service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "Sgt. Donald French of Camp Le Jeune, North Carolina, has been spending a short furlough with his parents...Sgt. French returned to the States last August after serving over two years in the Southwest Pacific with the Marine Corps. and took part in 15 battles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "Sgt. Donald L. French...who was attached to the hard-hitting first division of Marines, was a pleasant caller at the Eagle-Bulletin this week. He just received his honorable discharge at the distribution center, Camp Le Jeune, North Carolina. Sgt. French said his toughest experience in the Pacific war was at Guadalcanal, where his outfit was in contact with the Japs for four months without any relief, they were under constant fire from the enemy artillery. The sergeant was rather proud of his new uniform 'civies,' and he hopes to go to work at the Precision Castings Co. plant and enjoy life as just a plain American once more," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Donald French...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Frenz, Robert C. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll.

Frenzel, Charles, Jr. Manlius (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on both the Manlius Honor Roll and Oran Honor Roll.

Frost, Earl Spencer. Fayetteville. "Inducted, Syracuse Board 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Corp. Earl Frost, stationed in California has been spending his furlough with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Corp. Earl Frost of Westmoreland, Calif., is passing a two-week leave with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "Corp. Earl Frost, who has been stationed in California, is spending a fortnight with is mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "Robert Fietta, Cpl. Earl Frost and Mrs. Helen Sheridan motored to Ithaca Tuesday and visited Mr. Fietta's daughter, Miss Mary Fietta, at the Reconstruction hospital (polio)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "Mrs. Earl Frost has received word from her son Cpl. East Frost that he is confined to a hospital in southern Germany undergoing treatment for a knee injury," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "Cpl. Earl Frost is spending a few days with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945. "Pawling, N.Y.--T/5 Earl Frost of 206 Genesee street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been assigned to the AAF Convalescent Hospital here for treatment and rest, following his return from three months of duty in the European theater of operation. While at this hospital, which is one of several operated by the AAF personnel Distribution Command, he will participate in the physical training and vocational activities conducted by the convalescent services division. T/5 Frost, who served with the 9th Air Force, is the son of Mrs. Alice Frost, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945.

Fryer, Kenneth. Formerly Manlius. "Kenneth Fryer, a graduate of Syracuse University and music teacher at Old Forge high school, has resigned his position to enter the service, joining the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943.

Fulmer, David F. Fayetteville. "Aviation Cadet David F. Fulmer, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Fulmer of Highbridge street, was commissioned a second lieutenant at graduation exercises of the AAF Technical Training Command School at Yale University on Monday. Rated as a technical officer in Aircraft Maintenance Engineering, he is now prepared to assume duties with tactical units of the Army Air Forces, according to Col. Charles T. Arnett, commanding officer. Lt. Fulmer graduated from Manlius high school in 1937 and from Clarkson College of Technology in 1942, where he majored in chemical engineering. He entered the Army and was appointed a cadet on Nov. 23, 1942, at Valley Forge, Pa. and began his course at Yale January 9th of this year," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943. "Lt. David Fulmer, home on furlough from Texas, is visiting his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "A wedding of interest to local people is that of Miss Josephine T. Shay, daughter of Mrs. Winifred Shay, of Malone, N. Y. and Lt. David F. Fulmer, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Fulmer of Highbridge street, this village. The ceremony was performed by Lt.-Col. Edward Burns, Post Chaplain at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas, at 10 o'clock a.m. Aug. 3....The bridegroom was graduated from Manlius High school and was a senior at Clarkson College when he joined the air corps in 1942. For the present, the newlyweds are living at 206 Arciniega street, San Antonio, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. David Fulmer have returned to their home in Dayton, Ohio, after spending a ten-day leave with his parents...Lt. Fulmer is stationed at Wright Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "David L. Fulmer, 26, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Fulmer, 214 Highbridge st., Fayetteville, has been promoted to first lieutenant at Wright Field, O., where he is stationed with the ATSC. Lt. Fulmer is an alumnus of Clarkson College of Technology, Potsdam and the husband of the former Josephine Shay of Malone. They reside at 936 Manhattan ave., Dayton, O.," The Post-Standard, 2/28/1945. "Wright Field, O.--Promotion of David F. Fulmer, 26...to first lieutenant was announced here today by Brig.-Gen. Orval R. Cook, chief of Procurement Division, Air Technical Service Command. Lieut. Fulmer is assigned to the training and transport branch in the Procurement Division's production section. An alumnus of Clarkson College of Technology, Potsdam, N. Y., Lieut. Fulmer was appointed an aviation cadet upon entering the service in November, 1942. Commissioned a second lieutenant after graduating from the AAF technical school at Yale University in June, 1943, he was stationed at Kelly Field, Texas, as an engineering officer prior to his Wright Field assignment in September, 1944. Lieut. Fulmer and his wife, the former Josephine Shay, of Malone, N. Y., reside at 936 Manhattan Ave., Dayton, O., The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "A son was born Dec. 23 to Mrs. David Fulmer at Malone, N.Y. Lt. David Fulmer, stationed at Victorville Field, Calif., made a short visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Fulmer, enroute to Malone to visit his wife and new son. The baby has been named William," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Fulton, Douglas Aubrey. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include: William H. Goodfellow, Jr., Seldon Eugene Tubbs, Leonard George Seamans, Chester Leonard Smith, Frederick Kreis, Francis Randall Woessner, Douglas Aubrey Fulton, Carlyle Bruce Doupe, Robert Joseph Brown and Clarence Murgittroyd. Arthur Smith has been accepted in the Navy and Trooper Edward Kappaser enlisted with the Marines...Carlyle Doupe is the third son of Charles Doupe of 112 North Burdick street, to enter the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943.