WORLD WAR II HONOR ROLL

Town of Manlius and Adjacent Postal Areas

Part II of III

Submitted by Kathy Crowell

Gabrielson, William, Jr. Fayetteville. "Names of thirty-nine 17-year-old navy recruits were announced yesterday by CMB Royal H. Sanders, retiring as head of navy recruiting for Central New York district...William Gabrielson, Jr., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 7/15/1945.

Gaffney, Mason C. Formerly Manlius. "First Lt. Mason C. Gaffney, 47, a native of Manlius, died yesterday of a heart attack while waiting to purchase a railroad ticket in Rochester, where he was attached to the Rochester ordnance district, the AP reported. He was the son of Rev. Matthew Gaffney, pastor of Trinity Presbyterian church in Manlius about 40 years ago, and Mrs. Gaffney. The family left there when he was a young boy, according to residents. Lt. Gaffney served with the navy in world war 1," The Post-Standard, 5/9/1944.

Gage, Clarence. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included...Sgt. Clarence Gage...of Fayetteville...all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Gage, Roland. Fayetteville. "Roland Gage son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Gage, has been accepted as an air flight cadet for reserve training. Young Gage will finish high school in January and expects to be called for basic training after his 18th birthday, which is in March," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "William Goebel, Jr., and Roland Gage left Wednesday morning for the reception center, both youths enlisted in the reserves some months ago to be called after their 18th birthdays," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Pvt. William Goebel and Pvt. Roland Gage, who are receiving basic training at Keesler Field, Miss., have passed their tests and are now qualified candidates for air corps school, according to word received by their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "At the annual commencement exercises held in the (Fayetteville) high school auditorium Tuesday evening...William Goebel and Roland Gage, who are trainees at Bainbridge Air Base in Georgia were present to accept their diplomas and were given a big welcome. John Ragus, Benjamin Proper and Edward Hunt, members of the class who are also serving the armed services were unable to be present, and their diplomas were accepted by their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "A/T Roland Gage and A/T William Goebel, who are training at Bainbridge, Ga., were home this week to receive their diplomas at the Commencement exercises Tuesday night, having completed their work in January. The boys who entered service in April, are visiting their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "Mrs. Clarence Gage left Wednesday afternoon for Bainbridge, Ga., to visit her son A/T Roland Gage, who is training with the Army Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/10/1944. "A/T Roland Gage, who has been stationed at Sebring Field, Fla., is passing a 15-day leave with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/16/1945. "Cpl. Roland Gage, stationed at Sebring Field, Florida, is passing 15 days with his parents...at their home on South Park street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Gage, Willis Edward. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Willis E. Gage of 121 Chapel st., Fayetteville, left Albany yesterday for training at Newport, R. I., having enlisted in the navy here Wednesday...he had been employed as a linotype operator in the composing room of The Post-Standard since 1934. He was graduated from Fayetteville high school in 1927," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1942. "W. Edward Gage...who recently enlisted in the Navy left last Thursday morning for Albany from where he was sent to Newport, R.I., for training. Mr. Gage, a former employee of the Manlius Publishing Co., has been with the Syracuse Post Standard for the past several years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Now home on a seven-day leave after graduating from the navy's basic training school at Newport, R. I., W. E. Gage...is awaiting assignment to parts unknown. A printer at The Syracuse Post-Standard eight years, Gage enlisted six weeks ago. Hs father is also employed by The Post-Standard as a reporter. Gage describes his training as 'real rugged, but good.' It is largely composed of drilling, physical education, and seamanship courses, he said. His leave will end Thursday, when he must report back to Newport," The Post-Standard, 8/10/1942. "Edward Gage, who has been training at the U. S. Naval base at Newport, R.I., has been spending a few days furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1942. "Willis E. Gage, EM 2-c, is home on a five-day leave visiting his parents...Gage, who enlisted in the navy July 2, 1942, has been several months of overseas duty. He received basic training at Newport, R.I.," The Post-Standard 8/13/1943. "Apprentice Seaman Willis Gage...is stationed at the naval training base at Newport, R.I. After completing his basic training at Newport, Seaman Gage was granted a seven-day leave to visit his parents. Upon returning to his base, he entered the navy electrical school for advanced training..." The Post-Standard, 8/23/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Willis Gage have received word that their son, Edward, has entered a naval electrical school at Newport, R. I., and has been promoted to seaman second class," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Willis Gage...have received word that their son, Edward, has graduated from the Navy Electrical School at Newport, R. I. and has been sent to Norfolk, Va. to await further orders. Edward now ranks as Electrician Mate 3rd class," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1943. "W. Edward Gage, Electricians Mate 2/c, U. S. N., left this morning after passing a few days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 81/3/1943. "Edward Gage, Electrician's Mate f/c, arrived home Tuesday to spend a ten-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "With service totaling 25 months on the high seas on a battleship, both in the Atlantic and Southwest Pacific, Willis E. Gage, electrician's mate 1/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Gage, 121 Chapel st., Fayetteville, is home on leave decorated with three overseas ribbons, with battle stars for seven major battles of the Pacific. There could be quite a story on where he was during those 18 months in the Pacific in which he earned a silver star, for five battles, and two bronze stars. However, Gage, former employee of The Post-Standard 10 years, has been too many answers to the five Ws of newspaper writing pass thru his linotype machine. His orders say not to talk to the press--and he's not talking, even 'off the record.' 'It was all in the papers,' he said. 'I was in seven major battles. That's all.' he did admit that his ship reached the Pacific after the battle of the Solomons and that the Philippines battle had started before they left the scene of action. On the innocuous topic of food, he explained that sailors didn't have to dream of ice-cream as on the ship there was a 'gedunk' stand (ice-cream bar) with a couple of flavors available each day. Gage entered service June 1, 1942. After basic training at Newport, R. I., he entered electrician's school there. On completion of that course he was assigned to a battleship on Atlantic duty. His leave home will end Feb. 9. And the publicity-shy sailor won't say where he will be going," The Post-Standard, 1/21/1945. "Aboard the U. S. S. Alabama in the Pacific.--Richard J. Foote, S 1/c USNR, son of Mr. and Mrs. German B. Foote, Manlius, N.Y., is serving aboard this battleship which in one month's time raided the Japanese mainland twice, bombarded a Jap-held island north of Okinawa and rode unscathed through a violent typhoon. Edward Gage, E.M. 1/c...is also a member of the Alabama's crew. One of the raids against the Nip homeland was uneventful, but during the other operation the 'Mighty A,' as the man-o-war is known to her crewmen, ran into a hornet's nest of Jap suicide pilots. Scores of the Kamikaze planes were shot down outside the task force formation, but at least four came in close enough to be splashed by the guns of this and other ships. The Alabama gunners claim credit for downing two of these planes and for assisting in destroying another. One Kamikaze, a Zeke-type fighter, flew through the clouds of ack-ack before singling out this ship as his target, but as he turned to make his death run his plane was hit and crashed flaming, a scant 300 yards away. During her bombardment assignment, the Alabama turned loose her 5- and 16-inch guns to pulverize Jap shore installations. The typhoon the battleship experienced pounded the 35,000-ton vessel for hours, causing her to pitch and toss heavily, but she (incomplete)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945. "Among the reported 19 men from Onondaga County who were present at the signing of the surrender in Tokyo Bay were two local men, Edward Gage, E. M. 1/c...and Richard J. Foote, S 1/c...who are serving aboard the battleship U.S.S. Alabama, had a distant view of the ceremonies. The Alabama was one of the five ships which escorted the U.S.S. Missouri aboard which the official documents were signed ending the Pacific war," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Gallagher, Richard A. Formerly Fayetteville. "Sgt. Gallagher was killed in France July 6, according to information received by his wife, Mrs. Vera Gallagher, of Cleveland, O. A native of Fayetteville, Sgt. Gallagher was...employed at the Precision plant until he moved to Cleveland eight years ago. A letter received by his wife, who is a former Syracuse girl, on July 4 stated that he had landed with the D-Day invasion forces and at that time was in Cherbourg. The letter also said he had come through 'without a scratch,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944.

Galson, Edgar. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Shrivenham, England--More than 4,000 soldier-students from all 48 States are enrolled for the second term at Shrivenham American University, including Technician Fifth Grade Edgar L. Galson of 16 Kittell Blvd. Route 1, Fayetteville, N.Y. Three hundred and 69 courses in eight academic departments are offered at SAU, a GI school operated by the Army's Information and Education division. The mission is to provide courses of college and university grade for troops awaiting return to the U. S. The faculty, picked from American universities and Army ranks, totals 130 civilian educators and 100 officers and enlisted men. T/5 Galson, 19, is a member of the 36th Field Artillery group and has been overseas ten months. He is a former student at Cornell University. At SAU, which he describes as 'a great opportunity,' he is taking calculus, anthropology and philosophy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/21/1945.

Gary, Leonard. Minoa. "Pvt. Leonard Gary, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Gary, Syracuse RD 1, Minoa, is stationed at Truax Field, Wis., attending radio and gunnery school in the air corps. He entered service in May, 1944, and is a graduate of Minoa high school. He received basic air force training at Shepard Field, Tex.," The Post-Standard, 9/26/1944.

Gaudio, Leonard A. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Leonard A. Gaudio...of Manlius...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Leonard A. Gaudio has returned to camp after spending a ten-day furlough at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Gaudio, Sr. A lawn party was given at his home in his honor, also a dinner Thursday evening at the Rod & Gun Club, and a farewell party was held at the club house Saturday evening. Pvt. Gaudio has won four medals for high score with rifle and machine gun. He has been transferred to special headquarters of Chemical Warfare at Camp Bowie, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Leonard Gaudio, Jr., has been promoted from the rank of private to corporal, according to word received by his parents...Corp. Gaudio entered the service Nov. 2, 1942 and is stationed at Camp Bowie, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Mrs. Ida M. Gaudio, 55, died Nov. 28 at the People's hospital in Syracuse. Mrs. Gaudio suffered a stroke at her home in West Seneca street several weeks ago and was later taken to the hospital. Surviving are her husband Leonard Gaudio, three daughters, Mrs. Lois Colocci, Mrs. Morris Tridenti, and Mrs. Frank Giocondo; four sons, Raymond and Chester Phelps, Corp. Leonard Gaudio and Anthony Gaudio; 10 grandchildren and one great-grandchild," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "Mrs. Myrtle Wilcox, of 601 E. Seneca Street, announces the engagement of her daughter, Miss Leona Alice Wilcox to Leonard Gaudio, Jr., son of Mr. Leonard Gaudio, of Manlius. Mr. Gaudio, Jr., ...a graduate of Manlius high school, is employed at S. Cheney & Sons, Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/13/1946.

German, John G. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "The front page of a Dec. 17 Post-Standard returned to Syracuse from Australia last week, after it had been read and autographed by 19 soldiers from the Syracuse area. The men, who have been together since their induction in November, 1942, enclosed the page in a letter written Feb. 5 (1944). They are members of a gas supply company in Australia...Signed...John German, Manlius...." The Post-Standard, Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Gerthoffer, Herman. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. George Fabing, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hullar and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hullar spent a few days last week visiting Pvt. Herman Gerthoffer at Fort Wayne, Ind.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Pvt. Herman Gerthoffer of Fort Wayne, Ind., visited his parents over the weekend," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Herman Gerthoffer of Fort Wayne, Ind. visited his parents over the holiday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Gerthoffer, Herman J., 129 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Gerthoffer, Robert L. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll;.

Getman, William. Manlius. Manlius Honor Roll. "William Getman has enlisted for service and Mrs. Getman will make her home with relatives for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942.

Getson, Charles. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Gibides, James. Minoa. "Pvt. James Gibides, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Gibides of Minoa, is in England. He enlisted in the infantry a year ago and trained at Camp Wheeler, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 5/21/1944.

Gilbert, John. Manlius. "John Gilbert is home from Burma where he served 22 months after having been in Panama for 4 years. He is making his home with Mrs. J. Kean," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945.

Gittleman, Theodore K. Fayetteville. "The following naval personnel have been discharged at the separation center at Sampson...Theodore K. Gittleman, MM 3/c, 105 W. Genesee st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/21/1945.

Glazier, Francis C. Manlius. "Following physical examinations Tuesday, four local men were accepted for army service. Inductees under new regulations are now permitted to choose between immediate entrance into service or following a two-week leave. The inductees are...Francis C. Glazier...of Manlius," The Eagle Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Several Manlius men who are in the armed service are at home on a brief leave, among them are Frances Glasier..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "T/5 Francis Glazier has returned to Santa Fe, New Mexico, after spending a furlough with his wife and son here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "Mrs. F. Glazier and son Harry and Miss Marion Cuykendall left Wednesday to spend some time with Sergeant Glazier at Santa Fe, New Mexico," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945.

Goebel, William, Jr. Fayetteville. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors...William Goebel, Jr., of Highbridge street, Fayetteville, enlisted last week in the air corps reserve. He will be 18 in March and is subject to call after graduation from high school in June," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Sixteen 17-year-old volunteers from Syracuse and vicinity, just sworn into the Air Corps Reserve by the Army Aviation Cadet Examining Board are sporting silver wings today. They were sworn in yesterday and will be called to training upon reaching their 18th birthdays. Those sworn in were...John F. Ragus and William C. Goebell, Fayetteville..." Vail scrapbook, n.d. "William Goebel, Jr., and Roland Gage left Wednesday morning for the reception center, both youth enlisted in the reserves some months ago to be called after their 18th birthdays," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Pvt. William Goebel and Pvt. Roland Gage, who are receiving basic training at Keesler Field, Miss., have passed their tests and are now qualified candidates for air corps school, according to word received by their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "At the annual commencement exercises held in the (Fayetteville) high school auditorium Tuesday evening...William Goebel and Roland Gage, who are trainees at Bainbridge Air Base in Georgia were present to accept their diplomas and were given a big welcome. John Ragus, Benjamin Proper and Edward Hunt, members of the class who are also serving the armed services were unable to be present, and their diplomas were accepted by their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. A/T Roland Gage and A/T William Goebel, who are training at Bainbridge, Ga., were home this week to receive their diplomas at the Commencement exercises Tuesday night, having completed their work in January. The boys who entered service in April, are visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Gage and Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Goebel," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945.

Goldman, Oliver. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Gondeck, Herbert. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Goode, John D., Jr. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "John D. Goode, Jr., Lyndon Road, Fayetteville, was included among 150 aviation cadets who graduate this week from the Naval Flight Preparatory School at Colgate University. The NFPS work was the first phase of Goode's training as a Navy flier. He will remain at Colgate for the War Training Service course, in which he will be given his first flight instructions. Goode is a 1942 graduate of Fayetteville High School, and attended Hamilton College before joining the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "John Dennis Goode, Jr., 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Dennis Goode of Lyndon rd., Fayetteville, was commissioned an ensign in the naval reserve and designated a naval aviator at the naval air training base, Pensacola, Fla.," The Post-Standard, 5/6/1945.

Goodelle, Lorena M. Kirkville. "Miss Doris J. Doxsee, daughter of Mrs. Shada Doxsee of West Genesee street, Fayetteville, and Miss Lorena M. Goodelle of Kirkville were among the 46 nurses who left Syracuse last week for Fort Monmouth, N. J., for Army medical service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...Lorena M. Goodelle, Kirkville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Goodelle, Vernon Lee. Kirkville. "Five men from Syracuse and vicinity have completed basic training at the naval training station at Sampson and been granted leaves of absence...Vernon Lee Goodell, son of Mrs. Kenneth Goodell, Kirkville RD 1," The Post-Standard, 7/15/1943. "Vernon L. Goodell, seaman 2-c, who has been transferred to the Brooklyn navy yard from the Sampson naval training station, spent a two-day leave with his wife, Mrs. Wilma Goodell of Collamer," The Post-Standard, 8/4/1943.

Goodfellow, Fred, Jr. Fayetteville. "Fred Goodfellow, Jr., S 2/c, who recently completed his boot training, has returned to Sampson Naval Base for assignment after passing a week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Goodfellow, Sr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945.

"S 1/c Freddie Goodfellow, stationed at Pensacola, Fla., is passing an eight day furlough with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Fred Goodfellow of Burdick street. Freddie is with the dispensary unit of the Medical Corps in the U. S. Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Freddie Goodfellow...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Goodfellow, George. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Men enlisted here yesterday are as follows: Marines. George Goodfellow, 306 Walnut st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/17/1941. "Among the hundreds who are flocking to the recruiting station in Syracuse to join the nation's fighting forces since the attack on the United States by Japan and declaration of war by the Axis powers are many from the towns of Manlius and DeWitt. Enlisting from Fayetteville are...George Goodfellow, Marines..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. "Pfc. George Goodfellow, of the U. S. Marines, stationed at Parris Island, is passing a few days with his mother, Mrs. Carl Goodfellow, of Walnut street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "It is a small world after all. Two Fayetteville boys who entered the service a year ago and went their different ways met one day not so long ago on the Solomon Islands. George Goodfellow, son of Carl Goodfellow, and George (Pete) Bacel, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Bacel, enlisted December 8, 1941, and were assigned to different branches of service. Pfc. Goodfellow has seen service with the fleet marines doing coast guard and convoy duty, and is now in Guadalcanal. Pfc. Bacel is with the land combat and communication division and likewise was sent to Guadalcanal where they met. It was a happy moment for both boys. Goodfellow and Bacel have been lifelong friends and before entering the service had spent many hours hunting and fishing together. And so, according to the story, after preliminary greetings and salutations, their conversation immediately turned to fishing. However, they did not report whether they had any opportunities to fish in the blue Pacific for anything other than Japs," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Letters From Our Boys in Service / Fayetteville Service Committee: I received your check, and I want to thank you and all that had part in the service committee. I have read in clippings what a swell job you are all doing back home for us boys over here, and I know in return we fellows are trying to do our part for the people back home. I know if we all pull together we can soon win this war and be back home again. You people are giving all you can, and even go without, just to help us over here and we sure do appreciate it. If there is anything I can do while I am over here, let me know and I'll do it if it is in my power. So say hello to everybody, and I'll be looking forward to a word from you. Your friend, George Goodfellow," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "The navy was right on the beam,' Pvt. George E. Goodfellow, UWMC, an eyewitness to the epic battle offshore at Guadalcanal that began Nov. 15 and lasted the better part of two days, said yesterday. The Japanese fleet escorting troopships suffered heavy losses, and its remnants fled. He is visiting his mother, Mrs. Carl Goodfellow, 306 Walnut st., Fayetteville on a 30-day furlough and enters ordnance school at New River, N. C., Sept. 16. The marine outfit with which Pvt. Goodfellow served at Guadalcanal was one of the first that landed on that island Aug. 7, 1942, and he went thru several months of the toughest of the fighting to help clear the island of Japs. Several shrapnel wounds in battle put him in a hospital in the New Hebrides three months, and he afterwards served in New Zealand and Australia before returning to the United States. The Guadalcanal story has been told so many times already by marines who have come back to the states that it seems an old one now,' Pvt. Goodfellow said, but the fact still remains it was some of the toughest fighting in our history. Everyone who served there went through plenty of hardships in helping towards a hard-earned victory," The Goodfellow scrapbook, n.d. "Pfc. George Goodfellow, son of Mrs. Marie Goodfellow of Walnut street, arrived home last Saturday from the South Pacific and Guadalcanal, where he had spent the past 15 months. George told a representative of the Eagle-Bulletin that he could only say that he was mighty glad to be back. When questioned further, he modestly reported that he was laid up for three months with a shrapnel wound, and in answer to inquiries about his general health, he stated that he had been quite ill with malaria. After a thirty day leave, he expects to be assigned to some school for further training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Cpl. George Goodfellow, stationed at Dover, N. J., is spending the week with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945.

Goodfellow, John Colton. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Jack Goodfellow, employed at the Fayetteville post office, has ...joined the service and expects to be a flying cadet," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Merton Phillips entertained at a family dinner on Tuesday night in honor of the second birthday of their daughter, Virginia, and also Lt. John C. Goodfellow, Mrs. Phillip's brother, home on a furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "Lt. John C. Goodfellow of the U. S. Army Air Corps left Wednesday night by plane for Salt Lake City, Utah, after spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow at their home on Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "Lt. John C. Goodfellow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd C. Goodfellow of Fayetteville, has received his wings as a pilot in the army air corps from the southeast training center in Sumter, S.C. He is attending the aviation school of medicine at Randolph field, Tex. Then he expects to go to the four engine school at Casper, Wyo.," Post-Standard, 12/7/1942. "Two more local boys, serving Uncle Sam, have met by chance in foreign lands. They are Lt. John C. Goodfellow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow, and John Crimmins, both of the Army Air Corps. Information of this meeting was received by Mrs. Goodfellow in a letter from her son. Lt. Goodfellow is a pilot and Crimmins is a radio operator on a bomber, and were in North Africa at the time of their meeting. Lt. Goodfellow states that he is still traveling, destination unknown," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Letters From Our Boys in Service / Another letter received here by the parents of one of fighting men in Africa tells of enjoying ice cream and cake at a Red Cross station in that warring area. / From Jack Goodfellow, to His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow, Fayetteville. Dear Family: Believe it or not, I just had some ice cream, cake and some good cookies. I am at a Red Cross station, which runs our officers' club over here, and they furnish the sweets for us. It is the first sign of the Red Cross, beside the small office that they have at each field, that I have seen. There are a number of these places in large towns over here in North Africa. I have moved since the last time I wrote, and my address is different. I am getting a little more training over here than I did back in the States, and I feel much better about it. At present I am getting checked out as first pilot, which means that I will be able to take over a ship and crew of my own. It will probably be quite a while before I do, but you can never tell. I am seeing quite a bit of North Africa, but haven't been in the middle of it as yet. I am listening to some good records here in the officers' club which is coming over the radio from the American Expeditionary Radio Station in North Africa. They have continuous recorded playing, mixed with some playing and singing from the Army boys. I am actually in the middle of combat, and have been on two bombing raids over Italy. I will be going on my third raid tomorrow sometime. Things aren't as bad as I figured they would be in actual combat. We live in tents and wash out of a can of water, but we don't mind it much. We are kept pretty busy every day, which makes things a lot better for all of us. We have a very good outfit, and there are a lot of nice fellows in with us. I don't mind combat at all, and in fact enjoy it because we fly a lot, and work on the planes in between times. We have the same plane we came over in, and the same crew. I see more of the world every time we fly, and it is very interesting. Jack Goodfellow," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow have received word that their son, John C. Goodfellow, serving with the Air force in the European theater of war, has been promoted from second to first lieutenant," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Lt. John C. Goodfellow is passing three weeks leave with his parents...after completing 50 bombing missions in the European theater of war. He had been in that area for the past ten months. Jack, a former clerk at the local postoffice, entered the service in January, 1942, and received his wings, Nov. 10, 1942. He went overseas in March, 1943 as a pilot on a B-17, his plane was "The Wolfpack" and he participated in many exciting and dangerous experiences. On Jan. 30 Lt. Goodfellow will go to Atlanta, Ga., for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "First Lt. John C. (Jack) Goodfellow, 25, is home on leave after 50 runs as pilot of a B-17 Flying Fortress out of American bases in Africa and Italy to bomb France, Austria, Italy and Greece. Decorated with the air medal and nine oak leaf clusters to the medal, each signifying five bombing missions, Lt. Goodfellow relates that on only one of the 50 trips was anyone in his crew injured. On the 41st mission, the Fortress was attacked and one engine knocked out. The co-pilot was struck in the right knee by a 22 mm. shell and had to be taken to a hospital in Sardinia to have his leg removed before the plane returned to its base. Another member of the crew injured on that trip was Tech. Sgt. William R. Underhill of Rochester, radio operator, who was hit in the hand...Other Central New York me in the same group were...Frank Bigelow of Fayetteville, who is a prisoner of war after being shot down over Naples; Lt. George Coe, a bombardier, from Fayetteville...Lt. Goodfellow is a graduate of Fayetteville high school, where he was active in hockey and lacrosse. He was a postoffice clerk in Fayetteville before entering the service Jan. 21, 1942, and was commissioned at Turner Field, Ga., Nov. 10, 1942. After further training at Casper, Wyo., the lieutenant went overseas March 23, 1942. He will report for reassignment at Atlantic City Jan. 31..." Vail scrapbook, 1/14/1944, paper not mentioned. "Lt. Jack Goodfellow, of the AAC, is passing some time with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Lt. John C. Goodfellow spent a couple of days this week in Rochester, N. Y., where he was best man at the wedding of Lt. William B. Underhill. Goodfellow and Underhill were together through their entire missions and foreign service during which time they became very intimate friends. Lt. Goodfellow leaves today for Atlantic City for reassignment, after spending 21 days at his home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Lt. Jack Goodfellow spent the week-end with his parents...returning to Atlantic City Tuesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "Lt. John Goodfellow of Atlantic City, N. J. is spending a week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow entertained at a linen shower on Wednesday night at her home...in honor of Miss Marie Ruder, of Syracuse, whose marriage to Lt. John C. Goodfellow...will take place in late September," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "On Tuesday morning, Sept. 19, at the Church of the Most Holy Rosary in Syracuse, Miss Marie Elizabeth Ruder, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick B. Ruder, 1038 Bellevue avenue, Syracuse, became the bride of Lt. John Colton Goodfellow, U.S.A.A.F....Lt. Robert Cahill, a lifelong friend, was Lt. Goodfellow's best man...in the afternoon...Lt. Goodfellow and his bride left on a honeymoon to New York City...They plan to return to Syracuse and Fayetteville for a few days before going to Oklahoma, where Lt. Goodfellow is stationed at Ardmore Air Base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow entertained at dinner on Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Ruder and daughter Catherine, of Syracuse, and their son and daughter-in-law, Lt. and Mrs. John C. Goodfellow, who returned Saturday from their honeymoon... Lt. and Mrs. Goodfellow left Monday night for Ardmore, Okla., where Lt. Goodfellow is stationed at Ardmore A.A.B.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. John C. Goodfellow of Oklahoma are spending a few days with Lt. Goodfellow's parents...and also visiting Mrs. Goodfellow's parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945. "Army Air Field, Ardmore, Oklahoma--First Lt. John C. Goodfellow, 407 Spring street, Fayetteville, N.Y., was decorated with the Air Medal and his ninth oak leaf cluster at the presentation ceremony and review on the flight ramp here Saturday, Aug. 25. Col. Paul D. Brown, station commander, pinned the decoration on Lt. Goodfellow 'for meritorious achievement while participating in five sorties against the enemy,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. "Lt. John C. Goodfellow, stationed at MacDill Field, Fla. spent a few hours Saturday with his parents...and visited his wife in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946. "Lt. and Mrs. John C. Goodfellow are the parents of a son, born Wednesday. Lt. Goodfellow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Goodfellow, is stationed in the South, and Mrs. Goodfellow has been residing with her parents in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946. "First Lt. John C. Goodfellow of 407 Spring st., Fayetteville, was decorated with the air medal and his ninth oak leaf cluster at the presentation ceremony and review on the flight ramp at Ardmore army air field, Okla., Saturday. Col. Paul D. Brown, station commander, pinned the decoration on Lt. Goodfellow 'for meritorious achievement while participating in five sorties against the enemy," The Post-Standard, 8/29/1945.

Goodfellow, Kenneth. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Baptist Church service flag, The Eagle Bulletin, 2/27/1942. "Kenneth H. Goodfellow of Manlius, with an infantry division overseas, has been promoted to sergeant. He landed at Safi, French Morocco, Nov. 8, 1942, and later participated in the Tunisian and Sicilian campaigns. As motor sergeant of his outfit, he is responsible for the efficient operation of all the organization's vehicles, as well as supervising the 50-odd drivers, assistants and mechanics. A life resident of Manlius, he was inducted into the army medical department at Buffalo on July 16, 1941, and received basic training at Camp Lee, Va. He was assigned to the infantry at Fort Bragg, N. C., on Oct. 21, 1941. Sgt. Goodfellow was graduated from Manlius high school in 1937 and from New York State School of Agriculture in 1941. Prior to entering service he was employed by E. J. Gay's dairy of Manlius and later by the Queensboro dairy of Long Island City," The Post-Standard, 11/19/1943. "At the Manlius Methodist church last Saturday afternoon, June 15, Catherine Cora Coryell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Coryell, was united in marriage to Kenneth H. Goodfellow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Goodfellow...The groom was graduated from Manlius high school and Morrisville Agricultural and Technical Institute. He served with the armed forces in African-European theater. After a wedding trip the young couple will reside in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/21/1946.

Goodfellow, Raymond. Fayetteville. "One of Fayetteville's oldest residents, Mrs. Anna Goodfellow, widow of Edward C. Goodfellow passed away of Thanksgiving day...She celebrated her 89th birthday in October...She is survived by four children...The bearers were her oldest grandsons, Donald, William, and Robert Goodfellow, Pvt. Raymond Goodfellow of Ft. Niagara, Carlton Van DeBogart and Pvt. Edward Van DeBogart of Fort Bragg, N. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/54/1942.

Goodfellow, Robert. Fayetteville. "Color guard of the Legion post (at Memorial Day services) was four discharged veterans of this war who are members of the Legion, Glenn Trinder and Joseph Pezzati, both wearing the uniform of the army; Frank Matzell, formerly in the navy, and Robert Goodfellow, a former marine corpsman," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Robert Goodfellow. More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Goodfellow, William H., Jr. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include: William H. Goodfellow, Jr." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "William Goodfellow, Jr., who left today for the reception center at Ft. Niagara, was given a farewell party at the Wheeler restaurant last Sunday night. Twenty-three members of the family were present and 'Billy' was given many useful and practical gifts to take with him in his new line of duty. 'Billy' was a former employee of the Manlius Publishing Co., and the best wishes of his co-workers go with him into the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "William Goodfellow, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. William Goodfellow, of Mechanic street, who entered service about seven weeks ago, has been made private first class, and has been transferred to Scott Field, Ill., where he is being schooled in radio work," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "A card received at the Eagle-Bulletin office on Wednesday from Pfc. William Goodfellow, Scott Field, Ill., where he is being schooled in radio work, states that he made a trip to Jefferson Barracks last week and saw Bruce Edlund and Edward Paetow who entered the service about a month ago. According to Bill's card, Bruce and Eddie are going to aviation cadet school when they complete their basic training at Jefferson Barracks," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/23/1943. "Mrs. William Goodfellow of Mechanic street left Sunday night to spend a week in Illinois, where she will visit her son, Pfc. William Goodfellow, stationed at Scott Field. Her sister, Mrs. Florence Lyman, accompanied her on the trip," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Corp. John Litzenberger of Scott Field, Ill., is spending a ten-day furlough with is parents...Johnny says that he has had the opportunity of seeing Pfc. Billy Goodfellow, who is also stationed at Scott Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Harlington Army Air Field, Texas--Another class of aerial triggermen to guard Army Air Forces' bombers was graduated this week from the Harlingen Army Air Field, aerial gunnery school of the AAF Training Command, and among the qualified 'sharpshooters of the sky' was Pfc. William H. Goodfellow, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Goodfellow of 108 Mechanic street, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. William Goodfellow have received word that their son S/Sgt. William Goodfellow, U.S.A.A.C. is in a base hospital in England, where he is being treated for injuries. No further details were given. The word came through a letter written by a buddy, who said Bill was unable to write because of an injury to his hand. Very recently Mr. and Mrs. Goodfellow received a letter from Bill in which he told them of promotion to his present rank. He also wrote them that he had received the air medal, a bronze star for participation in the invasion, another bronze star for combat duty, and that the eighth army air force, of which he is a member, had been awarded the presidential citation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "An 8th Air Force Bomber Station, England--Staff Sgt. William H. Goodfellow...has been decorated with the Air Medal, it was recently announced by the commanding general, Eighth Air Force. The citation accompanying the award read: 'For exceptionally meritorious achievement while participating as a ball-turret gunner of a B-17 Flying Fortress, in sustained bomber combat operations over Germany and Nazi occupied continental Europe. The courage, coolness and skill displayed by Sergeant Goodfellow upon these occasions reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.' Sergeant Goodfellow is a former student of the Fayetteville high school...Prior to his entry into the Army Air Forces on March 5, 1943, he was employed by the Precision Castings Co., Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "Tech. Sgt. William Goodfellow arrived home early Sunday morning to spend 30 days with his parents...This is his first time home since he entered the service 27 months ago. He went overseas about a year ago and was a radio man and gunner on a B-17 until he suffered an injury to his hand last Fall which necessitated his being hospitalized. Returning to active duty again he acted as radio man only. He was awarded the air medal and has four bronze stars. After his furlough T/Sgt. Goodfellow will report to Camp Davis, N. C. Billy's greatest surprise upon his return home was the growth in boys and girls, especially his two kid brothers, who he said were just little boys 27 months ago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "T/Sgt. William Goodfellow is spending several days of his 30-day furlough with friends in St. Louis, Mo.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "T/Sgt. William Goodfellow left Wednesday for Greensboro, N. C., for reassignment after passing a 30-day leave with his parents...and friends in St. Louis, Mo.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Sgt. William Goodfellow has been honorably discharged from the U. S. Army after 31 months in service, one year of which was spent in the European theater, and has returned to the home of his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945.

Goodmore, Albert H. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for Army service at the induction center Monday include...Albert H. Goodmore...of Manlius...; Donald R. Casler and Floyd F. Crobar of Minoa; Frederick D. Holtz and Andrew Vinski of Kirkville. Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. C. Goodmore of Manlius, have received word that their son, Pfc. Albert H. Goodmore has graduated from the surgical technical school at General Hospital, Atlanta, Ga. He is now located at the Don-Ce-Sar Hospital, St. Petersburg, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/5/1943. "AAF Convalescent Hospital, Don Ce-Sar Place, St. Petersburg, Fla.--Albert H. Goodmore, son of Mrs. Bessie Goodmore, has been promoted to Corporal, Colonel Richard E. Elvins, commanding officer, has announced. Assigned to AAF Convalescent Hospital, Don Ce-Sar Place, St. Petersburg, Fla., Corp. Goodmore, who previously resided at 139 Seneca street, Manlius, N. Y., was recommended for promotion by his commanding officer, who places special trust and confidence in his fidelity and ability to carefully and diligently discharge his new duties," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945.

Goodrich, Foster E. Fayetteville. "Board 473 is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Navy...Foster E. Goodrich, 301 Salt Springs St., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944.

Goswick, Charles M. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Gott, Floyd. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Gott, Floyd, 229 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Gott, Malcolm B. Formerly Manlius. "Lt. and Mrs. Malcolm B. Gott and daughter Marilynn, of Auburn, have been guests of Mr. and Mrs. Clesson Sargent and family on the Cazenovia Road. Lt. Gott is a former resident of Manlius, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Gott, and grandson of the late Rev. J. H. Britten, all former Manlius residents. He has just returned from 18 months' service in Europe. Enlisting in the Army October, 1942, he volunteered for overseas duty in March, 1943, and left as 2nd Lieutenant and was promoted on the battlefield to lst lieutenant. Lieutenant Gott left England and made the invasion of France on D-Day with the First Infantry Division and the Fifth Ranger Battalion. He was presented with the Distinguished Service Cross from Gen. Patton. He also holds the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Combat Infantry Badge and a Presidential Citation. Their little daughter was born five months after her father left for England. Lieutenant Gott is to report to Camp Croft, S. C., on Dec. 2 for a new assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Gould, Paul Raymond. Fayetteville. "W/O Paul Raymond Gould, 29, ship's clerk, USN, whose wife, Anne, lives at 110 W. Genesee st., Fayetteville, is among the crew of 900 navy men aboard a U. S. submarine tender charged with refitting war-weary submarines returning from combat patrol in the Pacific," The Post-Standard, 7/29/1945.

Goulette, Albert R. Fayetteville. Arrival on U.S.S. Arenac in Seattle, T/5 Albert R. Goulette, 207 Elm st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 1/24/1946.

Gravelle, Francis C. Kirkville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...Francis Gravelle...of Kirkville (R.D. 1)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Pvt. Francis C. Gravelle, who joined the U. S. Army on December 5, 1942 at Kirkville, has arrived at Camp Chaffee where he is assigned to the 14th Armored Division. Pvt. Gravelle is the son of Mrs. Gertrude E. Gravelle of this village (Manlius). In civilian life Pvt. Gravelle was employed as chief clerk by the Prest-O-Lite Company, Inc., in Syracuse. He attended Central City Business Institute and finished in 1939. The Fourteenth, which was activated November 15, is commanded by Major General Vernon E. Prichard and is one of the newest of the hard hitting armored divisions to be organized by the Army. Camp Chaffee is near Fort Smith, Arkansas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/15/1943. "Francis Gravelle has written from Camp Chaffee, Ark., where he is stationed as supply clerk. He says he received a carton of cigarettes from Manlius friends, but no name of the donors were given. He enjoyed the smokes and thanks those who sent them. Mrs. Gravelle and infant daughter of Kirkville has joined her husband at Camp Chaffee," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Francis Gravelle is at home on furlough, and with his wife and infant daughter are spending some time with their mother, Mrs. Gravelle and grandmother, Mrs. Clark," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Corp. Francis Gravelle of Camp Chaffee, Ark., who has been spending a ten-day furlough with his wife at her home in Kirkville, and with his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Gravelle of this village (Manlius), returned last Wednesday to Camp Chaffee. Corp. Gravelle left on Sunday for Gulfport, Miss., where he has transferred into the air corps," The Post-Standard, 11/26/1943. "Corp. and Mrs. Francis Gravelle and little daughter returned last Tuesday to Tampa, Florida, after spending 15 days with their parents, Mrs. Gertrude Gravelle of Smith street and Mr. and Mrs. James Alvord, of Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "Corp. Francis Gravelle, Mrs. Gravelle and little daughter, of Tampa, Fla., have been passing 15 days on leave-of-absence in Manlius and Kirkville having been called here by the death of Mrs. Gravelle's father, James Alvord, of Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Corp. Francis Gravelle and Mrs. Gravelle and little daughter Esther Frances have been passing a 10-day leave of absence visiting their parents and friends in Manlius and Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945.

Gravelle, Robert. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Robert Gravelle, 18, son of Mrs. Gertrude Gravelle of Smith street, and a member of the senior class in Manlius High School, has enlisted for three years of service and left Syracuse Monday night for Camp Dix, where he will remain for two weeks and will then be transferred to Savannah, Ga., to begin training in a mechanical aviation course. A group of Robert's classmates took the day off on Monday and accompanied him to Syracuse where they entertained him in a 'big way' with dinner, movies, and a good time until his departure at 9 p. m.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1941. "Robert Gravelle and Bernard Taylor, two Manlius high school students, who enlisted for service, are now located at Savannah, Ga. Their address is Recruiting Detachment, Savannah Air Base, Savannah, Ga.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/1/1941. "Pvt. Robert Gravelle has written, giving a change of address: Bomb-Gun Range Dept., Savannah Air Base, Savannah, Ga. Gravelle and Bernard Taylor, both former Manlius high school pupils, have enrolled in the vocational high school. Robert is expecting to complete his senior year and is studying Spanish, English and history. (We are proud of our two boys and wish you success in your study)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1941. "Pvt. Robert Gravelle of Savannah Air Base, arrived Saturday to pass a week on furlough with his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Gravelle, and grandmother, Mrs. John Clark," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/7/1941. "Pvt. Robert Gravelle has a new address. He is now a member of the band. It is Air Force Band, Att. 63 Air Base Sq., Savannah, Ga.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Pfc. Robert B. Gravelle, a member of the air force band at Savannah, Ga., has returned to his post after a 10-day furlo at the home of his mother...5/12/1942," The Post-Standard, 5/12/1942. "Robert Gravelle, stationed at Savannah, Ga., is spending a few days with his mother, and will return to duties next Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1942. "Pfc. Robert J. Gravelle, 88th Air Force Band, Savannah, Ga., is spending a 10-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Gravelle and grandmother, Mrs. John Clark, 120 Smith st." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Robert Gravelle has returned to Savannah, Ga., after spending a 15-day furlough with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Pfc. Robert Gravelle of the Army Air Band, Hunter Field, Savannah, Ga., recently passed a two-weeks furlough with his mother...and grandmother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "Pvt. Robert Gravelle arrived Thursday to pass a furlough with his mother and grandmother..., but was called to return immediately to his base at Hunters Field, Ga. Pvt. Gravelle has been expecting to leave for overseas duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/15/1944. "Mrs. Gertrude Gravelle received a letter on Monday from her son, Pfc. Robert Gravelle of the Air Corps, now stationed in Australia. He is feeling fine and says the climate there is similar to that at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945. "Robert J. Gravelle...has been promoted to corporal. Corp. Gravelle is now serving with the Air Transport Command in Australia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Robert Gravelle has received his honorable discharge from the U. S. Army and arrived at the home of his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Gravelle, last Thursday. Robert has been in the Pacific area and came to San Francisco via plane from Tokyo," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945.

Gray, Charles M. Minoa. "The following named officers and enlisted men were discharged at Fort Dix Wednesday..."Pvt. Charles M. Gray, 316 N. Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 12/28/1945.

Gray, Milton. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Milton Gray has returned from three years overseas service in the U. S. Army. He has received an honorable discharge and has returned to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gray of East Seneca street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Gray, Robert. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Greenwood, Robert. Formerly Fayetteville. "Robert Greenwood, son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Greenwood of Syracuse and former residents of Fayetteville, who enlisted in the Army Air Corps several months ago has been assigned, with ten others from Syracuse, to the training center at Nashville, Tenn., effective January 30," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/43. "Mrs. Howard Greenwood is in Montgomery, Ala., where she is visiting her son, Air Cadet Robert Greenwood, who is stationed at Gunther Field. Mrs. Greenwood will return via plane to New York City," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Robert Greenwood, son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Greenwood of Redfield avenue, received his silver wings and was commissioned second lieutenant in the U.S.A.A.C. last Saturday at the Seymour Air Base in Seymour, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Greenwood attended the graduation exercises at Seymour. They returned home Monday, accompanied by Lt. Greenwood, who will spend a ten-day leave here before reporting to Salt Lake City for an advanced flying course," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Tooley of Liverpool announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Helen G. Tooley, to Lt. Robert Greenwood...Lt. and Mrs. Greenwood are living at 822 Denrock Street, Dalhart, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/10/1944. "Word has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Howard Greenwood of the safe arrival in England of their son, Lt. Robert Greenwood, who is serving with the A.A.F.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Lt. Robert A. Greenwood, co-pilot of a B-17 Flying Fortress, one of the 42 lost over Germany May 12, was reported missing in action on that date, according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Greenwood...from the war department. Veteran of ten missions into Nazi-occupied Europe, Lt. Greenwood had been awarded the Air Medal. He was transferred overseas with his ship and crew April 6 of this year. Lt. Greenwood married the former Miss Helen Tooley of Liverpool Feb. 11, after receiving his wings and commission as a second lieutenant in the army air forces at Freeman Field, Ind., on Dec. 5, 1943. A graduate of Eastwood high school in 1940, where he went after attending Fayetteville schools, Lt. Greenwood was employed by Lipe-Rollway Corp. before enlisting in the service as an aviation cadet in July, 1942, scrapbook, n.d. "Among 42 bombers lost May 12 over Germany was a B-17 Flying Fortress on which Lt. Robert A. Greenwood, 22...was co-pilot. Lt. Greenwood, who has been reported missing by the war department went overseas in April, and had been awarded the Air medal for five missions before the May 12 flight. He trained at Maxwell Field, Ala., Dorr Field, Arcadia, Fla., Gunter Field, Ala., and received his wings and commission Dec. 5, 1943 at Freeman Field, Seymour, Ind. This was followed by combat training at Dalhart, Tex. On Feb. 11 he married Miss Helen Tooley of 410 Balsam st., Liverpool, at Dalhart. He left Kearney Field, Neb., April 6 for overseas duty. A 1940 graduate of Eastwood high school, he was employed by Lipe-Rollway Corp., before enlistment in the air corps July, 1942," The Post-Standard, 6/1/1944. "A son was born Thursday morning, Dec. 7, to Mrs. Robert Greenwood, of Liverpool...The baby's father, Lt. Robert Greenwood, was reported as missing in action last summer and to date nothing more definite has been heard either by his wife or parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Howard Greenwood have received official word from the War Department that their son, Lieut. Robert A. Greenwood, was killed in action over Germany on May 12, 1944. He had been previously reported as missing and the information regarding his death came to his parents last Thursday night. Lieut. Greenwood was a co-pilot on a B-17 and went overseas April 19, 1944. He was awarded the Air Medal which came to his home here only recently. Entering the service on Jan. 30, 1942, he was commissioned at Seymour, Ind. on Dec. 5, 1943. The Greenwood family lived in Fayetteville prior to moving to Syracuse in 1936 and while here Bob attended Fayetteville high school. He was graduated from the Eastwood high school in June, 1941 and was employed at the W. C. Lipe plant before going into service. Surviving, besides his parents, is his wife, the former Miss Helen Tooley of Liverpool, and a seven-week-sold son Robert, Jr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "There will be a memorial service for Lieut. Robert a. Greenwood at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon, Nov. 18, at the United Church, Rev. Dr. John T. Cowan officiating. Lieutenant Greenwood was reported as missing over Germany, May 12, 1944, while on his eighth mission. His parents...received a notice from the war Department on Jan. 25, 1945, that their son was presumed to be dead. He attended Fayetteville high school and was graduated from Eastwood high school with the class of '40. At the time of his enlistment he was employed by the W. C. Lipe Co., of Syracuse. In December, 1943 Greenwood was graduated and received his wings at Seymour Field, Indiana. Lt. Greenwood went overseas on April 4, 1944. He was awarded the air medal and the Purple Heart posthumously. While in combat training in Dalhart, Texas, he was married to the former Miss Helen Tooley, of Liverpool. Surviving Lt. Greenwood, besides his parents, are his wife and a son, Robert A. Greenwood, 2nd," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. A. Brown and Mr. and Mrs. Francis Schoendorf and families, of Mohawk, N.Y., spent last week end with their brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Greenwood and attended the memorial service held for Lt. Robert A. Greenwood," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. Also Post-Standard, 1/1/1944.

Gregg, George. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pfc. George Gregg, who entered the service 11 months ago, has written to his father, Palmer Gregg of this village, in which he states he is feeling fine, but hopes 'this thing' will soon be over. At the time of writing the letter, George was in Africa. His brother, Palmer Gregg is in the Navy and is at present stationed at Sampson," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1943. "Palmer W. Gregg of West Genesee street received a message from the War Department Wednesday to the effect that his son, Sgt. George Gregg, is reported missing in action as of October 25. Sgt. Gregg was born in Fayetteville, attended Fayetteville high school from which he was graduated, and entered service on June 3, 1942. He was sent overseas in September of that same year and saw service in England, Africa, and Italy. He was with the 351 Infantry Division. A brother, Ensign P. W. Gregg, is serving in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Palmer Gregg has received a telegram from the International Red Cross stating that his son, Sgt. George Gregg, is a prisoner of war in Germany. On Nov. 15 Mr. Gregg received word that his son was missing in action and no further word was heard until the telegram Wednesday. The telegram was signed by Provost Marshall General Dunlop and it also read that a letter would follow," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945. "Palmer Gregg has received word from his son Pfc. George Gregg, who was taken prisoner in Italy eight months ago, that he is O.K. and well and expects to be home soon. George said he had been confined in a Nazi prison camp at Stalag 7-A Neusburg, Germany. During this time only one letter has been received from George and that was written to Miss Florence Eastman, a neighbor of the Greggs. Mr. Gregg has sent two packages, also six cartons of cigarettes and two pounds of tobacco to his son, none of these ever reached him," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "Sgt. George Gregg, who spent nearly eight months as a prisoner of war in Stalag 7-A, arrived in the States about two weeks ago and with his wife is spending a 60-day leave with his father...Sgt. Gregg was reported missing in action last October and a short time later his father received word that he was a prisoner in Germany. Mrs. Gregg has been living with her parents in Schenectady while her husband was overseas. Enroute home Sgt. Gregg visited relatives in New York and also stopped in Albany to see his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Gregg," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/20/1945. "Sgt. and Mrs. George E. Gregg spent a week camping at Sacandaga Lake with his brother Marshall Gregg and family of Albany, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "George Gregg, son of Palmer Gregg of West Genesee street, has received an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army and with his wife is residing in Herkimer, N. Y., where he is a salesman for the Frigidaire concern. Gregg spent eight months in a German prison camp, being liberated last June," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945. (See Gregg, Palmer).

Gregg, Palmer, W., Jr. Fayetteville. "...Palmer Gregg is in the Navy and is at present stationed at Sampson," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1943. "Ensign and Mrs. Palmer Gregg of Ilion, N.Y., are parents of a son, born Oct. 20. He has been named Palmer Eckler Gregg. Ensign Gregg is stationed with the armed forces in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "...Ensign P. W. Gregg, is serving in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. P. W. Gregg, Jr. and son Palmer 3d, are now located in New York City where Lt. Gregg is stationed at Brooklyn Navy Yard," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Palmer W. Gregg was honorably discharged from the service on January 8 at New York City, after serving in the Pacific area for two years. He is on terminal leave until March 1, after which he will return to the Gaffey Appliance Co., Inc., with stores in Herkimer and Little Falls, as general manager and secretary-treasurer. Gregg was promoted at Sampson Naval Training station on Feb. 15, from Lt. (jg) to full lieutenant in the U. S. Naval Reserve," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/22/1946. (See Gregg, George).

Gregory, Anne. Fayetteville. "Miss Anne H. Gregory...has arrived in Hawaii as a hospital staff aid for the American Red Cross," The Post-Standard, 8/27/1944. "Miss Anne Gregory arrived in Hawaii recently to begin her duties as an American Red Cross hospital staff aid according to word received by her mother, Dr. Clara H. Gregory of the Syracuse road. Miss Gregory was a case worker for the home service department of the Syracuse and Onondaga Chapter of the Red Cross, for a year prior to volunteering for overseas service. She went to Washington for special training before going overseas. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, she attended Radcliffe College for a year and was graduated from the College of Home Economics, Syracuse university, in 1939. She is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. Anne was employed by the home service department of the Central New York Power corp. and as a case worker for the Onondaga County Public Welfare department before joining the staff of the Red Cross," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. "Army Hdqs., MIDPAC, Ft. Shafter, T. H. -- "One of the last patients to be evacuated from Army general hospital 147 in Honolulu, Pfc. Herman Clayborn, 23, of Okra, Texas, wounded by a Jap hand grenade on Okinawa, receives a Hawaiian lei from Red Cross workers...Miss Anne Gregory...overseas twelve months, "The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945. "Mrs. Gregory has received word of the marriage of her...daughter, Anne Hetherington Gregory, to Capt. Paul Leslie Bunce, U.S.A. in Lihue, Kanai, T. H., on Nov. 26. Mrs. Bunce has been serving with the American Red Cross since 1942 and went overseas in July 1944. She attended Radcliffe College and was graduated from Syracuse College of Fine Arts. Capt. Bunce was graduated from Oberlin College and from Chicago University School of Medicine in 1942. Capt. and Mrs. Bunce plan to live in Omaha, Neb., in the Spring," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Gregory, David. Fayetteville. "David Gregory, Cady Kepler and Carl Swartner have enlisted in the U. S. Navy and expect to be called for boot training in the near future," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Gregory, George. Fayetteville. "Pfc. George Gregory is passing a few days furlough with his mother, Dr. Clara Gregory, of the Syracuse Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are George Gregory, India..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "George Gregory was a top-gunner in the Army Air Forces during world War II, flying in B-29 bombers over the Himalayan Mountains. That experience launched a life-long love of aviation. 'My father bought his first plane when he returned from the war,' said Mr. Gregory's son, Groot, of Boston. 'He purchased it for about $100, and then he learned to fly.' Over the next five decades, Mr. Gregory's passion for flying expanded to include the restoration of antique airplanes. His pride and joy was the 1929 Fleet 16-B -- a two-seater biplane powered by a radial engine -- which he had been building from scratch for the past 35 years. He started it in his basement. When it outgrew that space, he built a large garage to continue the construction. 'The fuselage was in our basement for about 15 years. My mother always referred to it as a very elaborate clothes hanger,' Mr. Gregory's son said. 'We used to hang all sorts of stuff on it.' When Mr. Gregory died of skin cancer Wednesday afternoon, the World War II-vintage aircraft was within one month of being ready for its maiden flight. 'We were going to bring it out this summer and take it to my hangar in Chittenango to finish it up,' said Lyle Stedman, Mr. Gregory's friend of many years, a fellow pilot and airplane builder. 'But then George got sick, and we weren't able to get it out here. I told George's daughter yesterday that I would love to finish it as a memorial to George,' Stedman said. 'I would love to finish it and fly it in his memory.' Mr. Gregory was 74 when he died at his home on Duguid Road in Manlius. His family and a few close friends were by his side...Mr. Gregory was a Fayetteville native and a graduate of Fayetteville High School. He graduated from Syracuse University, where he played in the band. A French horn player, Mr. Gregory belonged to many musical groups over the years...In 1970, Mr. Gregory founded G. G. Gregory in Manlius. The company sells filtration equipment. In the mid-1970s, when Mr. Gregory and his family moved into a larger house and he built an over-sized garage for airplane construction, the second floor of the garage was divided in two. 'Half was the office for the company, and the other half became a place for my father and all his musical friends to practice,' Groot Gregory said...Mr. Gregory was president of Fleet Club and publisher of the International Fleet Aircraft newsletter. He was a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association and the Stockbridge Valley Flying club...Surviving Mr. Gregory, in addition to his wife (Vivian) and son, are two daughters, Jonet Gregory Vandervelde of Charlotte, N.C., and Laurel Gregory Corbett of Syracuse; two sisters, Anne Bunce of Chapel Hill, N.C., and Jean Munger of Fayetteville; a brother, David of Feura Bush, Albany County; three grandsons, three granddaughters; and several nieces and nephews," The Post-Standard, 9/19/1997.

Gregory, Lou. Formerly Manlius. "Lou Gregory, high school principal at Cleveland, on Oneida Lake, and one of America's outstanding distance runners, today was commissioned a lieutenant (s.g.) in the United States. With his commission, Gregory received orders to report April 22 to the Navy Pre-Flight Training Corps at Chapel Hill, N.C. Gregory is a former United States Olympic team runner, holds several national distance titles and has been a member of the National A.A.U. All-Star track team for the last ten years," Bottrill scrapbook. "Lieut. (sg) Lou Gregory...has completed training at Chapel Hill, N.C., and is home for a five-day leave in travel, on his way to the University of Iowa where he will take a place on the training staff of the Navy's Pre-Flight Sea Hawks station. Gregory ran the fastest two miles of his career and broke a Southern track mark to win a meet for Chapel Hill recently. He hasn't had an assignment to duty at Iowa yet, expecting this to come after his arrival there Wednesday but he isn't inclined to think it will have anything to do with track work," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Appearing in the proverbial pink of physical condition, Lt. Lou Gregory of the Navy arrived back in Syracuse en route to New York City for the Navy Day program yesterday after 18 months in the Pacific. He has been in service two and one-half years. A winner of many national amateur distance running events, Lt. Gregory had praise for Lt. George Cole of Minoa, with whom he ran on a victorious relay team in Hawaii. Cole was a protege of Gregory when the latter coached Manlius High School to a State class championship in cross-country. Lt. Cole also arrived home for a visit. Lt. Cole matriculated at Michigan State after graduating from Manlius. He served a year and a half on an LST boat in the Pacific, and kept in condition by running up and down on his comparatively small craft in off duty hours. When he arrived in Pearl Harbor, he had only two weeks training before engaging in the long relay run with Gregory. Lts.. Gregory and Cole were on an eight-man Navy relay team which won a 36.6 mile race through Pali Pass in Hawaii. Seven of the eight runners set record times for their legs of the relay. The course was covered in three hours, 34 minutes and 30 seconds. Captaining and coaching the All-Navy team in Hawaii, Lt. Gregory led his charges to an 80-54 running meet victory over the All-Army team on the island," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. Formerly Manlius.

Greiner, Gerald. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Greiner, Gerald, 116 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y.

Greiner, Lewis J. Minoa. "Private Louis Greiner of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, spent the week-end with his mother, Mrs. Hilda Greiner, and other relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1941. "Mr. John Greiner and Mrs. Hilda Greiner left Friday for North Carolina, where they will visit Louis Greiner, who is serving in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1941. "Mrs. Charles Greiner, Mrs. Hilda Greiner, and Miss Leontine Snook spent the week-end at Fort Wayne, Ind., where they visited Pvt. Lewis Greiner," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1942. "Pvt. Lewis Greiner of Fort Wayne, Indiana, spent the week-end with his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "Pvt. Lewis Greiner of Fort Wayne, Ind., is spending a furlough with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Pvt. Lewis Greiner has returned to Fort Wayne, Ind. after spending an eleven-day furlough with his mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Greiner, Lewis J., 107 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Greiner, Ralph L. Minoa. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Army...107 N. Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Greiner, Ralph L., 116 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y."

Gress, Alexander. Fayetteville. "Pfc. Alexander Gress has been promoted to corporal at Selfridge Field, Mich., a base of the AAF. His home is 103 Genesee st., Fayetteville. He has been in the Army since July 16, 1941. The promotion was gained through diligent service, it was announced by Major Ralph R. Rader, his commanding officer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943.

Griffith, Amelius. Kirkville. "Corp. A. Griffith, who has been stationed in India is on his way home. He expects to be discharged from the service on his arrival," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse as Aemillius E. Griffith. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Griffith, Thomas. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Groesbeck, Chester D. Kirkville. "Onondaga county men inducted were...Army...Chester D. Groesbeck, Kirkville, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Groff, Elwood. Formerly Manlius. "Elwood Groff, seaman 2-c...who entered service in April, is on a week's leave from Sampson naval training station," The Post-Standard, 78/15/1943. "Elwood Groff, seaman 2/c, son of Mrs. Mary Groff, Syracuse, formerly of Manlius, is stationed at Sampson Naval Training Station," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943.

Grover, J. C. Manlius. "J. C. Grover, Academy street, has enlisted for service, and will leave Manlius June 1. Mrs. Grover is expecting to return to her former home in Ohio until the duration," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942.

Gwynn, Richard. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Richard Gwynn..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Seaman First Class Richard A. Gwynn, son of Mrs. Dorothy a. Gwynn, Fayetteville, RD, has been graduated from the aviation metalsmith course at the naval air technical training center at Norman, Okla., and will be assigned to a naval unit or for further training," The Post-Standard, 9/27/1943.

Haar, Robert L. Minoa. 1952 Minoa Village board minutes: Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Haar, Robert L., 115 Willard St., Minoa, N.Y."

Haberle, Benedict F. Manlius. "Thirty-eight men from Syracuse and vicinity were among 2,812 soldiers wounded in action in the European area, the war department announced last night thru the Associated Press. Those from Onondaga county not previously reported in The Post-Standard are...Pvt. Benedict F. Haberle, son of Mrs. Anna K. Haberle of RD 1," The Post-Standard, 11/5/1944.

Hackbarth, Carlyle. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Inductees from this village (Fayetteville) who left for the reception center at Fort Niagara last Friday were...Carl Hackbarth, son of Mr. and Mrs. DeForest Hackbarth..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Hackbarth received a cablegram from their son, Sgt. Carlyle Hackbarth, stating that he arrived overseas safely and was feeling fine. He is stationed somewhere in Australia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944.

Hackett, Rose M. Minoa. 1952 Minoa Village board minutes: Minoa Honor Roll - Village of Minoa only...Hackett, Rose M., 117 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Hafner, John W. Fayetteville. "T/4 John W. Hafner has been promoted from the rank of corporal to his present grade, according to an announcement from Army sources. He is attached to the 43rd Fd. Art. Battalion. Mrs. Maude Hafner, his mother, resides at 114 Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945.

Hains, Paul J. Kirkville. "Service men arriving at east and west coast ports include...on the Fitzhugh Lee, due in New York yesterday...T/4 Paul J. Hains, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 12/16/1945.

Hale, Clayton. H. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Hale, Elizabeth C. Manlius. "Miss Elizabeth C. Hale, daughter of Anderson L. Hale and the late Mrs. Christina Hale, will report for duty with the Army Nurse Corps at Atlantic City, N. J., on Sept. 15. Miss Hale is at present night superintendent at Crouse-Irving hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. Honorably discharged Monday, First Lt. Elizabeth C. Hale, Manlius, RD 1, The Post-Standard, 10/24/1945. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving: WACS...Elizabeth Hale, Manlius...Lieutenant Hale was graduated from Crouse-Irving hospital and was night supervisor at the hospital when she entered the service. She was with England General hospital, Atlantic City, for eighteen months and at Fort Jay, Governor's Island, for several months. Capt. Wesley I. Hale, a brother, has been overseas two years and is in the service and supply air transport command..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Mrs. George H. Hale is a patient in Crouse-Irving hospital recovering from an operation performed on Monday morning. Miss Elizabeth Hale, R.N., who has recently returned from Europe and given an honorable discharge, is caring for her aunt," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Miss Elizabeth Hale, daughter of Anderson Hale, who was recently discharged from overseas duty, has been called to New York to care for a friend," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Hale, Floyd M. Manlius. "Floyd Hale has resigned his position in Syracuse and enlisted for service, expecting to enter the aviation field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/16/1942. "Pfc. Floyd Hale, grandson of Mrs. A. Hotchkiss, is now somewhere in North Africa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "PFC Floyd M. Hale may pat himself on the back for his part in the Italian invasion, according to a citation his air wing received from Col. J. R. Hawkins, commanding officer of the wing serving in Italy. Issued Oct. 3 to all members of the fighter wing the citation reads: 'The Hun is fleeing across the plains of Naples while his columns and installations are being incessantly harassed from the air. The battle for Salerno bridgehead has been won. I wish to take this opportunity to commend you for a superior performance. Never before was air support so complete and devastating. You have won the admiration, not only of our combined armies and navies, but of our enemy as well. I particularly want to commend the ground personnel who disembarked, set up and operated efficiently in the face of enemy bombardment and incessant artillery fire. Without fear of contradiction you may say to yourself, 'Well Done'. Son of Mrs. Ruth Sutliff, 1650 S. State st., PFC Hale went overseas last February and served thru the African and Sicilian campaign before entering Italy with the invasion forces. He is attached to the headquarters company of the fighter wing. His mother also recently received a Christmas card and New Year's greeting from him in Italy. PFC Hale was employed by Durston Gear Co. before entering the service, Oct. 15, 1942," The Post-Standard, 11/30/1943. "Pfc. Floyd Hale of the 64th Fighter Wing stationed at an air base at Halle, Germany, flew to London, England, where he visited his schoolmate, Edward Hawkins, who is stationed at an air base outside London. Pfc. Hale is the son of Mrs. Rena Sutliff of 123 Smith street and he has been overseas since Feb. 1, 1943. He has been in the African, Sicilian, Italian, French and German campaigns and has seven bronze battle stars," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Mrs. Rena Sutliff has received word from her son Pfc. Floyd Hale, now stationed in France, that he is expecting to return to the States this month," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945. Honorably discharged Thursday, Pfc. Floyd M. Hale, 123 Smith st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 10/20/1945. "Floyd Hale...has received an honorable discharge from the Army and returned Thursday to his home in Smith st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945.

Hale, Frank Lucien. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Also served in World War I. "Frank Lucien (Bud) Hale of Fayetteville, famed World War I flying ace, whose official record notes 18 German planes shot down and who received the Distinguished Flying Cross from the hands of the Duke of Windsor, then the Prince of Wales, has been appointed a direct factory Pontiac dealer in Syracuse and has established his agency at 524 E. Genesee st. The quarters, which extend from E. Genesee st., through to E. Jefferson st., are being remodeled and redecorated, and a fully-equipped service department, featuring the newest devices for servicing, oiling and greasing automobile, has been provided, with entrance in E. Jefferson st. Mr. Hale extends his personal invitation to all in this community to visit his show rooms and see the new 1941 Pontiac," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/19/1940. "Capt. F. L. Hale visited his father, Mr. Frank Hale, last Wednesday enroute from Washington to Dayton, Ohio," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/18/1941. "In 1917, Frank Lucien (Bud) Hale tried to enlist in the U. S. army air corps. He was rejected as physically unfit. So he joined the Royal Air force, shot down 18 German planes, won two distinguished flying crosses, and came back to Syracuse a hero. Now Hale, twice as old as he was in 1917, has been accepted by the U.S. army air corps. He has been given a major's commission--and next week he leaves for overseas duty. Maj. Hale doesn't know where he is going. When he arrives in the capitol next week he'll be handed sealed orders, telling him where he is assigned. It may be China. It may be England. It may be the Near East. Since last July, when Hale was assigned to active duty as a captain, he has had a roving commission to aid in the production and delivery of aircraft. Based at Wright Field, Dayton, O., he has been flying all over the country, visiting one airplane factory after another--working with officials in scheduling production and distribution of planes. What his next job will be, he doesn't know--and until his week-long furlo is up, he's not worrying about it. He's visiting his father, Frank Hale of "Fayetteville; his brother, Ted Hale, and other relatives. Maj. Hale, incidentally, was founder of the Hale Pontiac Sales company here. Following his rejection by the U. S. air corps in '17, Hale entered training in Canada. He trained at Toronto and Deseronto fields, served as instructor in Texas, and then went overseas. Further training in England was followed by battlefront duty. When he stepped from his plane for the last time after his service on the western front and in Germany, he had 1,200 flying hours to his credit. All of that time, by the way, was flown in the same plane, on the sides of which Hale had painted 'Syracuse.' Six times the 'Syracuse' was shot down, out of control. But each time Hale managed to land safely. His flying comrades used to say he had a charmed life. One of his narrowest escapes occurred when two struts were shot off his plane. Hale had been flying at 18,000 feet, when suddenly a German plane swooped out of the sun and 'got me before I saw him,' he related. 'I fell 15,000 feet in a spin before I got my machine under control. They thought I was a goner and didn't follow me down or they would have got me easily as my plane limped slowly over the lines.' The other times he was shot down he was just as lucky. When he brought the 'Syracuse' to England for the last time, it crashed. The plane would have been junked anyway, said Hale, for hardly an original part was left. In one dogfight nearly every instrument in the plane was shot away, and bullets missed the pilot by inches. In October, 1918, Hale shot down three German planes in one day near Cambral. That was during the big drive in which tanks first appeared. For that action, Hale received the distinguished flying cross at the hands of King George V in Buckingham palace. Later, for what Hale terms 'a similar incident,' he received the decoration again--this time from the prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) aboard H. M. S. Renown, in New York harbor. In his new overseas duties for Uncle Sam, Maj. Hale doesn't expect to be a combat pilot. 'But if I see some Jap planes, I certainly won't go around them,' he grinned," The Post Standard, 3/10/1942. "Frank H. Hale, well known insurance agent and a leader in church, civic and fraternal circles, died Monday night at his home on the Syracuse Road...surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Elbridge Kinne and Mrs. Geo. Gregory of Fayetteville, Mrs. Robert V. Call of Batavia; two sons, Theodore C. Hale of Syracuse and Maj. Frank L. Hale, with the U. S. Army Air Corps; several grandchildren and a great-grandchild," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Frank Hale of the Syracuse Road and Bruce Edlund of South Manlius street left last week for Mobile, Ala., to visit Frank's father, Lt.-Col. Lucian Hale," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Frank Hale has received an honorable discharge from the army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Maj. Frank Lucien Hale, 48, an ace with the air forces in World War I and connected with the AAF overseas during this war until his retirement in February, died Wednesday morning in Buffalo of coronary thrombosis. Manager of the sub-contract division of Bell Aircraft Corp., Maj. Hale resided in Kenmore. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Muriel McMaster Hale; a son, Frank L. Hale, Jr. of Pelham, who recently received a medical discharge from service; three sisters, Mrs. Robert V. Call, of Batavia, Dr. Clara H. Gregory, and Mrs. Elbridge Kinne, both of Fayetteville; a brother, Theodore C. Hale, Syracuse and several nieces and nephews. Maj. Hale re-entered the service to serve in both the African and European theaters during this war and was in command of an AAF service group in England, The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. (Hale, one of a few dozen American World War I aces, received one Distinguished Service Cross - from the Prince of Wales.)

Hale, Gordon D. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Private Gordon Hale, who is stationed at Fort Knox, Kentucky, is now serving as driver of one of the army trucks," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/1/1941. "Private Gordon Hale, who has been passing a two weeks furlough at home, has returned to Fort Knox, Kentucky," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1941. "Pvt. Gordon Hale of Fort Knox, Kentucky, is passing a brief furlough at the home of his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/2/1942. "The annual reunion of the Hale family was held New Year's Day in the Manlius Methodist Church. Rev. and Mrs. Lyman Hale and family, missionaries in China, now passing some time at home, attended. Pvt. Gordon Hale of Fort Knox, Ky., is at home on furlough and was among the guests," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Sergeant Gordon Hale was written his parents from his present location in Northern Ireland," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. George H. Hale received a letter from their son, Sergeant Gordon Hale, now overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "He's in North Africa, under fire. In 16 months he has had exactly 18 hours off duty. But he writes home: 'We are willing to stay and finish the job, but we would like to hear that every last effort is being used (at home) to get it over with. Good news from home in this respect will give us a double boost. We will know that you are behind us 100 per cent, and that weapons we need will be flowing this way in an ever increasing stream.' Sgt. Gordon D. Hale, of Manlius, paints a vivid picture of the Tunisia campaign in a letter received this past week by his brother, Curtiss M. Hale. They are sons of Mr. and Mrs. George H. Hale, Manlius, and Gordon has been in service more than two years in North Africa since last November. His wife is teaching school in East Syracuse. 'When you read in Time for Nov. 30 and immediate subsequent issues about the progress of the British Army, supported by American armored units, we were part of it,' he writes. 'Our baptism took place at a place still very much in the news and came to us through the air a la Stuka. Let me say that is one of the world's most horrible sensations when one of those things comes down on you. We have since discovered their bite isn't nearly as bad as their bark, but we didn't know that at first and so had some rather bad moments. As you have read, we were without adequate air support at the time, and they came over time and again unmolested. Altogether we were in the thick of that first mad scramble well over two weeks and it was a bad time. Some of the British boys with us who had been through Dunkerque said in many respects it was worse than that had been. So, having survived that, I guess we can take most anything form here on. Subsequent action that we have seen has been a great deal easier on the nerves. It makes a big difference whose planes are overhead. On the whole, our outfit has done a pretty good job and has even received a citation for one particular action...Our radio entertainment consists of listening to the news from London each night at 7 except when we're up in the thick of it. However, we have a victrola in the company now, which helps some. We also had a visit from our band the other day. First time we've seen them in Africa." Mentioning reading about manpower shortages 'back home,' Sergeant Hale wrote: 'I'm not going to say that we're glad to hear that you home folks are experiencing different shortages and hardships, but we would like to hear that every last effort is being used to get it over with. We definitely want to make this as short as possible and get back home. ...Sergeant Hale wrote that a picture appearing in Life magazine 'Is definitely not me, although by coincidence there are a number of boys in it from our regiment. It was taken on another ship and 'my double' is unidentified here,' " Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Sgt. Gordon D. Hale...who was wounded in action in Italy on May 26, has returned to service with his armored division. Sgt. Hale has been overseas since May, 1942, and entered the service in February, 1941. His wife, Mrs. Agnes Hale, and daughter Margaret, 3, reside in East Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "Sgt. Gordon Hale...who has been overseas for the past two and one half years, arrived Saturday to spend a three week's furlough with his wife and daughter in East Syracuse, and with his parents here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Mrs. Lewis Clark, of Boston, is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George H. Hale, having come to greet her brother, Sgt. Gordon Hale, who had returned from overseas. Sgt. Hale expects to leave Saturday for Lake Placid where he will be given a new assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "Gordon D. Hale and his wife of East Syracuse are doing their Christmas shopping at the army ground and service forces redistribution station post exchange at Lake Placid. A veteran of several months service in Italy and Africa, Corp. Hale...is awaiting new assignment. He was wounded in action in Italy May 26 and returned to active service before being returned home. A member of an armored division, he went overseas in May, 1942," The Post-Standard, 12/20/1944. "Sgt. Gordon Hale is now stationed at Fort Knox, quartermaster division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Manlius. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Hale have a son, born Monday August 27, in St. Joseph Hospital. Mrs. Hale was the former Agnes Stuck of East Syracuse. The baby has been named Timothy George Hale," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Hale, Harry. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll." "...yesterday...recruits...Marines...Harry Hale, 312 South st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/23/1941. "Harry E. Hale, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hale of South street was honorably discharged from the service on Dec. 22, after serving three years in the Pacific area with the Marine Corps. On Saturday, Dec. 29, he was married to Marie MacManus. The couple will reside in New York City where Mr. Hale as accepted a position with one of the railroads," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Hale, Irving. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Capt. Irving Hale is visiting his father, Anderson Hale, and his brothers at their home in Eagle Village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Hale, Judson B. Manlius. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday...Those inducted from Manlius were...Judson Hale for the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Arde Schramm of Weedsport, announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Claribel Schramm to Pvt. Judson Hale, Sr., of Manlius. Pvt. Hale is stationed at Camp Upton, L. I., The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Army wounded, European region...Sgt. Judson Hale; Judson Hale, father, Manlius RD 1," The Post-Standard, 4/14/1945.

Hale, Wesley I. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "First Lieut. Elizabeth C. Hale, Capt. Wesley I. Hale, a brother (of 1st Lt. Elizabeth C. Hale, daughter of Anderson Hale), has been overseas two years and is in the service and supply air transport command. He was graduated from Syracuse University, College of Applied Science, and lived with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob G. Smith, while attending the university. He has a wife and two children at Lake Charles, La., where he has a position with Mathison Alkali Works," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944.

Haley, Robert. Fayetteville. "Lieut. (j.g.) Robert and Mrs. Haley, who are living in Washington, D. C. where Mr. Haley is stationed, are visiting Lt. Haley's parents in Syracuse and are former residents of Fayetteville, were entertained by their guild group at a dinner at the Fayetteville Inn on Monday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Word has been received from Washington that Lt. (jg) Robert M. Haley, U.S.N.R., of Fayetteville-Manlius road, has been released to inactive duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Hall, Albert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Hall, Carlton W. Manlius. "Carlton W. Hall, S 2/c, of 534 Pleasant street, Manlius, N.Y., has been assigned to the crew of the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt, second of the Navy's new super aircraft carriers. The 45,000 ton carrier, named for the late President Roosevelt, is the first major combatant vessel of the modern Fleet ever to be named for an individual. Members of the ship's crew took pre-commissioning training at the Atlantic Fleet's Naval Training Station at Newport, R. I. Son of Mr. and Mrs. William L. Hall of the Manlius address, Hall attended Manlius high school before entering the Navy last March," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Hall, Robert Lawrence. Manlius. "The list of inductees from board 473...Navy...Robert Lawrence Hall, 534 Pleasant st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943.

Hamilton, Charles. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Tech. Sgt. Charles Hamilton has been given an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army and is spending some time with his sister, Mrs. Parker Gladden of Chapel street. Mr. Hamilton arrived in Fayetteville last Tuesday with his POW German shepherd dog, after spending three and one half years in the service and 18 months overseas with the 37th Infantry Scout Dog Platoon. The dog, captured from the Nazis, is his own individual war trophy, Hamilton stated. He is a well-known dog fancier. Miss Marie Moody, of Omaha, Neb., fiancee of Mr. Hamilton, is also spending some time at the Gladden home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Hammond, Robert. Manlius. "Gerald Ritz and Robert Hammond are the latest boys home from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/19/1946.

Hanbidge, William. Fayetteville. "William Hanbidge, 18, of 110 North Manlius Street, Fayetteville, a member of the Army Air Forces Reserve and a student at Syracuse University, met instant death yesterday when a light plane he was flying cracked up during a landing near Point Pleasant, W. Va. Hanbidge, a son of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Hanbidge, was landing in the field, where his companion on the flight, William S. Durkee, 26, of 120 Arsenal Drive, an instructor in the War Service Training program at Canastota Airport, had made a forced landing in another plane. Durkee was uninjured. Daniel McCoy of Ravenswood, W. Va., a passenger in the two-seater plane with Hanbidge, was critically injured, an Associated Press dispatch reported. Hanbidge, who received his private pilot license Monday, took off from Canastota Airport with Durkee Tuesday morning in a Taylor-craft plane owned by Sturtevant Pratt of 205 Clinton Street, Fayetteville, owner of the Pratt Printing Company, 217 Walton Street, to pick up another plane in West Virginia, for delivery at Canastota. The two took delivery and headed back yesterday morning. About 30 miles from Pleasant Point, Durkee ran into difficulty and put into a small airport to correct the trouble. Hanbidge, seeing his friend land, was setting his plane down when the fatal crash occurred. Hanbidge was a native of Ogdensburg and came to Fayetteville when his parents moved here 12 years ago. He attended Lennox Preparatory School at Lennox, Mass., and graduated from Fayetteville High School last June. He entered Syracuse University and was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. He was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Fayetteville. While at Fayetteville High School, he served as manager of the football team and was a member of the camera club, hockey and bowling teams and riding club..." The Herald-Journal, 3/9/1945.

Hand, Charles I. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "...Onondaga County men accepted yesterday were...Charles I. Hand, 122 W. Seneca St., Manlius..." Post-Standard, 11/19/1942. "Pvt. Charles Hand...has returned to Camp Gordon, Johnston, Fla., after a 14-day furlo. He is in the infantry. Pvt. Hand was a mail carrier in Manlius before entering service Nov. 18, 1942. He attended Manlius high school," The Post-Standard, 6/16/1943. "A family dinner was held at the Rod and Gun Club recently for Eugene Hand, Seaman 2/c, who has been home on furlough after training at Sampson Naval Base...Pfc. Charles Hand, a brother, is with the armed forces somewhere in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "Eugene C. Hand, fireman 2/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hand of 122 W. Seneca st., Manlius, is attending school at Gulfport, Miss., where he was transferred after completing boot training at Sampson. He entered service April 7. An older brother, PFC Charles Hand, is in the infantry in England," The Post-Standard, Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Hand, Clifford. Fayetteville. "Mrs. Clifford Hand has returned home after passing a week with her husband Pfc. Hand who is stationed with the air-borne infantry division at Camp McCall, North Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Pfc. Clifford Hand, stationed at McCall Field, North Carolina, will return to his post tomorrow after passing a ten-day furlough with his wife," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Pfc. Clifford Hand is passing a 12-day furlough at his home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Twins, a girl and boy, were born, Thursday, March 9, to Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Hand (Frances Revoir) at the People's Hospital in Syracuse. The babies have been named Donna Lee and Donald Clifford. Their father is serving with a Glider Infantry Division on maneuvers in the South," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944. "Corp. J. Clifford Hand, who has been on maneuvers in the south, arrived home Thursday on a 7-day furlough to visit his wife and see the recent addition to his family, Donald and Donna, four-week-old twins who are still in the hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "Mrs. Clifford Hand left last night to spend a week with her husband, Cpl. Hand, in Nashville, Tenn. Her children are spending the week with their grandparents, in Central Square," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Donald and Donna Hand, year-old-twins of Sgt. and Mrs. Clifford Hand are under treatment at Syracuse Memorial Hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "Sgt. Clifford Hand was stationed at Luneville, France, and his brother Sgt. James Hand was stationed in Germany. A few weeks ago Sgt. Jim was sent to a rest camp in Riviera, France. About the same time Sgt. Clifford was given a 7-day furlough and he decided to visit the Riviera. In due time he arrived, and while standing in front of the USO, Sgt. Cliff saw a U. S. soldier coming down the street and there was something familiar about him. As the GI came closer Sgt. Cliff recognized his brother Jim whom he had not seen in about five years. They both wrote the same thing home--'Believe us we had a swell seven days together.' The Hand boys are sons of Joseph Hand of Green street. Sgt. Clifford Hand's wife and twin children live at 104 Salt Spring street in Fayetteville, while Jim's wife and six months old daughter live in California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Sgt. Clifford Hand has been honorably discharged from service after spending one and one-half years with the 17th airborne division overseas, and in the service three years. Arriving in this country last Thursday from Europe he reached home early Monday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Hand, Eugene. Manlius. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Navy...Eugene C. Hand, 122 W. Seneca St., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944." A family dinner was held at the Rod and Gun Club recently for Eugene Hand, Seaman 2/c, who has been home on furlough after training at Sampson Naval Base...Pfc. Charles Hand, a brother, is with the armed forces somewhere in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "Eugene C. Hand, fireman 2/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hand of 122 W. Seneca st., Manlius, is attending school at Gulfport, Miss., where he was transferred after completing boot training at Sampson. He entered service April 7. An older brother, PFC Charles Hand, is in the infantry in England," The Post-Standard, Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Eugene C. Hand, fireman 2/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hand of 122 W. Seneca st., Manlius, is attending school at Gulfport, Miss., where he was transferred after completing boot training at Sampson. He entered service April 7. Another brother, PFC Charles Hand is in the infantry in England," The Post-Standard, 6/25/1944.

Hand, James. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Corp. James Hand, son of Mr. Joseph Hand of Green street, joined the rank of benedicts when he was married to Miss Peggy Dwyer of Ellendale, Minn. at Praesidio Post, San Francisco, Calif., where he is stationed with the headquarters Fourth Army...After their honeymoon, they will reside in San Francisco," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Sgt. Clifford Hand was stationed at Luneville, France, and his brother Sgt. James Hand was stationed in Germany. A few weeks ago Sgt. Jim was sent to a rest camp in Riviera, France. About the same time Sgt. Clifford was given a 7-day furlough and he decided to visit the Riviera. In due time he arrived, and while standing in front of the USO, Sgt. Cliff saw a U. S. soldier coming down the street and there was something familiar about him. As the GI came closer Sgt. Cliff recognized his brother Jim whom he had not seen in about five years. They both wrote the same thing home--'Believe us we had a swell seven days together.' The Hand boys are sons of Joseph Hand of Green street. Sgt. Clifford Hand's wife and twin children live at 104 Salt Spring street in Fayetteville, while Jim's wife and six months old daughter live in California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Joseph Hand left Tuesday morning for San Diego, Calif., to visit his son James Hand who has recently been discharged from the U. S. Army. He plans to be gone a month," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Hand, Joseph C. Fayetteville. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station......Joseph C. Hand, 104 Salt Springs st., Fayetteville" The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "On the West Point, which arrived at Newport News Tuesday...Sgt. Joseph C. Hand, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/16/1945.

Handville, Melvin. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Corporal Melvin Handville of the New York State Police, stationed at the Fayetteville patrol, whose order number in his draft district is 44, expects to be called for training next month. In view of this, Captain McGrath advanced Handville's vacation period which was scheduled to begin January 26, and he left Monday on a three week's trip to Florida," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1941. "Maastricht, Holland, Wednesday, Sept. 20.--A wild-eye attempt by the Germans to flood and blow up a large part of this ancient Dutch city, as a sort of farewell present, went to pieces due to the combined courage and headwork of the Dutch underground and the American troops working with them. The flooding stunt was frustrated by a doughty band of American engineers, who capture the lock on the Maas Canal which the Germans had mined with the intention of unleashing a 20-foot head of water onto the city. Sneaking up to the bank of the canal under direct observation, engineers, under the command of Lt. E. G. Gro of Emmons, Iowa, lowered rubber boats down its sheer side to a point where eight American infantrymen, hiding in a tunnel, caught hold of them. The American squad then lowered itself and the boats to the canal surface and, accompanied by Gro, paddled 500 yards along it to the lock. There they overpowered a German officer and four men they found asleep and prepared the way for a larger force, headed by Lt. Col. Paul McCollum of Highpoint, N. C., to occupy the lock. They were nicely in position when 90 Germans came along to blow the lock and were neatly put into the bag. The plan to blow up the key buildings of the city began to work when a large package of TNT, concealed in a piano, blew up the building. Capt. Melvin C. Handville of Syracuse, N.Y., knew the answer to this situation. Capt. Handville had arrived at the Gestapo headquarters in Maastrict less than an hour after the Gestapo had left and had nabbed three Gestapo men who were busily destroying documents. Handville decided to give...(them)...a free tour of the town before sending them elsewhere and on that tour he gave them a chance to point out objects of interest. At the end of the trip he had a list of every building that had been mined; they were evacuated, and later the mines were removed. Two blew up before our engineers could operate on them but nobody was injured. Lt. Gro and Capt. Handville always will have a particular affection for Maastricht, and Maastrict, if it knows anything about them, will probably feel pretty friendly towards them. Capt. Melvin Handville, formerly Corp. Handville of the State police, was for a long period with the Fayetteville State police patrol and was known to many in Syracuse and vicinity. He joined the Army in February, 1943, as a private and on induction was sent to Fort Niagara," The Post-Standard, October1944. "A former state trooper with the Fayetteville patrol, now Capt. Melvin Handville, assisted in evacuating from 30,000 to 53,000 Dutch civilians to safety after the retreating Nazis drove them down one main highway in an effort to impede the American advance, according to an account from European army headquarters. He and two American majors supervised the mass movement. Capt. Handville, with army intelligence of the infantry, is credited with uniting a blind man with his Seeing Eye dog after first seeing the dog with a handle on his harness and later meeting the old man groping his way with the crowd. The captain entered service in 1940, leaving Fayetteville. He has a sister in South Butler and a brother, Raymond Handville, with the state department of education in Albany," The October 31, 1944.

Hanlon, Francis B. Manlius. "Selective service board 473 of East Syracuse sent 16 registrants into the armed forces last Monday...They are...Francis B. Hanlon, 117 Academy st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 6/1/1945.

Hanson, Paul W. Manlius. "On the USS Chester in the Pacific.--Paul W. Hanson, seaman second class, USNR, of Manlius, N. Y., served on this heavy cruiser when she helped occupy the Hokkaido-Aomori-Ominato area of northern Japan. The Chester, with other fleet units, steamed through Tsugaru Strait and Sept. 8 anchored a short distance from Ominato Naval Base. The cruiser saw action in the Marshalls, Wake, Marcus, Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima, Tarawa, Wtoje, the Battle of the Coral Sea, Tulagi, the Aleutians, Paramushiro, Chichi Jima, the Battle for Leyte gulf and operations in the East China Sea," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945. "Paul W. Hanson, seaman 2/c, USNR, of Manlius served on the USS Chester, heavy cruiser, when she helped occupy the Hokkaido-Aomori-Ominato area of northern Japan," The Post-Standard, 10/17/1945.

Hanson, Robert. Fayetteville. "With the Fifth Army, Italy--Sergeant Robert E. Hanson, son of Mrs. Esther E. Hanson, who resides on Stonybrook, Salt Springs road, Fayetteville, N.Y., has been promoted to staff sergeant on the Fifth Army front in Italy. S/Sgt. Hanson is a squad leader with the 85th Mountain Infantry Regiment of the 10th 'Mountaineer' Division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "With the Fifth Army, Italy.--Staff Sergeant Robert E. Hanson, of Fayetteville, N. Y., recently was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious service in combat in Italy. He serves with the Fifty Army in the 85th Mountain Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division. His mother, Mrs. Esther E. Hanson, lives at Stonybrook on Salt Springs Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945.

Hanson, Victor A. Formerly town of Manlius. "Victor A. Hanson, former Syracuse university football coach and Syracuse's greatest athlete, has enlisted in the army as a private and will be sworn into service tomorrow morning...Vic is 40 years old and had been doing war work in Wilmington, Del., for several months. He had been turned down in previous attempts at enlistment because of his age, but has kept on trying until he obtained special consent from Washington. A graduate of Central high and Manlius schools, where he was an outstanding athlete in every branch of sports, Vic enrolled at Syracuse university in 1923 and became an All-American in football and basketball. He was signed to a professional baseball contract by the New York Yankees after graduation and starred in professional basketball with the Cleveland Rosenblooms and later as owner of his own pro team, the Syracuse All-Americans. He coached varsity football at Syracuse for eight years and became one of the better known mentors in the country. Since leaving the Orange, Hanson coached and taught at Freeport, L.I. high school and at Manlius. Married and the father of two children, Vic will be sent to Camp Upton tomorrow morning," The Post-Standard, 12/7/1943.

Hapeman, Charles N. (Tink). Manlius. "Charles N. Hapeman, A/S., son of Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Hapeman of 601 Pleasant st., Manlius, has been transferred from the navy V-12 unit at Central college, Fayette, Mo., to the NROTC, V-12 unit at Rensselaer Polytechnic institute. The Central college unit was disbanded Oct. 24, and its trainees were sent to Troy after a six-day leave. A/S Hapeman received a certificate of achievement from the college," The Post-Standard, 11/4/1945.

Harrington, Robert R. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "The OWI...reported the following soldiers as wounded in the European area...Pfc. Robert R. Harrington, Mrs. Cora B. Harrington, mother, Kirkville RD 2," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hart, Peter. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hart, William L., Jr. Kirkville. "Pvt. William L. Hart, Jr., husband of Mrs. Mildred Hart of Kirkville...arrived at Camp Wolters, Tex. to begin training as an infantryman," The Post-Standard, 9/19/1944. "Mrs. Mildred Smith Hart and daughters are rejoicing over the arrival of their husband and daddy from overseas. He is spending 47 days at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Harter, Willard. Manlius. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...Willard Harter from Manlius...Harter...will see service in the U. S. Navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Seaman Second Class Willard C. Harter, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Harter of Manlius enjoyed a visit with his wife and immediate family. He completed basic training at Sampson Naval Training Station and is now stationed at Philadelphia Navy Yard awaiting ship assignment, "The Post-Standard, 10/30/1943. "Willard Harter of the U. S. Navy has been called home by the serious illness of his father, Clarence Harter," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Clarence J. Harter died Friday, May 18 at his home at 145 West Seneca street, Manlius, following an illness of several months. Surviving are his wife, Stella Tuttle Harter; one daughter, Mrs. Myrtle Ingerson; four sons, Glen, Wendell, Edward and S 1/c Willard Harter; one sister, Mrs. May Taylor; two brothers, Henry and Gardner Harter, of Cazenovia; six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945.

Harter, William E. Minoa. "Cortland F. Parsons, seaman 2/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Parsons of Minoa, is stationed at Pensacola, Fla., where he has been assigned to attend aerial gunnery instructor's school. William E. Harter, 18, another son of Mr. and Mrs. Parsons, has enlisted in the coast guard and is at Manhattan Beach for boot training," The Post-Standard, 3/25/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Harter, William E., 305 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Hartley, James. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. " 'Let's go to New York!' Just like that they said it one night about 9:30 o'clock and just like that they loaded into Nicky Bahouth's old jalopy and were off. Five of them--Jimmy Kieley, Bob Pierce, Joe Bracken, Bob Cole and of course, Nicky. Enroute they met Lou Spellman hitchhiking to Fayetteville from Schenectady, so Lou went along, too. When they reached New York they proceeded to look up their old pal Jimmy Hartley, and because none of them had ever been in the big city before they had their troubles. After making a couple of phone calls to Fayetteville, they located Jimmy at the Naval Recruiting Station. Hartley said he wouldn't have been any more surprised if the whole Jap army had walked in on him. A good moral to this story is that if Nicky's 'relic' can make New York and back without any trouble (?) the majority of our cars will last many years yet. The boys refuse to commit themselves as to how far authorities would allow them drive into the metropolis or how long it took them on the road, but from the shine on the seats of their trousers when they got home, it must have been a plenty," The Herald-Journal, 8/1942, Vail scrapbook. "...Word was received...yesterday from Jim Hartley, pharmacists mate 1/c, by his mother, Mrs. Alma Hartley of 110 Edwards street, that he had met and talked for a couple of hours with Coughlin somewhere in the Pacific. The boys enlisted in the Navy together and left May 9, 1941..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "Ph. M. 2/c James Hartley, U.S.N., is visiting his mother, Mrs. Alma Hartley at their home on Edwards street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Anna Jane Volles "met her tragic death last Sunday morning when an automobile in which she was a passenger skidded in the highway in East Genesee street, crossed the road, went over the curb, struck two trees and crashed into a telephone...Other passengers in the car involved in the accident were Ph. M. James Hartley of Center street...and George Fellows, U.S.N., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Fellows of Manlius. Both young men, stationed at Sampson, were home on leave...Fellows, who suffered numerous lacerations, has been taken to Sampson Naval Hospital from the University hospital, and Hartley was to have been removed there on Thursday. Hartley was said to have suffered forehead and cheek lacerations, a fractured skull and chest injuries...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "A $4,000 settlement on the death of Ann Jane Volles in an accident last July was approved by Surrogate Milford, Monday, The petition was made by Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Volles, parents of Ann Jane. The action was against two members of the motor party, Ph. M. James Hartley and S/1c George Fellows of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/28/1945.

Havill, Raymond D. Fayetteville. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday...From Fayetteville...Raymond Havill...who will serve in the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Pfc. Ray Havill has returned to Fort Snelling, Minn., after passing 15 days with his wife and parents here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "With U. S. Forces in Belgium.--Men of the 735th Railway Operating Battalion, among them 101 New York soldiers, have been assigned to one of the most vital lines in Belgium, a line the Luftwaffe tried to disrupt during the German counter-offensive in December. The railway unit, among those which operated the Normandy lines during the earlier stages of fighting on the Continent, kept the priority consignments of tanks, guns, ammunition and petroleum rolling to depots in the forward areas despite German hit-and-run raiders and difficult operating conditions. When the railroad men were not operating trains, they were guarding their assembly yards. Cpl. Raymond D. Havill, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Havill, Sr., of East Genesee street, Fayetteville, is a member of the 735th Railway Battalion. His wife, Mrs. Christine Havill, resides at 405 Warren st., Fayetteville. Working with Belgian civilian railroad men, these men now operate American British, Belgian, French and occasionally German locomotives, hauling vital supplies from a Belgian port to distribution areas. They operate at night under rigid blackout restrictions, guided only by the almost invisible signal lights," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945.

Hawkins, Edwin G. Manlius. "Among those sworn in at the induction center on Tuesday for military service were six local men...Edwin G. Hawkins...of Manlius will go into...the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Edwin Hawkins...left Syracuse early Tuesday morning for Camp Upton, L. I., having recently been called for service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Pvt. Edwin G. Hawkins of the Army Air forces has gone to Kearns Field, Utah, after passing a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hawkins of Smith street. He was formerly stationed at Greensboro, S. C., The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Pvt. Edwin G. Hawkins...is serving with the Army Air Forces in England. Pvt. Hawkins received his basic training at Greensboro, N. C., and later was transferred to Kansas Field, Utah, and Mountain Home, Idaho. He entered the service on Aug. 24, 1943. "Pfc. Floyd Hale of the 64th Fighter Wing stationed at an air base at Halle, Germany, flew to London, England, where he visited his schoolmate, Edward Hawkins, who is stationed at an air base outside London..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Pfc. Edwin G. Hawkins arrived Tuesday to pass a 32-day furlough with his parents...and sister Miss Donna Hawkins at their home in Smith street. Pfc. Hawkins has spent 18 months overseas stationed in England and has been away from home 21 months. The family are having a joyful reunion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945. "Pfc. Edwin Hawkins, who has been at home on a 45-day furlough, returned to Camp Dix on Monday and is expecting an honorable discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Hawkins, William J. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "If many more local boys enlist in the United States Navy appeal should be made to Uncle Sam to at least name a battleship after the village or give the village an interest in the Navy...Mr. and Mrs. William Hawkins, whose son, William Jr., went last week to the Great Lakes Base, entertained Tuesday night at their home in Thompson street at a farewell part for the three new 'sailors-to-be' (Al Dykeman, James Kieley Muckey, Keene Sahm)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/27/1941. "William J. Hawkins...was recently advanced to the rating of aviation machinist's mate third class at the naval air station, Pensacola, Fla. Hawkins enlisted in the navy in March, 1941, and was sent to the naval training station at Great lakes, Ill., for preliminary training. He was transferred to Pensacola in October, 1941, and assigned to duty with the ground crew. His latest promotion gives him a petty officer rating with a considerable increase in pay," The Post-Standard, 5/29/1942. "William Hawkins, Jr., petty officer in the navy Air Corps, at Pensacola, Fla., is passing a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Hawkins, Sr..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "William Hawkins, Jr., aviation mate, first class, left Thursday for Pensacola, Fla., after passing a 15-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Hawkins..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include...William Hawkins..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Hayes, John R. Kirkville. ""The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday...Army...John R. Hayes, Kirkville, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 1/6/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hayes, Paul J. Kirkville. "The following officers and enlisted men have been discharged from the army at Fort Dix, N. J.,..T/4 Paul J. Hayes, Kirkville, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 12/25/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Haynes, Charles E. Manlius. "Selective service board 473 of East Syracuse sent 16 registrants into the armed forces last Monday, it announced yesterday. They are: Charles E. Haynes, Jr., 227 Seneca st., Manlius..." The Post-Standard, 6/1/1945.

Hearn, Julian G., Jr. Formerly town of Manlius. "A graduate of Manlius school, Lt.-Col. Julian G. Hearne, Jr., of Wheeling, W. Va., discovered an unexpected talent in the South Pacific jungles while commanding the 24th Infantry regiment. He became a song writer. Col. Hearne has written 12 songs since October, 1943, when he decided to write a marching song for the infantry. The song has been submitted to Lt.-Gen. Leslie J. McNair, commanding general of the army ground forces, for consideration as the official infantry son. Units of his command were on Bougainville in March, when an estimated 8,000 Japanese were killed trying to destroy the American beachhead position. Col. Hearne was graduated from Manlius in 1922 and entered active duty in 1941. His songs include three marches, a hymn, 'God Sustain Our Armies Today,; presented in March over the Blue network; two waltzes, a few popular tunes and two humorous songs," The Post-Standard, 6/11/1944.

Heels, James. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Heels, Ray. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Heffernan, John. Manlius. "Sgt. John Heffernan of Tinker Field, Okla., has been spending a 12-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Heffernan.

Heffernan, Malcolm. Manlius. Joined the service during World War II when he was 16 years old, per Mac Heffernan.

Heigle, Raymond F. Minoa/Kirkville. "Selective service board 473, East Syracuse, has accepted a total of 40 men for Army and Navy duty who will report at Fort Dix, N.J. and at Buffalo reception center respectively Wednesday for final induction. They are: Army. Raymond F. Heigle, 239 N. Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 2/16/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Heigle, Raymond F., 239 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y." Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Heisler, Kenneth. Manlius. "Pvt. Kenneth Heisler, now stationed in Kentucky, is passing a ten-day furlough at home, returning today," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Kenneth Heisler of the Army, who has been stationed in the South Pacific arrived in the States and expects to be home within ten days. His brother, Warren, has received his honorable discharge from the service and returned to his home in Morrisville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946.

Heisler, Warren H. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Warren H. Heisler...of Manlius...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Warren H. Heisler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Heisler, 302 North St., Manlius, is studying aviation mechanics at the Amarillo air field, Amarillo, Tex.," Post-Standard, 12/17/1942. "Warren H. Heisler...is studying aviation mechanics at the Amarillo airfield, in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/1943. "Warren Heisler and Mrs. Clayton Heisler, of Chittenango, visited Mrs. A. Hotchkiss on Tuesday. Warren has received an honorable discharge from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Henderson, Hugh. Manlius. "Board 474 sent seven men, five of them taken by the army...Hugh Henderson of Manlius, RD," The Post-Standard, 12/7/1944.

Henderson, Wesley Britton. Kirkville. Inducted from Board 473...Wesley Britton Henderson, Kirkville, RD 1" The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942. "The army examiners inducted 30 men from East Syracuse Local Board 473...Wesley Britton Henderson, Kirkville..." The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942. Army release at Fort Dix yesterday, S/Sgt. Wesley B. Henderson, Kirkville, RD 1, The Post-Standard, 1/17/1946. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Henderson, William H. Manlius. "William H. Henderson, S 1/c, U.S.N., has just returned from the South Pacific and is spending a 30-day leave with his mother and family of Brickyard Falls Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Hendrikson, Leslie. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Herald, Ernest S. Manlius. "Pvt. Ernest Herald, of Buffalo, visited his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Herald, last week at their home on the Manlius-Fayetteville Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "Ernest Herald of the U. S. Army stationed in Buffalo, has been released from service and joined the police force in that city," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943.

Herman, Frederick. Fayetteville. "While Frederick Herman, formerly a Newburgh boy, was apparently whiling away his time when on summer vacations at the home of his aunt, Mrs. John Mott (Fayetteville), he was dreaming and planning of the day when he would go to sea and return and write a story of his experiences, getting his idea from Joseph Conrad's sea stories. Each vacation, Fritzie, as he is called by those who know him best, came to his aunt's home in Center street. His two brothers, Billy, now a corporal serving in Australia, and Homer H., Jr., now a sergeant with armed forces in Africa, also came, but they were more of an active type, playing ball, riding carts, etc., as Fritzie read and dreamed. So at the age of 20 he went to sea and has been a merchant marine ever since. And now at 25 he has completed his tale of submarines, bombings, heroism and death, giving it the title of 'Dynamite Cargo.' The story is told in a way that is new, vivid and his own. The book gets its name from the voyage of the Jason, which was loaded with dynamite and a member of a huge convoy of cargo ships, American and British, sailing from Britain to the White Sea and Russian ports. During the trip the convoy was subjected to one of the mightiest air attacks staged by the Nazis against shipping since the war began. The Jason got through, but the other ships did not. According to William McFee in the New York Times Book Review Section, and other reviewers, 'Dynamite Cargo' recently published, is regarded as a literary sensation. Miss Lewis of the Fayetteville Library states that the book is at the library. Read her book review on the subject in this issue," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "...here is just a snatch from it: 'Once when we had straggled afar (from the convoy), the flagship hove in sight and broke out a string of signal flags which advised us to consult St. Luke, Chapter 15, Verse 6. Young Hawley, the ensign, had a Bible...and he came up to the bridge with it and read the verse to the Old Man: 'And when he cometh home, he calleth together his friends and neighbors, saying unto them, Rejoice with me; for I have found my sheep which was lost,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Frederick Herman's 'Dynamite Cargo' was reviewed over the Columbia network at 11 o'clock last night. Mrs. John Mott, of Center street, aunt of Mr. Herman, received an advanced announcement of the broadcast from the author's father. Mr. Herman spent a few days recently in New York City, following a trip to Suez, and is off on another trip, according to Mrs. Mott," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943.

Herman, Homer P. Fayetteville. "Tuesday enlistments...Army...Homer P. Herman...Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/18/1941. "While Frederick Herman, formerly a Newburgh boy, was apparently whiling away his time when on summer vacations at the home of his aunt, Mrs. John Mott (Fayetteville), he was dreaming and planning of the day when he would go to sea and return and write a story of his experiences, getting his idea from Joseph Conrad's sea stories. Each vacation, Fritzie, as he is called by those who know him best, came to his aunt's home in Center street. His two brothers, Billy, now a corporal serving in Australia, and Homer H., Jr., now a sergeant with armed forces in Africa, also came, but they were more of an active type, playing ball, riding carts, etc., as Fritzie read and dreamed..., The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Mrs. John Mott has received word that her nephew, Homer Herman, who made his home with her here, and was injured in the Tunisia area has been returned to this country and is convalescing in the Woodrow Wilson Hospital in Virginia,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Sgt. Homer Herman has returned to the Woodrow Wilson Hospital for further treatment, after spending a ten-day furlough with his aunts, Mrs. John Mott and Mrs. Dorothy Francis. Sgt. Herman was wounded in the North Africa theater and spent four months in a hospital before he was returned to this country and placed in the Woodrow Wilson Hospital, where he had been for about three months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Sgt. Homer P. Herman, who suffered leg injuries overseas last summer has returned to the Woodrow Wilson Hospital for treatment after passing several days with his aunt, Mrs. John Mott," the Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "Sgt. Homer Herman has returned to the Phoenixville hospital in Pennsylvania for treatment to his leg, after spending a few weeks with his aunts, Mrs. John Mott and Mrs. Dorothy Francis at their home in Center street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Sgt. Homer P. Herman of Fayetteville...have returned from service overseas and are at the AAF redistribution station at Miami Beach, Fla. Sgt. Herman was an armorer in North Africa for 18 months..." The Post-Standard, 9/27/1944.

Herman, William. Fayetteville. "While Frederick Herman, formerly a Newburgh boy, was apparently whiling away his time when on summer vacations at the home of his aunt, Mrs. John Mott (Fayetteville), he was dreaming and planning of the day when he would go to sea and return and write a story of his experiences, getting his idea from Joseph Conrad's sea stories. Each vacation, Fritzie, as he is called by those who know him best, came to his aunt's home in Center street. His two brothers, Billy, now a corporal serving in Australia, and Homer H., Jr., now a sergeant with armed forces in Africa, also came, but they were more of an active type, playing ball, riding carts, etc., as Fritzie read and dreamed...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "William Herman has been given an honorable discharge from the Army and is spending some time at the home of his aunt, Mrs. John Mott, in Center street. Bill spent three years in the Pacific area and went through a very serious illness," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945. "Dear Editor: It would seem from Robert Petch's letter published in last week's Eagle-Bulletin, that the War Department is placing the blame for its own inadequacy in bringing the troops home, on labor. LIFE magazine has this to say in its Nov. 26 issue: 'By last week dozens of this war's invaluable 10,000 ton Liberty ships had joined older freighters in the rusting graveyards of the Mobile River, the James River and Suisun Bay near San Francisco. GIs in far replacement centers demanded that Liberty ships be used to carry them home. The National Maritime Union reinforced the GI plaint, threatened to strike if the War Shipping Administration did not act. Six CIO Maritime unions have been joined by one independent union in urging President Truman to investigate the failure to use 20 ships lying idle in the San Francisco area. The ships could carry anywhere from 400 to 7,000 troops each, the unions said. In New York City, the regional director of the CIO Marine and Shipbuilding Workers listed 11 shipyards where 51 merchant ships could be re-equipped in eight days as troopships capable of bringing 50,000 troops home. He added that there were facilities available in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Camden, Boston and New England ports for re-equipping 125 more ships. I, too, am interested in the truth and sincerely hope that the fore-going information will help to still the long-enduring prejudice against organized labor and give a clearer picture as to why the troops are not getting home quicker. Sincerely, Will Herman, Veteran 3 years, SWPA, Fayetteville, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Hess, Donald Charles. Minoa/Kirkville. "The army examiners inducted 30 men from East Syracuse Local Board 473...Donald Charles Hess, 222 DeSilva St., Minoa..." The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Hess, Donald, 222 DeSilva St., Minoa, N.Y." Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Hess, Raymond. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Hess, Raymond, 222 DeSilva St., Minoa, N.Y."

Heumann, Monroe. Formerly town of Manlius. "Monroe Heumann of Los Angeles, Calif., a post graduate of the Manlius school, has been admitted to the United States naval academy at Annapolis. Heumann entered a nationwide competitive examination for this appointment, finishing fourth among contestants. While at Manlius, he was corporal in Co. B of the ROTC battalion, played on the varsity football and tennis teams, was manager of the school hockey team, and a member of the company basketball team. He was awarded the athletic merit medal, served as art editor of the Haversack, student year book, and on the staff of The Windmill, student newspaper," The Post-Standard, 7/10/1942.

Hicks, Arthur. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). "Given a furlo was Pvt. Arthur C. Hicks of Maple dr., Fayetteville. Both are in a signal company of a motorized division at Camp Gordon, Augusta, Ga., The Post-Standard, 9/22/1942. "Pfc. Arthur Hicks, USA, and Kenneth Hicks, seaman 2/c, visited their parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Hicks, Sr., of Maple dr., Fayetteville, last week. A brother-in-law, Pvt. Walter R. Travers was also home on furlo at the same time," The Post-Standard 1/19/1944.

Hicks, Kenneth. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors...Called from Fayetteville are Kenneth Hicks, who goes into the Navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Kenneth Willard Hicks, seaman 2/c, of Maple dr., Fayetteville, has completed boot training at Sampson and has been granted leave," The Post-Standard, 1/12/1944. "Pfc. Arthur Hicks, USA, and Kenneth Hicks, seaman 2/c, visited their parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Hicks, Sr., of Maple dr., Fayetteville, last week. A brother-in-law, Pvt. Walter R. Travers was also home on furlo at the same time," The Post-Standard 1/19/1944. "Kenneth W. Hicks of Maple Drive is in a serious condition at St. Joseph hospital, undergoing treatment for injuries suffered when the car he was driving crashed into a tree...Hicks had fallen asleep at the wheel...fractured skull and a probable fracture of the left knee. Hicks was discharged from the Navy and returned home last week after service in the Pacific theater," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/3/1946.

Higgins, Clarence. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included...Corp. Clarence Higgins...all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Higgins, Marshall. Manlius. "Private Marshall Higgins, who is stationed at Fort Eustis, Va., Battery A, 11th Battalion, sent a snap shot of himself in uniform in a letter written to his mother, Mrs. Higgins, of Franklin street, last week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1941.

Higgins, Martin. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Mr. and Mrs. Leslie McDermott, Mrs. James Kelley of Syracuse and Miss Marie Leary left Sunday morning by motor for a vacation at Virginia Beach, Va., and a visit with Mrs. McDermott's and Mrs. Kelley's brother, Corporal Martin Higgins, of the 57th Coast Artillery, Camp Pendleton, Virginia Beach, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1941. "Corp. Martin (sic) Higgins of the 59th Coast Artillery Camp, Pendleton Virginia Beach, Va., returned to camp Thursday after spending a 10-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Wm. Higgins," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/18/1941. "Corp. Martin Higgins, who has been passing a 21-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Agnes Higgins, of Franklin street, left Thursday for Camp Pendleton, Va., where he expects to remain for some time as coast guard instructor. Corp. Higgins has served 18 months in Hawaii, and recently was returned to the States," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943.

Hildreth, Charles H. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hildreth, Robert G. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Hildreth, Truman G. Fayetteville. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Truman S. Hildreth, 54, died last Friday at his home on Walnut street...Surviving...are three daughters, Mrs. Edward Knapp of Buffalo, Mrs. Henry Kessler and Miss Alice Hildreth of Fayetteville; four sons, Truman G., of the U. S. Army, Albert, George and Gerald Hildreth, all of Fayetteville; his father, Truman S. Hildreth; two sisters, four brothers and four grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Pvt. Truman Hildreth has returned to March Field, Calif., having been called home by the death of his father, Truman A. Hildreth, Jr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. "Pvt. Truman Hildreth is home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "Truman G. Hildreth, 22, of 606 Walnut street, Fayetteville, N.Y., has been promoted to Technician 5th Grade in the Signal Corps, AAF, it was announced...by the commanding officer of the Seattle Fighter Wing. T/5 Hildreth is the brother of Mrs. Henry J. Kessler of Fayetteville. His brother-in-law, Cpl. Henry J. Kessler, is now in the armed service in Hawaii. "An enjoyable Thanksgiving was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Jerome of 605 Walnut st. Out-of-town guests were Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Pownall, Engineer 1/c Edward Stoll,, U. S. N., and wife, and Corp. Truman Hildreth and wife," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944.

Hill, Floyd F. Minoa. "Twenty-two 17-year-old youths...were enlisted yesterday in the naval reserve and transferred to the naval training center at Sampson...Floyd F. Hill, Minoa..." The Post-Standard, 12/17/1944. Possibly same as below.

Hill, Franklin. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Hill, Franklin, 229 McKinley St., Minoa, N.Y." Possibly same as above.

Hines, Earl A. Fayetteville. "Five soldiers from Syracuse and vicinity have been assigned to the reception center at Ft. Niagara. They are...Pvt. Earl A. Hines of Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 7/11/1942.

Hirsch, Leola, Miss. Fayetteville. Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Fayetteville has five women serving their country...Leola Hirsch...in the Nurses Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving...Nurse: Leola Hirsch...Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Funeral services for Miss Anna Jane Volles were held Tuesday afternoon at her late home in Thompson street followed by services in the United Church...Miss Volles is survived by her parents; three sisters, Betsy and Patricia, of Fayetteville, and Second Lt. Leola C. Hirsch, of Fort Dix, N.J.; a brother, Corp. David A. Volles, of Atlantic City, N.J., and her maternal grandmother, Mrs. David Jones, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "Lt. Leola Hirsch has returned to Fort Dix, after being in town to attend the funeral of Miss Anna Jane Volles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "Lt. Leola Hirsch, U. S. Army Nurse, has been transferred from Fort Dix, N. J., to Rhoads Hospital at Utica, N. Y. Miss Hirsch, when in Fayetteville, makes her home with Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Volles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945. "Lt. Leola Hirsch of 1343 Lancaster Ave., formerly of Manlius, is a patient in Rhoads hospital in Utica," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. "Lt. Leola Hirsch, of Rhoads Hospital, Utica, spent the week end with Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Volles at their home in Thompson street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Volles have announced the marriage of their foster daughter, Miss Leola Hirsch, to Lt. Kenneth H. Grawunder of Buffalo, N.Y. on Thursday, Jan. 3 at Buffalo. The bride is a lieutenant in the Army Nursing Corps, stationed at Rhoads Hospital, Utica, and Lt. Grawunder, who served in the infantry, is stationed at Buffalo," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Hirschfield, Donald M. Fayetteville. "Honorably discharged at Sampson...Donald M. Hirschfield, QM 3/c, 219 High Bridge st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/28/1945.

Hoag, Roger William. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included...Roger Hoag...all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944. "Eight 17-year-old youths from the Syracuse area enlisted in the Army Air Forces Enlisted Reserve today for call as aviation cadets on reaching their 18th birthday....Those enlisted were...Roger Hoag and Richard Lamprecht of Fayetteville..." The Post-Standard, 2/19/1944. "Roger William Hoag, son of Stanley Hoag of Center street, left Monday night for the Army induction center at Fort Dix. 'Bill' enlisted in the army air corps last summer, prior to his 18th birthday and only recently received his summons to report for service. Some of the 'boys' home on furloughs dropped in for a little surprise on Bill last Thursday night and tendered him a farewell, they re Pfc. Ed Lindenmayer, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Lt. (j.g.) Joseph McGraw, Pvt. George Phillips, Pfc. Eddie O'Donnell, East Syracuse, Milton Kepler and Bob Sims," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "A/C Roger (Bill) Hoag, of the Army Air Corps, has been transferred from Keesler Field, Miss., to the Army Air Field at Roswell, New Mexico. Bill entered the service on Jan. 16, 1945," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "Pvt. Roger W. Hoag is spending a brief leave at his home in Center street. Formerly stationed at Roswell, N. M., Pvt. Hoag will go to Keesler Field, Miss., at the conclusion of his furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945. "Roger Hoag has been given an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army and has returned to his home in Center street. Capt. Stanley Hoag, Jr., is also passing a short furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Stanley Hoag, Jr., and Roger Hoag have gone to New York, and will resume their aviation training at LaGuardia Field. The Hoag brothers served in the USAAF during the war," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/1/1946. "Stanley Hoag, Jr. and Roger W. Hoag, who are attending aviation school at LaGuardia Field, spent the Easter week-end with their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946. "Roger W. and Stanley Hoag, Jr. studying aeronautics at LaGuardia Field, New York, spent the weekend with their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/17/1946.

Hoag, Stanley, Jr.. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Stanley Hoag and George Coe expect to leave this week end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Hoag and family of Fayetteville were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. William Hoag in Kirkville. Stanley Hoag, Jr., who has enlisted in the Army Air Corps and was accepted, expects to be located in Alabama," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/6/1942. "Stanley Hoag, Jr. of Fayetteville spent a few days this past week with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William Hoag," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hoag visited their grandson Stanley Hoag, Jr. of Fayetteville, Friday evening. Young Hoag left for Kelly Field, Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/24/1942. "Stanley Hoag, Jr., who enlisted in the U. S. Air Corps some time ago, has been called to duty, and left Saturday night for training camp in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/24/1942. "Aviation Cadet Stanley D. Hoag, Jr.... has completed his primary training at Victory field, Vernon, Tex., and is now taking basic training at Perrin field, Sherman, Tex. Hoag entered the air forces April 18. He is 21 years old and a graduate of Fayette high school," The Post-Standard, 101/3/1942. "Stanley D. Hoag, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley T. Hoag of this village, has received his silver wings and is now a full fledged pilot in the U. S. Army. Lt. Hoag enlisted in the air corps in January 1942 and was called for basic training in April. He has spent the nine months training at bases in Texas and with the largest number of war birds in the history of the army air force, received his wings at Randolph Field last Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/15/1943. "Second Lt. Stanley Hoag of the U. S. Air Force, who received his wings in January, paid his parents...a surprise visit this week, arriving home at 5 a. m. Tuesday. He left Thursday evening for his new post in Missouri," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/19/1943. "Allied Headquarters in the Southwest Pacific--Lt. Stanley D. Hoag, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Hoag, 110 Center street, Fayetteville, was among the eight U. S. Army fliers from New York State who were awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross by Lt. Gen. George C. Kenney, commander of the Allied Air Forces in the Southwest Pacific area. The awards were made 'for extraordinary achievement while participating in 200 hours of operational flight missions in the Southwest Pacific area during which hostile contact was probable and expected.' The citations said the eight airmen displayed 'outstanding courage, ability and devotion to duty' during these flights were included long range bombing missions against enemy airdromes and installations and attacks on enemy naval vessels and shipping," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Letters From Our Boys In Service / "Stanley D. Hoag, Sr., has received the following letter from headquarters, 5th Air Force, regarding his son's recent decoration: Dear Mr. Hoag; Recently your son, Lt. Stanley D. Hoag, Jr., was decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross. It was an award made in recognition of courageous service to his combat organization, his fellow airmen, his country, his home and to you. He was cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flights in the Southwest Pacific Area from June 1 to August 19, 1943. He took part in more than 50 missions, dropping supplies and transporting troops over territory that was continually patrolled by enemy fighter aircraft. Often landings were made on fields which were only a few miles from Japanese bases. These operations aided considerably in the recent successes in this theatre. Almost every hour of every day your son, and the sons of other American fathers, are doing just such things as that here in the Southwest Pacific. Theirs is a very real and very tangible contribution to victory and to peace. I would like to tell you how genuinely proud I am to have men such as your son in my command, and how gratified I am to know that young Americans with such courage and resourcefulness are fighting our country's battle against the aggressor nations. You, Mr. Hoag, have every reason to share that pride and gratification. Very sincerely, George C. Kenney, Lt. Gen., Commanding," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Mrs. Jessie Rogers Hoag, wife of Stanley D. Hoag, died suddenly Monday at Crouse-Irving Hospital while undergoing a major operation...surviving besides her husband is one daughter, Norma J. Hoag of Utica; two sons, Lt. Stanley D. Hoag, Jr., a flier in the Army Air corps, stationed in the Pacific area, and Roger W. Hoag of Fayetteville; her mother, Mrs. James Rogers of Liverpool; two sisters, Mrs. Stanley Roof of Liverpool and Mrs. Grace Jerrald of Utica; one brother, John Rogers, of Liverpool," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Stanley Hoag, who is serving with the Fifth Army Air Force in the Pacific has been promoted to the rank of captain, according to word received by his father...Capt. Hoag has been in the service 3 years and in the Pacific area for nearly two years, and was last home in April, 1943. At present he is acting as assistant squadron engineer officer awaiting his coming home orders," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Captain Stanley Hoag, Jr., is spending a 30-day furlough with his father...after two years in the Pacific theater of war. Entering the service in April, 1942, Capt. Hoag received his wings at Lake Charles, La., in January, 1943, and went overseas the following April. He has 2,200 flying hours to his credit and has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. He also wears ribbons designating his service in the Southwest Pacific and the Philippines. At the expiration of his furlough, Capt. Hoag will report to Camp Davis, N. C. He expects to go to school for further training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Capt. Stanley Hoag is home from Selman Field, Monroe, La., on a 15-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945. "Stanley Hoag, Jr. and Roger W. Hoag, who are attending aviation school at LaGuardia Field, spent the Easter week-end with their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946. "Roger W. and Stanley Hoag, Jr. studying aeronautics at LaGuardia Field, New York, spent the weekend with their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/17/1946.

Hobb, Adam. Minoa/Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Adam Hobb of Georgia spent a ten-day furlough with his parents at Rotnour Bridge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hobb, Philip. Minoa. "John Albanese and Philip Hobb left for Army service on Wednesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942

Hobbs, Guy E., Jr. Manlius. "Miss Norma Nelson and Miss Shirley Moffett left Wednesday for Memphis Tenn., where they will visit Guy Hobbs, Jr., who is a student in training in the Army Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Miss Norma Nelson and Miss Shirley Moffett returned Tuesday from Memphis, Tenn., where they visited Guy Hobbs, Jr., a student in the U. S. Army Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "Guy Hobbs, Jr., of the U. S. Navy is spending the week on furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hobbs. He arrived Saturday from Chicago, where he had been stationed, and expects to leave tomorrow for his new assignment in New York," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946. "Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hobbs and Mrs. Frederick Nelson entertained a group of friends at dinner Tuesday night of last week in honor of Guy Hobbs, Jr., of the Navy, who was home on leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946. "Guy Hobbs, Jr., now stationed in New York, spent the week-end with his parents in Moulter street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946. "Guy Hobbs, Jr., of the Navy, is at home on a 17-day leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/31/1946. "Guy E. Hobbs, 56, of the Pompey Center road, Manlius, owner and operator of a filling station in that village 25 years, died yesterday afternoon at his home after a long illness...He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mildred Nelson Hobbs; three sons, Guy E., Jr., and John M. of Manlius and James B. Hobbs of Chittenango; three sisters, Mrs. Bert Raymond of West Minot, Me., Mrs. George Nelson of New Gloucester, Me., and Mrs. Ronald Adkins of St. Petersburg, Fla.; a brother, William Hobbs of Turner; three grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews," The Goodfellow scrapbook, died 1/25/1956.

Hogan, Thomas. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Hogan and daughter, Margaret, left Wednesday to spend a few days in New York. Their son A/S Tom Hogan, who is stationed at Colgate university with the V-12 Navy program and who is on leave until Tuesday, accompanied them on the trip," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Thomas Hogan, A/S U.S.N.R., who has completed a year in the Navy-12, left Wednesday for his station at Colgate university after spending a 10-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Hogan, on Salt Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. Brother of Cadet John Montgomery Hogan, Manlius Military School. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Hogan, 211 Salt Spring street, Fayetteville. Graduated from Manlius School in 1944, and is now in naval training, "The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945.

Holden, Frank L. Kirkville. "Pvt. Frank L. Holden of the army air forces, stationed at Gardner Field, Taft, Calif., has returned there after a 15-day furlo with his mother, Mrs. Charles Rahn of Kirkville. He enlisted Dec. 1, 1942. In civilian life he was employed by Precision and Die Casting Co., Fayetteville. He expects to be sent to an MP school in Florida," The Post-Standard, 1/1/1944. Army release at Fort Dix yesterday, Pfc. Frank L. Holden, Kirkville, RD 1, The Post-Standard, 1/17/1946.

Holden, George. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "A/C George Holden of Chanute Field, Ill., is spending a few days with his father, Arthur Holden at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William Holden," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Cpl. George M. Holden has returned to his base at Courtland, Ala. after spending a week's furlough with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Clark Holden. Corporal Holden is a chief engineer in the A.A.F.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945.

Holmes, Theodore. Fayetteville. "Board 473, East Syracuse, disclosed that it will send 18 men for induction tomorrow...Theodore Holmes, Fayetteville RD," The Post-Standard, 8/3/1944. "Theodore Holmes, S 2/c who has been spending a few days with his wife and children at their home in Highbridge has returned to Sampson Naval Base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Theodore Holmes, S. 2/c, has completed a course in Radar at Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., and is now stationed at Newport, R. I.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/15/1944.

Holtz, Dale E. Kirkville. Accepted into the Navy, "The Post-Standard, 12/4/1943. "Seventeen men from Syracuse, one from Solvay and one from Kirkville have completed boot training at Sampson and have been granted leaves. They include...Dale Holtz of Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 1/22/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Holtz, Frederick F. Kirkville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Frederick D. Holtz...of Kirkville. Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to world War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Honors, Charles. Fayetteville. "The following registrants with their order numbers in selective service district 473, comprising the towns of Dewitt, Manlius and Salina, will be inducted into the army today: ...Charles F. Honors, 203 Brooklea dr., Fayetteville, Fayetteville..." The Post Standard, 3/19/1942. Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pvt. Charles Honors, stationed in California, has been spending a ten-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. John Honors, and his sisters, in Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1843. "Pfc. Charles Honors has been passing a 15-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. John Honors, of Brooklea Drive. He is stationed in Chico, Calif.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Pfc. Charles Honors of Chico Flying Field, California, is passing his furlough with his mother, Mrs. Mary Honors..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "Corp. Charles Honors left Wednesday night for Wichita Falls, Texas, after spending two weeks with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/15/1944. Navy release, Charles F. Honors, MoM 3/c, 209 Highbridge st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 10/22/1945."Charles Honors has been honorably discharged from the service and has returned to the home of his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/22/1946.

Honors, Charles F. (Pat). Fayetteville. "Charles F. Honors has been accepted in the U. S. Navy and left last week for Sampson where he will undergo his boot training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Honors, Francis. Fayetteville. "A/S C. Francis Honors of Sampson Naval Base, spent a few days this week with his family in Highbridge street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944.

Honors, Jerry. Fayetteville. "Jerry Honors S 2/c, has just completed his boot training at Sampson Naval Base and is spending the week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Honors in Highbridge st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/20/1945. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including ...Jerry Honors...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Honors, John J. Fayetteville. "Honorably discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N. J....Sgt. John F. Honors," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1945. Possibly same as below.

Honors, Joseph. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Joseph Honors has been transferred from Atlantic City to the Syracuse Army Base. He visited his mother, Mrs. John Honors, over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/22/1943. "Joseph Honors arrived home last week, honorably discharged from the U. S. Army, after serving two and a half years overseas in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. Possibly same as above.

Honors, Thomas. Fayetteville. "Thomas Honors, S 2/c, spent last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Honors of Highbridge street. He returned to Sampson for assignment, having completed his boot training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Tommy Honors...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Hooker, Dewitt Everett. Formerly town of Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Capt. Everett Hooker of Jacksonville Beach, Fla., formerly of Manlius School has been transferred to Atlanta, Ga. for the duration. His parents have been passing the winter at Jacksonville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/13/1942. "Dewitt Everett Hooker, son of Rev. and Mrs. Dewitt S. Hooker, formerly of Manlius, has been promoted to captain at the Army specialized training command at University of Florida. For 17 years Capt. Hooker was commandant at Manlius School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943.

?Hooker, Thomas P. Fayetteville. "Thomas P. Hooker has been promoted to the rank of major, according to word received by his brother, Richard M. Hooker of South Manlius street. Major Hooker is stationed with the Engineers aviation regiment in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944.

Hopkins, Louis A. Manlius. "Louis A. Hopkins, son of Louis Hopkins, of Smith st., has returned from the Islands to California and has been commissioned staff sergeant. Mr. Hopkins was returned to enter a military training school for officers, for a four-month period. He has served for four years with the National Guard and two years in the regular Army. The father received a photograph of his son in uniform this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942.

Hopkins, Peter J. Manlius. "Pvt. Peter J. Hopkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hopkins of Cazenovia Road, who has been at home on a 30-day furlough, returned to the hospital at Atlantic City, N. J. for further treatment. He is a nephew of Mrs. B. F. Haeberle of Manlius-Fayetteville Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945.

Hopstein, Burt. Fayetteville. "A/C Burt Hopstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Hopstein, has graduated from pre-flight school at San Antonio, Texas and has been transferred to Bruce Field, Ballinger, Texas for further training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Hopstein have returned from a trip to Texas, where they visited their son A/C Burt Hopstein at Bruce Field, Ballinger, Texas. While in Texas they also visited Pvt. Francis Woessner at Camp Maxie, and enroute home stopped to see Corp. Aden Marquisee at Camp Crowder, Mo., both local boys, who are in service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "A/C Burt Hopstein has graduated from Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas, and is now at Advanced Flying School at Moore Field, Mission, Texas, and will receive his wings, October 2, according to word received by his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Young Americans from every State in the Union and from Alaska and Haiti stood in long lines on the parking ramps of eleven advanced flying schools in the great Southwest today to receive silver pilots' wings in graduation ceremonies of the Army Air Forces Central Flying Training Command. Precision-trained in modern air combat, the bronzed and husky flyers need but brief transitional schooling before taking their place in the fighting armadas already blasting at the Axis on globe-straddling fronts. Central Flying Training Command schools, a part of the nation-spanning Army Air Forces Training Command, bestowing flying status on their graduates today included Burt R. Hopstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hopstein of 407 Salt Springs street, Fayetteville, and Robert B. Ingersoll, of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Lt. Burt R. Hopstein has returned to A.A.F.B.S. at Midland, Texas, after spending a fifteen-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Roger William Hoag, son of Stanley Hoag of Center street, left Monday night for the Army induction center at Fort Dix. 'Bill' enlisted in the army air corps last summer, prior to his 18th birthday and only recently received his summons to report for service. Some of the 'boys' home on furloughs dropped in for a little surprise on Bill last Thursday night and tendered him a farewell, they re Pfc. Ed Lindenmayer, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Lt. (j.g.) Joseph McGraw, Pvt. George Phillips, Pfc. Eddie O'Donnell, East Syracuse, Milton Kepler and Bob Sims," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "The War Department has announced the promotion of Burt R. Hopstein from the rank of Second to First Lieutenant in the AAF. Lt. Hopstein will return to Westover Field today after spending a six-day leave with his parents.... Entering the service June 18, 1942, Hopstein trained at Moore Field, Texas, where he received his wings. He was then transferred to Randolph Field and alter to air officers training at Randolph Bomber Field. From there he went to Midland, Texas, where he received his wings., and before coming to Westover, Lt. Hopstein was at Air Officers' Command School at Liberal, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945. "Mrs. A. H. Hopstein knew that her son, Lt. Burt Hopstein, stationed at Salinas Air Base in California, would prefer a lemon pie to a birthday cake, so she forwarded money to the Chamber of Commerce in Salinas, asking them to have some reliable baker make a large lemon pie and send it to Lt. Hopstein on his birthday (Sept. 2). Unable to find a baker who would do this, members of the C. of C. took the matter in their own hands and got one of their mothers to make the pie. Sunday, Sept. 2 being designated as V-J Day, a review was in order and following the presentation of colors, drill, parade, etc., the commanding officer called Lt. Hopstein and his crew out front and presented him with a large pie. After the pie feast Lt. Hopstein and his crew were taken on a 70-mile sight seeing trip along the coast," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945.

Hornig, Vernon F. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Vernon F. Hornig, 22, of Manlius, who increased his height an inch by a hanging apparatus last year to meet height requirements for the army air corps, was graduated from the Midland bombardier school in Texas this week and commissioned a second lieutenant in the army air corps. Lt. Hornig obtained his private pilot license under a CAA program in Syracuse, but last January was unable to enlist in the army air corps because he lacked 3/4 of an inch. He is a son of Mrs. Anne B. Barnes and husband of Mrs. Ethel Hornig, both of 312 E. Seneca st., Manlius. Lt. Hornig formerly was a shop worker and farmer," The Post-Standard, 1/29/1943. "Second Lt. Vernon F. Hornig, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Barnes and husband of Mrs. Ethyl E. Hornig, all of Manlius is completing his training on a Flying Fortress at Dyersburg, Tenn., where he is training with heavy bombardment crews for aerial warfare," The Post-Standard, 9/21/1943. "Vernon Freizer Hornig, A/C, of 312 East Seneca street has been promoted from 2nd lieutenant to 1st lieutenant according to a report from the War Department on May 1," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945.

Hottel, Ralph L. Manlius. "T/Sgt. Ralph L. Hottel, 125 High st., Manlius received an honorable discharge from the army at Cril General hospital, Cleveland, O.," The Post-Standard, 7/16/1945.

House, Edward A. Minoa. "Mr. Floyd House, son of Mrs. Carrie Smith, died suddenly Monday, October 13. Mr. House is survived by two sons, Donald of Rochester and Edward who is in the U. S. Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/17/1941. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...House, Edward A., 229 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

House, Edwin J. Manlius. (Watervale, Town of Pompey) "Brig.-Gen. Edwin J. House of the army air corps has been promoted to the rank of major-general, his second promotion since last March, an Associated press dispatch revealed yesterday. The announcement did not say where the Syracusan is now stationed. Maj.-Gen. House attended Central and North high schools in Syracuse before entering West Point military academy, where he was graduated in 1917. Altho he was in the army during the first world war, he did not serve in France, meanwhile attracting the attention of senior officers with his activity in aviation. In March, 1941, when he was flying a plane at an altitude of 10,000 feet as commanding officer of March Field, Panama Canal Zone, he was notified of his advancement to the full rank of colonel. A year later, he was elevated to a brigadier-generalship. Gen. and Mrs. House, the former Miss Helen LeBrun, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William A. LeBrun of Syracuse, live on 90 acres in the Sweet rd. near Pompey. Gen. House also has been stationed in Puerto Rico. He has been in the air corps about 25 years, receiving his wings the day after the armistice was signed in the first world war," The Post-Standard, 2/9/1943. "Maj. Gen. Edwin J. House, who arrived from Italy on Feb. 10, has been visiting his wife, at the home of her parents in Syracuse, and also visiting his father J. M. House and brother Ray, of Lynacres. Gen. House has four and a half years foreign service to his credit, and was ranking U. S. Air Force officer in the Italian battle area. He owns a farm near Manlius, on the Sweet Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/10/1944. Maj.-Gen. E.J. House of Sweet rd., Pompey, is in command of the 12th air support command in Sicily, giving air support to Lt-Gen. George S. Patton's Seventh army. He writes Mrs. House that he is living with Gen. Patton's group and says that Patton 'is a great soldier,' Bond scrapbook, n.d.

House, Irving. Manlius. (Watervale, town of Pompey) Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Walter House has received a letter from his son, Irving C. House, now stationed at Dawson Creek, British Columbia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943. "Pvt. Irving House, stationed in British Columbia, is passing a 15-day leave with his father, Walter House," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Irving House, who has been at home on a 20-day furlough, left July 5 for South Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "The wedding of Miss Shirley Gay, youngest daughter of E. L. Gay of Smith street, Manlius and Pfc. Irving House, son of Walter House, Manlius R.D., took place on Friday, May 4, at 6 o'clock in the Manlius Methodist church...The groom is stationed in New York with the U. S. Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/11/1945.

Houseman, Robert L. Kirkville. "The following officers and enlisted men have been discharged from the army at Fort Dix, N.J...T/5 Robert L. Houseman, Kirkville, RD 2," The Post-Standard, 12/18/1945.

Housman, Clifford. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Housman, Clifford, 128 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y."

Housman, Raymond Howard. Minoa. "The list of inductees from board 473...Army...Raymond Howard Housman, 128 Osborne st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Housman, Raymond H., 128 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y."

Howard, John. Fayetteville. "On Sunday, Nov. 25, at...Trinity Church, in place of the regular sermon, there will be an address given by Capt. John J. Howard, USA, who is in charge of the POW camp at Green Lake. Captain Howard comes from Southern Virginia where he is a layman in the Episcopal diocese," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Howe, Henry J. Formerly town of Manlius. "Henry J. Howe has been promoted to captain, according to word received by his mother, Mrs. H. J. Hadley, 1108 E. Genesee street. Capt. Howe is a son of the late Edward C. Howe and a grandson of Henry J. Howe, founder of the Howe jewelry store. A graduate of Manlius school and Princeton university, he was a partner in the Whalen-Howe Plating co. before entering service with the national guard in September, 1941. He enlisted in the army about two years ago and was stationed at Camp Perry, O., and Camp Bowie, Tex., before going overseas more than a year ago. In his V-mail letter to his mother he said the 'big boss,' assumed to be Gen. Mark Clark, had pinned the bars on him. A veteran of the African and Sicilian campaigns, he censors himself very severely and writes little of what he sees, Mrs. Hadley said. He did, however, mention the bad weather and Italian mud. Last October he wrote he had been hospitalized in North Africa but revealed nothing of the nature of the injury or illness," The Post-Standard, 4/22/1944.

Howell, David. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Howell, Paul. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Paul Howell has completed his boot training in the U. S. Marines at San Diego, Calif.; and is spending ten days with his wife and daughter at their home here. He will leave Sunday for North Carolina where he will receive further training in the Engineering Division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Mrs. Paul Howell has returned from Washington, D. C., where she went to spend the week end with her husband who was on leave from his base in South Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944.

Howell, Robert Sands. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Robert S. Howell of Manlius is one of 154 first lieutenants in the marine corps temporarily promoted to the rank of captain, the Associated Press reported last night from Washington. The Manlius man was made a first lieutenant in August, 1941. He has been in the marine corps since 1938. A graduate of Syracuse university, he was a battalion major in the ROTC when an undergraduate," The Post-Standard, 1/27/1942. "Robert S. Howell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Howell of North street, is one of 154 first lieutenants in the Marine Corps temporarily promoted to the rank of captain, the Associated Press reported last night from Washington. The Manlius man was made a first lieutenant in August, 1941. He has been in the Marine Corps since 1938. A graduate of Syracuse University he was a battalion major in the R. O. T. C. when an undergraduate," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/6/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Two former Manlius men, veterans of the marine corps fighting in the Solomon islands area, have been promoted to the rank of major, the marine corps headquarters announced yesterday in Washington. They are Maj. Robert S. Howell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Howell of North st., Manlius, and Maj. Guido F. Verbeck, Jr., son of the late Col. Guido F. Verbeck, former headmaster of Manlius school, and grandson of the late Gen. William Verbeck. Howell took part in the battle of Santa Cruz, stationed on a warship. Verbeck has been in the Guadalcanal area thruout the fighting there. Maj. Howell, a graduate of Syracuse university, was home for a one-day visit last New Year's. At that time he bore several minor shrapnel wounds of the face, received in the battle of Santa Cruz. He is again aboard a battleship," The Post-Standard, 30/20/1943. "Capt. Robert Sands Howell...has been promoted to rank of major in the Marine Corps, having served in the Marines for five years. He had the rank of lieutenant with the R.O.T.C. at Syracuse University when he was graduated about five years ago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Maj. Robert Howell, who has been visiting his parents...has returned to his base on the West coast," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Lt.-Col. Robert Howell, who has been passing a brief furlough with his parents...has left for the Pacific Coast," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/10/1944.

Howell, Thomas. Fayetteville. "Pfc. Thomas Howell, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Howell of 408 E. Genesee st., Fayetteville...has been awarded the army good conduct medal at the Atlantic City basic training center, AAF technical training command," The Post-Standard, 7/5/1943. "Nine men from the Syracuse area are stationed at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., army air forces basic training center...Corp. Thomas Howell, whose wife resides at 103 Ball st., East Syracuse, is shipping and receiving clerk with the 31st training group, and at the time he entered the army in April of 1942 he was employed as a welder by the Reiver butler Radiator corp. He attended Fayetteville high school and came to Jefferson Barracks Aug. 4, 1943, from Atlantic City," The Post-Standard, 3/23/1944.

Howell, Tim. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Hoyt, William H. Fayetteville. 15th AAF in Italy -- Pfc. William H. Hoyt, 27, whose family resides at Fayetteville, N. Y., is a member of a B-24 Liberator group that has been awarded unit citation, it was announced by 15th AAF headquarters. He is now entitled to wear the Distinguished Unit ribbon. The award was given for the precision bombing of the Bad Voslau, ME 109 fighter factory. This new factory, the pride of Hermann Goering, had just swung into production, when it was attacked by the 15th AAF. Despite intense flack and numerous enemy fighters, this particular group led its entire wing directly over the target, and literally wiped the factory off the face of the earth. Not one building was left untouched. Called by the press 'the finest example of precision bombing by Liberators,' the destruction was so complete the Nazis never made an attempt to rebuild the plant, or even remove the debris. Prior to his enlistment Sept. 12, 1942, Pfc. Hoyt was employed as a furnace operator," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944. "15th AAF in Italy--Pfc. William H. Hoyt, 35, shown loading 100-pound demolition bombs on a B-24 Liberator bomber said, 'Each time I load a bomb I think I'm making certain that my four boys will not have to take part in another war, and that the coming peace will be governed by the four Freedoms.' He is an ordnance worker in a heavy bombardment group that has over 100 missions to its credit. Pfc. Hoyt's wife, Rosalind, and four sons William, Donald, Robert and Richard live in Fayetteville, N.Y. He enlisted in the service of his country on Sept. 12, 1942," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944.

Hughes, John W. Kirkville. "Washington, Jan. 16. The war department announced today the names of 2,317 soldiers wounded in action in the European area including those with next of kin...Hughes, Second Lt. John W. - Mrs. Dorothy M. Hughes, wife, Minoa Beach, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 1/17/1945.

Hulbert, Carl William. Fayetteville. "Carl Hulbert, who has recently joined the merchant marine, left last Sunday for Sheepshead Bay for assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944. "Carl William Hulbert...who joined the merchant marines last December and is now stationed at Sheepshead Bay, training to become a cook and baker, spent a Sunday recently with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur N. Hulbert, 109 Thompson st., when he joined a family birthday dinner for his brother, Arthur G. Hulbert, of Marcellus. Carl is anxious to get into active service and cook some classy dishes for the men who are serving the country so gallantly, the Merchant Marine," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Carl Hulburt of the Merchant Marines, who is stationed at Sheepheads Bay, passed the week end with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hulburt," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "Carl Hulbert S.C. 2/c, of the U. S. Merchant Marine, will leave Sunday to resume his duties after spending a month's leave with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Hulland, Robert F., Jr.. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Four of the seven Onondaga boys who enlisted in the marine corps last week were high school athletes. Of these, three were two-letter men, and one earned his numeral in football alone...Robert F. Hulland, Jr., 17, of RD 1, Fayetteville, attended Fayetteville high school and combined sports with swing. He not only played football but the clarinet and saxophone in two local orchestras. His father, Robert F. Hulland, Sr., was a sergeant in the army during the first world war," The Post-Standard, 9/10/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hulland have been on a motor trip to South Carolina, where they visited their son, Robert Hulland, Jr., at Camp Beaufort," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/15/1942. "Robert Hulland, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hulland of Highbridge street, is in the U. S. Hospital at Parris Island, S. C., with a triple fracture of the leg, suffered in an accident several days ago. According to a letter received by his parents, Hulland was guiding a rope and assisting with the closing of the hangar door which had to be done with a tractor, when the tractor stopped suddenly, letting the door crash, and pinned his leg beneath it. The leg was also crushed badly enough to cause severe hemorrhages. Enlisting in the marine corps over a year ago, Hulland was graduated from Jacksonville training base and is a chief mechanic and rear gunner on a dive bomber. He was transferred to Parris Island several months ago where he serves at the Page Field Air Base when not on active patrol duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Pfc. Robert Hulland of South Carolina has been spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hulland. He returned Friday night to resume active duty at Paige Field, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Barbara Seitz and Robert F. Hulland, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hulland of Highbridge street this village. At present the young couple are residing at Port Royal, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Mrs. Robert Hulland has returned from a trip to Massachusetts and Parris Island, S. C., where she visited her sister and her son, Pfc. Robert Hulland and family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Mrs. Robert Hulland of Highbridge, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Margaret Wortman of Massachusetts, spent a few days recently with her son and daughter-in-law, Sgt. and Mrs. Robert Hulland. Sgt. Hulland is stationed at Page Air Field, South Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944.

Hullar, Francis J. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Mr. Francis Hullar left Friday for Fort Dix, N. J., where he will serve one year in army service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/5/1940. "Mr. and Mrs. F. Hullar, Mr. and Mrs. R. Hullar and Mr. and Mrs. G. Fabing are spending a few days with Francis Hullar, who is in Army Service at Fort Dix, N. J.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Corp. Francis Hullar of Oregon is spending a 15-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hullar," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Corp. Francis Hullar has returned to Oregon after spending a 15-day furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Francis I. Huller of this village (Minoa), formerly first sergeant with the 114th infantry, was awarded the New York State conspicuous service cross Tuesday in the office of Maj. Sidney Zimmerman, commanding officer of the 248th army air forces storage depot at the State fair grounds. Assemblyman Lawrence M. Rulison, former marine major, presented the award, which is given by the governor for the State legislature to men with army air force decorations from the air medal up. Huller, who was the first man drafted from Minoa, served overseas almost five years and is employed at the storage depot, won the silver star for action near Gros Rederching, France, Jan. 6, 1945. Leading a platoon, Huller organized a combat patrol which wiped out an enemy gun position, killed two Germans and captured four. Huller's mother, sister and two brothers formerly in service, attended the ceremony," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Hullar, Francis J., 129 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y.

Hullar, Raymond N. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Raymond Hullar of Fort Benning, Ga., spent a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Hullar," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Private Raymond Hullar has returned to Fort Benning, Ga. after spending a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Hullar," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/9/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Hullar, Raymond, 117 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Hullar, Vincent. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "The following registrants with their order numbers in selective service district 473, comprising the towns of Dewitt, Manlius and Salina, will be inducted into the army today: ...Vincent P. Huller, 129 Edgerton st., Minoa..." The Post Standard, 3/19/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private Vincent Hullar and Private Earl Fleigle of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Private Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Private Earl Fleigle and Private Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Pvt. Vincent Hullar and Earl Fleigle of Pine Camp visited relatives here over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1942. "Pvt. Vincent Hullar and Pvt. Earl Fleigle of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel and Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine spent the week-end visiting relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Pvt. Vincent Hullar of Pine Camp is spending a week's furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel of Pine Camp spent the week-end with his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel, Pvt. Vincent Hullar and Pvt. Harold Pollard of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Hullar, Vincent, 129 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Hullman, Dewey. Kirkville. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, ...Hallman (sic), Dewey Franklin, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hunt, Arthur E. Manlius. "Pvt. Arthur E. Hunt, whose wife lives at 153 W. Seneca st., Manlius, has won the right to wear wings and boots of the U. S. army paratroopers at Fort Benning, Ga. He has completed four weeks of jump training during which he made five jumps from a plane in flight, the last a tactical jump at night involving a combat problem on landing," The Post-Standard, 5/17/1944.

Hunt, Edward. Fayetteville. "At the annual commencement exercises held in the (Fayetteville) high school auditorium Tuesday evening...William Goebel and Roland Gage, who are trainees at Bainbridge Air Base in Georgia were present to accept their diplomas and were given a big welcome. John Ragus, Benjamin Proper and Edward Hunt, members of the class who are also serving the armed services were unable to be present, and their diplomas were accepted by their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "Sioux Falls, D.S.D.--Pvt. Edward A. Hunt III, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Hunt, Jr., of Woodchuck Hill Road, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been assigned to the AAF Training Command Radio School at the Sioux Falls Army Air Field, for training as a radio operator-mechanic. Upon completion of a 20-week course, he will be fully trained to take his place as a member of a highly skilled bomber crew of the Army Air Forces. Pvt. Hunt is a graduate of Fayetteville high school. He was inducted into the service at Camp Upton on April 12 of this year. He was also stationed at Keesler Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944.

Huntley, Fred Malcolm. Minoa. "Fred Malcolm Huntley, 18, seaman, 2/c, USNR, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Huntley of 204 Edgerton st., Minoa, is on duty aboard the USS LSM 555, a new landing ship medium which was constructed at the Charleston, S. C. navy yard and commissioned there Sept. 24. Huntley attended Minoa high school and was employed by the New York Central Railroad. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Huntley, Fred M., 204 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Hurd, William. Fayetteville. "Sgt. William Hurd, who has been stationed at Green Lake Camp for the past several months, has been transferred to Fort Dix, and his wife and daughter Joanne, who have been living in Fayetteville, have returned to their home in Collingwood, N. J.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943.

Hurst, Bertram. Fayetteville. "Bennett Coughlin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Coughlin of Salt Springs road and James Kinsella, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella have enlisted in the U. S. Navy and left this week for their boot training at Sampson Naval Base. Both Coughlin and Kinsella are graduates of Fayetteville high school, class of '44, and had been attending Syracuse university where Coughlin was a member of the Orange football squad. Joseph Devoy, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Devoy of West Genesee street and Bert Hurst, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hurst also of West Genesee street, recently inducted, went to the induction center in Syracuse Wednesday morning for assignment. Both Devoy and Hurst attended Fayetteville high school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944. "Pvt. Bertram Hurst, 18,... is stationed with a paratrooper division at Camp Croft, S. C. He attended Fayetteville high school and was employed by Precision Die Casting Co., before enlisting in December, 1944. His father is a veteran of world war one," The Post-Standard, 1/28/1945. "Pvt. Bertram Hurst has left his home at 210 W. Genesee street, once again, to join his buddies at Fort Benning, Ga., after spending a 19-day furlough with his parents. Having completed the prescribed course of parachute packing, ground training, and bailing out tactics, Hurst is now a qualified parachutist, and expects to see overseas duty soon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945.

Hutchins, Christine. Kirkville. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving...WAVES...Christine Hutchins, Kirkville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hutchins, Paul Hannibal. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hutchins, Putnam W. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Hymers, James D. Manlius. "Honorably discharged from the army at Fort Dix yesterday...James D. Hymers, 111 E. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 8/14/1945.

Ince, Reginald F. Manlius. "Following physical examinations Tuesday, four local men were accepted for army service. Inductees under new regulations are now permitted to choose between immediate entrance into service or following a two-week leave. The inductees are William Pfohl of Fayetteville; Reginald F. Ince, Francis C. Glazier and Charles W. Cunningham of Manlius," The Eagle Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Arrivals aboard USS Anne Arundel, at Tacoma, Washington...T/5 Reginald F. Ince, 14 Pleasant st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 12/22/1945. "Reginald Ince has received an honorable discharge from the Army and returned last week to his home in Pleasant street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Ingersoll, Robert. Manlius. "Young Americans from every State in the Union and from Alaska and Haiti stood in long lines on the parking ramps of eleven advanced flying schools in the great Southwest today to receive silver pilots' wings in graduation ceremonies of the Army Air Forces Central Flying Training Command. Precision-trained in modern air combat, the bronzed and husky flyers need but brief transitional schooling before taking their place in the fighting armadas already blasting at the Axis on globe-straddling fronts. Central Flying Training Command schools, a part of the nation-spanning Army Air Forces Training Command, bestowing flying status on their graduates today included Burt R. Hopstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hopstein of 407 Salt Springs street, Fayetteville, and Robert B. Ingersoll, of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Word comes from Louis Broadfield of this village (Manlius) and St. Petersburg, Fla., of the marriage on Friday, Oct. 25, of his nephew, Robert Bailey Ingersoll and Miss Barbara Davis daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Davis of St. Petersburg...Mr. Ingersoll attended Chittenango high school and also Junior College at St. Petersburg. He enlisted in the service in 1942 and was a lieutenant in the AAF serving in India, Burma and China, and was released in 1945 as a captain. He is now with the Consumer's Cold Storage and Locker Co. in St. Petersburg," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/8/1946.

Jackman, Richard A. Manlius. "Twenty-five men were inducted into military service from selective service board, 473, located in the municipal building, East Syracuse Friday...Navy...Richard A. Jackman, 125 High st., Manlius...... " The Post-Standard, 7/30/1945.

Jackson, Robert A. Minoa. "Sgt. Robert A. Jackson, son of L. H. Jackson of 240 S. Main st., Minoa, is stationed at New River, N. C. He enlisted in the marine corps at Poughkeepsie in December, 1942. His wife, the former Florence Bennett of Albany, is a Syracuse university graduate. Sgt. Jackson, a graduate of Syracuse university in 1939, was formerly employed by the International Harvester Co., Albany. He was a Post-Standard carrier boy," The Post-Standard, 8/18/1943.

Jacobson, Milton. Fayetteville. "Miss Maud McIsaac...has been engaged to fill the vacancy made by the resignation of Milton Jacobson, instrumental music teacher (Fayetteville High School.) Mr. Jacobson has been called in selective service and has left for the reception center," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1943.

Jaeggli, Ralph. Fayetteville. Class of 43, Fayetteville High School. Appears on service roll page.

Jeffery, Laurence. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Jeffery, Laurence, 224 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y.

Jenner, Charles W. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Charles W. Jenner, who enlisted in the Marine Corps Aug. 6 has completed his training at Parris Island, S. C., and is now stationed at Cherry Point, N. C. He made his home with Mrs. Florence Lindsley for six years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/6/1942. "Pvt. Charles Jenner, arrived Saturday night for a week-end visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Lindsley in East Seneca street, returning Tuesday. Charles has received a number of medals for meritorious work since his enlistment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Mrs. James Lindsley received a letter from Pfc. Charles Jenner who is stationed in Virginia, stating that he has now been made corporal. Corp. Jenner formerly made his home with Mrs. Lindsley," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Corp. Charles Jenner of Quantico, Va., is spending a 9-day leave at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Lindsley," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/23/1943. "Corp. Charles Jenner has been ill with the flu for two weeks in the hospital at Quantico, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Mrs. James Lindsley has received word from Charles Jenner, located at Quantico, Va., that he has been made sergeant. Sgt. Jenner visited at the Lindsley home during the holiday vacation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Corp. Charles Jenner is visiting Mr. and Mrs. John Lindsay," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Sgt. Charles Jenner has been transferred from Quantico, Va., to Cherry point, N. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "S/Sgt. Charles Jenner spent a 10-day furlo from North Carolina at the home of Mrs. Florence Lindsley of Manlius, with whom he has made his home eight years. Before entering the marine, he worked at Fishman's store," The Post-Standard, 7/17/1944. "Staff Sgt. Charles Jenner, of Bogue Field, North Carolina, has returned after passing a ten-day furlough with Mr. and Mrs. James Lindsley," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "Staff Sgt. Charles Jenner before he enlisted for service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "Mrs. James Lindsley has been transferred to Jacksonville, Fla., where he is taking an advanced ordnance course. Staff Sgt. Jenner made his home for several years with Mr. and Mrs. James Lind received a letter from Sgt. Charles Jenner who left the California Coast for the South Pacific and has been stationed at Saipan for some time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945.

Jennings, James. Fayetteville. "Pvt. James Jennings, Jr., will arrive today from Camp Dix to spend a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Jennings, of South Manlius street," The Eagle-Bulletin 12/28/1945. "Pfc. James Jennings, Jr., has returned to his post at Camp Dix, N. J. after spending ten days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Jennings, Sr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946.

Jennings, William, Jr. Manlius. "Sixty-five 17-year-olds have been signed for navy duty this week...William Jennings, Jr., Manlius RD 2," The Post-Standard, 1/24/1945. "William J. Jennings, Manlius RD 2, has completed recruit training at Sampson and is now seaman second class..." The Post-Standard, 4/2/1945.

Jewson, Robert J. Fayetteville. "After passing a five-day furlo with his parents...Pvt. Robert Jewson has returned to Camp Gordon, Augusta, Ga. He formerly was employed at the Precision Die Casting Co.," The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Jesse R. Jewson, of Syracuse, former residents of this village (Fayetteville), have received a telegram reporting that their son Pvt. Robert Jewson, 26, was seriously wounded in France on June 7. Pvt. Jewson was born in this village and attended Fayetteville high school prior to moving to Syracuse some 14 years ago. Before joining the army in 1942, he was employed at the Precision Castings Co. plant here (Fayetteville). He trained at Camp Croft and later at Fort Dix and went overseas in January," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Two former Fayetteville boys have been killed in action since D-Day in the European war theater. They are Pvt. Robert J. Jewson and Sgt. Richard A. Gallagher. Pvt. Jewson died June 7 of wounds suffered in the invasion, according to a letter received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse R. Jewson, of Cherry st., Syracuse. Born in Fayetteville, Pvt. Jewson moved with his parents to Syracuse at the age of 12 years. He attended Lincoln School and Eastwood High, and later was employed at the Precision Castings Co. here. He joined the army in Feb. 1942, and trained at Camp Croft, Fort Dix and Fort Jackson, going overseas last January with the infantry. Besides his parents he leaves 3 sisters, Mrs. John Edlund, Mrs. Rudolph Raab and Mrs. Edward Whelan; and an uncle, Edward Jewson," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. Infantryman, in Herald Journal 9/6/1944 obituary. "...born in Fayetteville, Pvt. Jewson attended Lincoln school and Eastwood high school. He was employed by the Precision Casting Co., Fayetteville, before he entered service in February, 1942. He trained at Camp Croft, Fort Dix, Camp Gordon and Fort Jackson before going overseas in January," The Post-Standard, 9/7/1944.

Johnson, Jay. Fayetteville. "Jay Johnson, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Johnson of 125 Cleveland blvd., Fayetteville, was commissioned an ensign in the naval reserve and designated a naval aviator at the naval air training base, Pensacola, Fla. Ensign Johnson is the nephew of Lt.-Col. F. E. Crowe of the army," The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945.

Johnson, Kenneth E. Kirkville. "Mediterranean area. Pfc. Kenneth E. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johnson, parents, Kirkville, R.D. 1," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. "Pvt. Kenneth Johnson, who was inducted into the army in June, spent last weekend with his parents...on furlo from Camp George G. Meade, Md. Pvt. Johnson attended Minoa high school and was formerly employed at the Rome air depot," The Post-Standard, 9/15/1942. "Hopes that one of his buddies will see this article in the paper and give them further information about her son, Pfc. Kenneth E. Johnson, 22, who is reported missing as of July 10, was expressed yesterday by his parents...Pfc. Johnson was with an infantry unit stationed in North Africa. The wire was from the commanding-general in North Africa. Since it was the time of the Sicilian invasion, it is believed Pfc. Johnson was in the attack there. A graduate of Minoa high school, he had been employed by Rome airbase prior to entering service a year ago. He had been overseas seven months. The last letter from him was received July 1. His sister, Mrs. Robert Wall of Syracuse, gave birth to her third son a day after Pfc. Johnson was reported missing," The Post-Standard, 9/9/1943. "PFC Kenneth E. Johnson, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johnson of Kirkville, who was reported missing July 10, 1943, is among 18 men from this vicinity reported killed in action in an announcement by the war department yesterday thru The Associated Press. PFC Johnson, reported killed in the Mediterranean area, was with an infantry unit stationed in North Africa. It was believed that he participated in the Sicilian invasion..." The Post-Standard, 9/29/1944. "PFC Kenneth E. Johnson, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johnson of Kirkville, who was reported missing July 10, 1943, is among 18 men from this vicinity reported killed in action in an announcement by the war department yesterday thru the associated Press. PFC Johnson, reported killed in the Mediterranean area, was with an infantry unit stationed in North Africa. It was believed that he participated in the Sicilian invasion..." The Herald-Journal, 9/29/1944. "...PFC Johnson was with an infantry unit stationed in North Africa. The wire was from the commanding - general in North Africa. Since it was the time of the Sicilian invasion, it is believed PFC Johnson was in the attack there. A graduate of Minoa high school, he had been employed by Rome airbase prior to entering service a year ago. He had been overseas seven months. The last letter from him was received July 1. His sister, Mrs. Robert Wall of Syracuse, gave birth to her third son a day after PFC Johnson was reported missing," Minoa scrapbook, n.d.

Joncas, Victor. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "With two more days to go the army enlistment record for December was reported yesterday when 26 men were sworn into service at district recruiting headquarters raising the monthly total thus far to 1,250 men...Victor E. Joncas, Dewitt pk., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/30/1941. "Staff Sgt. Victor E. Joncas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Day, Dewitt pk., Fayetteville, was recognized as a member of the crew of a Fling Fortress refueling in Labrador in a picture that appeared on page one of the Post-Standard yesterday. Sgt. Joncas phoned his parents about a week ago that he was leaving for England," The Post-Standard, 5/17/1943.

Jones, Easton C. Fayetteville. "Honorably discharged at the Navy separation center, Sampson...GM 3/c Easton C. Jones, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/31/1945.

?Jones, Francis. Manlius. "Em 1/c Francis Jones, U. S. N., home on leave, visited his sisters, Mrs. Raymond VanGiesen and Mrs. Calvin Bunnell, this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/28/1945.

Jones, Frederick W. Fayetteville. "The following officers and enlisted men have been honorably discharged from the army at Fort Dix, N.J...Pfc. Frederick W. Jones, Fayetteville rd., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard 11/16/1945.

Jones, Gerald. Manlius. "Mrs. Gerald Jones...visited her husband at Fort Hancock," The Eagle Bulletin, 8/14/1941. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Pvt. Bill Daley, stationed at Tampa, Fla., spent the week-end recently with M/Sgt. and Mrs. Gerald Jones of Orlando, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/5/1943. "M/Sgt. Gerald Jones, and family, of Orlando, Fla., arrived Tuesday evening for a visit with Mrs. Jones' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Skelton, Pleasant street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944.

Jones, Louis. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Louis Jones expected to leave on Thursday for Fort Ontario," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. "Word has been received by relatives here that Louis Jones, with the U. S. Army in California, has been advanced to the rank of corporal," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Corp. Louis Jones, who has been stationed in California, is visiting his sisters, Mrs. R. W. VanGiesen and Mrs. Calvin Bunnell, after which he will report to Camp Pickett in Virginia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "...Louis Jones of the U. S. Army, home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Cpl. Louis Jones of Indiantown Gap, Pa., returned to camp Wednesday after spending a few days with his wife at the home of his sisters, Mrs. Raymond VanGiesen and Mrs. Calvin Bunnell," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Sgt. Louis Jones of Indiantown Gap, Pa., spent the week-end with his wife," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Mrs. Louis Jones has returned home after passing a week with her husband, Sgt. Jones, at Indiantown Gap, Pa.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Mrs. Louis Jones of Spring street has received word that her husband, who has been with the armed forces overseas, is enroute home. Sgt. Jones has been ill of a stomach ailment and it is expected he is being sent home for treatment. Mr. Jones is also the brother of Mrs. Raymond VanGiesen and Mrs. Calvin Bunnell of this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944. "Sgt. Louis Jones, who is undergoing treatment in a Veterans' hospital in Massachusetts, expects to spend the holidays with his wife and other relatives here and in Auburn," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944. Student, Syracuse University, 414 Spring St., Fayetteville Directory, 1940.

Joyner, James M., Jr. Fayetteville. "James Joyner has entered the service and left last week for the induction center," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "A daughter, Julia Ann, was born Sept. 25 to Pvt. and Mrs. James Joyner (Clara Jane Frost) of Center street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/5/1945. "...discharged from the marine corps under its point system at Cherry Point, N. C., Pvt. James M. Joyner, Jr., 107 Center st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/4/1945. "James Joyner of Center street has been given an honorable discharge from the Army and has returned to his home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945.

Judd, Leslie H., Jr. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). "Leslie H. Judd, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Judd of Maple dr., Fayetteville, has received his wings as a glider pilot and appointment as a flight officer at Lubbock, Tex. FO Judd recently spent a five-day leave with his wife and four-weeks-old daughter, Linda Diane, at 116 Elk st.," The Post-Standard, 5/23/1944.

Judge, Clyde H. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Baptist Church service flag, The Eagle Bulletin, 2/27/1942. "Private Clyde H. Judge of Chanute Field, Ill., spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Judge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. "Mrs. Harriette M. Leland, wife of Fred Leland, died Saturday, June 17, at the age of 79 years...Surviving besides her husband, is one daughter, Mrs. W. H. Judge; three grandsons, Leland H. Judge of Manlius, Pvt. Gordon H. Judge in Camp Lee, Va., and S/Sgt. Clyde H. Judge in England; two granddaughters, Lois Judge and Kathryn Judge; one great grandson, Richard Leland Judge; and one sister, Mrs. J. Maude Balsley, all of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Honorably discharged yesterday, T/Sgt. Clyde H. Judge, 109 E. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 10/11/1945. "Miss Jeanne R. Emerick, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Emerick, 304 E. Seneca street, became the bride of Clyde H. Judge, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Judge of Washington st., June 21 in St. Ann's church...both bride and groom are graduates of Manlius high school. The groom has received an honorable discharge from the Army after serving four years of over-sea duty, and is now employed by the Chapman Gas Co.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/28/1946.

Judge, Gordon H. Manlius, 109 W. Seneca St. Accepted into the Army, "The Post-Standard, 12/4/1943. "Private Clyde H. Judge of Chanute Field, Ill., spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Judge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. "Mrs. Harriette M. Leland, wife of Fred Leland, died Saturday, June 17, at the age of 79 years...Surviving besides her husband, is one daughter, Mrs. W. H. Judge; three grandsons, Leland H. Judge of Manlius, Pvt. Gordon H. Judge in Camp Lee, Va., and S/Sgt. Clyde H. Judge in England; two granddaughters, Lois Judge and Kathryn Judge; one great grandson, Richard Leland Judge; and one sister, Mrs. J. Maude Balsley, all of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Pvt. Gordon H. Judge, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Judge of West Seneca street, has completed his training in the non-commissioned officers administration and supply course at the Quartermaster School at Camp Lee, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944.

Kain, John Orville. Fayetteville. "Mrs. John F. Kain has received word from her son, Pvt. Orville Kain, that he is at present stationed in California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942.

"Mrs. John F. Kain left Friday night for Los Angeles, Calif., where she plans an extended stay with her son Harold Kain. Pvt. J. Orville Kain, stationed in California, expects to have a furlough in May which he will spend with his mother and brother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "Pfc. J. Orville Kain, who is stationed at Army Headquarters on Desert Maneuvers, is spending the week with his mother...at her home in Mechanic street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "The front page of a Dec. 17 Post-Standard returned to Syracuse from Australia last week, after it had been read and autographed by 19 soldiers from the Syracuse area. The men, who have been together since their induction in November, 1942, enclosed the page in a letter written Feb. 5 (1944). They are members of a gas supply company in Australia...Signed...Pfc. John O. Kain, 110 Mechanic St...." The Post-Standard, Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Mrs. John Kain received a message from her son, J. Orville Kain, telling her of his safe arrival in California, and also said he expected to be home the middle of next week, honorably discharged," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. "J. Orville Kain of Mechanic street with friends from Syracuse and Liverpool went to Buffalo over the week end where they held a reunion with members of their old company with whom they served overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/31/1946. "On Saturday morning, Oct. 5...in St. Peter's Church in Troy, N.Y., Miss Helen Walkinshaw became the bride of J. Orville Kain, son of Mrs. John F. Kain of this village...upon their return they will reside at 110 Mechanic street, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/11/1946. "Arrivals on the Joel C. Harris in New York Friday...T/5 John O. Kain, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/9/1945. "Discharged at Scott Field, Ill....T/5 John O. Kain, 110 Mechanic st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/23/1945.

Kane, Paul W. Manlius. "S.T. Paul Kane, who has been at home on a 20-day furlough, returned Monday to Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas. S. T. Kane, Mrs. Kane and family visited Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. William Madison," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. Lt. Paul Kane, of Kelly Field, Texas, has been spending a few days with Wayne Madison," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945. "Lt. Paul W. Kane of Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas, spent last week with Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Madison," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/18/1946. "Lieutenant and Mrs. Paul Kane of San Antonio, Texas, returned to their home by air on Thursday after spending a week with Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Madison," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946.

Kantak, Leonard V. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "A father--a veteran of world war one--and a son who enlisted six months before Pearl Harbor, both serving in the navy, are home in Manlius on leave. P/O IC Leonard V. Kantak came from the Great Lakes naval training station service school and his son, A. M. M. 2C Robert L. Kantak, arrived from an eastern seaport from duty on a navy bomber in the Caribbean area. Mrs. Robert L. Kantak of Detroit joined her husband in Manlius. In the world war, P/O Kantak served as supply sergeant of the 102d ammunition train, 27th division, which gained fame in the battle in which the Hindenburg line was broken in France in the fall of 1918. Most of the ammunitions train members were residents of Syracuse and Onondaga county. His son enlisted in the navy May 6, 1941, so when the father decided to serve his country again, he also chose the navy. Their reunion is the first of any length since they have been in service. Robert Kantak was visiting in Detroit when he met Miss Emma Angie and they were married Aug. 26, 1942. Mrs. Kantak is a daughter of Mrs. Emma Balogh of Detroit. Robert Kantak is a former member of the Sons of the American Legion drum corps of Syracuse Post 41," The Post-Standard, 2/18/1944.

Kantak, Robert L. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "A father--a veteran of world war one--and a son who enlisted six months before Pearl Harbor, both serving in the navy, are home in Manlius on leave. P/O IC Leonard V. Kantak came from the Great Lakes naval training station service school and his son, A. M. M. 2C Robert L. Kantak, arrived from an eastern seaport from duty on a navy bomber in the Caribbean area. Mrs. Robert L. Kantak of Detroit joined her husband in Manlius. In the world war, P/O Kantak served as supply sergeant of the 102d ammunition train, 27th division, which gained fame in the battle in which the Hindenburg line was broken in France in the fall of 1918. Most of the ammunitions train members were residents of Syracuse and Onondaga county. His son enlisted in the navy May 6, 1941, so when the father decided to serve his country again, he also chose the navy. Their reunion is the first of any length since they have been in service. Robert Kantak was visiting in Detroit when he met Miss Emma Angie and they were married Aug. 26, 1942. Mrs. Kantak is a daughter of Mrs. Emma Balogh of Detroit. Robert Kantak is a former member of the Sons of the American Legion drum corps of Syracuse Post 41," The Post-Standard, 2/18/1944.

Kappesser (Kappaser), Edward. Fayetteville. "Onondaga county men inducted were...Marines, Edward A. Kappesser, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Trooper Edward Kappaser (who) enlisted with the Marines..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943.

Karker, Frank H. Minoa. "Men enlisted here yesterday are...Army. Frank H. Karker, Minoa," The Post-Standard, 12/17/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "A veteran of 101 combat hours over enemy territory, S/Sgt. Frank H. Karker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Karker of Minoa, was presented a bronze oak leaf cluster in lieu of a second award of the air medal at an indoor ceremony at the Rapid City army air base where he is stationed by Col. R. Baez, Jr., station commandant. Karker was the assistant engineer-gunner on a B-17 with one of the first heavy bombardment groups to land at Henderson field on Guadalcanal after the marines made their first advance. He was in that area for seven months, bombing Munda, Bougainville, and the New Georgias from bases at Guadalcanal and in the New Hebrides. A veteran of 36 combat missions, Karker is one of the few airmen to survive a bout with the dreaded cumulus mammato-an aerial inhabitant of the South Pacific. The mammato, a fancy cousin of a tornado, is equipped with smaller powerful swirling counter currents. While on a night raid to bomb an island runway near Shortland in the Solomons group, Karker's plane ran into a storm. Suddenly the ship hurtled upward. According to the pilot, action of the dials indicated that an updraft was pushing them upstairs at 2,500 feet a minute. The pilot sent the ship into a 200 mile per hour dive--and still they went up. Fortunately, Karker in the tail-gunner's compartment was wedged in the turret and held on to the armor with both hands. Other crew members were battered about inside the plane. The pilot, fighting the controls, finally succeeded in bringing the ship around in a 180-degree turn," The Post-Standard, 4/23/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Karker, Frank H., 228 DeSilva St., Minoa, N.Y."

Kastner, Rexford. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. George F. Lee of Highbridge street have been entertaining Mrs. Lee's...(son) Rexford P. Kastner of Camp Stewart, Ga. Rexford Kastner is with the 207th Coast Artillery," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1941. "M/Sgt. Rexford Powell Kastner, son of Mrs. George F. Lee, RD 2, Fayetteville, N.Y., has reported at this station (Keesler Field, Miss.) of the Army Air Forces training Command for medical and psychological processing, classification and training to determine his qualifications as a pre-aviation cadet," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "With the 100th Division of 7th Army in France--The Service Company of the 398th Regiment has been awarded the Meritorious Service Unit Plaque for its superior performance of duty during its service in France, according to an announcement from 100th Division headquarters. The company, commanded by lst Lieut. Clifford G. Day, of New Virginia, Iowa, provided food and supplies in their regiment's fighting in the Vosges Mountains region of the western front, and the bitter struggle for the hinge of the German-held Maginot Line fortress system at Bitche and Lemberg. M/Sgt. Rexford P. Kastner, of R.F.D. 2, Fayetteville, N.Y. is a member of the Service Company, 398th Regiment, and contributed to its winning the Meritorious Service Unit Plaque. The 100th (Century) Division, of which the 398th Infantry is a part was one of the four divisions praised by Lt. Gen. Jacob L. Devers, Sixth Army Group commander, for stopping the German counteroffensive on the Seventh Army front in January," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "Shrivenham, England--The U.S. Army University Center in England, designed to give soldiers a chance to get college instruction while waiting to return to the United States, has started its first semester here with an enrollment of 3,611 students, including Master Sergeant Rexford P. Kastner, son of Mrs. George F. Lee, RD 2, Fayetteville, N. Y. Sgt. Kastner, a member of the 63rd Infantry Division, is studying Economics, American Government and College Algebra. He attended Cornell University before entering the service. A selection of 300 courses is offered in the fields of liberal arts, science, engineering, fine arts, journalism, education and commerce. Each student is allowed to register for three courses, and his hours of instruction will be equivalent to a summer semester at a civilian institution. Courses are taught for the most part by civilian educators from the United States," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945. Honorably discharged Oct. 5...Rexford R. Kastner, Fayetteville, RD 2," The Post-Standard, 10/7/1945.

Keese, Thurston L. Fayetteville. "Dr. Thurston L. Keese received his orders from the government on Monday to report to Camp Dix, N. J., for duty. Dr. J. M. Keese, father of Dr. Keese, will hold regular office hours and will be available for calls and carry on the practice in Fayetteville. He will be in the office starting this Thursday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Dr. Thurston L. Keese, who has practiced medicine in this village (Fayetteville) for five years and left recently for army service has been commissioned a first lieutenant and is stationed at Fort Devens, Mass. Lt. Keese was graduated from Lawrenceville school, Princeton University and the College of Medicine at Syracuse University, and interned for two years at Cooper Hospital, Camden, N. J. He is a member of Syracuse Academy of Medicine, Onondaga County Medical Society, New York State Medical Society, Nu Sigma Nu fraternity and the University Club. Active in the service of their country were Lt. Keese' great-great grandfather, grandfather and uncle," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Dr. Thurston L. Keese of this village has been promoted to captain in the medical corps of the U. S. Navy, according to word received this week from Africa by members of his family. Captain Keese has been in the Army for eight months and has been in Africa nearly the entire time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Capt. T. L. Keese and S/Sgt. Charles Bender, serving with the armed forces in the European Theater, are stationed within a few miles of each other, but only became aware of the fact a sort time ago. They made contact and had the opportunity of spending a day together reminiscing on the old home town and according to both men, the meeting was far better than medicine to them. Sgt. Bender, who has been overseas 21 months, has five stars on his campaign ribbon, denoting action in five major campaigns. Capt. Keese is with the Battalion Mobile Division and has been overseas about 18 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944. "Capt. T. L. Keese, Medical officer in the U. S. Army, surprised his family on Monday when he arrived home for a 30-day leave after spending 27 months on overseas duty. Capt. Keese says he does not note many changes and his one big comment was that he was glad to be back. He reports that he spent nine months in French Morocco and Tunisia, going to Italy early in the fall of 1943. Since that time they have been progressing steadily north. At present the outfit in which he is doing group surgeon work is in North Italy where he expects to return at the end of his furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "Capt. Thurston L. Keese left Thursday for Fort Dix, N. J., accompanied by Mrs. Keese where they will reside until Capt. Keese is reassigned. He has been spending a 30-day furlough with his family after 27 months overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "Capt. T. L. Keese has returned from overseas and is spending a 35-day leave with his family at their home in Walnut street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. "The speaker for the evening (of The Fayetteville Civic Club) is Capt. Thurston L. Keese. He will present a side of the war that few have heard of before--what went on to save the lives of men. You all know Captain Keese as a physician and now is your opportunity to see what a difference there is in the 'bedside manner' of an officer of the Medical Corps., than that of your local doctor. Capt. Keese has seen a lot of things and he wants to tell you about them. He has something different to talk about, in fact what he say it will be nearly as earth-shaking as the atomic bomb....Now on leave, Capt. Keese will return shortly to active duty, but his heart is here in the village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/5/1945. "Dr. Thurston L. Keese having been recently discharged from the Army after three years' service will resume the practice of medicine on Monday, Nov. 5. His office is now located at 116 Walnut street where his father, Dr. J. Mumford Keese, has been practicing in his son's absence. Office hours may be had by calling the office," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Keller, Loren. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll.

Kelley, James J. Fayetteville. "Capt. James J. Kelley, who has been stationed in the Central Pacific area with the U. S. signal corps since October, 1943, was advanced to the rank of captain on April 20, according to word received by his wife, Mrs. Ella Caffrey Kelley of 854 Maryland ave. Formerly an engineer at WFBL and instructor in pre-radar courses at Syracuse university, Capt. Kelley entered the army on May 12, 1943. Capt. and Mrs. Kelley formerly lived at 141 Edwards dr., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 5/4/1944. "Capt. James J. Kelley of Fayetteville is with the signal office in Kwajalein where he is in charge of all radio transmitters. Before entering the army in May, 1943, he was transmitter supervisor for radio station WFBL," The Post-Standard, 7/13/1945.

Kelley, Paul R. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll.

Kellish, Stanley W. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey) Name appears on both the Manlius Honor Roll and the Oran Honor Roll. "The following officers and enlisted men have been discharged from the army at Fort Dix, N.J...First Lt. Stanley W. Kellish, Manlius RD 1," The Post-Standard, 12/25/1945.

Kelly, Robert M. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Kelly, Robert M., 120 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Kenville, John. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included...John Kenville, of Fayetteville, and Lt. Harold Ballard, of Manlius, all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Kepler, Cady. Fayetteville. "David Gregory, Cady Kepler and Carl Swartner have enlisted in the U. S. Navy and expect to be called for boot training in the near future," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945. Kepler enlisted in June1945 in the U.S.N. Reserves for the duration, was inducted in October 4,1945, and had boot training at Camp Perry, VA. From January 1946 - August 1946, S/1c (SM) served at Guam and also on patrol craft-589 and patrol craft escort-896. He was discharged at Lido Beach, LI, NY 8/10/1946.

Kepler, Milton. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area...Milton Keppler...of Fayetteville...all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Kessler, Henry J. Fayetteville. "Truman G. Hildreth, 22, of 606 Walnut street, Fayetteville, N.Y., has been promoted to Technician 5th Grade in the Signal Corps, AAF, it was announced...by the commanding officer of the Seattle Fighter Wing. T/5 Hildreth is the brother of Mrs. Henry J. Kessler of Fayetteville. His brother-in-law, Cpl. Henry J. Kessler, is now in the armed service in Hawaii.

Keville, Cecil L. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Keyes, William Randall. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "William Keyes has returned to Newport Naval Base after spending a week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Keyes on the Dry Hill Road, The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1940. "Mrs. William N. Konvicka of East Genesee street announced the engagement of her daughter, Miss Esther Adeline Konvicka to William Rendell Keyes, Ph. Mate 1/c, U. S. N., son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Keyes of Salt Springs Road, Fayetteville...Both Miss Konvicka and Petty Officer Keyes were graduated from Fayetteville High School...Petty Officer Keyes attended St. Lawrence University and is a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He is now on active duty with the Fleet Marine Force somewhere in the Southwest Pacific," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "William R. Keyes, Ph. M. 1/c, is home on a 30-day leave. He has had three years continuous sea duty, the last eighteen months of which were in the Southwest Pacific. Mr. Keyes made the landing on Cape Glouster, New Britain, thereby being in direct action against Japanese forces. At the expiration of his furlough, he expects to be based at Gainesville, Georgia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Miss Esther Konvicka, whose married to William R. Keyes, Ph. M. 1/c will take place at the United Church on Sunday afternoon, was feted...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "On Sunday afternoon, August 6, at four o'clock in the United Church, Esther Adeline Konvicka, daughter of Mrs. William Konvicka and the late Mr. Konvicka, and William Randall Keyes, Phm. 1/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Keyes, were united in marriage...After September 1, Mr. and Mrs. Keyes will be at home in Gainesville, Ga.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Petty Officer William R. Keyes, Ph.M. 1/c, U.S.N., has been transferred from the Naval Base at Gainesville, Ga., to the medical staff of the Naval Hospital at Great Lakes, Chicago, Ill. Mrs. Keyes, the former Esther Konvicka, is passing a short time at the home of her mother, Mrs. William N. Konvicka, and P.O. Keyes' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. S. Keyes, before joining her husband at Great Lakes," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945. "William R. Keyes, Pharm. 1/c, U.S.N. has reported to the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Va., for ten weeks' advance training, after spending a 10-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Keyes. Mrs. William Keyes will spend the summer in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945. "C. Ph. M. and Mrs. William R. Keyes, of Boston, Mass., were in town for the Thanksgiving holidays. Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Keyes entertained at a Konvicka-Keyes family dinner on Thanksgiving," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "Chief Phar. William R. Keyes has been transferred from Boston, Mass. to the naval station at Portland, Maine. Mrs. Keyes is now residing in Fayetteville after having been with her husband in Boston, since last September," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946. "William R. Keyes, chief Ph. M., U.S.N., spent the week-end recently with his wife at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Keyes of Salt Springs road, after which he returned to duty in Portland, Me.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/14/1946. "C. Ph. M. and Mrs. William Keyes are the parents of a son, Charles William, born July 24 in the Syracuse General hospital. Mrs. Keyes is the former Esther Konvicka," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/2/1946.

Kicak, John. Minoa. Enlisted in the marines, John Kicak, 124 Main st., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 3/16/1943. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll.

Kiddle, Edwin. Minoa. "Edwin Kiddle left for the Army Air Corps last Wednesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Sgt. Edwin H. Kiddle, 19, who had been reported missing in action after the Oct. 14 bombing of Schweinfurt, Germany, was killed in action on that date, according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard D. Kiddle of 229 East ave., Minoa. The death of the sergeant, who would have been 20 years old last Dec. 20 was reported in a telegram from the war department, which said the news had been received from the German government thru the International Red Cross. The Kiddles received word yesterday that their other son, Sgt. Howard D. Kiddle, Jr., has arrived safely in England. He had been stationed at the Rome airfield. The raid on the ball-bearing plant at Schweinfurt, in which Sgt. Kiddle was killed, was the one in which 60 American Flying Fortresses and two escorting Thunderbolt P-47 fighters were shot down. It was the greatest Allied aerial loss of the war. Promoted to sergeant on Sept. 15, the Minoa youth enlisted Dec. 10, 1942, as a clerk in the air forces. In a letter received shortly before Sgt. Kiddle was reported missing in action, he said that he had 'new duties,' altho he didn't explain them. He received his training at Miami Beach, Fla.; Sheppard Field, Tex.; Lawton, Okla., and Fresno, Calif., arriving in England last May. A native of Kirkville, Sgt. Kiddle was graduated from Minoa high school in June, 1942. He was widely known in Syracuse, as an attendant at the Edwards parking lot, where he worked after school and summers. Surviving besides his parents and brother are his grandmother, Mrs. John R. Spencer of Onondaga Hill, two uncles and two aunts," The Post-Standard, 1/7/1944. "Howard D. Kiddle, of the Fabrication Section, Turbine, has received the 'Order of the Purple Heart' medal, awarded posthumously to his son, Sgt. Edwin (Teddy) H. Kiddle, who was killed in an air raid over Schweinfurt, Germany on October 14, 1943. Ted's buddies have avenged his death--and the United States Government has recognized his unselfish sacrifice in awarding posthumously the Order of the Purple Heart. Sergeant Kiddle was born December 20, 1923. His mother and father live at 229 East Avenue, Minoa. He enlisted in the Air Corps December 10, 1942, receiving his training at Lawton, Okla., and Fresno, Calif., and was sent overseas in May last year. His fiancee, Jane E. Smiley, has been in the mail section of the Turbine plant since September, 1943. A brother, Howard D., Jr., a former employee at Transmitter No. 1, is in the Air Forces and stationed somewhere in England--carrying on for 'Teddy' and family," Minoa scrapbook. n.d. "A military funeral will be held Saturday for Sgt. Edwin H. Kiddle, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Kiddle, 229 East Ave., Minoa, who was killed in action on a raid over Schweinfurt, Germany, Oct. 14, 1943. Services will be conducted at 2 P.M. in the home and at 2:30 P.M. in the Minoa Methodist Church. ...Hackett-Scheurman-Moore Post 1102, American Legion, Minoa, will hold services in Collamer Cemetery. Sgt. Kiddle was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart medal, the presidential citation. Born in Kirkville, Sgt. Kiddle was graduated from Minoa High School and entered service Dec. 10, 1942. A member of the 526th Squadron, 379th Bomber Group, he went overseas after training at Miami Beach, Fla.; Sheppard Field, Tex.; Lawton, Okla., and Fresno, Calif. Surviving, besides his parents, are a brother, Howard Jr., and several aunts and uncles," The Herald-Journal, 1/19/1949. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Kiddle, Edwin, 229 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Kiddle, Howard D., Jr. Minoa. "Sgt. Howard D. Kiddle, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard D. Kiddle of 229 East ave., Minoa, and brother of Sgt. Edwin H. Kiddle, who was reported killed in action Oct. 14 in the Schweinfurt raid, has arrived safely in England, his parents have learned. Sgt. Kiddle, 21, attended Minoa high school and was employed by Broome Distributing Co., Inc., and General Electric Co. before enlisting Oct. 22, 1942. He had been stationed at the Rome air depot until he was sent overseas," The Post-Standard, 1/8/1944. "Howard D. Kiddle, of the Fabrication Section, Turbine, has received the 'Order of the Purple Heart' medal, awarded posthumously to his son, Sgt. Edwin (Teddy) H. Kiddle, who was killed in an air raid over Schweinfurt, Germany on October 14, 1943...A brother, Howard D., Jr., a former employee at Transmitter No. 1, is in the Air Forces and stationed somewhere in England--carrying on for 'Teddy' and family," Minoa scrapbook. n.d. "Howard Kettle (sic) was inducted into the Army Air Corps on Thursday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Howard Kiddle of Rome, visited his parents last Wednesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. Both Kettle and Howard Kittell, whose name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll, are Howard Kiddle, Jr.. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Kiddle, Howard, Jr., 229 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Kiely, James C. Fayetteville. "If many more local boys enlist in the United States navy appeal should be made to Uncle Sam to at least name a battleship after the village or give the village an interest in the Navy...James Kieley, son of Mrs. Floyd Muckey...of Mill street, has passed all required examinations and expects to be called for training soon. ....Mr. and Mrs. William Hawkins, whose son, William Jr., went last week to the Great Lakes Base, entertained Tuesday night at their home in Thompson street at a farewell party for the three new 'sailors-to-be,' (Al Dykeman, James Kieley, Keene Sahm)," The Eagle Bulletin, 3/27/1941. "Jimmy Kiely's ambition to become a seaman was realized Monday, when after trying innumerable times to enlist in Uncle Sam's Navy during the past year, he was finally accepted. He was rejected before because of a foot condition. Jimmy attended Fayetteville High School where he was an all around athlete and last year he made the county football team. Following his acceptance at Albany, he left for the Great Lakes training station in Illinois where he will undergo training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/9/1942. "Mrs. John Wells entertained...in honor of her nephew, James Kiely A. S., who was home on furlough from Great Lakes Training Base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942. "James Kiely, seaman, 2nd class, son of Mrs. Floyd Muckey is stationed at Alameda, Cal.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "The U.S. Naval personnel separation center, Lido Beach, L.I. announces the discharge of James C. Kiely, S 1/c, 119 S. Mill st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 2/12/1946. The Fayetteville Legion softball team (composed entirely of war veterans) continued to set a hot pace in the county league by defeating the Polish Veterans Monday night at Star Park, 5 to 2...In the fifth, with Paul Nichols and Jack Sampson on second and third, Jim Kieley stepped into a 3-2 pitch for a sharp single, netting two runs. In an attempt to break the deadlock, speedy Skip Honors tried to score...Many West End softball fans are planning to see Fayetteville play the U. S. Hoffman champs on Fayetteville grounds," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/26/1946.

Kiely, Lois. Fayetteville. "Miss Lois Elaine Kieley, the daughter of Mrs. Floyd Muckey and the late Patrick Kieley, is at Hunter College in New York where she is training as an apprentice seaman in the WAVES. Miss Kieley is a graduate of Fayetteville High School, and Syracuse Secretarial School, and also attended Syracuse University for two years. She was employed by the Onondaga Tool and Salvage Co. before enlisting in the WAVES. She left Syracuse last Friday for New York and prior to her departure was honor guest at several social affairs," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Mrs. Floyd Muckey of South Mill street and Mrs. Arnold Cox of DeWitt, N. Y., were on a trip to Boston, Mass. over the weekend where they visited their daughter and niece, Miss Lois Kieley, a second class seaman in the WAVE's," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Seaman Lois E. Kieley, who has been undergoing basic training at Boston, Mass., spent a few days recently with her mother, Mrs. Floyd Muckey of North Mill street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "3/c Petty Officer Lois Kieley has arrived in Fayetteville to spend a ten-day furlough with her mother, Mrs. Floyd Muckey at their home in Mill street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Fayetteville has five women serving their country...Lois Kiely...in the WAVES..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944.

Kiggins, Harry R. Manlius. "On Queen Elizabeth due in New York yesterday, Pfc. Harry R. Kiggins, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 10/10/1945. "Honorably discharged from the army at Fort Dix, N.J...Pfc. Harry R. Kiggins, Manlius," The Post-Standard, 10/16/1945.

Kilian, Theodore C. Formerly town of Manlius. "Lt. Theodore C. Kilian, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick K. Kilian of 111 Wendell ter., who was cited for delivering an important message concerning enemy concentration of vehicles thru heavy artillery fire during the Tunisian campaign, has received a battlefield promotion from second to first lieutenant. During his senior year at Manlius school, Lt. Kilian was battalion commander of the school, under the late Col. Guido Verbeck. After graduation in June, 1940, he was associated with his father in the Kilian Manufacturing Corp., 1728-36 Burnet ave. At the conclusion of his school and ROTC activities he was declared eligible for a reserve officer's commission upon reaching his majority. He received his commission as second lieutenant in February, 1942, about a month before his 21st birthday. He immediately joined the armed forces being assigned to Camp Croft, where he was the youngest second lieutenant. He later was assigned to Fort Benning, and then was returned to Camp Croft, where he was a training officer. Lt. Kilian went overseas in December, 1942, with the first division under Gen. Terry Allen. He went thru the Tunisian campaign and is now at the Sicilian front. His brother, First Lt. Robert E. Kilian, is with the war department, stationed at the Springfield ordnance department, Springfield, Mass.," The Post-Standard, 8/14/1943. Co. "B", Manlius School. "for the second time in less than two years, First Lt. Theodore C. Kilian...has distinguished himself on the field of battle and for that gallantry won citations. The latest recognition was the silver star, which was given him for gallantry in action in the vicinity of Schevenhutte, Germany, during the battle of the Hurtgen forest. That was Nov. 16, and the citation just received, along with the medal, by his parents, relates: '...Altho painfully injured during a fierce attack upon hostile strongpoints, Lt. Kilian refused to be relieved and courageously continued to direct the fire of his machine-gun platoon. When bitter resistance was encountered, he fearlessly proceeded forward and reconnoitered strategic positions from which his men inflicted heavy casualties on the Germans, neutralizing their emplacements and forcing them to withdraw. Lt. Kilian's gallant actions and outstanding leadership reflect great credit upon the army of the Untied States...Previously, he had been awarded the bronze star and two clusters for action during invasion on Omaha beach, as well as the purple heart with cluster for wounds received during the battles of Normandy and the Hurtgen forest. During the Tunisian campaign, the Syracusan was cited for delivering an important message concerning enemy concentration of vehicles, even tho the journey meant braving heavy artillery fire. Shortly after that feat, he received a battlefield promotion from second to first lieutenant. A. Manlius school graduate of June, 1940, Lt. Kilian was commissioned a second lieutenant in the army in February, 1942, a month before his 21st birthday. He immediately joined the army and was assigned to Camp Croft, where he was the youngest officer. Later, he was at Fort Benning and then back at Croft. He went overseas in December, 1942, with Gen. Terry Allen's First division," The Post-Standard, 5/6/1945.

Kilpatrick, William, Jr. Manlius. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors...William Kilpatrick, Jr., of Manlius School..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943.

Kimball, Edward F. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Edward F. Kimball, who has been stationed at Puerto Rico, arrived Saturday on furlough for a visit in Manlius and he also expects to spend a few days visiting friends in New York," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Never very convincing in propagandizing Syracuse weather, the chamber of commerce took it in the neck again yesterday from two Manlius soldiers, who exhibited deep tans and healthy complexions and extolled Puerto Rico, the island to which they were assigned, with a series of superlatives. The men were Lt. Robert F. LaPointe, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. LaPointe of Manlius, and Corp. Edward F. Kimball, son of Mrs. Rose Kimball of Manlius. Nearing the end of their furlos, they submitted yesterday afternoon to an interview. As a topic of conversation, the military situation was definitely out. Which left the weather...'The most beautiful place in the world,' they agreed about their adopted land, which they had both been in for more than a year. The temperature is always about 80 degrees, and once a visitor samples it for any length of time, he is satisfied with nothing else....Lt. LaPointe will go to Ft. Riley, Kan., after his furlo, while Corp. Kimball will return to the islands with the fighter command," The Herald-Journal, July 23, 1942. "Home on furlough are two Syracuse comrades in arms, Pvt. William E. Kimball, 128 Rose Ave., and Pvt. Bernard C. Leonard...Pvt. Kimball, who is 20, formerly worked at the Halcomb steel plant. He is in the ordnance department and is stationed at Camp Forrest, Tenn. A son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kimball, 128 Rose Ave., he has been in the army eight months. Pvt. Kimball has two brothers in the service Staff Sgt. Louis Kimball, Jr., 22, who is at Fort Jackson, S. C. and Sgt. Edward Kimball, 23, who is at Camp Stewart, Gal. They spent three years together at Puerto Rico," Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Kimball, Louis H., Jr. Formerly Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Home on furlough are two Syracuse comrades in arms, Pvt. William E. Kimball, 128 Rose Ave., and Pvt. Bernard C. Leonard...Pvt. Kimball, who is 20, formerly worked at the Halcomb steel plant. He is in the ordnance department and is stationed at Camp Forrest, Tenn. A son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kimball, 128 Rose Ave., he has been in the army eight months. Pvt. Kimball has two brothers in the service Staff Sgt. Louis Kimball, Jr., 22, who is at Fort Jackson, S. C. and Sgt. Edward Kimball, 23, who is at Camp Stewart, Ga. They spent three years together at Puerto Rico," Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Kimball, William E. Formerly Manlius. "Home on furlough are two Syracuse comrades in arms, Pvt. William E. Kimball, 128 Rose Ave., and Pvt. Bernard C. Leonard...Pvt. Kimball, who is 20, formerly worked at the Halcomb steel plant. He is in the ordnance department and is stationed at Camp Forrest, Tenn. A son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kimball, 128 Rose Ave., he has been in the army eight months. Pvt. Kimball has two brothers in the service Staff Sgt. Louis Kimball, Jr., 22, who is at Fort Jackson, S. C. and Sgt. Edward Kimball, 23, who is at Camp Stewart, Ga. They spent three years together at Puerto Rico," Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Kimber, James H. Formerly Fayetteville. "James H. Kimber, formerly of Fayetteville, will graduate from the Syracuse University College of Medicine on June 2, and will intern at the U. S. Navy Hospital at San Diego, California. He is a High School (alumni)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/22/1941.

Kimbrell, Jasper. Fayetteville. "Jasper Kimbrell of the Syracuse Road left yesterday for service in the Army as a sergeant in the Signal Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/19/1943.

King, Robert. Fayetteville. "Board 473, East Syracuse, disclosed that it will send 18 men for induction tomorrow...Robert King, 611 Clinton St., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 8/3/1944. "Robert King S2/c has returned to Sampson Naval Training Base after spending a few days with his wife and daughter at their home in Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Robert King, fireman 2/c, has completed his boot training at Sampson Naval Base and has been transferred to Gulfport, Miss., where he is studying engineering," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/10/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Robert King are the parents of a daughter, born at the Crouse-Irving hospital January 21. Mr. King, F 2/c, U.S.N., is stationed at Gulfport, Miss.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/26/1945. "Robert King, Fireman 1/c, who has been training in Beloit, Wis., has been spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George King, in John street and his wife and two little daughters in East Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945.

Kingsley, Charles E. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Kingsley, Charles E., 328 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Kingsley, Robert E. Kirkville. "Robert E. Kingsley, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Kingsley of Boston, Mass., and a grandson of the late Minnie B. Moyer of this village, will leave Friday morning for Chickasha, Okla., where he will train to become a flying cadet. Mr. Kingsley attended Syracuse University and was affiliated with the Delta Upsilon fraternity. The Kingsleys are summer residents of Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/31/1941. "Two Syracusans, 14 others from Central New York, and a total of 78 from New York State, are among members of Class 42-E fighter-fliers who are receiving their war wings at seven different pilot schools in the country this week. The class represented every state in the Union, and is the largest in history to graduate...Others from the Central New York section, all lieutenants, are:...Robert E. Kingsley, R. D. 2, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 5/17/1942. "Lt. Robert E. Kingsley, 24, a pilot on a B-26 bomber, has been missing in action over France since May 27, according to a telegram from the war department received by his wife,...Lt. Kingsley was stationed in England 10 months. He completed 50 missions in March, and holds the distinguished flying cross and the air medal. In his last letter to his wife written May 25, he looked forward to coming home this summer. He wrote that he was worn out from the heavy schedules of two or thee missions a day. Since he was overseas, Lt. Kingsley has piloted three planes. His first co-pilot and bombardier were killed in action, but he did not say whether he was in the plane at that time. When he entered service in November, 1941, he had completed three years at Syracuse university, where he majored in business administration and was a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity. He won his wings May 20, 1942, at Lake Charles, La. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Grover Kingsley, live in Wellesley Hills, Mass. Lt. Kingsley has a one and one-half-year old daughter, Deanna," The Post-Standard, 6/13/1944. "Mrs. Donna Hossbein Kingsley of this village (Kirkville) has been informed by the war department that her husband, Lieut. Robert E. Kingsley, 24, a pilot on a B-26 bomber, has been missing in action over France since May 27. Lieut. Kingsley has been stationed in England for 10 months and had completed 50 missions in March. He had a distinguished flying cross and an air medal. Mrs. Kingsley had a letter from her husband dated March 25 in which he expressed hopes of coming home this summer. He entered service in Nov. 1941 after three years at Syracuse University and won his wings in May, 1942, at Lake Charles, La. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Grover Kingsley, live in Wellesley, Mass. Lieut. Kingsley also has an 18-months old daughter Deanna," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Lt. Robert E. Kingsley, 24, pilot with the Ninth air force who was reported missing in action, was killed in action on May 27, according to word received by his wife, Mrs. Donna H. Kingsley of Kirkville. A French family living near Paris wrote his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Grover G. Kingsley of 55 Arnold rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass., that they had witnessed the crash of his plane. Lt. Kingsley enlisted as an aviation cadet in the U. S. army air forces in May, 1941, when he was a junior at Syracuse university. He received pilot training at Chicasha and Enid, Okla., and Lake Charles, La. After receiving his wings in May, 1942, he instructed for several months at Midland, Tex., where he applied for tactical combat flying and was assigned to Barksdale Field, La., as pilot of a B-26 Marauder. In June, 1943, he flew his plane and crew to England. He had completed more than 65 missions and had been decorated with the air medal with eight oak leaf clusters and the distinguished flying cross. Besides his wife and parents, he leaves a two-year-old daughter, Deanna Lynn; his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis B. Kingsley of East Syracuse; and two sisters, Mrs. John L. Scott and Mrs. David S. Imrie, both of Wellesley Hills," The Post-Standard, 3/2/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Kingsley, William. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Kinsella, James. Fayetteville. "Bennett Coughlin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Coughlin of Salt Springs road and James Kinsella, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella have enlisted in the U. S. Navy and left this week for their boot training at Sampson Naval Base. Both Coughlin and Kinsella are graduates of Fayetteville high school, class of '44, and had been attending Syracuse university..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944. "S 2/c James Kinsella has completed his boot training at Sampson naval Base and is spending a short leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella, at their home in Spring street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "Miss Catherine Kinsella entertained at a party Sunday night in honor of her brother, S 2/c James Kinsella, who returned to Sampson Naval Base Tuesday after spending a week with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945. "Mrs. James Kinsella has returned home after spending a week visiting her sister in New York, and her son, S 1/c James Kinsella, Jr., who is stationed at Camp Perry, Williamsburg, Va. Mrs. Kinsella and her son spent this past week-end in Washington, D.C., "The Eagle Bulletin, 4/13/1945. ""S 1/c James Kinsella, Jr., who has been passing several days on leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella, has returned to his base at Camp Perry," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945. "James Kinsella, Jr., S 1/c, stationed at Richmond, Va., spent the week end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945. "James Kinsella, Yeoman 3/C, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella of Spring street, is recovering from an attack of scarlet fever in the base hospital at Sampson naval station," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/1/1946. "James Kinsella, Jr., USN, based at Sampson, N.Y. spent the weekend with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella, Sr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946. "S 1/c James Kinsella, stationed at Pier 49 Brooklyn, spent the week end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/19/1946.

Kippley, Charles Alfred, Jr. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Mr. and Mrs. George Ebeling, Sr., entertained at dinner last Sunday having as their guests Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kipley and son Bud and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kippley of Kirkville...the dinner was given in honor of Bud Kippley who has joined the Marines and will leave on Friday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/13/1942. "His whereabouts unknown since last June, Pvt. Charles A. (Bud) Kippley, marine corps, has written his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Kippley of Kirkville, that he is on Guadalcanal where the marines are pinning back the ears of the Japs. The letter, in photostat, without a date and the space restricted to one sheet, reached Mr. and Mrs. Kippley yesterday. They had believed that Bud was with the marines somewhere in the Southwest Pacific, but were uncertain. It is one of the first, if not the first letter, from a Syracusan on Guadalcanal. 'I am in the jungle country, but don't mind it. I am well and perfectly all right and hope you are the same' he wrote. Pvt. Kippley enlisted Feb. 13, asking for action. He did not want a desk job. He wanted a fighting job, he told the recruiting officer. He trained first at Parris Island, S. C., and then at New River, N. C., from where he went overseas in June, it is believed. The last letter previously received from him by his parents was written June 8, bearing a California postmark," The Post-Standard, 9/18/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Kippley, George F., Jr. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Pfc. George Kippley, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. George F. Kippley of 128 Edgerton Street, Minoa, has been awarded the Bronze Star medal. He is with the 26th Division. 'For meritorious service in connection with military operations against the enemy in France, Oct. 7 to Dec. 12, 1944," the citation says. 'During the division's offensive operations, Pfc. Kippley, a member of the division judge advocate's section, performed his duties in an outstanding manner,' Minoa scrapbook, n.d. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Kippley, George F., Jr., 128 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Kippley, Willis C. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "John Shedd, Willis Kippley and John Metrick left for army service last Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "Willis C. Kippley, 301 N. Main St., Minoa...(is) stationed at the army medical replacement training center at Camp Pickett, Va. After extensive physical, military and specialized training, they will be assigned to hospitals or to tactical units of the army," Post-Standard 12/11/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Kippley, Willis C., 301 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Kling, Otto Paul. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara...Otto Paul Kling...from Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "O. Paul Kling, a former employee of J. P. White, has received a medical discharge from the Army and has returned to civilian life. He saw action in the Aleutian Islands and suffered a major injury which caused his release, according to reports. After spending a few days at the Fayetteville Inn, Mr. Kling left for his home in Gloversville, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7.23.1943.

Knapp, Glenn Stafford. Manlius. "Capt. G. Stafford Knapp, 29, was killed in action on Saipan Island, according to word received by his wife, residing with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. McCormick, in Jamesville road. Capt. Knapp was a former instructor at the Manlius School here and while at Manlius resided at the Remington Arms apartments in Pleasant street with his mother and sister. He entered the Army service in 1940 and was stationed at Fort McClellan. He was transferred after the Pearl Harbor attack to Hawaii. Capt. Knapp and Miss Peggy McCormick were married when he was home on furlough from Fort McClellan and she returned with him to his post, remaining until he was transferred. Their daughter, Diane Burdett Knapp, whom he ever had seen, was born in February, 1942. Capt. Knapp was then on the West Coast and Mrs. Knapp telephoned him the news of the birth of their child. Graduated from Yale university in 1936, Capt. Knapp afterwards was an instructor of history at the Manlius School and also tennis coach. At Yale he was a member of the R.O.T.C. and Alpha Sigma Phi. He was also a member of the New York National Guard. In Hawaii he was promoted to the rank of captain. Capt. Knapp was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Glenn S. Knapp. Besides his wife and daughter he leaves a brother, Kingdon G. Knapp formerly with the Canadian Air Corps, now with the American Army Air Forces, and a sister, Miss Lynne Knapp of Lynn, Mass. Mrs. Knapp recently received a letter from him dated June 7," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Knapp, Joel Ernest. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces...Leaving on Sunday for Atlantic City for training were Joel Knapp..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Joel Ernest Knapp...is enrolled as an aviation cadet in the army air forces pre-flight school for pilots at Maxwell Field, Ala.," The Post-Standard, 8/10/1943. "Lt. Joel Knapp is spending a ten day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Knapp in Warren street, having come from Furan Field, Albany, Ga. where he received his wings and commission last Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Lt. Joel Knapp, who is a bomber pilot in the U. S. A. A. F. and stationed at Greenville, S. C., spent the week end recently with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. "According to recent announcements, Joel Knapp, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest C. Knapp of Warren street has received a first lieutenant commission, and has also been awarded the air medal for meritorious achievement. Lieut. Knapp is a pilot with the Crusaders 13th AAF, B25 medium bombardment unit in the Philippines. He has completed 38 bombing missions with the jungle air force against Jap airdromes and installations in the Southwest Pacific," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "Lieut. J. E. Knapp, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest C. Knapp...has been awarded the bronze oak leaf cluster to the Air Medal. Lieutenant Knapp, a pilot with the Crusaders, a medium bombardment unit of the 13th AAF, has completed 46 bombing and strafing attacks on Japanese installations in the Southwest Pacific and Philippines for the jungle air force," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945. "First Lt. Joel E. Knapp has recently returned from 12 months' service in the Asiatic-Pacific area. Lt. Knapp entered service in January, 1943, and had been overseas since October, 1944, having served as a pilot on a B-25 Mitchell bomber in New Guinea, the Admiralty Islands, Netherlands East Indies and Palaman in the Philippines. He wears the Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters, the Philippine Liberation ribbon with two battle stars, the Asiatic-Pacific ribbon with four battle stars and the Presidential Citation. At the termination of his 45-day furlough, he will report to Greensboro, N. C., for re-assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. "The marriage of Lt. Joel E. Knapp, USAAF, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Knapp of Warren street, to Miss Phyllis Jane Paape, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walden W. Paape of 225 North Institute Place, Peoria, Ill., formerly residing in Roycroft Road, Syracuse...Saturday afternoon, Dec. 30 in Westminster Presbyterian church...the bride attended Fayetteville high school, and was graduated from the Convent school. He also attended Syracuse University...Lt. Knapp, Fayetteville high school alumnus, returned in October from a year's service overseas. When the couple left for Enid, Okla., to which army base Lt. Knapp was recently re-assigned,...Lt. Knapp will remain in the service for another year," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/18/1946. "Paul Edlund, a student at Yale University, and a former resident of this village, was a recent guest of Joel Knapp at his home in Warren street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/13/1946.

Kneeskern, LeGrand J. Kirkville. "Two men from the Syracuse area will be among 18 pilots who will receive their wings at seven advanced flying schools in the gulf coast and Texas area tomorrow. They are...Lt. LeGrand J. Kneeskern of Kirkville...Kneeskern will receive his wings at Kelly field. The graduates have completed a rigorous 32 weeks flying schedule of 200 hours aloft and 400 hours ground school work," The Post-Standard, 7/2/1942. "Canastota.--'Seen John. He's alive and well. Destroy letter.' Such was the reassuring message in a cablegram that brought joy Saturday to Mr. and Mrs. Grover Kneeskern and family of Bridgeport, formerly of this village. The message was relative to their son, lst Lt. LeGrand John Kneeskern, who was reported to his parents in a message from the war department earlier this month as missing in action. He was stationed in New Guinea. Saturday's message was from the captain of Kneeskern's squadron, who was a close friend, and indicated that a letter to the Bridgeport family written before the captain had knowledge that John was alive and well was on its way and to destroy that letter when it arrives. The family Monday was anxiously awaiting further details as to the son's safety," The Post-Standard, 8/24/1943.

Kniskern, W. M. Formerly Manlius. "Lt. W. M. Kniskern, former principal of Manlius high school has been transferred from Florida to Alaska," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/1943.

Konvicka, William. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Word has been received by his mother that William N. Konvicka, Jr., A. M. M. 2/c, is in a New Zealand hospital. He states that he has no wounds, and says he is only allowed to say that he is there for a rest. Petty Officer Konvicka has been in the Southwest Pacific for 15 months and has not had a furlough since August 9, 1942, when he finished boot camp at Newport, R. I. He then went to Jacksonville, Fla., for training, where he received the rate of aviation machinist mate. Following this, he was sent to Treasure Island, Calif., from where he embarked for overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...William Konvicka in the navy" The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "William Nelson Konvicka, Jr., aviation machinist's mate 2/c, USN,...was presented the purple heart for wounds received in action in December 1943. The award was made by Comm. Dixie Kiefer, USN, commanding officer, naval air station, Quonset Point, R. I. Konvicka was wounded in a Jap bombing attack against Sterling island. He is on duty in the flight operations department of the naval air station, Quonset Point, R. I.," The Post-Standard, 6/9/1945."Petty officer William N. Konvicka, Jr., is enjoying a 30-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. William Konvicka, at their home in East Genesee street. This is his first furlough in over 29 months, 18 of which were spent in the Southwest Pacific. P. O. Konvicka has just been discharged from the U. S. naval hospital at Sun Valley, Idaho. At the conclusion of his leave he will report to Boston for six months' limited duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "William N. Konvicka, Jr., A.M.M., 2/c, U.S.N. has reported to Boston, Mass., for six months' limited duty after having spent a 30-day leave with his mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "William Konvicka, Jr., AMM 2/c, of Quonset Point, Rhode Island, spent the week end at his home in East Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945. "William N. Konvicka, Jr., A.M.M. 2/c, has received his honorable discharge from the U. S. navy and is at his home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Kousky, Edgar. Manlius. "Lt. Edgar Kousky of Broadfield Drive, now stationed in Albany, was called home last week to attend the funeral of his grandfather, Jacob Lindenmayer, of Danforth st., Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946.

Krafft, Melvin C. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Krafft, Melvin C., 237 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Krafft, Raymond. Kirkville. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Krause, Emory. Formerly Fayetteville. "Mrs. Louie Powlesland and Mrs. Lena Balsley have returned from Sherburne where they were in attendance at the wedding of Miss Marie Armstrong and Emory Krause, B. M. 2/c of the U. S. Coast Guard, on August 13. The Krause family were former residents of Fayetteville, having moved to Sherburne 11 years ago. Another son, Robert, is stationed in Texas in the Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin 8/25/1944.

Krause, Robert. Formerly Fayetteville. "Mrs. Louie Powlesland and Mrs. Lena Balsley have returned from Sherburne where they were in attendance at the wedding of Miss Marie Armstrong and Emory Krause, B. M. 2/c of the U. S. Coast Guard, on August 13. The Krause family were former residents of Fayetteville, having moved to Sherburne 11 years ago. Another son, Robert, is stationed in Texas in the Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin 8/25/1944.

Kreis, Frederick. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Frederick Kreis..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Calcutta, India--Tec/5 Frederick Kreis, R. D., Fayetteville, N. Y., is a member of a port battalion which recently has been awarded a meritorious service unit plaque by Maj.-Gen. W. E. R. Covell, commanding general, Services of Supply, in the India-Burma theater. The port battalions of Base Section No. 2, commanded by Brig. Gen. R. R. Neyland, have made the base the foremost military port installation operating in a theater of war. The port battalions have cut down the unloading of ships in the docks to an average of 3 1/2 days, the fastest record in the world, and recently unloaded a Liberty Ship in 44 1/2 hours. The port of Calcutta, due to the efforts of the port battalions, has consistently led military ports throughout the world in the unloading of vitally needed materials of war," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945.

Kronen, Jack. Fayetteville. "Among graduates of the class of '43 from Fayetteville high school who have already gone into military training are Bruce Edlund, who...left last Thursday for Jefferson Barracks, Mo., where (he) will train as (an) air cadet..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "John D. Kronen, an ensign in the Navy until his recent discharge, and a former resident of Fayetteville, left New York City by plane for Rio de Janeiro, Tuesday, to spend two months with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/11/1945.

Krzykowski, Alfred. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey) Name appears on both the Manlius Honor Roll and Oran Honor Roll.

Krzykowski, Edwin. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey) Name appears on both the Manlius Honor Roll and Oran Honor Roll.

Krzykowski, Henry. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey) Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. Navy. Enlisted 1944. Discharged Lido Beach, L.I., N.Y., May 31, 1946, per discharge papers of Hank Krzykowski.

Lake, William. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Lamb, Wilbur. Manlius. "Wilbur Lamb, U.S.N., who has been stationed in the South Pacific on Admiralty Island, has been visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fordyce Lamb of Academy street. Mr. Lamb returned to New York this week to receive his honorable discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946.

Lambert, John Y., Jr. Manlius. "John Y. Lambert, Jr. left Thursday for the induction center and will be transferred to Fort Dix, N. J., to begin training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Twenty-five men were inducted into military service from selective service board, 473, located in the municipal building, East Syracuse Friday...Army...John Y. Lambert, Jr., 31 E. Seneca st... " The Post-Standard, 7/30/1945.

Lambert, William B. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces...Leaving on Sunday for Atlantic City for training were William Lambert..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Mrs. William Lambert and Mrs. William Langenmayer have returned to Fayetteville after visiting their husbands who are stationed at Atlantic City," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/5/1943. "Second Lt. William B. Lambert, formerly of Salt Springs rd., Fayetteville, who received his wings and commission Jan. 7 from Turner Field, Albany, Ga., is in Syracuse with Mrs. Lambert staying with Mrs. Lambert's sister, Mrs. Gerald W. Avery, of 118 Kirk ave. After a 10-day leave he will report to Tampa, Fla., for further training," The Post-Standard, 1/16/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Carl Edlund have received word that their nephew, Lt. Paul Edlund, was seriously injured when the plane on which he was a bombardier went down in the European theater on June 26. Lt. Edlund is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Birger Edlund of Lakewood, Ohio, and all are former residents of this village. Word came first to Fayetteville of Lt. Edlund's misfortune by way of a letter from William Lambert to friends in which he told of having visited Paul in a hospital in Italy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/14/1944. "The heaviest flak encountered on his 50 missions with the 15th AAF in Italy was over a small town near Breslau, Germany, when his B-17 Fortress went thru it for 18 minutes, said Lt. William B. Lambert, 28, home over Christmas visiting his wife, Mrs. Ellen Lambert of 1018 Madison st. 'Generally we hit flak for about five or six minutes of the run,' he said in describing other raids over Romania, Germany, and Austria. He recalls the flak over southern France, when they supported the land invasion, as being less but 'awfully accurate.' All members of the 10-men crew who went overseas together in May as a replacement group, returned to the United States. Four of them received purple hearts. Because he knew that he would be getting home before it got very cold in Italy, Lt. Lambert did not construct one of the huts which dot the grounds of his Flying Fortress squadron. With the aid of Italian labor, obtained at 75 cents a day, bungalow colonies built from packing cases and stones from bombed buildings, have sprung up at the airfield, he said. He explained that some of the amateur builders even had tiled floors. Lt. Lambert enlisted in service Oct. 7, 1942, and was called to active duty, Jan. 31, 1943. He received his pilot's wings at Turner Field, Albany, Ga., Jan. 7, 1944, and went to MacDill Field, Tampa, Fla., where the crew was formed. He went overseas as a co-pilot when in Italy. On Sept. 18 he was promoted to first lieutenant. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, he attended Syracuse university. He was formerly employed by Precision Castings Co., Fayetteville. Lt. Lambert has the air medal with three oak leaf clusters and the European ribbon with stars for the Italian campaign and Southern France. He was ill with malaria in Italy. He will report to Atlantic City, N. J., for reassignment ..."Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Lubbock Army Air Field, Lubbock, Texas.--First Lieutenant William B. Lambrecht, a former Fayetteville accountant and a graduate of Fayetteville high school, now a veteran of many months of combat duty in the European Theater, has now completed a post-graduate course of instruction in instrument pilot training at this AAF instructors school and soon will return to his base to train other fliers in the latest methods of 'all-weather' instrument flying. Lieutenant Lambert was on duty in Italy for about seven months as a Flying Fortress pilot flying bomber missions against the enemy for which he has been awarded the Air Medal and three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Distinguished Unit Badge and he wears the ETO ribbon with three battle stars," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "Lt. William Lambert, based at Westover Field, Mass., is passing ten days with relatives in Fayetteville and Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945.

Lamprecht, Jerome. Fayetteville. "...and Jerome N. Lamprecht, 18, son of Joseph Lamprecht of Manlius rd., Fayetteville, are students in the navy V-12 college training program at Tufts college, Medford, Mass.," The Post-Standard, 12/27/1943. "The body of Ensign Theodore Lamprecht, aged 20, who was killed when his plane crashed in the Everglades of Florida three weeks ago, was recovered last week and the cremated remains brought to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lamprecht of Manlius Rd. in Fayetteville. Mr.. and Mrs. Lamprecht have two other sons in service, Joseph, in the Army Engineering Division and Jerome with the V-5 Navy Program at Tufts College, Massachusetts. A third son, Richard, who is at present attending school here has enlisted, and will enter the Army air corps in July. Besides his parents and brothers in the service, two other brothers, David and Daniel Lamprecht and a sister, Mrs. Charles D. Mills survive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944.

Lamprecht, Joseph. Fayetteville. "The body of Ensign Theodore Lamprecht, aged 20, who was killed when his plane crashed in the Everglades of Florida three weeks ago, was recovered last week and the cremated remains brought to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lamprecht of Manlius Rd. in Fayetteville. Mr.. and Mrs. Lamprecht have two other sons in service, Joseph, in the Army Engineering Division and Jerome with the V-5 Navy Program at Tufts College, Massachusetts. A third son, Richard, who is at present attending school here has enlisted, and will enter the Army air corps in July. Besides his parents and brothers in the service, two other brothers, David and Daniel Lamprecht and a sister, Mrs. Charles D. Mills survive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944.

Lamprecht, Richard. Fayetteville. "The body of Ensign Theodore Lamprecht, aged 20, who was killed when his plane crashed in the Everglades of Florida three weeks ago, was recovered last week and the cremated remains brought to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lamprecht of Manlius Rd. in Fayetteville. Mr.. and Mrs. Lamprecht have two other sons in service, Joseph, in the Army Engineering Division and Jerome with the V-5 Navy Program at Tufts College, Massachusetts. A third son, Richard, who is at present attending school here has enlisted, and will enter the Army air corps in July. Besides his parents and brothers in the service, two other brothers, David and Daniel Lamprecht and a sister, Mrs. Charles D. Mills survive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Eight 17-year-old youths from the Syracuse area enlisted in the Army Air Forces Enlisted Reserve today for call as aviation cadets on reaching their 18th birthday....Those enlisted were...Roger Hoag and Richard Lamprecht of Fayetteville..." The Post-Standard, 2/19/1944.

Lamprecht, Theodore. Fayetteville. "Naval Aviation Cadet Theodore Lamprecht, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lamprecht of Fayetteville, has successfully completed the intensive 11-week course at the U. S. navy Preflight school here. He has been promoted to primary flight training at the naval air station at Bunker Hill, Indiana. Cadet Lamprecht graduated from Fayetteville high school with the class of 1941. At the Preflight school his course included physical conditioning, athletics, military drill, instruction in the essentials of Naval service and ground school subjects. After three months of primary flying and three additional months of advanced flying, he will be eligible for a commission as an Ensign in the U. S. naval Reserve or second lieutenant in the marine corps reserve, and the covet 'gold wings' of a naval aviator," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Theodore Lamprecht, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Lamprecht of Manlius Rd., won his navy 'Wings of Gold' and was commissioned an ensign in the naval reserved this week, following completion of the prescribed flight training course at the Naval air training center, Pensacola, Fla., the 'Annapolis of the Air.' having been designated a naval aviator, Ensign Lamprecht will go on active duty at one of the navy's air operational training centers before being assigned to a combat zone," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944. "The body of Ensign Theodore Lamprecht, aged 20, who was killed when his plane crashed in the Everglades of Florida three weeks ago, was recovered last week and the cremated remains brought to the home of his parents in Fayetteville and placed in a vault to await services and burial. 'Ted' as he was known to everyone, won his wings of gold and was commissioned an ensign the first week in April, following completion of the prescribed flight training course at the Naval Air Training Center, at Pensacola, Fla., the 'Annapolis of the Air.' According to reports, Ted's plane crashed after colliding with another in mid-air and landed in the swamp and thicket of the Everglades. Mr. Lamprecht went to Florida and assisted in the search for his son's body, which was found under the wrecked plane. Lamprecht was an honor student throughout his school career and was graduated with honors from Fayetteville High School in 1941. He attended the College of Forestry at Syracuse University before entering the service. He was also active in Scout work in Troop 51 of Fayetteville, and was assistant scout leader. Mr. and Mrs. Lamprecht have two other sons in service, Joseph, in the Army Engineering Division and Jerome with the V-5 Navy Program at Tufts College, Massachusetts. A third son, Richard, who is at present attending school here has enlisted, and will enter the army air corps in July. Besides his parents and brothers in the service, two other brothers, David and Daniel Lamprecht and a sister, Mrs. Charles D. Mills survive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "With a great deal of sorrow we add the second gold star to our honor roll. Ensign Theodore Lamprecht lost his life when his plane collided in mid air with that of another pilot over the Everglades in the State of Florida. Ted started working at Precision December 18, 1941 in the Inspection Department and left for the Navy Air Corp., February 9, 1943. He was a very good natured young man with a host of friends who mourn his death very deeply. We of Precision feel this loss of a fellow worker very keenly and wish to extend our sympathy to his family and many friends, "Precision Castings News, May 20, 1944. Stationed at Lee Field, Green Cold Springs, Fla., at the time of the collision, Post Standard, 7/6/1944.

Landers, Earl A. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Landers, Frederick J. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Landers, Frederick J., 309 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Landers, Howard. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Howard G. Landers, apprentice seaman, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Landers of Fayetteville, who enlisted in the coast guard in April is now stationed in Panama City, Fla. He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school and was formerly employed by Precision Castings company," The Post-Standard, 7/31/1942. "Letters From Our Boys in Service / To My Friends in Fayetteville: I am writing this letter to thank you very much for the gift you sent. It made me feel like Fayetteville was the only place to live. You people are sure doing your bit. When I was home on leave I saw men working over in the park on the scrap drive, and they certainly worked hard. I, too, am especially proud of the citizens of the village for going over the top in the drive. In the months I have spent in the Coast Guard I have learned a lot and experienced things which I shall never forget. I wish all my friends in service and in Fayetteville the best of luck and I will close by saying again 'Thanks a lot.' Your friend, Howard G. Landers," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Announcement has been received by relatives here of the marriage of Miss Lillian Johnson of Port St. Joe, Fla., and Howard George Landers, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Landers of Manlius street, this village. The ceremony was performed at the home of the bride's parents, on Thursday, June 24 at 8 p.m. After a short wedding trip they will reside at Port St. Joe, where the bridegroom is stationed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "U. S. Coast Guardsman and Mrs. Howard Landers, who have been spending ten days at the home of his mother, Mrs. George Landers, have returned to Panama City, where Mr. Landers is stationed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "Seaman 1/c Howard Landers and Mrs. Landers, of Port St. Joe, Fla., announce the birth of a daughter on Friday, Nov. 10. Seaman Landers has recently been transferred to Mobile, Ala....son of Mr. and Mrs. George Landers of Manlius street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944.

Landers, Wilbur P. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Lane, Albert H. Formerly Kirkville. "Second Lt. Albert H. Lane, son of Mrs. Mary Sudol, Kirkville RD 1, is serving overseas with a 9th air force advanced service group as an assistant group quartermaster somewhere in Great Britain. Before entering service in March, 1941, Lt. Lane was employed by the Cutler-Hammer Co. of New York as personnel manager for five years," The Post-Standard, 5/15/1944.

Langenmayer, James W. Fayetteville. "The following soldiers from this area were honorably discharged Thursday at Fort Dix, N.J...Sgt. James W. Langenmayer, 210 Burdick st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/8/1945. Possibly same as below.

Langenmayer, William. Fayetteville. "Mrs. William Langenmayer has come from Oneida, N. Y. to live with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Palmer during the absence of her husband, who left Sunday for service in the armed forces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Mrs. William Lambert and Mrs. William Langenmayer have returned to Fayetteville after visiting their husbands who are stationed at Atlantic City," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/5/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. William Langenmayer are the parents of a daughter, born Sunday. Mrs. Langenmayer, the former Catherine Palmer, has been residing with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Palmer for the past few months, following her husband's induction into the Army. Pvt. Langenmayer is at present stationed in Salt Lake City, Utah," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Corp. William Langenmayer returned to his base in Idaho, after spending several days with Mrs. Langenmayer at the home of Mrs. Langenmayer's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Palmer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. Possibly same as above.

Laning, Raymond. Manlius. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...Raymond Laning...from Manlius...in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Lanning are at home for a week during the time Mr. Laning is enjoying a furlough. Mrs. Lanning has been spending two months near Camp Lee, Va., where her husband is stationed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Raymond Laning of the U.S. Army, now stationed in Virginia, and Mrs. Laning are passing two weeks on furlough visiting his mother, Mrs. Anna Laning and other relatives and friends," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Lanning who have been visiting his mother and other relatives and friends in Manlius returned last week to his base in Virginia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "Mrs. Anna Laning has received a letter from her son Raymond who is now stationed at Okinawa and in his letter he described the destructive hurricane that he witnessed. Like many others, Raymond is waiting to be returned to the States and receive an honorable discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945. "Raymond Laning has received an honorable discharge from the Army and has returned to his home in St. Johns avenue," The Eagle-Bulletin 1/11/1946.

Lannon, James H. Fayetteville. "Twenty-one Syracuse and vicinity men have been enlisted in the navy and placed on inactive duty...James H. Lannon, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 7/23/1945. "James Lannon, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Lannon of Brooklea Drive has enlisted in the U. S. Navy and expects to leave soon for boot training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "James Lannon, S 2/c has completed his boot training at Camp Perry, Va., and is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Lannon of Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

LaPointe, Betty. Manlius. "Miss Betty LaPointe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward LaPointe of Fayette street, has enlisted in the Waves and passed her physical examinations at Rochester on Wednesday. Miss LaPointe will study at Hunter College for her basic training. She is a graduate of Manlius high school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/24/1944. "...Others with brothers in the army are...Miss Betty Jane LaPointe, 204 Fayette st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/19/1944."Betty Jane LaPointe enlisted in the Waves, will be receiving her training at Hunter College. Before leaving she was entertained by the office personnel department of Air Cooled Motors...Miss LaPointe received a gold identification bracelet and many other gifts. The 12 Waves who left were given a party at Schraft's, by 3c/as Miss Helen Walker of the Service Center," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving...WAVES: Betty Jane LaPointe..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Miss Betty LaPointe has just completed her training in the WAVES at Hunter College and has been placed in a Naval Office in Washington, D. C., "The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "Miss Betty LaPoint, a Wac stationed in Washington, spent the week end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward LaPoint of Fayette street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Edward La Pointe had as their guests over the week end their daughter Betty and Miss Marjorie McKenzie, of Mississippi, both are seamen 1/c, Women's Naval Reserve; Miss Margaret Taite, of San Antonio, Texas, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry La Pointe and family, of Johnstown. Miss Betty La Pointe was guest of honor on Sunday at a dinner given by her parents, the occasion being her 24th birthday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Betty LaPointe, S 1/c, of Washington, D. C., spent the week end with her parents...Seaman LaPointe has been confined to a hospital by illness for several weeks. The trip to Manlius and return was made by plane," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "Margie L. McKenzie, S 1/c, U.S.N.W.R....is a guest of Miss Betty Jane LaPointe. Miss LaPointe, a member of the WAVES has received a medical discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

LaPointe, Robert Frederic. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Corp. Robert LaPoint,...earlier this month was notified of his promotion to that post. Twenty-four years old, he enlisted in the army a year ago in this city and now is with the 27th engineers at Fort Buchanan near San Juan, Puerto Rico. The new corporal was born in Watertown, went to school there and at Manlius and was employed at the Precision Die Casting company, Fayetteville, before enlisting," The Post-Standard, 8/15/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Benham, formerly of San Antonio, Texas, now of Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Margery Tait, to Sgt. Robert LaPointe, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. LaPointe of Manlius, on March 7...no date has been set for the wedding. Sgt. LaPointe expects to return to the States some time this month to attend Officers' Candidate School, "The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Never very convincing in propagandizing Syracuse weather, the chamber of commerce took it in the neck again yesterday from two Manlius soldiers, who exhibited deep tans and healthy complexions and extolled Puerto Rico, the island to which they were assigned, with a series of superlatives. The men were Lt. Robert F. LaPointe, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. LaPointe of Manlius, and Corp. Edward F. Kimball, son of Mrs. Rose Kimball of Manlius. Nearing the end of their furlos, they submitted yesterday afternoon to an interview. As a topic of conversation, the military situation was definitely out. Which left the weather...'The most beautiful place in the world,' they agreed about their adopted land, which they had both been in for more than a year. The temperature is always about 80 degrees, and once a visitor samples it for any length of time, he is satisfied with nothing else....Lt. LaPointe shied a little at the mention of girls. The islands had given him his bride to be, Miss Margery Tait of San Antonio, Tex., who worked for the civil service in Puerto Rico,...Lt. LaPointe will go to Ft. Riley, Kan., after his furlo, while Corp. Kimball will return to the islands with the fighter command," The Herald-Journal, July 23, 1942. "Mr. and Mrs. E. C. LaPointe entertained 40 guests at their home at 204 Fayette street, Manlius, in honor of their son, Lieut. Robert LaPointe. Lieut. LaPointe received his commission on July 15th at Officers Candidate School, Fort Benning, Ga. After an eight-day furlough he has returned to his post at Fort Riley, Kansas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. LaPointe, 204 Fayette st., Manlius, have received word that their son, Robert F. LaPointe, has been promoted from second to first lieutenant, and is now stationed at Camp Fumston, Kan. Lt. LaPointe was graduated from officers' training school July 15," Post-Standard, 11/8/1942."First Lt. Robert F. LaPointe has been appointed to the staff of Brigadier General Frank A. Allen, Commanding Officer, Combat Command 'a,' 9th Armored Division. LaPointe enlisted in the Army shortly before the United States entered the war and has made an unusually rapid rise to his present rank and position. His wife, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. LaPointe, live at 204 E. Fayette street, Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Mrs. LaPointe and aunt, Mrs. Lulu O'Brien, left Tuesday by train for Needle, Calif., where Lieut. La Pointe is now stationed, and where they will make their home for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Lieut. Robert LaPointe...has recovered from a ten-weeks hospitalization in Needles, Calif., and with Mrs. LaPointe has been transferred to Leesville, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "Robert LaPointe...has recently been promoted to the rank of Captain at Camp Polk where he is stationed, according to word received by his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/19544. "Robert F. LaPointe...has recently been promoted from the rank of captain to that of major and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal in Germany on May 10 for 'meritorious service' from Dec. 27, 1944 to April 30, 1945 in France and Germany. A member of the 21st Corps Headquarters, Quartermaster Corps, he has been in the European theater of operations since November, 1944. The citation read in part: 'His willing cooperation, coupled with initiative for the successful operation of the 21st corps supply elements, aided materially to the successful completion of the missions assigned his unit.' Major LaPointe enlisted in August, 1940. He spent 18 months in Puerto Rico and returned to this country April 19, 1942, On July 17, 1942 he was graduated from Fort Benning, Ga. He transferred to Fort Riley, Kan., and attended quartermaster school at Camp Lee, Va. At Camp Polk, La., he was transferred from the Ninth Armored Division to the 21st Corps Headquarters. Two years ago Major LaPointe was married to Miss Florence Patrick, who was a former home economics teacher in Manlius high school. The ceremony was performed at the home of her parents in Mexico, with whom she resides," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Mrs. Robert LaPointe of Mexico, N.Y. sailed Sunday from New York City for Germany where she will join her husband, Major LaPointe," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/30/1946.

Lasher, Norbert Augustus. Minoa. "Promotions to captain went to...Norbert Augustus Lasher of Minoa," The Post-Standard, 12/12/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Lasher, Norbert A., 232 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Laws, Harold. Minoa. "Private Harold Laws of Fort Niagara has been spending a ten-day furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Laws, Harold, 211 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Leebrick, Karl C., Jr. Fayetteville. "T/Sgt. Karl Leebrick, who is stationed at Camp Breckenbridge, Ky., spent a day last week visiting old friends in town, while enroute to New York City to pass the remainder of his furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Leech, Ernest G. Fayetteville. 100 Franklin St., Fayetteville. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Pfc. Ernest G. Leech of Dulzura, Calif., is passing a 15-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest S. Leech," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Cpl. Ernest G. Leech of Camp Kearns, Utah has been spending a ten-day leave with his wife, Mrs. Viola Leech, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest S. Leech," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "Sgt. Ernest G. Leech has received his honorable discharge after 40 months in the Air Force, 20 of which was spent in the Pacific area. He and his wife are making their home with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Leland, Everett W. Formerly town of Manlius. "A memorial service will be conducted Sunday afternoon in the chapel of the Manlius School in honor of the late Ensign Everett W. Leland of Hamilton, the first Manlius Old Boy killed in World War II. He died in an airplane accident at Corpus Christi, Tex., in September, 1942," The Post-Standard, 3/14/1944. Former Manlius School cadet.

Lening, Seymour E. Fayetteville. "Seymour E. Lening, 107 North st., Fayetteville...have finished boot training at Sampson naval training center and will be granted leaves..." The Post-Standard, 12/23/1944.

Lenning, Clarence E. Kirkville. "The following enlisted in the regular navy for a four-year hitch...Clarence E. Lenning, Main st., Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 1/18/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Leonard, Richard M. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Richard Leonard of Fort Dix visited his parents over the holiday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Mr. Richard Leonard, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Leonard, who has been a teacher at Babylon, L. I., has left to serve his year in army training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/3/1941. "Mr. Richard Leonard was called back to Army service January 3 for duty at Fort Dix, N. J.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1942. Honorably discharged Thursday, T/4 Richard M. Leonard, Minoa, The Post-Standard, 10/27/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Leonard, Richard M., 408 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Lewis, Barbara. Fayetteville. "Miss Barbara C. Lewis, American Red Cross staff assistant has arrived safely in London, England, it was announced yesterday. She is the daughter of Mrs. A. Huntington Lewis, Fayetteville, RD 1. Until her appointment with the Red Cross, Miss Lewis was an architectural draftsman at the U. S. engineer office here (Syracuse) and previously practiced as an architectural consultant and supervisor in her own firm in Syracuse. A former student at Goodyear Burlingame school and the National Cathedral school, Washington, D.C., she received her bachelor's degree in architecture at Syracuse university in 1936 and has worked since for architectural firms in Syracuse," The Post-Standard, 10/3/1943. "Section Captain Barbara Lewis has returned to the States after serving 26 months overseas, and is spending three weeks terminal leave with her mother, Mrs. Huntington Lewis, at their home on the Reservoir Road. Miss Lewis was with the American Red Cross clubmobile unit and served in England prior to D-Day. After that time the unit followed the troops to Normandy, France, Belgium and Germany. Miss Lewis states that while the going was pretty rough at times, the experience was well worth while, and she is grateful that she had the opportunity to serve. She says she has no definite plans after her discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Lewis, Elwyn. Formerly Manlius. "Elwyn Lewis, a former resident of Manlius, is now in service, stationed at Camp Edison, Sea Girt, N. J., "The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943.

Leyden, Edward J. Minoa. "Sgt. Edward J. Leyden, son of Daniel P. Leyden of Minoa, has been promoted to that rank according to a letter received by his sister, Miss Jane E. Leyden of 1819 South ave. from Col. James L. Murchison, medical corps, commanding the 27th general hospital in England. He wrote, 'It is a pleasure to inform you that on March 16 your brother was promoted to the grade of sergeant...He is a hard worker and very attentive to duty...we are proud that he can be in our unit. I see him every day. His spirit is high, and he seems to be enjoying everything to the fullest extent.' Sgt. Leyden was a former employee of the New York Central doing clerical work 15 years. He has been overseas since September, 1943. He has another sister, Mrs. O. R. Evans, 2d," The Post-Standard, 5/5/1944.

Leyva, Robert R. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "The following are scheduled to arrive in the States after service overseas, according to lists prepared by The Associated Press...on Abe Lincoln due in Newport News Nov. 17...Pvt. Robert R. Leyva, Dewitt Park, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/19/1945.

Lindenmayer, Arthur C. Kirkville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...Arthur Lindenmayer...(R.D. 1) of Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942.

Lindenmayer, Bernard J. Kirkville. Army discharge...Corp. Bernard J. Lindenmayer, Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 3/24/1946.

Lindenmayer, Edward. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Harold Oeinck son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Oeinck and Ed Lindenmayer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Lindenmayer of this village and Charles Carveth of Kirkville are among the recruits who are undergoing preliminary training at the Marine Corps barracks at Parris Island, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Privates Edward Lindenmayer and Harold J. Oeinck, U.S.M.C., both of Fayetteville, are now in their second week of Marine Corps training at Parris Island, S. C. They enlisted in the Syracuse recruiting office. Reports say they are feeling fine and doing excellent work in preparation for their services with Uncle Sam," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Pvts. Louis E. O'Donnell of East Syracuse, R.D. 1, and Edward Lindenmayer of Fayetteville, who are serving with the Marines, have arrived safely overseas, 'somewhere in the Pacific,' according to word received by Mrs. H. J. O'Donnell of East Syracuse, R. D. 1. They enlisted last summer and obtained their basic training at Parris Island, S.C.," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. "Pfc. Edward Lindenmayer is home after 25 months in Guadalcanal and vicinity, and will spend a month with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Lindenmayer at their home in Huntleigh avenue. 'Lindy' enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps July 2, 1942, and after boot training at Parris island, was sent to the Pacific area. Although he has had malaria fever four times, Lindy is now apparently in the pink of condition and looks fine, according to those who have seen him. At the conclusion of his furlough he will report to Parris Island for re-assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Roger William Hoag, son of Stanley Hoag of Center street, left Monday night for the Army induction center at Fort Dix. 'Bill' enlisted in the army air corps last summer, prior to his 18th birthday and only recently received his summons to report for service. Some of the 'boys' home on furloughs dropped in for a little surprise on Bill last Thursday night and tendered him a farewell, they were Pfc. Ed Lindenmayer, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Lt. (j.g.) Joseph McGraw, Pvt. George Phillips, Pfc. Eddie O'Donnell, East Syracuse, Milton Kepler and Bob Sims," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Pfc. Edward Lindenmayer will leave Monday for California to resume duties in the U. S. Marine Corps in which he has served for the past three and one-half years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Lindenmayer, George J. Fayetteville. "George J. Lindenmayer has completed the prescribed course of study at the Naval Air Technical Training Center at Memphis, Tenn., and is now attending gunnery school at Jacksonville, Fla. George was one of 22 of a class of 85 who finished and graduated at the Training Center," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Lindenmayer, Paul. Kirkville. Inducted into the service, Paul A. Lindenmayer, Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 5/9/1941. "Private Paul Lindenmayer returned Monday to Fort Blanding, Florida, after spending a few days with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942.

Lindenmayer, Raymond. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Lindenmayer, Richard. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Lindsay, Floyd. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Lindsley, Cecil W. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Cecil W. Lindsley...of Manlius...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Aviation Cadet Cecil Lindsley, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Lindsley of East Seneca street, Manlius, has been transferred to San Antonio Texas after receiving his basic training at Mitchell Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/26/1943. "Pvt. Cecil Lindsley of San Marcos, Texas is expected home on Saturday, where he will spend a 15-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Lindsley. "Cecil Lindsley, stationed at San Marcos, Texas, has been made private, first class," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/23/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. James Lindsley have received a letter this week from their son, Cecil, now stationed at San Marcos, Texas, stating that he had been made a corporal," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Corp. Cecil Lindsley of San Marco, Texas is passing a two-week leave of absence with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Cpl. Cecil Lindsley was one of 37 GI drivers who was honored with awards for excellent handling of army vehicles last Saturday morning in an impressive ceremony at the post motor pool at San Marcos, Texas. In order to qualify for the awards drivers performed a minimum of three months' duty as driver of an army vehicle without traffic violations and with an accident-free record, and rating excellent. Lt. Col. R. C. Haby, post commander, pinned the badges on the blouse of each driver and in his presentation talk said: 'I think we have one of the best motor pools in the Central Flying Training Command, and it has gained recognition even outside this field. I am proud that it is a quartermasters activity.' Cpl. Lindsley was also one of three to receive the Driver M (for motorcycle) bar," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/10/1944. "Corp. Cecil Lindsley, who has been at home on furlough, returned Wednesday night to his base at San Marco, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. James Lindsley entertained at a family dinner on Sunday at their home in East Seneca street, in honor of their son, Corp. Lindsley, "The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Corp. Cecil Lindsley, who has been at home on a seven-day furlough, returned Saturday to his base at Scott Fields, Ill., where he was graduated in September from the radio school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945. "Corp. Cecil Lindsley, who has been at home on a ten-day furlough, has returned to Scott Field, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946.

Ling, Stuart James. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Stuart James Ling, former music supervisor in Manlius high school, has been commissioned a second lieutenant in the army upon completion of the officer candidate course at the infantry school, Fort Benning, Ga. The new lieutenant was inducted into the army April 3, 1942, and served with the 76th division. He was a corporal before being commissioned. A graduate of West Pittston high school in West Pittston, Pa., he was graduated from Syracuse university in 1940. Prominent as a musician, he was co-writer of the music for 'Tambourine & Bones' musical comedies and member of Sigma Nu fraternity. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. I. Ling of San Angelo, Tex.," The Post-Standard, 3/25/194e.

Lisi, Frank P. Kirkville. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Army...Frank P. Lisi, Box 63, Kirkville, The Post-Standard 4/6/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Littler, J. William. Manlius. "Promotion of Maj. J. William Little of Manlius from the rank of captain has been announced at Cushing General Hospital. Maj. Littler is in charge of hand surgery in the Orthopedic department of the hospital. After receiving his medical degree from Duke University he interned at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. He entered the service in July, 1943, went overseas with the 60th Field Hospital in April, 1944 and went to Cushing Nov. 1944 from Lovell General hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/15/1946.

Littler, Robert B. Manlius. "Robert B. Littler, aviation student, a son of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Littler of 130 Academy st., Manlius, has arrived at Corsicana Field, Tex., from the San Antonio aviation cadet center, San Antonio, Texas," The Post-Standard, 12/11/1943. Army release...Corp. Robert B. Littler, 130 Academy st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 2/14/1946.

Litzenberger, John. Fayetteville/Kirkville. "John Litzenberger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Litzenberger of Center street, has enlisted in the aviation ground air crew of the Army and left last Saturday for Fort Niagara. Mr. Litzenberger, who is employed in Albion, N. Y., was home for the week-end to see his son," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. "Mrs. Herbert Litzenberger of Center street, left last week for Denver, Col., where she will visit her son, Pvt. John Litzenberger, who is receiving basic training for ground crew work in the Army Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943. "Corp. John Litzenberger was home on a 12-hour leave during the week-end and visited his mother...and sister, Miss Mary E. Litzenberger. Corp. Litzenberger has just been transferred from Denver, Colo., to Detroit," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Corp. John Litzenberger of Scott Field, Ill., is spending a ten-day furlough with his parents...Johnny says that he has had the opportunity of seeing Pfc. Billy Goodfellow, who is also stationed at Scott Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Corp. John Litzenberger of Lincoln, Neb., is passing a 17-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1911. "Sgt. John Litzenberger has returned to Lincoln Army Air Field after passing two weeks with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Lough, John A. Kirkville. "John A. Lough of Kirkville, N. Y., is now in his second week of comprehensive training at Parris Island, S. C. He enlisted October 22 at the Syracuse Recruiting Office in the U. S. Marine Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/6/1942. "On Monday, August 23, Miss Lillian Roberta Hart, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Hart, became the bride of John Alexander Lough of Kirkville, stationed with the U. S. marines in North Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943.

Loupe, Dale. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Honorably discharged from the U.S. army at Fort Dix...Pfc. Dale D. Loupe, Manlius, R.D. 2," The Post-Standard, 8/19/1945.

?Love, Henry. Fayetteville. "Henry Love has recently received an honorable discharge from the U. S. Navy and has joined his wife at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Wolfanger in Walnut street. Mr. and Mrs. Love are spending a few days with relatives in Elmira," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945.

Luce, Howard J. Manlius. "Board 473, East Syracuse, sent 19 into the army...Howard J. Luce, Manlius, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945.

Lyman, Walter, Jr. Fayetteville. "Selective service board 473, East Syracuse, has accepted a total of 40 men for army and navy duty who will report at Fort Dix, N.J. and at Buffalo reception center respectively Wednesday for final induction. They are: Navy. Walter J. Lyman, Jr., 408 Elm st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 2/16/1944. "Walter Lyman, Jr...has been advanced from apprentice seaman to Sp. (M) 3/c, at Sampson," The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "Walter Lyman, Jr. Specialist 3/C has finished his boot training at Sampson, N.Y., and is passing a few days at his home in Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Walter Lyman, Jr., mail specialist 3/c, who is stationed in New York City at the Fleet Postoffice, spent the week-end with his family ..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Mrs. Walter Lyman, Jr., spent a few days last week with her husband, Mail Specialist 2/c Lyman, in New York City. Lyman is stationed in the Fleet Postoffice in that city," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "Mrs. Walter Lyman, Jr. and daughter, Leni Lee, have gone to Hastings-on-Hudson, where they will make their home for the next few months. Mr. Lyman is stationed in the Fleet Postoffice in New York," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "Mrs. Walter Lyman and daughter Leni Lee returned last Saturday from Hastings-on-the-Hudson, where they have been spending the past several weeks. M. C. 1/c Walter Lyman, stationed at the Fleet Post Office in New York City, arrived home Wednesday for a six-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Mail Specialist Walter Lyman, Jr., U.S.N., of New York City, is spending a furlough with his wife and family here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "M.M. 3/c Walter Lyman, who was called home because of the illness and death of his mother, will return to his duties at the Fleet Postoffice in New York on Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "M/S Walter Lyman, U.S.N., Mrs. Lyman and their daughter Leni Lee, of New York, are passing a few days at their home in Elm st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "MaM 2/c Walter Lyman, Jr., and Cpl. Aden Marquisee met for a few hours a couple of weeks ago on Okinawa, shared a K ration supper and had a wonderful time talking about the old home town, according to letters received by Mrs. Lyman and Cpl. Marquisee's mother. Lyman was one of the survivors of the typhoon which struck the island of Okinawa, being stationed at the point where it struck, and the meeting which was effected by Cpl. Marquisee's mother took place a few days later," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Mrs. Walter Lyman, Jr., plans to leave today to meet her husband in New York City where they will spend the week-end. MaM 1/c Lyman arrived in Seattle, Wash., last week aboard the USS Ticonderoga. He will be honorably discharged from the Navy this week,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Bunny Lyman...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Lynch, Betty M. Fayetteville. "The promotion of Pfc. Betty M. Lynch, stationed at Camp Butner, N. C., from the grade of private to that of private, first class, has been announced by Co. H. W. Huntley, Post Commander. Her commanding officer stated that this promotion was based on leadership qualities and attention to duty. Before entering the Army, Pfc. Lynch lived at Woodchuck Hill Road, Fayetteville. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Ford, of Little Falls, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces: WACS...Betty Lynch, Manlius..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Lyons, W. Jackson. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men of this vicinity have been called before Selective Service Board 473 for tests at the Induction Center: Jackson Lyons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Lyons, 310 Elm street; Ralph Crouch, 309 Clinton street...These men take the places of those sent to the induction station and disqualified there or men not sent by their local boards owing to the fact that they reported too late and had enlisted in the Army, Navy or the Marine Corps. This is the second group of young men who have been sent before the Selective Service Board from this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/7/1941. "Stricken while driving his car near Cortland Tuesday afternoon about 5 o'clock, H. Jackson Lyon, of 310 Elm street (Fayetteville) died five hours later in the Cortland Hospital...Besides his widow, he is survived by a son, Jackson Lyon, now serving in the armed forces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Corp. Jackson Lyon, who is stationed in Hawaii is spending a 30-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. H. J. Lyon, 310 Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Lt. Jackson Lyons of Fort McClellan, Ala., is passing a ten-day furlough with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. George B. Plunkett of Highbridge Road, announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Marjorie Plunkett to Lt. W. Jackson Lyon, U.S.A.A.C....Lt. Lyon was graduated from Cook Academy and attended Colgate University. He received his commission in the infantry at Fort Benning, Ga., and has since transferred to the Air Corps. He is stationed in San Antonio, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "On Thursday, March 9, at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Miss Marjorie Plunkett...became the bride of Lt. W. Jackson Lyon, U.S.A.A.C...The couple left on a honeymoon to New York City and will visit Lt. Lyon's mother in Georgia, after which they will go to their new home in Alabama, near Ft. McClellan, the bridegroom's post...Lt. Lyon was graduated from Cook Academy and attended Colgate University. He received his commission in the infantry at Fort Benning, Ga., and has since transferred to the Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. W. Jackson Lyon have been visiting their parents...enroute to Mississippi, where Lt. Lyon has been transferred," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "Mrs. H. J. Lyon and Mrs. George Plunkett left last Friday for Virginia. Mrs. Jackson Lyon, daughter of Mrs. Plunkett, will return home with them, since her husband has been transferred overseas," The Eagle Bulletin, 9/15/1914. "Lt. W. Jackson Lyon is home from 10 months overseas and is visiting his mother...and his wife at the home of her parents...After a 30-day leave, Lt. Lyon will report to a hospital in Rhode Island for further treatment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945. "Jackson Lyon has received his honorable discharge from the Army and with his wife will spend the winter at the home of his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945.