WORLD WAR II HONOR ROLL

Town of Manlius and Adjacent Postal Areas

Part III of III

Submitted by Kathy Crowell


Madison, Robert. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "On the SS Costa Rica Victory due in New York city last Friday...Pfc. Robert Madison, 106 Kittle rd., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 10/7/1945.

Mallott, Charles. Fayetteville. "Pfc. Charles W. Mallott of Fayetteville will be graduated today from the army administration school at Huntsville, Tex., after an eight weeks' course. He will be assigned to administrative duty with some branch of the army air corps," The Post-Standard, 12/24/1943. "Miss Shirley Seymour, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bessee, of 119 LaFayette avenue, Syracuse, and Corp. Edwin Weeks, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks of Warren street this village, were married Monday morning, Aug. 7...Miss Madeline Thornton and Cpl. Charles Mallott attended the bridal couple...The bridegroom and Corp. Mallott, whose home is in Fayetteville, are stationed at MacDill Field near Tampa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Cpl. and Mrs. Charles Mallott, of Tampa, Fla., are visiting Mrs. Mallott's parents, Mr. and Mrs. James B. Havill," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Sgt. and Mrs. Charles Malott, of Tampa, Fla., are spending a few days with Mrs. Malott's parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945. "Sgt. Charles Mallott has gone to Utah for assignment, after spending a few days with relatives here. Mrs. Mallott will remain for the present with her parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945.

Mann, William H. Formerly town of Manlius. "Lt. William H. Mann of Buffalo is spending a few days at the Manlius School, on furlo from Ft. Knox, Ky. Mt. Mann was graduated from the Manlius School in June, and received his commission at that time," The Post-Standard, 9/19/1942.

Manton, David. Fayetteville. "Lt. David Manton has received an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army, and with his wife, is spending some time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Manton, East Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944.

Manworren, Ida L. Kirkville. "Corp. Ida L. Manworren, assigned to the military personnel section at headquarters, Camp Upton, is spending a 10-day furlo with his mother, Mrs. Jessie M. Manworren of Kirkville. Corp. Manworren reported at Fort Des Moines, Ia., last August for basic training and was sent with some of the first groups graduating to Daytona Beach, Fla., to open the second WAAC training center," The Post-Standard, 6/16/1943. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records, spelled Ida Gainor Manwarren.

?Maphey, John. Manlius. "Pvt. John H. Maphey, husband of Mrs. Licha Anne Maphey, 710 Pond st., has been wounded in action in the Mediterranean area, the war department announced yesterday through The Associated Press, The Post-Standard, 7/20/1944. "Sgt. Eva Albanese, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Albanese of 126 W. Seneca st., is the ninth member of her family to serve in the armed forces...a brother-in-law, Pvt. John Mophey, was killed on the Anzio beachhead..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944. "Pvt. John Maphey died June 14 of wounds suffered in action during the fighting in Italy, according to a War Department telegram received by his wife, Mrs. John Maphey of 710 Pond Street. Pvt. Maphey entered the service Sept. 23, 1943 and received his basic training at Camp Wheeler, Ga. He last visited home on furlough Feb. 3. At that time he reported back to Fort Meade and was then sent to Italy. He was wounded in action May 27. Besides his wife, the former Miss Licha Albanese, he is survived by a daughter, Anne, a year and a half old," The Herald-Journal, 7/11/1944. Wife born in, and later settled in, Manlius.

Mapstone, Carl C. Manlius. "Among those sworn in at the induction center on Tuesday for military service were six local men. They were...Carl C. Mapstone...of Manlius will go into...the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Edwin Hawkins, Carl Mapstone and Edward Shanahan left Syracuse early Tuesday morning for Camp Upton, L. I., having recently been called for service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Pvt. Carl Mapstone, who was called home by the death of his father, has returned to his base in Oregon. Mrs. Mapstone, who had been spending some time in Oregon, will remain at her home on the Manlius-Jamesville road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Carl Mapstone has received an honorable discharge from service and returned Monday night to his home on the Manlius-Fayetteville Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945. "Pvt. Carl Mapstone (photo). Some time ago we printed a photo of Carl 'Red' Mapstone one-time News-Caster photographer. It wasn't so good, and rather than offend Red's taste as a lens snapper, we give you his latest. Looks pretty chipper in his uniform, eh?, Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Mapstone, Franklin Adelbert. Fayetteville. "The list of inductees from board 473...Army...Franklin Adelbert Mapstone, Fayetteville RD 1," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943. "Pvt. Franklin A. Mapstone...has been assigned for training as a radio operator-mechanic at the army air forces training command, Sioux Falls, S.D. He was graduated in 1943 from Fayetteville high school where he played football and hockey. He entered the service June 9 and was formerly at Keesler Field, Miss.," The Post-Standard, 11/11/1943. "Military rites will be conducted at the grave, following services at the home at 2 p.m. today for Aviation Cadet John E. Mapstone, son of Mr. and Mrs. John B. Mapstone of Highbridge, who was killed in a crash of a combat training plane near Faceville, Ga., Sunday night...Surviving besides his parents, is a brother, Franklin, who is training with the radio division of the Army Air Corps at Sioux Falls, S. D., and several aunts and uncles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944, age 21. "Pvt. Franklin A. Mapstone...has been promoted to private first class at Bergstrom Field, Tex.," The Post-Standard, 9/27/1944. "Bergstrom Field, Texas.--Corporal Franklin A. Mapstone...was recently presented the good conduct medal at the monthly review by Colonel Samuel J. Davis, base commanding officer of Bergstrom Field, the First Troop Carrier Command's combat crew training replacement station in Austin, Texas. Cpl. Mapstone's fidelity through faithful and exact performance of duty, efficiency through capacity to produce results has been such as to deserve emulation..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/10/1944. "The following officers and enlisted men were discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N.J.,..S/Sgt. Franklin A. Mapstone, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 1/22/1946.

Mapstone, John E. Fayetteville. "John E. Mapstone is taking a five months' course of instruction at Williamsport-Dickinson Jr. College, Williamsport, Pa., prior to being appointed aviation cadet in the army air forces," The Post-Standard, 7/19/1943. "Two youths from Fayetteville, N. Y. have reported to the Army Air Forces Pre-Flight School for Pilots at Maxwell Field, Alabama, to begin the third phase of their training as pilots in the U. S. Army Air Forces' expanding program. These aviation cadets are receiving nine weeks of intensive physical, military and academic instruction at Maxwell Field, Ala., preparatory to beginning their actual flight training at one of the many primary flying schools located in the Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command. These men are Aviation Cadets Carlyle B. Doupe...and John E. Mapstone, son of Mr. and Mrs. John B. Mapstone," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "In service since February of last year, Aviation Cadet John Mapstone, 21...was killed Sunday night...Parents of the youthful pilot were informed of the death of their son by telegram that night...No details were given other than the accident happened during night flight training...Cadet Mapstone...was employed by Bell Aircraft Corporation at Buffalo when he entered the service. He trained at Williamsport, Pa., and Ocala, Fla., before going to Bainbridge...A brother, Franklin Mapstone, is serving with an Army radio division at Sioux Falls, S.D" Herald Journal, 3/14/1944. "Military rites will be conducted at the grave, following services at the home at 2 p.m. today for Aviation Cadet John E. Mapstone, son of Mr. and Mrs. John B. Mapstone of Highbridge, who was killed in a crash of a combat training plane near Faceville, Ga., Sunday night...Cadet Mapstone's body arrived in Fayetteville Wednesday night. Aviation Cadet William Martinkie, a close friend of Mapstone, who had been in training with him since he entered service, accompanied the body from the Bainbridge air base. Stationed at the Bainbridge flying field, Cadet Mapstone would have completed advanced flight training and received his pilot's wings and commission in July. He had been at Bainbridge about a month. John was born in this village 21 years ago, and attended Fayetteville High School from which he was graduated in 1942. During his school career he was active in athletics. He was employed by the Bell Aircraft Corp. before enlisting in the service in February, 1943. Appointed an aviation cadet, Cadet Mapstone trained at Williamsport, Pa., and Ocala, Fla., before being sent to Bainbridge. Surviving besides his parents, is a brother, Franklin...and several aunts and uncles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944. "It is with deep sorrow that we place the first gold star on our honor roll opposite the name of John E. Mapstone. He was 20 years old and worked as a machine operator before entering the air force. Soon to be graduated and receive his commission, he crashed to his death while on a routine training flight. Sympathy of the entire organization is extended to his father, John B. Mapstone, and uncles Lynn and Henry Mapstone, who are employed at Precision; and also the rest of the family who are life-long residents of Fayetteville," Bond scrapbook, n.d., Precision Castings Co. newsletter.

Marcellus, Clyde D. Fayetteville. "Among Syracuse men in the army reserve who will receive orders starting Saturday are the following...Clyde D. Marcellus, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 2/23/1943. "Scott Field, Ill.--Pvt. Clyde D. Marcellus, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde S. Marcellus, of Fayetteville, N. Y., has just been graduated from the radio school of the Army Air Forces Training Command here. His intensive training at Scott Field saw him complete a course in radio operator-mechanic. Now qualified for further duty as a skilled radio technician on the world wide battle fronts of the AAF, he may become one of the many Scott Field graduates serving as members of American bomber crews. In civilian life Pvt. Marcellus was a student at Syracuse university," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944.

Marcellus, Donald C. Fayetteville. "Among Syracuse men in the army reserve who will receive orders starting Saturday are the following...Donald C. Marcellus, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 2/23/1943. "Corp. Donald C. Marcellus, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde S. Marcellus of Fayetteville RD 3, has been assigned to Westminster college near Pittsburgh, Pa., in the army specialized training program. He received his rating at Aberdeen proving grounds and was graduated from the advanced training school on July 17. While there he received the expert marksmanship medal. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, he attended Syracuse university, leaving March 9 with the army reserves," The Post-Standard, 8/17/1943.

Marko, Joseph. Minoa. "Veterans of more than two years in the European theater, Pvt. Frank Ducar...and Pvt. Joseph Marko, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Marko of Minoa are home on furlo and aren't envying the boys still over there...Joseph Marko, after 31 months overseas, has no qualms as to the numbers 'three' and 'one,' in any combination, be it 13 or 31. He enlisted on his birthday, March 13, 1941, was sent overseas a year later to the day, March 13, 1942, and after 31 months, arrived back home on Friday the 13th last week. A former employee at Halcomb steel plant, Pvt. Marko was sent to Ascension island between South America and Africa with the engineers in September, 1942, and after 14 months his outfit was sent 400 miles inland in Africa to the Congo to construct landing fields. Transferred to the air transport command, Pvt. Marko will report in Delaware...Pvt. Marko's brother, Staff Sgt. William Marko, is in Texas in the medical corps," The Post-Standard, 10/17/1944.

Marko, William. Minoa. ...Pvt. Marko's brother, Staff Sgt. William Marko, is in Texas in the medical corps," The Post-Standard, 10/17/1944.

Marquisee, Aden. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were Aden Marquisee..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Corp. Aden Marquisee, US air forces...was inducted Jan. 4 and received his basic training at Atlantic City, N. J., has been transferred to Camp Crowder, Mo., where he is a member of the signal training regiment," The Post-Standard, 3/9/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Hopstein have returned from a trip to Texas, where they visited their son A/C Burt Hopstein at Bruce Field, Ballinger, Texas. While in Texas they also visited Pvt. Francis Woessner at Camp Maxie, and enroute home stopped to see corp. Aden Marquisee at Camp Crowder, Mo., both local boys, who are in service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Corp. Aden Marquisee of Camp Pinedale, Fresno, Calif., is on a 15-day furlough and is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Marquisee at their home in West Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...Army fliers who were formerly in the uniform of the band include...Aden Marquisee..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "MaM 2/c Walter Lyman, Jr., and Cpl. Aden Marquisee met for a few hours a couple of weeks ago on Okinawa, shared a K ration supper and had a wonderful time talking about the old home town, according to letters received by Mrs. Lyman and Cpl. Marquisee's mother. Lyman was one of the survivors of the typhoon which struck the island of Okinawa, being stationed at the point where it struck, and the meeting which was effected by Cpl. Marquisee's mother took place a few days later," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Corp. Aden R. Marquisee, stationed on Okinawa with the 374th signal company wing...Corp. Marquisee entered service in January, 1942 and trained for radio repairman at Camp Crowder, Mo., Hammer Field, Calif., and Camp Pinedale, Calif. In June, 1945, he went overseas. Before entering service he was employed by the electrical contractor at work on the GE plant building on Thompson rd..." The Post-Standard, 11/4/1945. "Aden Marquisee was honorably discharged from the Army last Friday at the separation center at Fort Dix, N.J. A sergeant with the 1374th Signal Company Wing, Marquisee was in the service for 38 months, nine of which was spent on Okinawa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/15/1946. "Adam Marquisee left last Friday night to attend Coyune Electrical School in Chicago, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1946. Brother of Rose Marquisee.

Marquisee, Rose. Fayetteville. "Miss Rose Marquisee, 20, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Marquisee of 205 W. Genesee St., Fayetteville, has been sworn into the WAVES. She attended Fayetteville high school and Powelson institute and was employed at Hartford Accident and Indemnity Co. She will report to Hunt college for training. A brother, Aden Marquisee, is with the air corps in California," The Post-Standard, 2/4/1945. "Miss Rose Marquisee, who recently enlisted in the WAVES is receiving her initial training at Hunter College, New York City. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Marquisee of West Genesee street, and has a brother in the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "Rose Marquisee, Seaman 1/c (MaM), USNR (WR) stationed at the fleet postoffice in New York city...she received boot training at the naval training school at Hunter college, Bronx. She also attended specialized training school for mailmen there. After graduation, she was in a ship's company at Hunter as mail clerk. Prior to entering service, she was employed by Hartford Accident and Indemnity Co.," The Post-Standard, 11/4/1945. Sister of Aden Marquisee.

Marsh, Alton J. Formerly Fayetteville. "Alton J. Marsh, pilot of a combat-cargo plane in the China-Burma theater, has been promoted to captain from first lieutenant, according to word received by his sister, Mrs. Ralph Downes of Center street. Captain Marsh was a resident of this village (Fayetteville) for some time prior to his enlistment in service in January, 1942. He worked for Mr. Downes in the grocery business and his wife is the former Mabel Shearer. He has been in active service in Asia since he went overseas last August. In a recent letter home he stated that he had been stationed in Sylket and Tulehal (Imphal), in Assam, India, at Hathazan and was at the present time in Myitkyina, Burma. Captain Marsh was at Kunming, China, for a while and was also in Yunnanyi, Linchow, Chanyi, Tuliang, Tai-Keh, Mentszu and Nanking plus a few other places. He further said 'We helped in the evacuation of Kweilien and Linchow. In India and Burma we were in the midst of things all the way from the defense of the Imphal Valley when it was completely surrounded and the Japs had machine guns right off the runway, down to Rangoon. Have flown all over Burma and India. Right now we've been spending our time flying 'the hump to the Chinese coast,' " The Eagle Bulletin, 8/10/1945. "Capt. and Mrs. Alton Marsh are spending the holidays with Capt. Marsh's brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Downes. Capt. Marsh is on terminal leave from Randolph Field..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/20/1946.

Martin, John. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "John Martin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Martin of Chapel street has enlisted in the U. S. Navy and left Wednesday for Norfolk, Va., where he will train," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1942. "Shipfitter 3/c John Martin of the U. S. Seabees is passing a three-week furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Martin, after an absence of 15 months during which time he had been serving in the Pacific area. After his furlough he will return to California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. William H. Goodfellow of Mechanic street announce the engagement of their daughter, Dorothy A. Goodfellow to John Martin SF 3/c...Mr. Martin, serving with Navy, has just returned to duty after spending a 21-day leave at his home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "John Martin SF 3/c, U. S. N., is on leave and visiting his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include...John Martin, Seabees..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Mateson, Howard J. Kirkville. "Board 473, East Syracuse, sent 19 into the army...Howard J. Mateson, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records, spelled Matteson.

Mathers, Gordon. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "First Sgt. Gordon E. Mathers, formerly of Fayetteville and Syracuse, is home on a 20-day furlo visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Mathers of 106 New Scotland ave., Albany, formerly of Fayetteville, and his sister, Mrs. E. J. Dumas, Jr., of Albany. This is Sgt. Mathers' first visit home in three and a half years as he had been stationed in Panama. He recently was transferred to Fort Tyson, Tenn., with the balloon barrage battalion. Sgt. Mathers, now 30, has been in the army eight and one-half years. He is visiting friends and relatives in Syracuse this week," The Post-Standard, 3/12/1943.

Matthes, Raymond A. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Matthes, Raymond A., 136 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y."

Matzel, Albert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Local Draft Board 473 called up 19 men for induction this week. They will be examined by the board of which Jesse W. Clarke is chairman and Collin Armstrong and Matthew F. O'Brien. The group called from this vicinity are as follows: ...Albert W. Matzel, 105 Warren street, Fayetteville...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. "S/Sgt. Albert Matzel of the Army Quartermaster Corps, is passing a 20-day furlough with his family, and getting acquainted with his 14-month-old son whom he had never seen. His arrival home came as a complete surprise to his family. They had not heard from him since last December. According to reports, Sgt. Matzel, who has seen action in numerous countries, embarked for his home trip at Irian, and was three months reaching the States. At the conclusion of his furlough he will report to Ft. Devens, Mass., for reassignment. Mrs. Matzel was the former Harriet Case, and with her little son, is residing on Kimber road, DeWitt," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944. "M/Sgt. Albert Matzell, who has been spending a three-day leave with his wife and children at the home of his parents in Perryville, N.Y., and friends in Fayetteville, has returned to his camp in Maryland. He has 96 points to his credit and has applied for a discharge from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945.

Matzel, Frank. Manlius. "Color guard of the Legion post (at Memorial Day services) was four discharged veterans of this war who are members of the Legion, Glenn Trinder and Joseph Pezzati, both wearing the uniform of the army; Frank Matzell, formerly in the navy, and Robert Goodfellow, a former Marine corpsman," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944.

Mawson, Sidney. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Sidney Mawson has been at home for a brief furlough and returned to Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Burris E. Prest of Arlington, Mass., announce the marriage of their daughter, Gertrude Elizabeth, to Sidney Millard Mawson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Mawson of West Seneca street, Manlius, which occurred February 14th of this year...Sidney Mawson has been a mail carrier in Manlius for the past twelve years. At present he is in U. S. Army, stationed at Fort McClennan, Ala.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Mrs. Sidney Mawson, of Newfoundland, Pa., arrived Thursday to pass the week end with her parents-in-law..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "A Letter from a Soldier / Dear Mrs. Anderson: I'll bet you have forgotten that you have a mail man 'way over here in London. In case you have, here is a reminder! Something happened here today that I think will make good copy for the Eagle-Bulletin: I was out in front of the postoffice unloading mail bags from a truck when I noticed an air force officer pass by. The slight notice I gave that usual happening led me to believe that I knew that person. The brain worked, and I called to him. He looked around and a big smile lit up the face of Lt. Burns Neveldine. He came back, and the usual greetings took place. He confessed to knowing that I was in London, but its such a big city that its hard to find one particular person. We stood there on Oxford street with streams of people passing by, and talked of nothing but home and all the fellows we knew, 'way back when! As you know, I was over here before Burns ever got into the Army. He slugged out 23 missions with bombs while I have thrown all kinds of mail at those cases and bags, both very necessary to the war effort, I agree, but direct contrasts, too. It was a very pleasant few minutes we spent there and he is stopping in again tomorrow. I hope to see him again before either one of us leave the U. K. Yes, it was old home day right in the middle of London, England! Old neighbors met, and how pleasant it was. I hope to see you again soon, the sooner the better! Best wishes 'Sid,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Word has been received by the family of Sgt. Sidney Mawson, former mail carrier in Manlius, that he has been promoted to staff sergeant. Sgt. Mawson went overseas in September, 1942, and worked in a London Base P.O. until June, 1945, when he was sent to Paris where he is now stationed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. "Sgt. Sidney M. Mawson was honorably discharged from the U. S. Army at Fort Dix on Dec. 3 and has returned to his home here. He was in the service 42 months, 38 of which were spent overseas in the U. S. Army postal service. For the present Sidney and his wife will make their home with Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Mawson, and after a much needed rest will return to his work at the post office," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Mawson entertained at a family dinner on Christmas Day. This was a special occasion, honoring their son, Sidney, who had recently returned from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/28/1945.

Maxwell, Frank P. Minoa. "Second Lt. Frank P. Maxwell...has been appointed weather officer at Altus Army Air Field, Altus, Okla. Lt. Maxwell was employed in the quality control laboratory of the U. S. Gypsum Co. prior to enlistment. He received his B. A. degree in ceramic engineering from Alfred university in 1941. He was commissioned after training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology," The Post-Standard, 9/29/1943. "Second Lt. Frank P. Maxwell, 24, son of Frank S. Maxwell of N. Manlius rd,. Minoa, received the silver wings of an aerial navigator Saturday at San Marcos, Tex. He was a student officer," The Post-Standard, 3/22/1944. Honorably discharged, First Lt. Frank P. Maxwell, N. Manlius Rd., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 10/30/1945.

May, Lawrence. Formerly Manlius, Mill St. In naval air corps. Born in Manlius, moved to Bolivar, Madison Co.

Maynard, Edwin Bruce. Minoa. "The list of inductees from board 473...Navy...Edwin Bruce Maynard, 407 East ave., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 7/3/1943."Edwin B Maynard of Minoa, formerly of Manlius, was one of 26 accepted for the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/19/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Maynard, Edwin B., 407 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Maynard, William C. Minoa. "William Maynard has been accepted in the Army Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "On the Cumberland Sound, due at Seattle Thursday...Sgt. William C. Maynard, 407 East ave., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 12/8/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Maynard, William C., 407 East Ave, Minoa, N.Y."

?McAlteer, John. Manlius. "S/C John McAlteer, who is at home on furlough, has been visiting his brother William McAlteer and family on Hillside Drive and will leave Sunday to report for duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945.

McCarthy, Parnell J. Manlius. (Town of Pompey). Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Air Cadet Parnell J. McCarthy and Mrs. McCarthy of Avon Park, Fla., spent Wednesday with their parents, Postmaster and Mrs. Chas. O'Brien. They departed Wednesday evening for the Air Base at Greenville, Miss.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1842. "Five aviation cadets of the Syracuse-Onondaga area have reported for basic flight instruction at the army flying school at Greenville, Miss. They are...Parnell McCarthy, R.D. Manlius," The Post-Standard, 5/19/1942. "Parnell James McCarthy...received his wings and rank of second lieutenant at Columbus, Miss., a week ago today. He has been sent to Fort Meyer, Fla., for advanced training. Lt. McCarthy attended the district school at Pompey Center, Manlius high school and Dwight Preparatory school in New York. Following his graduation from Cornell university, he enlisted in the army air corps last December and was sent to Montgomery, Ala. and later to Avon Park, Fla.," The Post-Standard, 9/13/1942. His parents resided in Pompey Center; wife's parents were postmaster and Mrs. Chas. O'Brien of Fayetteville, Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "First Lt. Parnell J. McCarthy, 23, bomber pilot in the Latin-America area, has been killed on duty, according to a telegram from the secretary of war received by his wife, Mrs. Parnell J. McCarthy of 405 Walnut st., Fayetteville. Lt. McCarthy...joined the air force Jan. 2, 1942, at Columbia, Miss. He went overseas last Christmas day. He was promoted to first lieutenant about three weeks ago. Born in Fairport, he was graduated from Manlius high school and attended Cornell university and Dwight Preparatory school in New York. He married Miss Genevieve Reilly at Christmas time, 1941. Besides his wife and parents, he is survived by a sister, Miss Anne McCarthy, Intermont college, Bristol, Va..." Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Mrs. Genevieve O'Brien McCarthy was notified Wednesday night of the death of her husband, Lt. Parnell McCarthy on Sept. 11, somewhere in the South American area. She had received a letter from him last week, stating that he expected to undergo an operation. Lt. McCarthy, a member of the U. S. Air corps, had received his present rank only two weeks ago. He entered service in January, 1942, and received his basic training in Texas, where Mrs. McCarthy spent some time with him. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Parnell J. McCarthy of Pompey Center, who with his wife, and sister, Anne, survive. Mrs. McCarthy is the daughter of Postmaster and Mrs. Charles O'Brien, with whom she has resided since she returned from Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "...commissioned a second lieutenant Sept. 6, 1942, at Columbus, Miss. He went overseas last Christmas Day. He was born 23 years ago at Fairport...At Christmas time, 1941, he married Miss Genevieve Reilly, who survives him. He leaves also his parents...and one sister, Miss Anne McCarthy of Intermont College, Bristol, Va....he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant about three weeks ago," Vail scrapbook, n.d.

McCollough, William J. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "William J. McCollough of Lyndon Farms, Fayetteville, has been promoted to technical sergeant at the Fifth Ferrying group, Love Field, Texas., his commanding officer, Col. Thomas D. Ferguson, announces. Prior to entering the service on may 6, 1942, T/Sgt. McCollough was employed as horse trainer and stable manager for Lyndon Farms. Under his training many thoroughbred horses have won championships in the show ring. T/Sgt. McCollough has two brothers serving with the armed forces. His father, William, is a resident of Camlough, Ireland," The Post-Standard, 9/6/1943.

McCombie, Alexander. Kirkville. "Among soldiers from Upstate New York fighting in infantry and artillery units of the Fifth army in Italy are...PFC Alexander M'Combie, Kirkville, ammunition handler..." The Post-Standard, 10/17/1944. "Arrival on the Admiral Capps, due in Newport News last Saturday...T/5 Alexander McCombie, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 12/18/1945.

McCoy, John E. Fayetteville. "Arrivals on George Washington, due in New York today...Pvt. John E. McCoy, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/22/1945.

McCutchin, Cecil. Fayetteville. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Cecil McCutchin...More veterans are needed to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

McDonald, George A. Manlius. To arrive on the USSR Victory at Newport News Friday, George A. McDonald, The Post-Standard, 1/13/1946.

McGann, Raymond. Manlius. "Those accepted are...Navy...Raymond R. McGann, 106 Moulter st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/17/1943."Raymond McGann, who is expecting to leave April 23 to enter the armed services, was honored at a dinner on Wednesday night given by co-workers at the Easy Washer Co. Mr. McGann was presented with a billfold and a gift of money," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...Raymond McGann...from Manlius...Philo, McGann, Harter and Decker will see service in the U. S. navy and the other draftees in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Durwood Hickox of Eastwood, gave a dinner on Sunday in honor of their brother, Raymond McGann, who leaves Friday to enter service in the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Raymond McGann of the U. S. Navy has written this week, telling of his safe arrival at Camp Peary, Williamsburg, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Raymond McGann, F. C. F. of the construction regiments Seabees, U. S. Navy, stationed at Camp Peary, Williamsburg, Va., arrived in Manlius last Saturday for a brief visit with his wife and infant daughter, returning to his base at midnight the same day," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Raymond McGann, F. I. C., has been transferred from Camp Perry, Va. to Camp Davisville, R. I., The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1843. "Mrs. Raymond McGann has returned from Providence, R. I., where she visited Mr. McGann of the Navy, who was having a brief furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Raymond McGann of the navy, is expecting to pass a brief furlough this week-end at his home in Moulter street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Raymond McGann of the Seabees, has returned to camp in Mississippi after spending a ten-day furlough at his home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Mrs. Raymond McGann returned Tuesday night from providence, R. I., where she visited Mr. McGann U. S. N., who is now stationed at Camp Endicott, Rhode Island," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Raymond McGann, F.I.C., and friend, Ernest C. King, M.M. 2/c, both Seabees, now stationed in Rhode Island, spent Sunday with Mrs. McGann and their little daughter, Ruth Elaine, at their home in Moulter street...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Mrs.. Raymond McGann returned Monday morning from Albany, where she spent the week-end with her husband, who was having a brief furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/24/1943. "Mrs. Raymond McGann entertained at a family party last Sunday in honor of her husband, F.I.C. McGann of Ft. Davis, R. I., who was home on a 35-hour leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Mrs. Raymond McGann spent Wednesday and Thursday of last week in Providence, R. I., visiting F 1/c McGann," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Raymond McGann F/1c, U. S. Navy is spending this week at his home in Moulter street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Howard McGann entertained at dinner last Sunday in honor of their son, Raymond, who was returning to Camp Davis, R. I. following a five-day leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Raymond McGann, F 1/c of the Navy, will spend Sunday with his wife and daughter, and will combine Christmas and their daughter's first birthday, as this will be his last leave of absence this year," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Raymond McGann, M.M. 3/c stationed at Rhode Island, spent Sunday with Mrs. McGann and their daughter, Ruth, of Moulter street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Raymond McGann mm 3/c was at home Saturday on a 40-hour leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Howard McGann entertained last Saturday night at their home in Smith street in honor of their son, Raymond McGann, of Camp Thomas, Davisville, R. I., and their son-in-law, Durward Hickox, stationed at Sampson Naval base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Raymond McGann m.m. 3/c of Camp Thomas, R.I., is at home on a leave, on account of the illness of his little daughter," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Mrs. Raymond McGann received word on Tuesday of the safe arrival of her husband, M.M. 3/c R. R. McGann in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Raymond McGann, MM 3/c, has written this week from France where he is serving with the Seabees, having crossed the English Channel with our forces on D-Day," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Raymond McGann M.M. 3/c Seabee, has written from France that he is expecting to return to the States in November," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Raymond McGann MM 3/c, who has been overseas serving with the Seabees in France and England, has returned to the United States and will arrive this week to visit his wife and little daughter in Moulter street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Howard McGann entertained on Sunday in honor of their son Raymond McGann MM 3/c who recently returned from France and England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944. "Raymond McGann, MM 2/c, a Seabee who has been stationed for 10 months in the South Pacific, has written stating that he expects to set sail on Oct. 26 for the States and that he is eligible for an honorable discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945. "Raymond McGann MM 2/c has received an honorable discharge and returned Saturday evening to his home at 106 Moulter street. He has served nearly three years as a Seabee, taking active part in the European invasion, returning to the States for a 30-day furlough before leaving for the South Pacific where he was stationed for nearly 11 months until his discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "Raymond McGann, who recently returned from Service in the South Pacific area, has accepted a position with the Easy Washer Co., Syracuse, where he was formerly employed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

McGraw, Joseph. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Joseph McGraw in the air forces..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Recommended for the navy cross after shooting down his fourth and fifth Japanese planes during 11 1/2 hours of almost continuous combat flight when his ship, escort carrier Gambier Bay, was sunk off Leyte in a sea and air battle Oct. 24, Lt. (j.g.) Joseph D. McGraw, son of Mr. and Mrs. James L. McGraw, Dewitt, is home on a 30-day leave. McGraw, who took off from the Gambier Bay just as the battle opened, flew to another carrier after his own ship was lost. During the three extra hops that he made from the second carrier, he and three other pursuit pilots were credited with breaking up a formation of 18 Japanese dive bombers and 12 Zero fighters. His personal possessions, including a Samurai sword that he had picked up on Saipan, were lost when the Gambier Bay went down. After transferring ships, he said, he continued to fly with another group, almost missing his scheduled leave. The Syracuse navy flier, who is credited with three probable planes in addition to the five credited, is slated to report to Jacksonville, Fla., for a new station after completing his leave. In June, he was forced to bail out of his Wildcat fighter when mechanical difficulties made the plane unfit for flying while he was on patrol. He was picked up immediately by an American destroyer. Coming into San Francisco on his leave, McGraw said that he and other pilots 'almost got pneumonia' standing in a rainstorm to watch the shore line come in sight. After the war, the 21-year-old officer declared that he plans to go to college," The Post-Standard, 12/17/1944. "Roger William Hoag, son of Stanley Hoag of Center street, left Monday night for the Army induction center at Fort Dix. 'Bill' enlisted in the army air corps last summer, prior to his 18th birthday and only recently received his summons to report for service. Some of the 'boys' home on furloughs dropped in for a little surprise on Bill last Thursday night and tendered him a farewell, they were Pfc. Ed Lindenmayer, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Lt. (j.g.) Joseph McGraw, Pvt. George Phillips, Pfc. Eddie O'Donnell, East Syracuse, Milton Kepler and Bob Sims," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945.

McIntyre, Clarence E. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara: Clarence McIntyre...from Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Pvt. Clarence McIntyre of Camp Miles Standish, Mass., spent Christmas and the week-end with his mother, Mrs. Charles McIntyre," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/1943. "Pvt. Clarence McIntyre...is reported to be 'missing in action' since Feb. 3, according to a telegram received by his mother last Saturday morning from the U. S. War Department. 'Mac' as he was known to most Fayetteville people, entered service August 15, 1942. At the reception center in Fort Niagara he was assigned to the Medical Corps and sent to Camp Pickett, Va. After training at Camp Pickett, his unit was transferred to Camp Miles Standish, Mass. His last visit at the home of his mother was at Christmas time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/19/1943. "Mrs. Chas. McIntyre has received confirmation from the War Department of the death of her son, Pvt. Clarence McIntyre on Feb. 3, 1943. He was one of the many who went down to sea when their ship was torpedoed in the North Atlantic area. Lt.. McIntyre's death occurred on his 37th birthday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Mrs. Charles McIntyre has received from the War Department, the Purple Heart decoration, which, by the direction of the president of the United States, was awarded posthumously, to her son, Pvt. Clarence E. McIntyre of the Medical Corps, who sacrificed his life in defense of his country, Feb. 3, 1943. The Purple Heart was originally established by General George Washington at Newburg on Aug. 7, 1782, during the War of the Revolution. The decoration was revived by the War Department of Feb. 22, 1932, the 200th anniversary of Washington's birth, thus paying respect to his memory and recognizing his military achievements. An excerpt from a letter received by Mrs. McIntyre from the Adjutant General's office stated that 'As evidence of the Nation's recognition of military merit and courage, this award is made to honor the memory of a brave soldier who died as a result of enemy action," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943.

McIntyre, John. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "A surprise party in the nature of a farewell, was tendered John McIntyre on Tuesday night at the camp of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Thomas Nolan, on Cazenovia Lake. Mr. McIntyre has enlisted for army service, and leaves June 18 for officers' training camp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Mrs. Charles McIntyre has received word that her son, John McIntyre, has been transferred from Fort Niagara to Fort Monmouth, Red Bank, N. J., and is training in the signal corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "John McIntyre, home on a short furlough last week from Fort Monmouth, N. J. visited his mother, Mrs. Charles McIntyre," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "John McIntyre, a trainee in the Signal Corps at Fort Monmouth, N. J., was home on a 72-hour furlough spent with his wife at their home in Oran and his mother, Mrs. Charles McIntyre of Brooklea Dr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Corp. John McIntyre of Fort Monmouth, N. J., spent Sunday and Monday with his mother..., and his wife at their home in Oran," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. John McIntyre of Fort Monmouth, N. J. spent Sunday with their mothers..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. John McIntyre are home from Fort Monmouth, N. J., and have been visiting their mothers.... After a week's furlough Lt. McIntyre will report to Ft. Belvoir, Va. Mrs. McIntyre will remain at her home in Oran for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. John McIntyre have been passing a few days with their mothers...enroute to Wisconsin, where Mr. McIntyre will receive further training in engineering," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Mrs. Kenneth Rapp of Binghamton, N. Y., spent the week-end with her mother, Mrs. Charles McIntyre, coming to see her brother, Lt. John McIntyre before he left for his new post in Wisconsin," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "A son was born July 15 to Lt. and Mrs. John McIntyre (Katherine Nolan) at Memorial hospital in Syracuse. Mrs. McIntyre has been living with her mother, Mrs. Thos. Nolan at Oran, and Lt. McIntyre is serving with the 275th Engineers at Camp Breckinridge, Ky..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944. "Lt. John McIntyre of Camp Breckenridge, Ky. has been spending a few days with his wife and son...in Oran...and his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "lst Lt. John McIntyre, who served overseas for 15 months with the 275th Engineers as Adjutant, has been honorably discharged from service and has joined his wife and son...and has also been visiting his mother, Mrs. Charles McIntyre, in Clinton street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

McIntyre, Winfield Edward, Jr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Edward McIntyre, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre of this village, has been accepted as a flying cadet, and has enlisted for three years in the United States Flying Corps. He left Sunday night for Lakeland, Fla., where he will train for the ensuing ten weeks. After this period he will spend several months in advanced fields. Mr. McIntyre gave a family dinner at the Fayetteville hotel Sunday in honor of his son....Following the dinner the group went to the McIntyre home and later all accompanied the recruit to the station, where he entrained," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/20/1941. "W. Edward McIntyre, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre of 106 South Park Court, Fayetteville, is scheduled to receive the silver 'wings' of a flying officer today at the Air Corps Advanced Flying School, Maxwell Field, Montgomery, Ala. 'Chubby,' as he is familiarly known to his many friends here, has been home on furlough since last Saturday, and he started back Wednesday night to be present for the military graduation exercises. His commission is that of lieutenant and the ceremonies take place on the ramp at the flying school. Praise for the good record made by McIntyre is given by Maj. Clinton W. Davis, director of training. He enlisted March 19 and during the seven and one-half months he has completed 200 hours of flying training at the regular army school. This included practice in gunnery, formation, night flying, time and distance flights, ground instruction in military organization, combat orders and pistol practice. He will remain at Maxwell Field until ordered to an Air Corps tactical unit or to a flying school as instructor. While home the McIntyre family held a get-together Sunday to greet the enthusiastic aviator and wish him success," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/31/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. Leon Lindenmayer of Huntleigh drive have made known the engagement of their daughter, Miss Kathryn E. Lindenmayer to Lieut. Winfield E. McIntyre, Jr....Lieut. McIntyre, a flying officer at the Air Corps Advanced Flying School, Maxwell Field, Montgomery, Ala., was recently home on a furlough. No date has been set for the wedding," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/21/1941. "A telegram received by W. E. McIntyre Monday night, stated that his son Lt. W. Edward McIntyre had been seriously injured in action. No details were given. Enlisting in service in March, 1941, McIntyre received his wings seven months later at the Air Corps Advanced Flying School at Maxwell Field, Ala. He visited his parents here last October prior to receiving his commission, and shortly after was sent to Alaska. Lt. McIntyre is known as a solo fighter--shooting and piloting his plane at the same time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "The Order of the Purple Heart for 'extraordinary initiative and devotion to duty' has been awarded to Second Lt. Winfield Edward McIntyre, Jr...who was wounded June 4 during the Jap raid on Dutch Harbor, Alaska, when his fighter plane was shot down by an enemy ship. The Alaska defense command, in citing the young flying officer yesterday for outstanding performance of duty in action in the Aleutian area, said that McIntyre while 'in his first combat with an armed enemy and flying on routine patrol, was attacked, shot down and wounded, but safely beached his plane.' His parents...were notified on June 10 that their son had been injured seriously in the Jap raid, but the telegram gave no details of the affair. Lt. McIntyre was graduated from Fayetteville high school, where he played football, lacrosse and hockey, and attended Cook academy at Montour Falls prior to matriculating in the College of Forestry at Syracuse university. He enlisted in the army air corps more than a year ago, after completing his first year of college work. He received his wings and commission as a second lieutenant last October at Maxwell field, Ala. Transferred to Detroit, Lt. McIntyre was later sent to the west coast and went to Alaska in January of this year," The Post-Standard, 9/5/1942. "Second Lieut. W. Edward McIntyre has been awarded the Order of the Purple Heart for 'extraordinary initiative and devotion to duty' according to reports made several days ago. Lt. McIntyre was cited by the Alaskan defense command for his brilliant performance in his first combat with an armed enemy. The citation included the fact that he 'was attacked, shot down and wounded, but safely beached his plane.' McIntyre was injured during the initial Jap attack on Dutch Harbor on June 4," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "On Saturday morning, Oct. 24 at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Miss Kathryn Elizabeth Lindenmayer...became the bride of Lt. Winfield Edward McIntyre...the couple left late in the afternoon by train for Everett, Wash., where Lt. McIntyre expects to be stationed for a time. Lt. McIntyre has seen service in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands, and was home last week for the first time in nearly a year," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/30/1942. "Lt. and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre of Westover Field, Mass., have been spending a few days with their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. W. Edward McIntyre visited their parents...a few days last week enroute to Dayton, Oh., where Lt. McIntyre has been transferred," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. "Lt. Winfield Edward McIntyre, Jr., 23,...has been promoted to captain in the army air corps, and is in Syracuse with his parents on a short leave. A former Fayetteville high school athlete, Capt. McIntyre received the Order of the Purple Heart when wounded in action in June during a Japanese raid on Dutch Harbor. He will report to duty at New Haven, Conn.," The Post-Standard, 2/26/1943. "Passing over Fayetteville Monday afternoon a flight of twelve planes, led by Capt. W. Edward McIntyre, thrilled the people of the village with an exhibition of plane maneuvers, which made them think that the Germans or Japs had arrived to bomb us. Taking the village unaware, the graceful P-40s swooped low, barely missing chimneys and trees. Men, women and children rushed to the streets to watch the performance and all were awed by the demonstration. Citizens were left to wonder what it was all about until 'Chubby Mac' called Ed Willet on the phone, asking him how he liked the show he had just staged over Fayetteville. The call was made from the Syracuse Air Base where the planes had stopped to refuel on a routine flight from LaGuardia Field. They later flew over in formation enroute to their home base. Capt. McIntyre made good his promise that if he ever had the opportunity to do so, he would give Fayetteville a demonstration that they would long remember," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Capt. Winfield E. McIntyre of this village who won the Purple Heart in the Aleutians fighting, is credited with bagging one of the five Nazi planes which beset a Flying Fortress on the way back to its English base after bombing Bremen. According to an Associated Press report, Thunderbolt pilots spotted the crippled B-17 full of holes, its rudders and one stabilizer shot away just as three Messerschmitts and two Focke-Wulfs were preparing to attack the ship. The Thunderbolts were enroute home from their part in the escort job. Captain McIntyre and four other Thunderbolt pilots barged in and bagged all five enemy planes, saving the battered bomber from destruction...His wife and small son resides with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Lindenmayer in Huntleigh avenue. He has been in the service over two years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "...an Associated Press dispatch from London...gave an account of the brilliant action by the American fighter pilots. The dispatch listed Capt. McIntyre as one of those in the thick of the aerial fight and one of the pilots who bagged a Nazi plane. The Fortress under attack was on its ways back to an English base after bombing Bremen. Riddled by German guns, it had fallen behind its formation when pounced upon by the Nazis. The dispatch said the Thunderbolts streaked out of the sun and picked off the German fighter planes one by one. The fight was over in a matter of minutes, the account read, and the Fortress made its home base. Capt. McIntyre won the Purple Heart for injuries suffered June 4, 1942, when the Japanese raided Dutch Harbor, Alaska. He has been in the Army Air Forces three years, receiving his commission and wings at Maxwell Field, Ala., Oct. 15, 1940," Vail scrapbook, n.d.. "Capt. W. Edward McIntyre, husband of Katherine Lindenmayer McIntyre of Redfield avenue, and son of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre of South Park street is reported as missing in action somewhere over France since December 30 of last year at which time he was piloting his P-47 Thunderbolt fighter plane on a bombing mission. Capt. McIntyre was only recently cited for bagging one of five Nazi planes which had beset a Flying Fortress on its way back to its English base after bombing Bremen. For this accomplishment, he was awarded the Oak Leaf Cluster. 'Chub' as he was known here before going into service, was also awarded the order of the Purple Heart for outstanding achievement when the Japs bombed Dutch Harbor in June, 1942. His wife, and an infant son, whom he has never seen, reside with her parents..." "Capt. Winfield Edward McIntyre, Jr., Army flier...has been reported by the War Department as missing in action somewhere in France since Dec. 30. His father was called from the American Legion dinner at the Hotel Onondaga last night to receive the information. His parents assume that Capt. McIntyre was forced down while piloting his P-47 Thunderbolt fighter, which he had named 'Kay' after his wife, Mrs. Katherine L. McIntyre of Huntleigh Drive, Fayetteville. In June, 1942, McIntyre, then a lieutenant, was seriously injured when the Japs bombed Dutch Harbor, Alaska. Capt. McIntyre has been cited for bagging one of five Nazi planes that attacked a Flying Fortress on its way back to its base after bombing Bremen. The other four Nazis were shot down by companion fighters. A graduate of Fayetteville High School, Capt. McIntyre won his pilot's wings in October, 1940..." Vail scrapbook, 1/25/1944. The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "Word has been received by Mrs. Katherine L. McIntyre that her husband Capt. W. E. McIntyre, Jr., is a prisoner of war in Germany. Two weeks ago she received a telegram from the war department stating that her husband was missing in action since last December. Relatives of Capt. McIntyre did not give up hope that he was alive. The telegram, confirming their belief was received here Tuesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "Mrs. W. E. McIntyre, Jr., received a cablegram from the American Red Cross on Tuesday night at the request of her husband, Capt. Winfield E. McIntyre, stating that he had been liberated from German Prison Camp Stalagluft I and was awaiting to be transported to the States. Capt. McIntyre has been confined to the camp for about 16 months, having been reported as missing on Dec. 30, 1943. He entered the service in March, 1941 and after training was sent to Alaska and the Aleutians. He was injured in air action in that area and was awarded the Purple Heart and also cited for bravery. After a furlough home, he was assigned to Westover Field, Mass., from where he went overseas two years ago. Capt. McIntyre has never seen his year-and-half old son who with his mother resides with her parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "After two years overseas, 16 months of which were spent in a German prison camp, Capt. W. E. McIntyre is home for 60 days, and is getting acquainted with is little son, now 1 1 /2 years old, whom he had never seen. Capt. McIntyre stated to a representative of the Eagle-Bulletin that he cannot say enough for the American Red Cross, for any bright spot in their weary hours as POWs came through this organization. He was shot down over German territory on Dec. 30, 1943 while piloting a P-47 Thunderbolt on a bombing mission. Ed also saw service in the Aleutians and was awarded the Purple Heart for outstanding achievement when the Japs bombed Dutch Harbor in June, 1942. After being hospitalized for several months he returned to the States and visited at his home here. Shortly before he was taken prisoner, Capt. McIntyre was cited for bagging one of five Nazi planes which had attacked a Flying Fortress on its way back to an English base after bombing Bremen. For this accomplishment he was awarded the Oak Leaf Cluster," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "Mrs. W. Edward McIntyre has returned from Detroit, Mich., where she visited her husband, Capt. W. E. McIntyre, who is based at Selfridge Field. In addition to flying Capt. McIntyre is working in the personal equipment. Mrs. McIntyre and son Winfield, Jr., expect to join Capt. McIntyre in Detroit in about three weeks to take up residence," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945. "Mrs. Winfield E. McIntyre and little son Winfield, left last Saturday by plane for Selfridge Field, Detroit, Mich., where she will join her husband, Capt. McIntyre who is stationed there. This will be the first Christmas they have had together since their marriage more than three years ago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. "Pfc. Edward Lindenmayer will leave Monday for California to resume duties in the U. S. marine Corps in which he has served for the past three and one-half years. Enroute he will visit his brother-in-law and sister, Capt. and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre at Selfridge Field, Detroit. Mrs. McIntyre recently underwent an appendectomy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. "Captain and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre and little son, of Detroit, Mi., are vacationing with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre and Mr. and Mrs. Leon Lindenmayer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946 "Mr. and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre have received word from their son Winfield E., Jr. that he has been promoted from the rank of captain to major in the Army Air Force at Selfridge Field, Mt. Clemens, Mich. Major and Mrs. McIntyre and their little son reside at Mt. Clemens..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/18/1946. "Major and Mrs. W. E. McIntyre and children of Chicago, are spending the holidays with their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/27/1946.

McKinley, John H. Minoa. "The following men...have been honorably discharged from the U.S. army thru the separation center at Fort Dix, N.J...S/Sgt. John H. McKinley, 200 Edgerton st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 8/22/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...200 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

McLean, Robert. Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. Arley Gingold will visit their son, Robert McLean, who is in camp in North Carolina, over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. "At least one German aviator is minus his flying emblem today. It is now in the possession of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gingold of Manlius, whose son, Corp. Robert McLean, 21, picked it up on an African battlefield. Corp. McLean sent home the Flying Eagle with a suspended swastika, which once adorned the breast of a Nazi pilot and a special emblem, which was taken from the German plane. He also sent home a five-cent note on the Bank of Algiers...which denomination, he said, is used mostly for buying beers. Corp. McLean has 1,800 hours of anti-tank fighting to his credit in two and one-half years of service. He saw action in the battles of Tunisia, Carthage and Bizerte. This month completes one year that young McLean has been in service overseas. McLean attended Manlius High School and later graduated from Nottingham High. He went into service with Troop K of the National Guard and reported first to Fort Benning, Ga. He was later transferred to Camp Sutton, N. C. and Fort Bragg. He sailed for England a year ago and was shipped into Africa at the time of the invasion," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "On SS Timothy Dwight due in Boston August 16...T/4 Robert F. McLean, 101 E. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 8/17/1945.

McManus, Melvin. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Melvin McManus spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred McManus," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. "Private Melvin McManus arrived in Syracuse on Thursday afternoon where he was met by his sister Mildred McManus. Melvin spent the remainder of the week at home, returning Monday to Fort Hancock, N. J.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1941. "Private Melvin McManus has been at home for the holiday and week-end, arriving last Thursday, and left Monday night. He was accompanied on his return by motor to Ft. Hancock, N. J., by his sister, Mildred, and Miss Janet Gay, who returned Wednesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1941. "Miss Mildred McManus returned Wednesday from Fort Hancock, N. J. where she has been visiting her brother, Private Melvin McManus. Miss McManus was accompanied by Mrs. Gerald Jones, who visited her husband at Fort Hancock," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/14/1941. "Private Melvin McManus of Fort Hancock, N. J., spent last week-end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/18/1941. "Corp. Melvin McManus, Battery L, 245th Coast Artillery, Fort Hancock, N.J. spent last week-end at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/5/1941. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Melvin McManus has been passing a ten-day furlough with Mrs. McManus in Syracuse and his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/ 1943. "Sgt. Melvin McManus has returned to his base at Norton Point, Brooklyn, after passing a ten-day leave at his home in Smith street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1941. "Sgt. Melvin McManus has returned to camp after spending 14 days with his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/19/44. "Mrs. Melvin McManus, who has been spending some time with Mr. McManus' parents...has moved to the Smith apartment, Brooklea Drive, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Sgt. Melvin McManus, stationed in Brooklyn, spent three days this week with his wife and son Ross at their home in Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/15/1944. "Mrs. Melvin McManus of Brooklea Drive is spending the week with her husband in New York City," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945.

McNally, Claire Eugena. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). "Miss Jean McNally, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward McNally, has left to undergo training in the SPARS, the ladies' auxiliary to the U.S. Coast Guard," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Miss Jean McNally, training with the Spars at Hunter College, spent the week-end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward McNally of Leverett Lane," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "Fayetteville has five women serving their country ...Jean McNally in the WAVES..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces... SPARS--Jean McNally, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving...Nurse: ...Joan McNally, Fayetteville" The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Roy A. Johnson and daughter, Rose Elaine, have returned from a trip south. They visited Miss Joan McNally, a cadet nurse at John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, and joined another daughter, Miss Arlene Johnson, in Washington on their return trip," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Claire E. McNally has been released from the coast guard in which she served 33 months, and has returned home to Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 2/3/1946.

McTiernan, John J. Manlius. "Lieut. John J. McTiernan, an instructor at Manlius School has been assigned to active military duty. A graduate of Syracuse University, Lieut. McTiernan is assistant professor of military science and tactics and English teacher at Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/20/1942. "Capt. John J. McTiernan, Jr., 25, graduate of Syracuse university in 1940 and instructor at Manlius school in 1941, died Sept. 17 of wounds suffered in the Italian campaign. Capt. McTiernan, native of Bridgeport, Conn. studied business administration and journalism at the university. Following his graduation he began teaching English at Manlius and assisted in coaching football, basketball and baseball. He was called into service as a second lieutenant in the fall of 1942 and was an instructor at Oswego military police barracks before going overseas. The captain served thru the African, Sicilian and Italian campaigns. His wife resides at Mineola," The Post-Standard, 10/31/1944.

McVinney, Clifford A. Manlius/Fayetteville. Listed as Clifford A. McVinney, RD 1, Manlius in The Post-Standard, 10/6/1943. "Local men were among the 56 accepted for services in the armed forces this week. Army...Clifford A. McKinney, R. D. l, Manlius..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Pvt. Clifford McVinney, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. McVinney of Fayetteville, N. Y., formerly of Nyack, has been promoted to private first class in the 110th SCSU, special Training Unit, at Pine Camp. Prior to his induction into the armed forces, Pfc. McVinney was a member of the Nyack Public Schools faculty. He is a graduate of Syracuse University and of Albany States Teachers College," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944.

McWalters, John P. Fayetteville. "The following are scheduled to arrive in the States after service overseas, according to lists prepared by The Associated Press...Sgt. John P. McWalters, 105 W. Genesee st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard 11/19/1945.

Mead, Gilbert. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Meadler, John W. Fayetteville. Navy release, S 1/c, 300 Clinton st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 2/7/1946.

Meagher, J. Merle. Fayetteville. "Miss Irene W. Lackin, daughter of Mrs. Winifred Lackin of South Wilbur avenue, Syracuse, became the bride of J. Merle Meagher of this village (Fayetteville) on Saturday, Nov. 14...Mr. Meagher is a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Frank Meagher of Mycenae...Mr. Meagher, recently inducted into the Army, left Wednesday for the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942.

"Mrs. Margaret O'Shea Sheedy, widow of Michael Sheedy, died Sunday afternoon, Nov. 5, at her home in Warren street after a long illness. Mrs. Sheedy was born in Canada 85 years ago but had spent most of her life in this vicinity. Surviving are three grandsons, Merle Meagher, with the U. S. Army overseas; LeRoy Meagher, in the U. S. Navy; and Thomas Meagher, of Sonyea, N.Y.; also one niece, Miss Mary Gorman, of Rochester; and a nephew, Thomas Gorman, of Rome," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/10/1944. "Cpl. and Mrs. Merle Meagher are the parents of a son, John Joseph, born at the Memorial hospital in Syracuse Jan. 13. Corporal Meagher is serving with the armed forces overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "Sgt. Merle Meagher, who was recently discharged from the service, and his wife and little son are residing with Mrs. Meagher's parents in Syracuse and have been visiting relatives here. Mr. Meagher served overseas with the 193rd C.L.M. for 18 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Meagher, J. W. Fayetteville/Manlius. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday. From Fayetteville are...J. W. (Bud) Meagher, picked for the Navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Seaman 2/c John W. Meagher, stationed at Sampson, has been visiting his sister, Mrs. Stanley Collins of North street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Mrs. George Williams of Manlius announce the marriage of her daughter, Alice, to Seaman 2/c John Meagher, son of Edward Meagher, of 602 Walnut street, Fayetteville on Saturday, Feb. 19...Mr. Meagher will return to his base at Sampson on March 2nd," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944. "Seaman 1/c John Meagher and Mrs. Meagher, of Orange, Texas, have been visiting Mr. Meagher's sister, Mrs. Stanley Collins of North street. Mr. Meagher is on a 15-day furlough. They will return Friday to Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "S 2/c John Meagher and Mrs. Meagher have returned to Orange, Texas, where Seaman Meagher is stationed, having spent a 11-day furlough with relatives and friends in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944 (l/c then 2/c?) "Mrs. John Meagher has returned from Orange, Texas, where she has been visiting her husband, Seaman 1/c John Meagher, who has been transferred to Shoemaker, Calif.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "S 1/c Walter Meagher, who has been stationed in San Francisco, Calif., is passing a furlough with his wife and baby in Manlius and at the home of his father here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Seaman 1/c John Meagher and Mrs. Meagher are the proud parents of a son, born March 25 in Crouse-Irving hospital. The boy has been named John Edward. Seaman Meagher is spending a 23-day furlough at home, and will return to his base at San Francisco," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945.

Meagher, LeRoy. Fayetteville. "Mrs. Margaret O'Shea Sheedy, widow of Michael Sheedy, died Sunday afternoon, Nov. 5, at her home in Warren street after a long illness. Mrs. Sheedy was born in Canada 85 years ago but had spent most of her life in this vicinity. Surviving are three grandsons, Merle Meagher, with the U. S. Army overseas; LeRoy Meagher, in the U. S. Navy; and Thomas Meagher, of Sonyea, N.Y.; also one niece, Miss Mary Gorman, of Rochester; and a nephew, Thomas Gorman, of Rome," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/10/1944. "Leroy Meagher of Salt Lake City, Utah, formerly of this village (Fayetteville), was honorably discharged from the navy June 17 at Bainbridge, Md. after 3 1/2 years in service, the last two years was spent in the Southwest Pacific as yeoman 1/c on the U.S.S.. Nashville. Mr. Meagher is visiting relatives in this vicinity and is at present staying with his aunts, Mrs. Walter Sawsaw and Miss Gertrude Meagher," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/12/1946.

Meehan, John A. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Meehan, John A., 121 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Meehan, Robert S. Fayetteville. "The following officers and enlisted men were discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N.J...S/Sgt. Robert S. Meehan, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 1/22/1946.

Meigs, Carl W. Formerly town of Manlius. "Lt. Col. Carl W. Meigs of East Syracuse, a graduate of Manlius School, was killed Dec. 31, 1944, while being transferred as a prisoner of war from the Philippines to Japan, according to a Navy Department telegram. The telegram, which was addressed to his mother, Mrs. Mabel E. Meigs of 109 Kinne st., East Syracuse, who died two years ago, was received by her niece, who lives at the same address. Lt. Col. Meigs was born in East Syracuse and attended Tech High School, where he was a star fullback on the old Tech High School football team. Later he entered Manlius School, from which he was graduated in June, 1917. Three months after graduation he entered the Marine Corps as a provisional lieutenant in the reserves and later was appointed a second lieutenant of regular Marine. He rose grade by grade, serving in Santo Domingo, Haiti, Nicaraugua and in many other places. He was sent to the Philippines from Quantico in April, 1941, where he served for a time in the Marine Corps School. Lt. Col. Meigs was engaged in the campaign that ended in the fall of Corregidor at the time he was taken a prisoner in May, 1942. The last word received by his family from him was in December, 1943. He wore the Victory Medal, the Expeditionary Medal, the Dominican Republic Medal and the Second Nicarauguan Campaign Ribbon. There are no immediate survivors," The Herald-Journal, 8/5/1945.

Mercer, Claude. Manlius. "Sergeant Claude Mercer of New Mexico, arrived Thursday morning Jan. 12 to pass a ten-day furlough with Mrs. Mercer and family at their home in Pleasant street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/22/1943.

Mercer, Francis E. Manlius. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Army...Francis E. Mercer, Garrett dr., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943.

Merriam, Eugene. Fayetteville. "Eugene Merriam has reported for duty at Camp Upton. His wife and infant daughter, Nancy, will make their home with Mr. Merriam's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry A. Merriam at Lyndon, for the duration," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Pvt. Howard (Gene) Merriam spent 15 days with his wife and infant daughter at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Merriam at Lyndon. Gene was enroute to Pennsylvania from Camp Shelby, Miss., after completing a 13-week course in railroad transportation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944.

Merritt, Estes W. Fayetteville. "Estes Merritt, son of Mrs. David Ellis of 200 Warren street, has enlisted as a ground crew mechanic in the Army Air Corps and left Batavia last Thursday for training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Pvt. Estus (Red) Merritt...is attending radio technical school at Sioux Falls, S. D. Pvt. Merritt entered the air corps on Dec. 3 and was stationed at Miami Beach, Fla., after leaving Fort Niagara. He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school and a former employee of the Doehler Die Casting company in Batavia," The Post-Standard, 1/28/1943. "Pvt. Estes Merritt has been spending a few days with his mother...having been called home by the death of his grandfather in Bridgeport, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Pfc. Estes Merritt, who graduated from Radio Technical School at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, May 28, and assigned to the 90th Ardrm. Sq., Hunter Field, Savannah, Ga., in June has received his permit for driving ambulances, trucks, jeeps, etc., according to word received by his mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Estes Merritt, U. S. A., spent a few days last week with his mother, Mrs. David Ellis of Warren street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "Air Transport Command Base, India--Pfc. Estes W. Merritt, aerial radio operator, of 200 Warren street...has been awarded an Air medal, it was announced by Brig. Gen. William H. Tunner, commanding general of the India-China division, Air Transport Command. The award was made upon completion of 150 hours of operational flight in transport aircraft over the dangerous and difficult air routes, where enemy interception and attack was probable and expected. The citation accompanying the award adds: 'Flying at night as well as by day, at high altitudes over impassable, mountainous terrain through areas characterized by extremely treacherous weather conditions, necessitating long periods of operation on instruments...requiring courageous and superior performance of his duties to overcome, he accomplished his mission with distinction." Pfc. Merritt is the son of Mrs. David Ellis," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Pfc. Estes W. Merritt, aerial radio operator in Army Transport Command, landed in Miami Beach by ATC and is at his home at 200 Warren street on a 31-day furlough after 20 months in the China-Burma-India theater. He was awarded the air medal and also the Distinguished Flying Cross upon completion of 300 hours of operational flight in transport aircraft over the dangerous and difficult India-China air routes where interception and attack was probable and expected. The air trail over the 'Hump,' famed route through the towering peaks of the Himalayan mountains, blazed by the ATC, is recognized by airmen as the world's toughest flying by night as well as by day at high altitudes over impossible mountain terrain through treacherous weather conditions. Pfc. Merritt is the son of Mrs. David Ellis of the Warren street address," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945. "Estes Merritt has been honorably discharged from the army air forces and is spending some time with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945. Class of 1942 Fayetteville High School shows "Estus Merritt."

Mertes, Michael T. Formerly Fayetteville. "Word has been received by Mrs. Richard Brown, of Syracuse, from her brother Michael T. Mertes, of his promotion to the rank of corporal. He has been in service in the Medical Corps for the past 27 months, of which 24 have been spent in the South Pacific area. Both Mrs. Brown and Corporal Mertes are former residents of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/15/1944.

Messinger, Henry. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Messinger, Henry E. Kirkville. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Corp. Henry E. Messinger, husband of Mrs. Dorothy B. Messinger and son of Mr. and Mrs. Ashert E. Messinger, Sr., of Kirkville, has been missing in action in Luxembourg since Dec. 20, according to a telegram received from the war department by his wife. Corp. Messinger, serving with the medical corps, has been overseas since October, 1943. He entered service in March, 1942, and received training at Camp Livingston, La., Camp Gordon Johnson, Fla., and Camp Pickett, Va. Before entering service he was employed by the New York Central railroad," The Post-Standard, 1/28/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Metrick, Anthony. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Anthony Metrick of Mississippi is visiting his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942.

Metrick, John. Kirkville. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "...Onondaga County men accepted yesterday were...John Metrick, R.D. 1, Kirkville ..." Post-Standard, 11/19/1942. "John Shedd, Willis Kippley and John Metrick left for army service last Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942.

Metz, Ordway. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Ordway Metz is now at Camp Croft, S. C. He was transferred to the states after having been wounded in action overseas. Pvt. Metz joined the armed forces last June," The Post-Standard, 7/15/1943.

Metzel, Albert W. Formerly Fayetteville. "Staff Sgt. Albert W. Metzel, Perryville, formerly of Fayetteville, was promoted to his present rank June 15. He entered the service in February, 1941, and is stationed with the armed forces somewhere in Iran. He has been overseas since June, 1942. Staff Sgt. Metzel has a son, named for him, born in December," The Post-Standard, 7/21/1943.

Meyer, Harrison G. O. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Master Sgt. Harrison Meyer, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Meyer, Jr., of 300 S. Manlius st., Fayetteville, was recently promoted from first sergeant at Camp White, Ore. where he is with an engineers unit. Meyer enlisted Aug. 8, 1940, at Syracuse and was transferred to Camp White Sept. 15, 1942, from Fort Bragg, N.C. He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school and was employed by the Precision Die Castings Inc., in a clerical capacity," Post-Standard, 11/9/1942. "Other sons (besides Nelson) of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Meyer of South Manlius street, in service are M/Sgt. Harrison Meyer, U. S. Army, and Pvt. Warren Meyer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Harrison Meyer, New Caledonia..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. Master Sgt. Harrison G. O. Meyer is with a headquarters and service company of construction engineers in the Southwest Pacific. He was employed by Precision Die Casting office, Fayetteville, before entering service about four years. ago. Both Warren and Harrison are graduates of Fayetteville high school," The Post-Standard, 8/4/1944. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer have two other sons in service, M/Sgt. Harrison Meyer with the Engineers, and Cpl. Nelson Meyer with the Marine Air Warning Corp., Radar Division, both in the Southwest Pacific. Cpl. Nelson Meyer's wife and son reside in Thompson street in this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945. "The following soldiers were discharged from service at the separation center at Fort Lewis, Wash....M/Sgt. Harrison G. O. Meyer, 8 Huntleigh ave,. Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1945.

Meyer, Nelson C. Fayetteville. "Nelson Meyer, third son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Meyer of South Manlius street to join the colors, has enlisted in the Marines, and left Monday for Paris Island, S. C. here he will receive his boot training. Formerly a corporal in the New York State Guard, he was put in charge of the nine others who left Syracuse for Paris Island in the same contingent. Before his enlistment, Mr. Meyer was employed by the U.S.F.&G. Company in Syracuse. His wife, who is employed at the General Electric plant, and little son, Nelson, Jr., will live with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Meyer, 3rd, of Thompson street, for the duration. Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Meyer 3rd entertained at a farewell party for the new enlisted prior to his departure, inviting relatives and friends to share the occasion. Other sons of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer in service are M/Sgt. Harrison Meyer, U. S. Army, and Pvt. Warren Meyer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "PFC Nelson A. Meyer, son of Mrs. C. C. Meyer, Jr., of 218 Huntleigh ave., Fayetteville, is with a marine airborne radar division in the Southwest Pacific. He has been overseas a year. While in boot training at Parris Island, he received one point less than the highest score in sharpshooting. He is a graduate of Jamaica high school, Long Island. Before entering service he was employed by the U.S. Fidelity and Guaranty Co. He has two brothers in service. Corp. Warren George Meyer is with the air engineers in India and has been overseas a year. His unit received the presidential citation. Master Sgt. Harrison G. O. Meyer is with a headquarters and service company of construction engineers in the Southwest Pacific. He was employed by Precision Die Casting office, Fayetteville, before entering service about four years. ago. Both Warren and Harrison are graduates of Fayetteville high school," The Post-Standard, 8/4/1944. "...Mr. and Mrs. Meyer have two other sons in service, M/Sgt. Harrison Meyer with the Engineers, and Cpl. Nelson Meyer with the Marine Air Warning Corp., Radar Division, both in the Southwest Pacific. Cpl. Nelson Meyer's wife and son reside in Thompson street in this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945.

Meyer, Warren George. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara...Warren George Meyer...from Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "A church wedding solemnized Monday night at 8 o'clock united Miss Betty Goodfellow, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William C. Goodfellow of Mechanic street, and Pvt. Warren Meyer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Christian C. Meyer, Jr., of Huntleigh avenue...The bridegroom, serving in the U. S. Army, will return to his post at Savannah, Ga., this week-end and Mrs. Meyer will resume her work at the Carrier Corporation in Syracuse for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Warren G. Meyer, Jr., 23, ...has been promoted to corporal at an air transport base in India. His wife lives at 108 Mechanic St., Fayetteville. Meyer has been in the China-Burma-India theater more than six months. He is an aerial engineer," Post-Standard, 3/4/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Warren Meyer, India..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. Corp. Warren George Meyer is with the air engineers in India and has been overseas a year. His unit received the presidential citation. Master Sgt. Harrison G. O. Meyer is with a headquarters and service company of construction engineers in the Southwest Pacific. He was employed by Precision Die Casting office, Fayetteville, before entering service about four years. ago. Both Warren and Harrison are graduates of Fayetteville high school," The Post-Standard, 8/4/1944. "Warren G. Meyer, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Meyer, Jr., and husband of Betty Goodfellow Meyer, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant, according to word received by his mother. Sgt. Meyer has been with the Air Transport Command in India for the past two and a half years. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer have two other sons in service, M/Sgt. Harrison Meyer with the Engineers, and Cpl. Nelson Meyer with the Marine Air Warning Corp., Radar Division, both in the Southwest Pacific. Cpl. Nelson Meyer's wife and son reside in Thompson street in this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945.

Mezzalingua, Stephen. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Private Stephen Mezzalingua was home for the week-end and returned Monday to Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/15/1942. "Pvt. Stephen D. Mezzalingua is now located at Camp Shelby, Miss.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1942. "Pvt. Stephen Mezzalingua, stationed in Mississippi, is home on a 15-day furlough. Mrs. Mezzalingua entertained at a family dinner on Sunday in honor of her son. Mrs. Stephen Mezzalingua has resigned her position in Syracuse and will return with her husband to Mississippi. A farewell party was given in her honor at the Mezzalingua home, Thursday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/16/1942. "Mrs. Stephen Mezzalingua arrived Thursday of last week from Harrisburg, Miss. Corp. Mezzalingua is expected to arrive from California to pass a brief furlough at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Mrs. Daniel Mezzalingua has received word of the safe arrival of her son, Corp. Stephen Mezzalingua, in Italy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944.

Miller, Carl N. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on both the Manlius Honor Roll and Oran Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942.

Miller, Eugene. Kirkville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were...Eugene Miller of Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. Honorably discharged Monday, Pfc. Eugene Miller, Kirkville, RD 2, The Post-Standard, 10/24/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Miller, Howard. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Miller, James Albert. Manlius. Navy, 1944-45.

Miller, Joseph. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Miller, Richard C. Manlius. Navy release, Sampson...Richard C. Miller, F 1/c, Manlius RD 1, The Post-Standard, 4/4/1946.

Miller, William. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942.

Mills, Frank. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Frank Mills..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943.

Mills, John, Jr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Mills, Rodney C. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Rodney C. Mills, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mills of Manlius, leaves today for MacDill Field, Tampa, Fla., after spending a 30-day furlo with his parents. Mills, who has been in the service 18 months, is a graduate of the air corps technical school at Keesler Field, miss., and upon his return to camp, he will be transferred to a training school for flying cadets," The Post-Standard, 5/29/1942. "Mrs. Edna M. Gustafson of Kansas City, Mo., announces the marriage of her daughter, Miss Virginia Marie Gustafson to Lt. Rodney Charles Mills, U.S.A.A.C., son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mills of Manlius...on Sept. 18...the couple will live in Kansas City, near Lt. Mill's station," The Post-Standard, 11/20/1943. "Rodney C. Mills, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mills, has recently been promoted to first lieutenant. Lieut. Mills is now air transport pilot over the 'Hump' between India and China," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Lt. Rodney C. Mills, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Mills, Manlius, was presented the Air Medal by Maj. N. D. Patterson in India for services rendered the Air Transport Command in flights over the Himalayan 'Hump.' He has completed 50 millions in the China-Burma-India theater and is now visiting his parents, wife and small son before reporting to New York City for reassignment, Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Lt. Rodney C. Mills, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Mills of R. D. 1, Manlius, has been honorably discharged from the Rome Separation Center. He entered service in November, 1940, and served overseas 10 months. He wears the Asiatic-Pacific theater ribbon with three battle stars, the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945.

Minor, Randall K. Kirkville. Navy release, Lido Beach, L.I., Randall K. Minor, McMM 3/c, Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 2/20/1946.

Mitchell, William Harry. Kirkville. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Mitterhofer, George W. Fayetteville. "Corp. George W. Mitterhofer is spending a seven-day furlo from Camp Pickett, Va., with his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Benedict Schupp of Fayetteville rd., Fayetteville. Corp. Mitterhofer entered the army April 3, 1942, and is in a medical training battalion. Before entering the army he was employed by A. G. Chase, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 4/25/1943.

Monroe, Lloyd. Fayetteville. Inducted, Lloyd S. Munroe (sic) RFD 1, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 6/4/1943. "Petty Officer 2/c Lloyd Monroe of the Navy, has been spending five days with Mrs. Monroe at their home on the Syracuse Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Monroe arrived in Fayetteville this week from California, and after visiting relatives in Albany will return to their apartment on the Syracuse Road. Mr. Monroe has been discharged from the service. His wife, a teacher at Fayetteville school was given leave of absence, and she has been in California for the past year and a half with her husband," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Moon, Donald. Formerly Fayetteville. "First Lt. Donald Moon, 26, an infantry officer, was killed Sept. 29 on Palau island, according to word received by his mother, Mrs. Kathryn Moon of Thompson rd. He went to Hawaii in May, 1944, and was fighting in the Southwest Pacific area before his death. A native of Syracuse, he attended Nottingham high school and was graduated from Fayetteville high school and Cornell university. He entered service in February 1941, from Rochester. In December, 1942, he won his commission on graduation from officer candidate school at Fort Benning, Ga. Before going overseas he was stationed at Camp Rucker, Ala., and in California. He leaves his mother; his wife, Mrs. Donald Moon of Newfield and a son, Donald Moon, Jr., who was a year old last Friday; three sisters, Mrs. Constas Kazacos, Mrs. Harry Brinkerhoff, both of Syracuse, and Madeline Moon, Seaman 1/c, WAVES, stationed in Washington, a brother, Ronald Moon, 12," The Post-Standard, 10/27/1944." "...He entered service in February 1941 from Rochester. In December, 1942, he won his commission on graduation from officer candidate school at Fort Benning, Ga. Before going overseas he was stationed at Camp Rucker, Ala., and in California..." The Post Standard, 10/27/1944.

Moore, Ray Francis. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. 601 E. Seneca St., Manlius. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942.

Morey, G. Martin. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Martin Morey, son of Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Morey of Manlius, reports to his Draft Board Friday morning at 8:30 to be sent to a camp at Royalston, Mass., where he will engage in what the government speaks of as 'work of national importance' under civilian auspices. This work will consist of such things as are necessary to the care of forest and the conservation of the country's natural resources. At the time members of the camp will study, in preparation for reconstruction work after the war is over. Martin registered as a conscientious objector in the draft, and the camp to which he goes is under the direction of the American Friends Service Committee. Work done is without salary or other compensation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1941. "Rev. and Mrs. Arthur E. Morey expect to leave Friday by automobile to visit their son, Martin Morey, at Camp Roylston, Mass.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1941. "Martin Morey...came home on a week's furlough, and while here motored to Iroquois for his mother, who had been passing the week with her mother. Martin returned to camp Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/31/1941. "Martin Morey of Camp Roylston, Mass., arrived Monday night for a two-day vacation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/21/1941. "Martin Morey...having been released from the Civilian Public Service camp...because of a physical disability, last week accepted a position with the Adirondack Daily Enterprise at Saranac Lake, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/12/1941. "Martin Morey, son of Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Morey has joined the U. S. Army and is now stationed at Fort Niagara. He is a graduate of Fine Arts College, Syracuse U. and had been employed as editor of an Adirondack daily for several months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Lt. G. Martin Morey, who recently graduated from the Officers' candidate school at Grinnell, Ia., visited his parents...last week. Leaving Sunday, Lt. Morey, with several other officers, boarded an Eastern Air Lines plane in New York for the first assignment in New Orleans, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/5/1943. "The marriage of Miss Carolyn Grant, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Grant of Mansfield, Pa., to Lieut. Martin Morey...was solemnized Thursday afternoon, May 20, in the Methodist Church in Mansfield...Lieut. Morey is a graduate of Cazenovia Seminary, 1937, and Syracuse University, 1941. Before entering the armed forces he was city editor of the Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Saranac Lake. After completing a course at the officer Candidate School at Grinnell College, Ia., he was commissioned Feb. 17, 1943. Since that time he has been stationed at New Orleans, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. Martin Morey spent last week-end with the former's parents...Lt. Morey returns this week to New Orleans, where he has been stationed since last March. Mrs. Morey will resume her work with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Lt. G. Martin Morey, son of Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Morey, has been assigned to Fort Belvoir, Va., for additional study and training in a Basic Officers' Course over a period of eight weeks, after which he will return to his original assignment at the New Orleans staging area as personnel adjutant," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "Lst Lieut. Martin Morey and Mrs. Morey have been visiting Lieut. Morey's parents...leaving to visit Mrs. Morey's parents in Mansfield, Pa. They will return to Manlius for a brief visit before leaving for New Orleans, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Willard S. Cole observed their golden wedding anniversary on Sunday, Aug 20, at their home in Fayette street...Guests from out of town included...lst Lieut. Martin Morey and Mrs. Morey, of New Orleans, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944.

Morgan, Arley. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Morgan, DeForest. Manlius. "Keith Morgan, a recent inductee, is now stationed at the Sampson Naval Base. DeForest Morgan, a brother who is also in the U. S. Navy, is located in New Guinea. They are sons of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Morgan of Washington street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "DeForest Morgan of the Navy has returned from the South Pacific. He has received an honorable discharge and returned to his home in McConnellsville. Mr. Morgan visited his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Morgan on Tuesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Morgan, Keith. Manlius. "Keith Morgan, a recent inductee, is now stationed at the Sampson Naval Base. DeForest Morgan, a brother who is also in the U. S. Navy, is located in New Guinea. They are sons of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Morgan of Washington street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "Keith Morgan, Sp. (1) 2/c, Mrs. Morgan and their son, Keith, Jr., who were called to Manlius by the illness of Mr. Morgan's father, returned last Thursday to his base at Washington, D.C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Morgan, Robert. Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Morgan entertained at a family dinner last Thursday at their home on the Sweet road, given in honor of their son, Robert, who was leaving for serving in the Army. He is stationed for the present at Camp Dix," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946. "Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Morgan entertained at the Tally-Ho-Ho at dinner last Sunday in honor of their son, Pvt. Robert Morgan, who is at home on a 14-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/12/1946. "Pvt. Robert Morgan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Morgan, is now stationed at Stoneman, Calif.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/26/1946

Morley, Gordon. Manlius. "Mrs. Jessie R. Morley left Wednesday to visit her son C/3 Gordon Morley who is attending F.E. school at Aylemer, Ontario, Canada," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945.

Morley, Henry W. Manlius. "Mrs. A. V. Morley of Smith street, talked with her son, Pvt. Henry W. Morley, over the phone the other day. Pvt. Morley has been ill in a New Jersey hospital, but is much improved and will soon continue training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Pfc. Henry Morley of the Signal Heavy Command Battalion and Pharm. Mate 2/c Kenneth Bex, both from Manlius, N.Y., had a great handshake, and exchanged experiences when they met at Guam, recently. Both are graduates of Manlius High School, and had not seen each other for over two and a half years. The reunion was brought about by 'letters from home.' Bex's wife learned that Morley was stationed on Guam and immediately wrote, giving the details. After three weeks the service men finally met. Morley has seen 2 1/2 years of service and Bex has been in the Navy 1 1 /2 years and is at present stationed at a Fleet Hospital on Guam. Pfc. Morley has a brother, Seaman 2/c Herbert Morley in the Seabees, and is stationed at Rhode Island at present..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945.

Morley, Herbert. Manlius. "Pfc. Henry Morley...has a brother, Seaman 2/c Herbert Morley in the Seabees, and is stationed at Rhode Island at present..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945.

Morley, John F. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "The local draft board 473 listed a group of young men who will report on Thursday for induction...John F. Morley, Manlius...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1941. "John Morley, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Morley, of Fayette street, is located at Fort Jackson, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1941. "A. V. Morley of Norfolk, Va., and son, Pvt. John Morley of Camp Dix spent several days at home returning Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Private John Morley was at home for a brief furlough, returning to Fort Bragg Monday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Corp. John Morley of 102 Smith st...are members of an airborne division which landed in France for the first attack on the enemy in Normandy several hours before H-hour on D-day. Dropping from the skies with camouflaged parachutes, the men floated down over the Cotentin peninsula into action. Their job was to prevent German forces from reaching the beachhead and to clear the way for our ground troops following closely behind," The Post-Standard, 8/20/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Morley of Smith street received word from the War Department on Wednesday that their son, Paratrooper John Morley, had been killed in action in Belgium. A previous message stated he was seriously wounded. John was a student in Manlius high school and was employed as delivery clerk on a milk route. He was of a sunny disposition, and had many friends in Manlius and Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "Pfc. John F. Morley, 27, a paratrooper who participated in the invasion of Normandy, Holland and Belgium, died January 9 of wounds suffered in action in Belgium, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Morley of Manlius, learned from the War Department. Before entering the service on April 3, 1941, Pfc. Morley was employed by the G. L. F. Corp. at Utica. He received infantry basic training at Fort Jackson, S.C. before volunteering for the paratroopers in August of 1943. He then trained at Alliance, Nebraska, going overseas in December, 1943. He had received the Presidential Citation and three Silver Stars. Besides his parents he leaves three brothers, Pvt. Henry Morley, with the Army in the South Pacific, Austin Morley of Minoa, and Herbert Morley, of Manlius, two sisters, Mrs. Leon Model of Syracuse, and Mrs. Claude Benedict, Jr., of Manlius. Pfc. Morley was engaged to marry Miss Jeanne Bushy of Lake Placid," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945. "A memorial service for Pfc. John Morley who died Jan. 9 in Belgium of wounds received in action, will be conducted in the Manlius Methodist Church on Sunday afternoon, March 11, at four o'clock. Rev. H. E. Adamy, pastor of the church, will officiate at the service. Pfc. Morley had been with the 82nd Airborne Division ever since going overseas in December, 1943, and had participated in the invasion of Normandy, Holland an Belgium. He was awarded the Presidential Citation and the Purple Heart, the latter being awarded posthumously to his parents. Born in Manchester, Conn., 27 years ago, John had lived in Fayetteville and Manlius for about 12 years. He attended Fayetteville high school and prior to entering service in 1941 he was employed by the G.L.F. corporation. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Morley of this village, brother of Pvt. Henry Morley with the U.S. Army in the South Pacific, Austin Morley, of Minoa, Herbert Morley, of Manlius, Mrs. Leon Model, of Syracuse, and Mrs. Claude Benedict, Jr., of Manlius. The family, with the exception of Henry will be present for the memorial service. The Archie VanPatten Post of American Legion have been invited to take part in the memorial service. They will meet in the parlors of the Methodist church at 3:45 p.m. and prepare to enter the church auditorium in a body at 4 o'clock. Sons of the American Legion, as well as non-member veterans of either war, and service men are invited to join the unit for the occasion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945.

?Morrison, Roy. Fayetteville. "Roy Morrison is making plans to take his family South with him when he returns to resume duties," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943.

Mosebrook, Harry Stewart. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Harry S. Mosebrook...of Fayetteville...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Second Lt. Harry Stewart Mosebrook, instructor in forest extension at the New York State College of Forestry, was graduated April 28 from the engineer officer candidate school, Fort Belvoir, Va.. Born of July 14, 1913, he attended Johnson high school, St. Paul, Minn.; the University of Minnesota and the University of Michigan. He married the former Edna Madge Phelps. Their home is at 325 Highbridge st., Fayetteville. He entered the army on Oct. 19, 1942," The Post-Standard, 4/28/1943. "Capt. Harry F. Mosebrook is spending a 30-day leave with his wife and family at their home at 611 Clinton street after spending nine months with the 1288th Eng. Combat Battalion in the European theater," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Moth, Floyd V. Kirkville. "Floyd V. Moth, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford C. Moth, Kirkville, RD 2, has been promoted to technician fifth grade at Camp Lee, Va., where he is a technical instructor with a provisional company. Before being inducted on Oct. 27, 1942, he was a tank truck operator for D. H. Brown of Minoa," The Post-Standard, 3/2/1943. "The following officers and enlisted men have been discharged from the army at Fort Dix, N.J...Pfc. Floyd V. Moth, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 12/18/1945.

Moth, Glenn W. Kirkville. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday....G. W. Moth of Kirkville...will serve in the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. Besides his parents, Pfc. (Harold) Moth is survived by four brothers, Fireman 1/c Glenn Moth, and Fireman 1/c Merle Moth, both serving in the South Pacific; Mach. M. 2/c Paul Moth, who is home on leave from Florida and Reginald Moth, of Kirkville, and five sisters, Mrs. Dora Brownell, Mrs. Grace Daniels, Mrs. Florence Howard, all of Kirkville, and Mrs. Hazel Griesbach and Mrs. Erla Russell, of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. Honorably discharged from Samson, Glen W. Moth, F 1/c, Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 12/6/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Moth, Harold. Kirkville. "Funeral services for Pfc. Harold Moth, 29, of Fyler Road, Kirkville, will be held this afternoon at his late home, Rev. Buchanan officiating. Interment will be made in Fyler cemetery. Pfc. Moth of the U. S. Marine Corps, was killed instantly Tuesday at about 2:25 p.m. when the light truck he was driving was struck by an eastbound train at the Main street crossing in Minoa. He is one of four sons in service and arrived home East morning for a 30-day leave after serving 29 months in the South Pacific area. According to witnesses, the bell at the crossing was sounding and the red signal light was against him when he drove onto the tracks. The watchman shouted a warning but Moth apparently did not hear him. Besides his parents, Pfc. Moth is survived by four brothers, Fireman 1/c Glenn Moth, and Fireman 1/c Merle Moth, both serving in the South Pacific; Mach. M. 2/c Paul Moth, who is home on leave from Florida and Reginald Moth, of Kirkville, and five sisters, Mrs. Dora Brownell, Mrs. Grace Daniels, Mrs. Florence Howard, all of Kirkville, and Mrs. Hazel Griesbach and Mrs. Erla Russell, of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "PFC Moth...arrived home Easter morning on 30 days' convalescent leave from the United States Naval hospital at Portsmouth, Va. He had just left Scheuerman's hotel, near the crossing, where he had chatted for 20 minutes with Donald Peters, the proprietor, concerning the whereabouts of several Minoa friends in the service. The warning bell at the crossing was ringing as the truck PFC Moth was driving went approximately 40 feet to the crossing and Nicholas Pallotta, crossing watchman, was shouting a warning as the light truck reached the tracks. Pallotta reported to Coroner Harry L. Gilmore that PFC Moth heard him, looked in his direction..." The Post-Standard, 4/4/1945.

Moth, Merle. Kirkville. Besides his parents, Pfc. (Harold) Moth is survived by four brothers, Fireman 1/c Glenn Moth, and Fireman 1/c Merle Moth, both serving in the South Pacific; Mach. M. 2/c Paul Moth, who is home on leave from Florida and Reginald Moth, of Kirkville, and five sisters, Mrs. Dora Brownell, Mrs. Grace Daniels, Mrs. Florence Howard, all of Kirkville, and Mrs. Hazel Griesbach and Mrs. Erla Russell, of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Moth, Paul K. Kirkville. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors, five of them are Kirkville men. They are...Paul Moth...Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Besides his parents, Pfc. (Harold) Moth is survived by four brothers, Fireman 1/c Glenn Moth, and Fireman 1/c Merle Moth, both serving in the South Pacific; Mach. M. 2/c Paul Moth, who is home on leave from Florida and Reginald Moth, of Kirkville, and five sisters, Mrs. Dora Brownell, Mrs. Grace Daniels, Mrs. Florence Howard, all of Kirkville, and Mrs. Hazel Griesbach and Mrs. Erla Russell, of Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Motquin, Emile. Fayetteville. "Word has just been received by Mrs. William Hyde of 222 West Genesee street through the office of strategic services in Washington, notifying her of the death of her son Corp. Emile Motquin who was killed in action on May 3. Corp. Motquin was a member of the French Foreign Legion, and was stationed in Africa for ten years. He was assigned to the Indo-China sector in 1936, and it was there he lost his life on May 3 of this year. Mrs. Hyde had no word from her son for a long time and appealed to Washington for news of his whereabouts. The following letter was received from the office of Strategic Services: 'In accordance with your request of June 10, 1945, we cabled our office in China, and deeply regret that the information received concerning Corp. Emile Motquin showed that he had been killed in action on May 3, 1945. Although this information came from the Commanding General of the French Forces in China, and we believe it to be reliable, it should not be considered official until you have heard directly from French military sources. In order to speed that information, I have taken the liberty of informing the French Military Mission in Washington and have asked them to request official word from French army headquarters in Paris. Although it is the official responsibility of the French government to inform you of Corp. Motquin's death, we felt that his mother would prefer to have this information as quickly as it was available, rather than wait for months for the information to come through routine channels. The French Military Mission has agreed with this decision of informing you of such unhappy tidings,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945.

Mott, Howard. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Dan Cupid won another bout with the United States army when Pvt. Howard I. Mott, 26, son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Mott of E. Seneca st., Manlius, and Miss Doris Tuttle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Tuttle of the town of Pompey, were married...yesterday. Plans for the wedding were made some time ago when Pvt. Mott expected that he would be granted a 10-days leave of absence for the ceremony and wedding trip but just before he was to leave Camp Edwards, Mass., he received the bad news that he would be allowed only three days. The outlook was discouraging when Mott boarded a plane for Syracuse Friday afternoon. If the requirements of the law were met, the young soldier and bride-to-be would not be able to wed during his leave of absence, but love, with the assistant of Attorney John C. Young and Justice Frank C. Gregg, found a way, when the court, on the application presented by Young, entered an order waiving the deferments. Procuring the order yesterday morning, Pvt. Mott and Miss Tuttle hurried from the courthouse to their home to prepare for the wedding ceremony...Pvt. Mott's leave expires Tuesday morning, The Post-Standard, 9/21/1941. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Sgt. Howard Mott, Jr., who has spent three years in service overseas in Australia and New Guinea, returned home last Tuesday night on a 21-day furlough. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Mott, Sr., had retired for the night and had left their front door unlocked. Sgt. Mott entered and awoke his parents and they visited until morning. Sgt. Mott is passing his furlough with his wife at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Tuttle, in Elbridge. He will then go to Lake Placid for re-assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945.

?Mott, Morris V. Fayetteville. "Local Draft Board 473 called up 19 men for induction this week. They will be examined by the board of which Jesse W. Clarke is chairman and Collin Armstrong and Matthew F. O'Brien. The group called from this vicinity are as follows: Morris V. Mott, 208 South Manlius street, Fayetteville...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. Possibly did not serve.

Moynihan, Charles. Fayetteville. "Spending a ten-day furlough at their respective homes here are Fireman 1/c Lisle Clark, Machinist Mate 1/c George Schleich, and Fireman 1/c Charles Moynihan, all members of the Seabees, stationed at Providence, R. I., " The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Another meeting which, no doubt, was equally enjoyed was that on Feb. 4, of George Ebeling, S 1/c, U.S.N., with George Schleich, M.M. l/c and Lisle Clark, M.M. l/c of the U.S. Seabees, on Leyte Island. According to the story, Ebeling came ashore on Leyte on Feb. 3 and asked about the battalion with which Schleich and Clark were serving, only to learn that they had left for Samar. In some way the message reached the two Seabees and they either walked, ran or swam back to Leyte where they met Ebeling for a half hour the next day. Whether Ebeling saw his brother-in-law, Charles Moynihan, who is also serving in the same battalion with Clark and Schleich, has not been learned," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945.

Mults, Bowen. Manlius. "Mrs. Bowen Mults of Fayette street will reside in Syracuse during the absence of her husband, who joined the armed forces on March 1," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944.

Mulvilhill, Arthur F. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Arthur F. Mulvihill of Manlius...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Sgt. Arthur Mulvihill of K-9 and S 2/c Jack Mulvihill, USCG, are visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Mulvihill of Highbridge rd., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 1/1/1944.

Mulvihill, John E. Manlius. Inducted into the coast guard October 5, 1943, The Post-Standard, 10/5/1943. "Local men were among the 56 accepted for services in the armed forces this week...Marines. John E. Mulvihill, R.D. 1, Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Sgt. Arthur Mulvihill of K-9 and S 2/c Jack Mulvihill, USCG, are visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Mulvihill of Highbridge rd., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 1/1/1944.

Murgittroyd, Clarence. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Clarence Murgittroyd..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943.

Murphy, Benjamin. Fayetteville. "Sgt. Benjamin Murphy of Green Lake Camp, was taken to the Army Air Base Hospital for treatment late Monday afternoon after being injured when he walked into the path of a car driven by Chester Carpenter of Chittenango, and was knocked to the pavement. The accent occurred in the upper end of the village. At the time of the accident visibility was poor, due to the snow storm which was raging at the time. Reports from the hospital state that Murphy's injuries were slight," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943.

Murphy, Raymond. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Murphy, Warren B. Manlius. "Warren B. Murphy, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B.

Murphy, who has been training as an Army Air Corps cadet at Nashville, Tenn., is reported as recovering from a serious illness in the Lawson General Hospital, Atlanta, Ga.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943.

Murray, Edward A. Fayetteville. "Promotion of...two more of the Fayetteville military police detachment were announced yesterday. The MP officers, formerly stationed in the Syracuse old postoffice, at Lt. Edward A. Murray, advanced to captain, and Lt. Stephen Nemeth, Jr., promoted to first lieutenant," The Post-Standard, 3/13/1943.

Murray, Robert E. Minoa. Marine Corps, scrapbook, n.d.

Myers, Floyd W. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Myers, Floyd W., 110 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Myers, George. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Myers, George, 110 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Myers, Jesse. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Jesse Myers of Camp Piquet, Va. recently visited his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "A home wedding took place Sunday afternoon, Aug. 29, when Lenora Edith Benedict, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Benedict (Fayetteville), was united in married to Pvt. Jesse B. Myers, son of Mrs. Miriam Myers of Minoa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Myers, Jesse, 110 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Myers, Leo E., Jr.. Kirkville. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Honorably discharged by the army, Leo E. Myers, Jr., Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 12/6/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Nardella, Louis. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Louis Nardella, 25, has completed training in the medical administrative corps officer candidate school at Camp Berkeley, Tex. and received a commission as second lieutenant," The Post-Standard, 6/14/1943. "Corp. Nicholas Nardella and Lt. Louis Nardella, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Nardella, 207 E. Seneca st., Manlius, met recently on a visit home, after two years separation. A former employee of Swift & Co., Lt. Nardella served overseas for 13 months in Ireland and England and returned for officer candidate school. He is now stationed at Camp Edwards, Mass. Corp. Nardella is stationed with an anti-aircraft unit at Camp Stewart, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1943. "Miss Josephine Eleanor Frate, daughter of Mrs. Antonio Frate, of Hecker Ave., Noroton Heights, Conn., became the bride of Lieut. Louis Nardella, son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Nardella, of East Seneca street, Manlius, in a ceremony Aug. 5 in St. John's Catholic church, Noroton, Conn...Pfc. Nicholas Nardella was his brother's best man. Lieut. Nardella has been in the Army with the Medical Corps for three and one-half years. He served overseas for 11 months in Ireland and England and now is overseas. Mrs. Nardella is living with her mother. Pfc.. Nardella is stationed at Camp Stewart, Ga. Lieut. Nardella was employed by Swift & Co. as an accountant before entering the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "Lieut. and Mrs. Louis Nardella are the proud parents of a daughter, Florence Victoria, born on April 29 at Stamford, Conn. Mrs. Louis Nardella is residing with her mother in Darien, Conn., while Lieut. Nardella is overseas. Lieut. Nardella has been overseas for the second time since October and has been with the Ninth Army in France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Michael Nardella, Helen and Anthony and Mrs. Nicholas Dapolito have just returned from a trip to Darien where they visited at the home of Mrs. Louis Nardella and the new baby," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945.

Nardella, Nicholas. Manlius. "Nicky Nardella left last Thursday for Ft. Niagara. Word received this week stated that Mason Crowe had already left Ft. Niagara, but the other boys were remaining for an indefinite time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. "Corp. Nicholas Nardella and Lt. Louis Nardella, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Nardella, 207 E. Seneca st., Manlius, met recently on a visit home, after two years separation. A former employee of Swift & Co., Lt. Nardella served overseas for 13 months in Ireland and England and returned for officer candidate school. He is now stationed at Camp Edwards, Mass. Corp. Nardella is stationed with an anti-aircraft unit at Camp Stewart, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1943. "Miss Josephine Eleanor Frate...became the bride of Lieut. Louis Nardella...in a ceremony Aug. 5 in St. John's Catholic church, Noroton, Conn...Pfc. Nicholas Nardella was his brother's best man. Lieut. (Nicholas) Nardella has been in the Army with the Medical Corps for three and one-half years. He served overseas for 11 months in Ireland and England and now is overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944.

Naylor, James. E. Fayetteville. "Second Lt. and Mrs. James E. Naylor are enroute to Mobile, Ala., after a ten-day visit with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Naylor and Mr. and Mrs. Roger H. Cross. Lt. Naylor was graduated from Yale University as aeronautical engineer on May 3 and is being stationed at Bates Field, Mobile, Ala., in the air transport command," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bunnell had as dinner guests last Wednesday night, Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Naylor of this village and Lt. and Mrs. James Naylor of Florida," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "lst Lt. James E. Naylor...has been assigned to duty with the army air forces following his graduation from Camp Curtiss air field at Buffalo," The Post-Standard, 12/5/1943. "A son was born April 1 to Lt. and Mrs. James Naylor (Barbara Cross) at the Biltmore Hospital, at Coral Gables, Florida. He has been named Peter Randolph. Mrs. Cross is in Coral Gables and will stay with her daughter until she leaves about May 1 to join Lt. Naylor in California where Lt. Naylor is stationed at the Palm Springs Army Air Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "Mrs.. Roger Cross is spending some time with her daughter, Mrs. James Naylor (Barbara Cross) and infant son Peter in Coral Gables, Fla. She will return the last of May when Mrs. Naylor and little son plan to join Lt. Naylor who is stationed at Palm Springs, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/11/1945. "Mrs. James Naylor and little son, Peter, of California, are staying with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Cross, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Naylor, while her husband is overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/28/1945.

Naylor, Robert J. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Robert J. Naylor spent a few days in Fayetteville recently when being transferred from Fort Bragg to Camp Chenango, Greenville, Pa.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Pfc. Robert Naylor arrived in this country on the Queen Elizabeth on Tuesday, according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Naylor of Redfield Ave. He will be discharged from the Army and expects to reach home sometime next week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945. Honorably discharged, Pfc.. Robert J. Naylor, 122 Redfield, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 10/18/1945.

Near, Joseph. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Near, Joseph, 145 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y.

Nemeth, Stephen, Jr. Fayetteville. "Promotion of...two more of the Fayetteville military police detachment were announced yesterday. The MP officers, formerly stationed in the Syracuse old postoffice, at Lt. Edward A. Murray, advanced to captain, and Lt. Stephen Nemeth, Jr., promoted to first lieutenant," The Post-Standard, 3/13/1943.

Nester,Walter. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Neveldine, Burns J. Manlius. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...Burns J. Neveldine...from Manlius...Philo, McGann, Harter and Decker will see service in the U. S. Navy and the other draftees in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "...Burns J. Neveldine, son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Neveldine, 179 West Seneca street, Manlius...was...graduated from the Army Air Forces Pilot School (advanced two engine) at Stockton Field, Calif., made...a...full fledged Army Air Force pilot and presented silver wings...He...will go on active duty with the Army Air Forces," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Burns J. Neveldine...has completed basic pilot training in the Army Air Forces at Chicago, Calif.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "Burns J. Neveldine...graduated from the Army Air Force Pilot School (advanced two-engine) at Stockton Field, Calif., made full fledged air pilot and received his silver wings at a recent ceremony," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/7/1944. "Entering aerial combat for the first time, Second Lt. Burns J. Neveldine, 19,...co-pilot on a B-17 Flying Fortress, participated in an Eighth air force attack on submarine pens at Bremen, Germany. Lt. Neveldine, a member of the 447th bomb group, received advanced tactical training in England on high altitude formation flying, first aid to wounded crewmen, gunnery, communications and crash landing and ditching procedures. A 1942 graduate of Manlius high school, he was employed by the Prestolite Co. before entering the AAF in April, 1943. He received pilot's wings and commission in June, 1944, at Stockton, Calif. His wife, Mrs. Ann M. Neveldine lives at 128 Washington st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 3/20/1945. "A Letter from a Soldier / Dear Mrs. Anderson: I'll bet you have forgotten that you have a mail man 'way over here in London. In case you have, here is a reminder! Something happened here today that I think will make good copy for the Eagle-Bulletin: I was out in front of the postoffice unloading mail bags from a truck when I noticed an air force officer pass by. The slight notice I gave that usual happening led me to believe that I knew that person. The brain worked, and I called to him. He looked around and a big smile lit up the face of Lt. Burns Neveldine. He came back, and the usual greetings took place. He confessed to knowing that I was in London, but its such a big city that its hard to find one particular person. We stood there on Oxford street with streams of people passing by, and talked of nothing but home and all the fellows we knew, 'way back when! As you know, I was over here before Burns ever got into the Army. He slugged out 23 missions with bombs while I have thrown all kinds of mail at those cases and bags, both very necessary to the war effort, I agree, but direct contrasts, too. It was a very pleasant few minutes we spent there and he is stopping in again tomorrow. I hope to see him again before either one of us leave the U. K. Yes, it was hold home day right in the middle of London, England! Old neighbors met, and how pleasant it was. I hope to see you again soon, the sooner the better! Best wishes 'Sid' (Mawson)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. Syracuse sector to arrive in New York today on the Queen Elizabeth from Europe...First Lt. Burns J. Neveldine, 179 W. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 8/31/1945."Burns Neveldine has purchased the Bullard grocery and meat market in West Seneca St., (Manlius)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946.

Nichols, Edna. Fayetteville. "Miss Edna Nichols left yesterday for Hunter College to begin training in the Waves, in which she enlisted several weeks ago...feted at a farewell party...presented with a lovely flannel house coat...and several other gifts from individuals. A daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Albert Nichols, former residents, Miss Nichols has made her home with her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Loren Darling for the past 15 years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Mrs. Herbert Brown and Mrs. Merino Phillips will leave tonight for New York City where they will spend the week end with A/S Edna Nichols who is on shore liberty. Miss Nichols is training at Hunters college in the Bronx," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/20/1944. "Miss Edna Nichols, Yeoman 3/c, of Washington, D. C., spent a few days this week with her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Loren Darling, coming to attend the funeral of Anna Jane Volles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945.

Nichols, Paul. Fayetteville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were...Paul Nichols...of Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Paul Nichols, son of Mrs. Harry Nichols of Green street, who has been called in selective service, has written over 60 musical compositions (music and words) during the past few years. He is an accomplished pianist, has a good singing voice and plays the violin, trombone and saxophone, which should enable him to afford his share of entertainment in his camp. Being modest about his talent, Paul has laid his compositions on the shelf and never done anything about them. Of late, however, some of his work has been brought to the attention of Melville Clark of Syracuse, who has taken a great interest in them. Mr. Clark has selected several numbers which he believes will be well received and urged Paul to have them published and copyrighted. And , who knows, maybe our next popular war song may come out as written and composed by Paul Nichols of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Pfc. Paul Nichols is in the Old Containment Hospital at Fort Knox, Ky., where he is recuperating from a nasal operation performed recently," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Pfc. Paul Nichols, who has recently graduated from radio school at Fort Knox, Ky., has been spending a weeks furlough with his mother...He left yesterday for his new post in Arkansas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Cpl. Paul Nichols stationed at Camp Campbell, Ky., has been passing a ten-day furlough with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "A song, composed by Corp. Paul Nichols of Camp Campbell, son of Mrs. Mary Nichols of Green street, and recently published, was introduced over the radio last Thursday by Jim Parsons, of WSYR. Both the words and music were written by Paul since he has been in the army, although he had written several numbers prior to that time, which he just didn't do anything about. The song, 'My Tom' is a ballad of a youth in service, and will be sung by Paul's sister, Mrs. Alfred Fischer, in the Civil Club Minstrel Show at Fayetteville high school ...In addition to Paul's ability to compose he has a nice voice, and is an accomplished pianist," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Army fliers who were formerly in the uniform of the band include Paul Nichols..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Cpl. Paul Nichols, who has been stationed at Camp Campbell, is passing two weeks with his mother.... Mrs. Howard Ray and daughter Nancy Ann, of East Syracuse, are also guests of her mother, Mrs. Nichols," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Corp. Paul Nichols, with Troop D Reconnaissance, has arrived overseas, according to word received by his mother ..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944. "By direction of the late President, the silver star has been awarded to Corporal Paul E. Nichols, son of Mrs. Mary Nichols of Green street, for gallantry in action in the vicinity of Salmbach, France, from the 13th to the 15th of December, 1944. During the entire period Corporal Nichols acted as point for the reconnaissance element of a combat command. He reconnoitered under intense enemy fire and though only driving a peep (sic), maintained contract with two German Tiger tanks. Later he was instrumental in the capture of twenty prisoners, two wagon loads of munitions, one light howitzer and five horses. Even though wounded, he continued to lead his section until the objective had been attained. Corporal Nichols' heroic leadership reflects great credit on himself and the armed forces, so stated a communication to his mother from headquarters in France. Corporal Nichols is still hospitalized in France suffering the effect of trench foot which result from his feet being frozen at the time he was injured. He has also been awarded the Purple Heart which his mother received a short time ago. Paul has always been an ardent musician and has written the words and music for several songs, some of which have been published," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945. "Mrs. Harry Nichols has received word from her son Sgt. Paul Nichols who is stationed in Soyen, Germany, that he has been given a 25-day leave to spend in England, Ireland and Scotland," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945. "Sgt. Paul Nichols has been honorably discharged from the Army and arrived at his home in Green street last Saturday. Paul was overseas nearly two years, and in the service over three," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. The Fayetteville Legion softball team (composed entirely of war veterans) continued to set a hot pace in the county league by defeating the Polish Veterans Monday night at Star Park, 5 to 2...In the fifth, with Paul Nichols and Jack Sampson on second and third, Jim Kieley stepped into a 3-2 pitch for a sharp single, netting two runs. In an attempt to break the deadlock, speedy Skip Honors tried to score...Many West End softball fans are planning to see Fayetteville play the U. S. Hoffman champs on Fayetteville grounds," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/26/1946.

Nichols, Roy. Manlius "Sgt. Eva Albanese, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Albanese of 126 W. Seneca st., is the ninth member of her family to serve in the armed forces...Those in her family serving at various stations include...Corp. Roy Nichols, somewhere in England." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944.

Niles, Willard John. Fayetteville. "Seventeen men from this area have been sworn into the naval reserve thru the Cahill building recruiting office...they are...John Niles, jr., 218 Highbridge st., Fayetteville, enlisted as a seaman 1/c..." The Post-Standard, 4/25/1944.

Noble, Donald. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Donald I. Noble, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harlow P. Noble of Manlius RD 1, is a member of the first basic pre-meteorology class to study at Haverford college, Haverford, Pa., under the army air forces training command program to train weather officers for army air forces combat units. Noble is a graduate of Manlius high school, " The Post Standard, 8/13/1943. "Lt. Donald Noble, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harlow Noble of Broadfield road and Miss Johnny Casey, of Los Angeles, Calif., formerly of Childress, Texas, were married on March 24, 1945 in Christ Church, Los Angeles...The groom has received his bombardier wings and has been assigned to Navigation School at Hondo, Tex. to acquire a dual rating as bombardier and navigator," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945. "Hondo Army Air Field, Hondo, Texas.--Hondo Army Air Field on Saturday, July 7, turned out another class of double and triple-threat navigators, most of them soon to be skyteam members shooting and bombing the heart out of Japan. Included in the class was 2nd Lt. Donald I. Noble, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Noble, of Route 1, Manlius, N. Y., and husband of Mrs. Johnny Casey Noble, Los Angeles, Calif. Already rated bombardiers or bombardier-gunners, they received 13 weeks of aerial navigation training at Hondo Field, AAF Training Command installation, to earn the double or triple rating of bombardier-navigator or bombardier-navigator-gunner. All of this class of navigation trainees previously received commissions of second lieutenant or appointments as flight officer upon completion of bombardiering school. The streamlined ceremony at the busy airfield took but 20 minutes. The guest speaker, Major Ralph J. Jones, of Boston, navigator-returnee now assigned here as Officers' Club officer, emphasized the importance of aerial teamwork to accomplish successful bombing missions," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945.

Noble, Gordon P. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "PFC Gordon P. Noble, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harlow P. Noble of Manlius, RD 1, was graduated last week from the army air forces instructors school at Laredo Field, Tex., qualifying as instructor in aerial gunner," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1944.

Noble, Leslie E. Manlius. Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Leslie Noble, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Noble of Pleasant street, who is now stationed in Trinidad writes his parents that he is feeling fine and has been promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He says it gives the boys great joy to receive news from their home town. So keep on writing to the Soldiers, Sailors, Cadets and Marines, it means so much to them at this time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Sgt. Leslie Noble of Trinidad arrived Friday to pass a 20-day leave at his home in Pleasant street. Sgt. Noble enlisted in the Army December, 1940, and this is his first visit here since that time. He expects to return to a base in Alabama for an indefinite time before leaving for foreign service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Noble of Pleasant street have received a telegram from the War Department informing them that their son Sgt. Leslie E. Noble was seriously wounded in action in Italy on Feb. 20. Sgt. Noble has been overseas about 29 months. His brother, Pvt. Roland E. Noble, is somewhere in France with the U. S. Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945.

Noble, Roland E. Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Noble...have received a telegram from the War Department informing them that their son Sgt. Leslie E. Noble was seriously wounded in action in Italy on Feb. 20...His brother, Pvt. Roland E. Noble, is somewhere in France with the U. S. Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945. "PFC Roland E. Noble, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Noble of 116 1/2 Pleasant st., Manlius, is serving in France, it was announced by headquarters of the Ninth air defense command. He is a member of an anti-aircraft unit, serving as a loader and firer in a 40 millimeter gun crew. PFC Noble is a brother of Sgt. Leslie Noble, who was seriously wounded in action in Italy. A graduate of Sherburne school, PFC Noble was employed by the Halcomb division of the Crucible Steel Co. of America before entering the army Jan. 6, 1944. His wife, the former Elizabeth Nolan, lives at 409 Wilkinson st.," The Post-Standard, 5/11/1945.

Norris, Elwood. Formerly Manlius. "Pvt. Elwood Norris of Batavia, is now stationed at Camp Wheeler, Georgia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Pvt. Elwood Norris, of Batavia, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris, of Manlius, is now stationed somewhere in France," The Eagle-Bulletin, 101/3/1944. "Pfc. Elwood Norris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris of West Seneca street, has been awarded the bronze star for meritorious service in connection with military action with the armed infantry in Belgium," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "Pfc. E. C. Norris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris, has been awarded the Purple Heart. He was seriously wounded while in action with the 7th Armored Division in Germany. He is now in a hospital in France," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945. "Corp. Elwood Norris, who has been stationed in Germany with the U. S. Army has received an honorable discharge and returned to his home in Warsaw. Mr. and Mrs. Norris an daughter are visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris of West Seneca street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Norris, Robert. Manlius. "Robert Norris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris, who enlisted for service left Wednesday for training at the Sampson Naval Base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. "Robert Norris, apprentice seaman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris of Sampson Naval base is at home on a five-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Robert Norris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris, has been transferred from the navy to the Marines, in the medical division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943.

"Robert Norris, Ph. M. 3/c, has written his parents that he is well. Robert is stationed with the marines at Saipan in the Marianas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "Robert Norris has been a patient for ten weeks in a California hospital recovering from a nervous condition. He is expecting to visit his parents soon, and will then receive a reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Norris have received a letter recently from their son, Robert, of the Medical Corps, now recovering from a nervous condition in a California hospital. He is improving and expects to return home on furlough soon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945. "Robert Norris of the U. S. Navy medical division has received a medical discharge and returned to his home in West Seneca street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/16/1945.

Noyes, Donald R. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Nyehart, Kenneth. Minoa. "Corp. Kenneth Nyehart of Virginia spent a short furlough with his wife, Mrs. Arlene Bateson Nyehart," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Pvt. Kenneth Nyehart of Camp Riquet, Va., visited his wife last week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Corp. Kenneth Nyehart of Camp Piquet, Va., recently spent a few days visiting his wife," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Cpl. Kenneth Nyehart of Camp Pickett, Va., visited his wife over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/9/1942. "Mrs. Kenneth Nyehart recently visited her husband for a few days at Camp Piquet, Virginia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942.

O'Brien, Daniel. Fayetteville. "Father Daniel O'Brien, son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel O'Brien of Lyndon Rd., celebrated the 8:30 Mass at the Church of the Immaculate Conception last Sunday. Father O'Brien was paying a visit to his home while enroute to the West Coast, where he will assume duties as a Navy Chaplain," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943. (town of Dewitt).

O'Brien, William Griffith. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "William G. O'Brien of Lyndon road has enlisted in the coast artillery and left Monday for Fort Niagara to be assigned for training. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William S. O'Brien. He was a junior in Syracuse University Law School and finished his midyear grades before leaving. A graduate of Fayetteville High School, '34, O'Brien was active in sports as a lacrosse player. He was valedictorian of his class," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/30/1942. "Sgt. William G. O'Brien of Fort Hayes, Columbus, Ohio, is passing a five day furlough with his parents on Lyndon Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3, 1942. "S/Sgt. William G. O'Brien, son of Mr. and Mrs. William S. O'Brien of Lyndon road, who has been stationed at Fort Hayes, O., has entered officers' candidate school at Fort Washington, Md.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/25/1942. "Lt. William G. O'Brien, 36 ... is spending a 10-day furlo at the home of his parents. Recently commissioned a second lieutenant at Fort Washington, Md., he formerly was stationed at Fort Knox, Ky., after enlisting in February, 1942. Before entering the service he was graduated from Syracuse university and attended the university law school," The Post-Standard, 2/28/1943. "Lt. William Griffith O'Brien has been promoted from 2nd to first lieut.," The Post-Standard, 9/10/1943.

O'Donnell, Edward. Minoa. "Pvt. Edward O'Donnell of the U. S. Marines is spending a six-day furlough with his parents at Rotnour Bridge. Pvt. O'Donnell is stationed at Paris Island, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. May be same as below.

O'Donnell, Louis E. Minoa. (Town of Dewitt) Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Pvts. Louis E. O'Donnell of East Syracuse, R.D. 1, and Edward Lindenmayer of Fayetteville, who are serving with the Marines, have arrived safely overseas, 'somewhere in the Pacific,' according to word received by Mrs. H. J. O'Donnell of East Syracuse, R. D. 1. They enlisted last summer and obtained their basic training at Parris Island, S.C.," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. May be same as above.

Oeinck, Harold. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Harold Oeinck son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Oeinck and Ed Lindenmayer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Lindenmayer of this village and Charles Carveth of Kirkville are among the recruits who are undergoing preliminary training at the Marine Corps barracks at Paris Island, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Privates Edward Lindenmayer and Harold J. Oeinck, U.S.M.C., both of Fayetteville, are now in their second week of Marine Corps training at Parris Island, S. C. They enlisted in the Syracuse recruiting office. Reports say they are feeling fine and doing excellent work in preparation for their services with Uncle Sam," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "After serving 25 months with the Marine Corps in the Pacific area, Corp. Harold 'Gus' Oeinck is home on a 30-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Oeinck, at their home in North Manlius street. 'Gus' has a service career quite parallel to that of Pfc. Lindenmayer, who arrived last week for a month's leave. Gus also enlisted in the U. S. M. C. July 2, 1942 and trained at Parris Island. He was sent to the Pacific area at the same time as 'Lindy' and they have been together pretty much of the time. He, too, looks great, and says he feels fine, and that it is a grand and glorious feeling to be back home again," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Funeral rites were held Thursday morning at the Church of the Immaculate Conception following services at the home for Leo J. Oeinck, 56, who died suddenly in Syracuse a little after midnight Sunday...Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Angeline Echter Oeinck; two daughters, the Misses Eleanor and Regina Oeinck of Fayetteville; five sons, Richard and Robert Oeinck of Fayetteville and Corporal Leo C. of the U.S.A.A.F. in the South Pacific, Corporal Harold J. of the U.S.M.C. Parris Island, and Corporal Raymond F. Oeinck with the U.S. forces in Germany; also by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oeinck, of Yorkville, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "Cpl. Harold Oeinck, of the U. S. M. C., stationed at Parris Island, is spending a 30-day furlough with his mother, having been called here by the death of his father," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/1/1945. "Corporal Harold Oeinck, USMC, stationed at Cornell university, has been spending a few days with his mother, Mrs. Leo J. Oeinck, in So. Manlius street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. "A solemn High Mass will be held Saturday morning in the Church of the Immaculate Conception for Leo C. Oeinck, officially declared dead by the war department...Corp. Oeinck was the son of Mrs. Angelina Oeinck of South Manlius street, and the late Leo J. Oeinck, whose sudden death occurred a year ago...Besides his wife and mother, he is survived by a three-year-old daughter, Carolyn; four brothers, Harold Oeinck, with the marines; Raymond, a former member of the AAF, and Robert and Richard, at home; two sister, Jean and Eleanor, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/24/1946.

Oeinck, Leo Chester. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Chester Oeinck has returned to Fort Myers, Florida, after spending two days with his wife, little daughter, and parents here. Pvt. Oeinck is training to be a radio gunner," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/14/1944. "Funeral rites were held Thursday morning at the Church of the Immaculate Conception following services at the home for Leo J. Oeinck, 56, who died suddenly in Syracuse a little after midnight Sunday...Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Angeline Echter Oeinck; two daughters, the Misses Eleanor and Regina Oeinck of Fayetteville; five sons, Richard and Robert Oeinck of Fayetteville and Corporal Leo C. of the U.S.A.A.F. in the South Pacific, Corporal Harold J. of the U.S.M.C. Parris Island, and Corporal Raymond F. Oeinck with the U.S. forces in Germany; also by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oeinck, of Yorkville, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "A solemn High Mass will be held Saturday morning in the Church of the Immaculate Conception for Leo C. Oeinck, officially declared dead by the war department. Corp. Oeinck, aged 27, was shot down over Kyushu, a year ago, while stationed at Guam, and has been listed as missing in action since that time. His wife, Mrs. Dorothy Martin Oeinck received the official notice from the war department last week. A graduate of Liverpool high school, Corp. Oeinck was the son of Mrs. Angelina Oeinck of South Manlius street, and the late Leo J. Oeinck, whose sudden death occurred a year ago, a few days before the family received notice that their son was missing in action. With members of the crew, Corp. Oeinck was forced to parachute when their plane was attacked by Jap planes. He was a gunner on a B-29. Besides his wife and mother, he is survived by a three-year-old daughter, Carolyn; four brothers, Harold Oeinck, with the marines; Raymond, a former member of the AAF, and Robert and Richard, at home; two sisters, Jean and Eleanor, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/24/1946. "A solemn High Mass will be held Saturday morning in the Church of the Immaculate Conception for Leo C. Oeinck, officially declared dead by the war department. Corp. Oeinck, aged 27, was shot down over Kyushu, a year ago, while stationed at Guam, and has been listed as missing in action since that time. His wife, Mrs. Dorothy Martin Oeinck received the official notice from the war department last week. A graduate of Liverpool high school, Corp. Oeinck was the son of Mrs. Angelina Oeinck of South Manlius street, and the late Leo J. Oeinck, whose sudden death occurred a year ago, a few days before the family received notice that their son was missing in action. With members of the crew, Corp. Oeinck was forced to parachute when their plane was attacked by Jap planes. He was a gunner on a B-29. Besides his wife and mother, he is survived by a three-year-old daughter, Carolyn; four brothers, Harold Oeinck, with the marines; Raymond, a former member of the AAF, and Robert and Richard, at home; two sister, Jean and Eleanor, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/24/1946.

Oeinck, Raymond F. Manlius. "Funeral rites were held Thursday morning at the Church of the Immaculate Conception following services at the home for Leo J. Oeinck, 56, who died suddenly in Syracuse a little after midnight Sunday...Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Angeline Echter Oeinck; two daughters, the Misses Eleanor and Regina Oeinck of Fayetteville; five sons, Richard and Robert Oeinck of Fayetteville and Corporal Leon C. of the U.S.A.A.F. in the South Pacific, Corporal Harold J. of the U.S.M.C. Parris Island, and Corporal Raymond F. Oeinck with the U.S. forces in Germany; also by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oeinck, of Yorkville, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "A solemn High Mass will be held Saturday morning in the Church of the Immaculate Conception for Leo C. Oeinck, officially declared dead by the war department...Corp. Oeinck was the son of Mrs. Angelina Oeinck of South Manlius street, and the late Leo J. Oeinck, whose sudden death occurred a year ago...Besides his wife and mother, he is survived by a three-year-old daughter, Carolyn; four brothers, Harold Oeinck, with the marines; Raymond, a former member of the AAF, and Robert and Richard, at home; two sister, Jean and Eleanor, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/24/1946.

O'Neill, Roland S. Manlius. Reported to the armored force school tank department at Ft. Knox, Ky., Corp. Roland S. O'Neill, 112 Smith st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 3/9/1943.

Oot, Clarence John. Minoa. "Twelve men from this area have completed basic training at Sampson and are on leave. All seamen second class, they are...Clarence John Oot of N. Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 12/1/1943. "...completed basic training at Sampson and are on leave...Clarence John Oot..." The Post-Standard, 12/1/1943.

Oot, Donald R. Kirkville. "Board 473, East Syracuse, sent 19 into the army...Donald R. Oot, Kirkville, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Oot, Earl L. Kirkville. "...Earl L. Oot, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard C. Oot, Kirkville, were commissioned second lieutenants June 20 upon completion of the officers candidate course at the infantry school at Fort Benning, Ga....Lt. Oot, a graduate of Minoa high school and Syracuse university College of Law, enlisted in the army in September, 1942, and held the rank of corporal before being commissioned. He is a member of Phi Delta Phi, national law fraternity," The Post-Standard, 6/26/1944. "Lt. Earl L. Oot, son of Mr. and Mrs L. C. Ott of East Ave., Minoa, is stationed at Camp Butner, N.C. He enlisted May 22 and received basic training at Camp Wheeler, Ga. He was graduated from officers'' training school June 20. Lt Oot attended College of Law, Syracuse University. A brother, Pvt. Leo Oot, is at Fort Benning training as a paratrooper," The Post-Standard, 8/18/1944. "Leonard Oot, of Maintenance, Aircraft Gas Turbine Division, has always been proud of his three sons now serving in the armed forces. The other day he was prouder when he read the citation which had been presented his son, Lt. Earl Oot, for heroic achievement in the European Theater. Lt. Earl Oot is now in Belgium; Pfc. Leo, a paratrooper, in Belgium; and Pvt. Leo (sic) is taking basic training in Camp Rucker, Alabama. Mr. Oot states that it is for just such reasons as those implied in Lt. Earl's citation...that men like himself work so diligently in factories all over the country: 'By direction of the President, under the provisions of Art. 600-45, 22 September, 1943, as amended, a Bronze Star Medal is awarded to: 'First Lieutenant Earl L. Oot, 0552931, Infantry, Army of the United States, for heroic achievement in connection with military operations against an armed enemy as a Platoon Leader of Company F, 353rd Infantry, on two occasions, 20 March, and 4 April, 1945, in Germany. On the first occasion, under heavy enemy rifle, machine gun and 20 mm fire, he fearlessly led his platoon in the destruction of formidable enemy defenses at Limbacher Hohe, capturing 40 prisoners, 11 88 mm guns and a number of machine guns and rifles. On the second occasion, south of Berka, his platoon was suddenly subjected to severe automatic, machine gun and rifle fire coming from a wooded hill. With decisive judgment, First Lieutenant Oot immediately rallied his men and aggressively led them in the attack across open terrain to destroy the position without suffering casualties, killing 24 enemy and capturing three. His remarkable leadership, courage, tactical skill and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon him and were in keeping with the best traditions of the armed forces of the United States. Entered the military service from New York.' In a letter dated July 11, Lt. Oot told his parents of his experiences. Leonard Oot, just proud of his son's achievements, served in the U.S. Army in 1904-1908 during the Philippine Insurrection in Co. B, 13th Regiment," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. "An airplane flew under the Arc de Triomphe where the tomb of the unknown soldier lies, on VE-day in Paris, according to First Lt. Earl L. Oot, who witnessed the celebration in the French capital. Lt. Oot,...wrote home about the demonstration where 'everyone went wild.' A brother, Leo, is a paratrooper, serving in Europe. Another brother, Donald R. Oot, is in basic training at Camp Rucker, Ala. 'We stared in amazement,' wrote the infantry officer on a three-day pass from Germany. 'Millions crowded the Champs-Elysees, the famous street of Paris. Airplanes flew low down the street and one even went thru the arch. Jeeps and trucks loaded to capacity moved thru the streets. The famous French cavalry moved thru in bright red uniforms. Here and there bands played and the tempo grew. 'All night and all day the crowds moved. Beverages flowed freely at 20 cents for watered beer and champagne at $16 a bottle. The girls kissed the soldiers and occasionally we kissed them--maybe you'll see me in a newsreel. Anyway, we were just off the front lines, and it was too much for us. Everyone we knew was back, we still had our muddy boots on. 'Then we began our night life. The night clubs are wilder than anything in the States. Terrific is no name for it. Two orchestras played a solid hour while pretty girls entertained, then 30 minutes of dancing and an entire new show began. The lights went on in Paris, the fountains began to flow. Great joy was everywhere present and everyone was doing his part. My only sorrow was for those who'd done the real job and couldn't be there. Also for those who will never see the lights again. But the road back to Paris from Germany, where he is stationed, was not so gay. At Aachen Lt. Oot said that hardly a building stands. On passing thru the Siegfried line he reminisces: 'What a line--how did we ever do it? I can tell you, inch by inch and on the bell. It was the infantry that crawled up on them at night and knocked them out. No amount of artillery, except direct fire, can knock them out. Some are six feet of concrete and others much thicker.' On his return part of the journey was over Hitler's great road in trucks doing more than 50 miles an hour. He is now stationed in a German schoolhouse near Gera," The Post-Standard, 6/3/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Oot, Jack. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Oot, Leo E. Kirkville. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors, five of them are Kirkville men. They are Leo Oot...all selected for the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. A brother, Pvt. Leo E. Oot, is at Fort Benning training as a paratrooper," The Post-Standard, 8/18/1944. "Leonard Oot, of Maintenance, Aircraft Gas Turbine Division, has always been proud of his three sons now serving in the armed forces. The other day he was prouder when he read the citation which had been presented his son, Lt. Earl Oot, for heroic achievement in the European Theater. Lt. Earl Oot is now in Belgium; Pfc. Leo, a paratrooper, in Belgium; and Pvt. Leo (sic) is taking basic training in Camp Rucker, Alabama..." Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Kirkville P.O., according to the World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Osborn, Ambrose. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Ostrander, George. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "George Ostrander of the U. S. A. Air Corps, is passing a short furlough with Mrs. Ostrander, the former Myrtle Sebring," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942.

Owen (Owens), Raymond. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Sgt. Raymond Owens of Wiley Post, Camp Funston, Kansas, is passing a short furlough with his mother...Sgt. Owens is a tank instructor in Company D, 14th A. R.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Master Sgt. Raymond Owens of Camp Funston, Kansas, is passing a 15-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Owens in North Manlius street. M/Sgt. Owens is an instructor in the armored tank division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/19/1943. "Raymond Owens of Camp Poland, La., spent a few days last week with his parents...Sgt. Owens is with the Armored Division Tank Bombers," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Sgt. Raymond Owen returned Wednesday to Camp Polk, La., after spending several days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Owens," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Edward Owens received a telegram from the War Department last Sunday, stating that their son, Sgt. Raymond Owens, is reported missing since December 24. He was serving as Tank Commander in Belgium. Sgt. Owens attended Fayetteville high school and worked at the Precision Castings Co. plant prior to going into service in May, 1941. He trained in the Tank Division and for more than two years was an instructor at various bases in this country before going overseas last August," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Mrs. Edward Owen has received a letter from her son, Sgt. Raymond Owen, stating that he is a patient in an England hospital where he is being treated for a wound in his left foot. On January 14 the Owens family received word from the war department that their son was missing in action as of December 24. Nothing to the contrary was heard until they received the letter from Raymond on Wednesday of this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/26/1945.

Owens, Ruth. Fayetteville. "Miss Ruth Owens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Owens of W. Genesee street, has joined the Spars and has gone to Manhattan Beach, N. Y., for boot training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Miss Ruth Owens, S 2/c, spent the week end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Owens in West Genesee street. She has completed her boot-training at Manhattan Beach and has been assigned to nine weeks in Yeoman School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945. "Miss Ruth Owens, S 2/c, stationed in Brooklyn, spent the week end with her parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Ruth Owens, S 1/c (Y), spent last week with her parents Mr. and Mrs. Robert Owens. She has completed her Yeoman training at Manhattan Beach and has been assigned to Washington, D. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/20/1945. "Ruth Owens, S 1/c (y) and Ann Valentine S 1/c (y) of Independence, Mo., spent the Armistice Day week end at the home of Miss Owens' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Owens of 214 Salt Spring St. The young ladies are stationed at Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. "Ruth E. Owens, Y 2/c, stationed at the S.P.A.R. headquarters at Washington, D.C., received a promotion to her present rank on Feb. 1..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/8/1946. "Miss Ruth Owens has returned to her home...having been honorably discharged from the Coast Guard Women's Reserve," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/14/1946.

Paetow, George Edward, Jr.. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). "A card received at the Eagle-Bulletin office on Wednesday from Pfc. William Goodfellow, Scott Field, Ill., where he is being schooled in radio work, states that he made a trip to Jefferson Barracks last week and saw Bruce Edlund and Edward Paetow who entered the service about a month ago. According to Bill's card, Bruce and Eddie are going to aviation cadet school when they complete their basic training at Jefferson Barracks," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/23/1943. "San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center, Texas--At the cadet center's preflight school for pilots here, 161 cadets from New York, including one from Fayetteville, are learning the fundamentals necessary for actual aerial instruction. Cadets in the present class include George E. Paetow, age 18, of Dewitt Park," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army...Edward Paetow..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "George E. Paetow, Jr.... received his wings this week after graduation ceremonies at Moore Field, Tex., advanced pilot school, and has been appointed a flight officer in the army air forces," The Post-Standard, 12/28/1944. "Flight Officer G. Edward Paetow of Moore Field, Texas, has been spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Paetow at their home in Dewitt Park, before reporting for duty at Lincoln, Neb. He had as his guest, Lieut. Martin Masman of California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. (Town of Dewitt).

Page, Addie. Fayetteville. "Miss Addie Page of Knollwood Road enlisted in the Women's Army Corps several weeks ago and left Wednesday, Feb. 7 for training at the Fort Des Moines, Iowa, center. She is a graduate of Fayetteville high school, class of '42, and was a sophomore in the College of Home Economics at Syracuse university. After a period of basic training, Miss Page will enter a Medical Technician School in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/16/1945.

Palmer, James H.. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Among the hundreds who are flocking to the recruiting station in Syracuse to join the nation's fighting forces since the attack on the United States by Japan and declaration of war by the Axis powers are many from the towns of Manlius and Dewitt. Enlisting from Fayetteville are...James H. Palmer, Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. "Sgt. James H. Palmer, whose parents reside in this village (Fayetteville), is one of the six Central New York men who have received awards of the Air medal or the Oak Leaf cluster to the Air Medal for meritorious achievements over Sicily, according to announcements by the War Department," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943.

Parker, Laurence. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Among the hundreds who are flocking to the recruiting station in Syracuse to join the nation's fighting forces since the attack on the United States by Japan and declaration of war by the Axis powers are many from the towns of Manlius and Dewitt. Enlisting from Fayetteville are...Lawrence R. Parker, Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/19/1941. "Pfc. Lawrence R. Parker, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Parker of High Bridge st., Fayetteville, who was graduated from the army air corp technical school at Lowrey Field, Denver, Col., as an aerial photographer, is now stationed at the air base at Colorado Springs, Col. He enlisted last December and received his initial training at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. He was formerly employed by the Precision Castings Co., Fayetteville, and later by the Davey Tree company, Kent, O. Parker is a grandson of 92-year-old E. L. Parker, proprietor of the Parker Peony farm of Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 9/28/1942. "Pfc Lawrence Parker, stationed at Colorado Springs, is passing a 14-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Parker on Highbridge street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Miss Iiona Guiles, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Guiles of Clay, N. Y., and Lawrence Parker of the U. S. Army stationed at Colorado Springs, Colo., son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Parker of this village (Fayetteville), were united in marriage Oct. 1, at Liverpool...Mr. Parker, who was home on a furlough, has returned to his post in Colorado, and Mrs. Parker will continue her work at the Onondaga Hotel, Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Staff Sergeant Lawrence Parker, stationed at Colorado Springs, is passing a 15-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Parker, of Highbridge street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943.

Parsaci, Frank. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Army...Frank Parsaci, Ely dr., Fayetteville" The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943.

Parslow, Robert J. Manlius. "Soldier arrivals at East coast ports from various war theaters include the following...on the Sea Cat due in New York city yesterday:...M/Sgt. Robert J. Parslow, Manlius," The Post-Standard, 11/5/1945.

Parsons, Cortland F. Minoa. "Cortland F. Parsons, seaman 2/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Parsons of Minoa, is stationed at Pensacola, Fla., where he has been assigned to attend aerial gunnery instructor's school. William E. Harter, 18, another son of Mr. and Mrs. Parsons, has enlisted in the coast guard and is at Manhattan Beach for boot training," The Post-Standard, 3/25/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Parsons, Cortland F., 305 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Pastner, Rexford P. Fayetteville. "Sixth Army Group, France--Baptism of fire is an experience few soldiers ever forget--and the men of the 398th Infantry Regiment of the 100th (Century) Division have special reason never to forget theirs. For they went into action for the first time in one of the toughest sectors of the long Sixth Army Group front in Eastern France. The enemy held prepared positions in dense forests. Their dugouts were deep, covered with logs, and well camouflaged. Their artillery was placed on the mountainous heights that rose above the forest level. Tank traps, booby-traps and land mines--many of the latter ingeniously fitted with tripwires -- blocked the narrow routes and paths through the forest. Still, against military obstacles like these, against a fanatic enemy, and in weather conditions that included rain and snow and ankle-deep mud, the 398th proceeded without delay to help take Baccarat, to cross the swift, flooded Muerthe River, and to press the Nazis further back toward the Rhine. The 398th Infantry, with other units of the Century Division, was activated at Fort Jackson, S. C., in November, 1942, participated in maneuvers in Tennessee, and later moved to Fort Bragg, N. C., for training in coordination of infantry with tanks, artillery and air force. It proved that it had learned its lessons well, for the drive on Raon L'Etape, a strategic town on the 7th Army front, the regiment skillfully out-maneuvered the Nazis' prepared defenses and took the high ground which surrounds the town and commands a stretch of open terrain to the east--in the direction of the Rhine. Private James E. Petch of 400 Spring street, Fayetteville and M/Sgt. Rexford P. Pastner, R.D. 2, Fayetteville are attached to this gallant outfit," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945.

Pearson, Donald. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Pearson, George. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942.

Pease, Loyal. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Among several of the young men who have returned for Christmas furlough are Privates Robert B. Rhoades and Loyal Pease both of this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/2/1941. Name appears on the Manlius Baptist Church service flag, The Eagle Bulletin, 2/27/1942. "lst Lt. Lloyd Pease of Aberdeen, N. M. visited his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Pease on Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Pease of Brickyard Falls road received a letter on Wednesday from their son, Loyal, in which he informed them that he had been promoted to the rank of Captain. Capt. Pease is located somewhere in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Pease have received letters from their sons, Capt. Loyal Pease and Corp. Oscar Pease, telling of a reunion in Mainz, Germany. The two brothers visited for one hour and the occasion was the first time they had been together since entering service. Both expressed being overjoyed with the opportunity, and needless to say, the time passed all too quickly. Both brothers are enjoying good health, according to the letters," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Capt. Loyal Pease is a patient in a hospital Austria, recovering from Shrapnel wounds. He brother, Staff Sgt. Oscar Pease, is stationed about 200 miles from him, and was expecting to visit him some time this month, according to a letter received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Pease of Brick Yard Falls Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/21/1945.

Pease, Oscar H. Manlius. "Inductees at the state armory yesterday totaled 154...army...Oscar H. Pease, Manlius RD 2," The Post-Standard, 9/2/1943. "Pfc. Oscar Pease of Camp Hale, Col., arrived last Friday to spend a brief furlough at home. He expects to return to his base on Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Oscar Pease is home on a furlough and is visiting his parents on the Brickyard Falls Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Pease have received letters from their sons, Capt. Loyal Pease and Corp. Oscar Pease, telling of a reunion in Mainz, Germany. The two brothers visited for one hour and the occasion was the first time they had been together since entering service. Both expressed being overjoyed with the opportunity, and needless to say, the time passed all too quickly. Both brothers are enjoying good health, according to the letters," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "Capt. Loyal Pease is a patient in a hospital in Austria, recovering from Shrapnel wounds. He brother, Staff Sgt. Oscar Pease, is stationed about 200 miles from him, and was expecting to visit him some time this month, according to a letter received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Pease of Brick Yard Falls Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/21/1945. Army release, Oscar H. Pease, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 5/1/1946. "S/Sgt. Oscar Pease has received his honorable discharge and is spending the summer with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Pease, on the Brickyard Falls Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/17/1946.

Peck, Fred R., Jr. Formerly town of Manlius. "Lt. Fred R. Peck, Jr., of 168 Parkside ave. is home on a 10-day furlo from Cherry Point, N. C. He enlisted in May, 1941, and was sent first to Saxton, Miss. He was then transferred to Brady, Tex., Brooks Field, Tex., Manchester, N. H., Dover, Del., Langley Field, Va., and finally to Cherry Point. He received his commission in January this year. Lt. Peck attended Nottingham high school, the Manlius school and Colgate university for two years. Previous to his enlistment he was employed by the New York state bureau of agriculture and markets," The Post-Standard, 7/26/1942.

Peckham, Irwin. Fayetteville. "T/Sgt. Irwin Peckham is spending a furlough with his wife and small daughter and his mother, at their new home in Clinton street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Corp. Irwin Peckham has returned to Fort Dix, N. J., after spending a few days with is wife and mother at their home in Clinton street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "S/Sgt. William Mace Peckham, son of Mrs. Nelly Hoyt Peckham...and the late William M. Peckham, was killed in action in Germany on Dec. 20... Surviving besides his wife, the former Elizabeth Young, of Atlanta, Ga., and his mother, is a small daughter, Lynn; three brothers, Sgt. Irwin Peckham, with the U. S. forces in the Pacific area; Lawrence Peckham, of Cobleskill, and Donald Peckham, of Albany, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. Sgt. Irwin Peckham, is with the U. S. forces in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945.

Peckham, William Mace. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "William Peckham has been visiting friends here and is at present staying with his aunt, Mrs. Wentworth, in Syracuse. Bill has enlisted in the U. S. Army and expects to be called to Georgia in January," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/14/1940. "Corp. William Peckham of Fort Benning, Georgia, has been spending a few days furlough with his aunt, Mrs. Mabel Dey," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1941. "Pvt. and Mrs. William Peckham of Temple, Texas, are the parents of a daughter, born July 28, according to announcements received by friends here. The baby has been named Lynne Edith," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Mrs. Nellie Peckham left last week for Texas where she will spend a few weeks with her son and daughter-in-law, S/Sgt. and Mrs. William Peckham. S/Sgt. Peckham is stationed at Camp Hood, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/28/1944. "S/Sgt. William Mace Peckham, son of Mrs. Nelly Hoyt Peckham, of Clinton street, and the late William M. Peckham, was killed in action in Germany on Dec. 20, according to word received by his wife in Atlanta, Gal. 'Billy', 31 years old, was a resident of this village for some 20 years and was graduated from Fayetteville high school with the class of '32. A lover of animals, especially dogs, he was employed at a famous kennel on Long Island prior to his enlistment in the service early in 1941. He was also a former member of the old Troop K Guard. Overseas since February, 1943, Sgt. Peckham went to France with the invasion troops. Recent letters to his wife and mother carried a note of confidence in spite of the rigors of Army life with a tank destroyer outfit in a continental winter. Surviving besides his wife, the former Elizabeth Young, of Atlanta, Ga., and his mother, is a small daughter, Lynn; three brothers, Sgt. Irwin Peckham, with the U. S. forces in the Pacific area; Lawrence Peckham, of Cobleskill, and Donald Peckham, of Albany, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "A memorial service for S/Sgt. William M. Peckham who was killed in action in Germany Dec. 20, 1944, will be held in Trinity Church Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock. Rev. Augustus M. Peckham, an uncle, pastor of the Methodist church at Chittenango, and Rev. Dr. John T. Cowan, pastor of the United Church here will officiate at the service. Sgt. Peckham was serving with a tank destroyer outfit and went to France with the invasion troops. He enlisted in the service early in 1941 and went overseas in February, 1943. He was 31 years of age. His wife, the former Elizabeth Young, of Atlanta, Ga., and his 2-year-old daughter Lynn, are guests of Sgt. Peckham's mother and will be present for the service Sunday. She will leave early next week for her home in Atlanta. Others coming for the memorial service are two brothers, Lawrence Peckham, of Cobleskill, and Donald Peckham, of Albany, and a sister-in-law, Mrs. Irwin Peckham, of Detroit, Mich. Another brother, Sgt. Irwin Peckham, is with the U. S. forces in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "...Sgt. Peckham went overseas last February and following training in England, went to France with invasion troops. Recent letters from Germany to his wife and mother carried a note of confidence, despite the rigors of army life with a tank destroyer outfit in a Continental winter. He was a nephew of Mrs. Donald Mitchell Dey and of Mrs. Gilbert R. Wentworth," The Herald-Journal, 1/5/1945.

Penoyer, Oscar Arthur. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Oscar Penoyer enlisted last week in the United States Marine Corps for the duration, and expects to leave on March 12 for the training station at Paris Island. A native of this village he attended the Fayetteville High School where he was a three-letter man, and also attended Cornell College of Agriculture. Penoyer served as president of the F. F. A. and is a member of Fayetteville Grange. For the past several months he has been affiliated with the Ralston Purina Co. at Watertown, N.Y., as assistant manager," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1942. "Arthur Oscar Penoyer one of the Fayetteville young men who enlisted in the Marines April 2, is rapidly becoming a first-class fighting man at Paris Island, S. C., traditional home training base for the United States Marine Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Word has been received by friends here that Oscar Penoyer, with the U. S. Marine Corps at Parris Island, S. C., was one of the men who qualified as expert with a 45 pistol and sharpshooter with the rifle. For attaining the latter feat, the government gives each man $36 extra money," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Corp. Oscar Penoyer, in charge of the U. S. Government Farm on the Marine base at Parris Island, has been spending a short furlough with his father, Arthur Penoyer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/30/1942. "Oscar Penoyer, of the U. S. Marines is on leave and is visiting his father, Arthur Penoyer, and his sister, Mrs. Frances Aprahaniam," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Georgia Savery, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred L. Savery of 357 Gulf street, to Pl/Sgt. Oscar Arthur Penoyer, U.S.M.C.R., son of Arthur C. Penoyer of Fayetteville, N. Y., was solemnized on Saturday, Jan. 13, at t candlelight service held at 4 o'clock in the Mary Taylor memorial Methodist church, Milford, Conn...Sergeant Penoyer was attended by his brother, Corporal Robert Penoyer, U. S. Army Air Force, as best man, and S/Sgt. Martin Boyle and Corporal Arthur Martin of the USMCR, ushered...Sergeant Penoyer attended the College of Agriculture, Cornell university, and is stationed at the Marine Corps air station, Eagle Mountain Lake, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945.

Penoyer, Robert. Fayetteville. "The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Georgia Savery, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred L. Savery of 357 Gulf street, to Pl/Sgt. Oscar Arthur Penoyer, U.S.M.C.R., son of Arthur C. Penoyer of Fayetteville, N. Y., was solemnized on Saturday, Jan. 13, at a candlelight service held at 4 o'clock in the Mary Taylor memorial Methodist church, Milford, Conn...Sergeant Penoyer was attended by his brother, Corporal Robert Penoyer, U. S. Army Air Force, as best man, and S/Sgt. Martin Boyle and Corporal Arthur Martin of the USMCR, ushered..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945.

Perry, Eugene. Minoa. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...Eugene Perry of Minoa..., scrapbook, n.d. "Corp. Eugene Perry of 416 Central ave., Minoa, is a member of the railroad battalion which assisted army engineers in repairing the damaged rail lines of Normandy. Sponsored by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, the battalion is now operating out of the Cherbourg rail yards which have been almost cleared of debris and repaired," The Post-Standard, 8/11/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Perry, Eugene, 416 Central Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Perry, Irving E. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Corp. Irving Perry of the U. S. Air Corps, is passing a ten-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irving D. Perry at their home in East Genesee street. Corp. Perry has been in South and Central America for the past three years, and is making this visit to his family before they move to their new home in Chappaqua, N. Y., about July 15," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943.

Perry, James M. Formerly Manlius. "Corp. James M. Perry, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Perry, of North Syracuse and formerly of Manlius, a waistgunner, is flying combat missions with the AAF in the Mediterranean theater," The Eagle-Bulletin, 101/3/1944.

Petch, James E. Fayetteville. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday. From Fayetteville are James Petch...who will serve in the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Pvt. James Petch, who has been stationed in Florida, is passing a couple of weeks with his wife and daughter at their home...He will leave next Wednesday for Fort Mead," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Seventh Army Front, France--Pvt. James Petch, whose wife, Mrs. Arlene C. Petch, lives at 400 Spring street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge while fighting with the 100th 'Century' Division on the Seventh Army front in Eastern France. The Fayetteville soldier's division is one of the newest on the front of Lt. General Alexander M. Patch's American Seventh Army. The 100th Division, commanded by Major General Withers A. Burress, left the United States with a high reputation earned in its training period in the Carolinas and Louisiana Maneuver Areas. It was the Century Division which was called upon to provide infantry battalion which paraded and demonstrated in New York City as part of the country's first Infantry Day celebration on June 15, 1944. Another honor paid the division in March of this year was the War Department's selection of the 100th Division to be the first organization to present the Expert Infantryman Badge to one of its members. Activated on Nov. 15, 1942, at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, the 100th Division's personnel makes it a fighting unit representative of every State in the Union," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Sixth Army Group, France--Baptism of fire is an experience few soldiers ever forget--and the men of the 398th Infantry Regiment of the 100th (Century) Division have special reason never to forget theirs. For they went into action for the first time in one of the toughest sectors of the long Sixth Army Group front in Eastern France. The enemy held prepared positions in dense forests. Their dugouts were deep, covered with logs, and well camouflaged. Their artillery was placed on the mountainous heights that rose above the forest level. Tank traps, booby-traps and land mines--many of the latter ingeniously fitted with tripwires -- blocked the narrow routes and paths through the forest. Still, against military obstacles like these, against a fanatic enemy, and in weather conditions that included rain and snow and ankle-deep mud, the 398th proceeded without delay to help take Baccarat, to cross the swift, flooded Muerthe River, and to press the Nazis further back toward the Rhine. The 398th Infantry, with other units of the Century Division, was activated at Fort Jackson, S. C., in November, 1942, participated in maneuvers in Tennessee, and later moved to Fort Bragg, N. C., for training in coordination of infantry with tanks, artillery and air force. It proved that it had learned its lessons well, for the drive on Raon L'Etape, a strategic town on the 7th Army front, the regiment skillfully out-maneuvered the Nazis' prepared defenses and took the high ground which surrounds the town and commands a stretch of open terrain to the east--in the direction of the Rhine. Private James E. Petch of 400 Spring street, Fayetteville and M/Sgt. Rexford P. Pastner, R.D. 2, Fayetteville are attached to this gallant outfit," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "With the 100th Division of Seventh Army in France--The 100th Division has awarded the Bronze Star to Pfc. James E. Petch, 398th Infantry of 400 Spring st., Fayetteville, N.Y., in recognition of individual action in the Division's fighting on the southern end of the western front. The award was among those made during the past month signalizing bravery and ability in combat. The ward singled out the part these men played in three months of the division's fight through the Vosges Mountains and the Alsatian-France sectors of the western front. During recent weeks, the 100th met the Germans' counterdrive on the Seventh Army front with such effect that it was commended by Lt. General Jacob L. Devers, Sixth Army Group commander," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Pfc. James Petch and Pfc. Robert Petch enjoyed a get-together on Sunday, Oct. 21, according to letters received by their parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. Earl Petch of North Park street. The brothers met in Seckenheim, Germany, where Robert is stationed with the postal department. James, who is stationed in Esslingen, Germany, was given a 48-hour pass and the use of a jeep to make the 110 mile trip for the reunion with his brother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Pfc. James Petch has arrived in the States, according to word received by his wife. He has serve 18 months in Europe with the infantry division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Petch, Robert. Fayetteville. "Robert Petch has enlisted in the army reserves and expects to be called for basic training in the near future," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "Robert Petch left for Camp Upton, L. I., Tuesday, where he has been called for service. Bob enlisted in the air corps reserve last June," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Pvt. Robert Petch is undergoing basic training at Ft. Belvoir, Va., according to word received by his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Pvt. Robert Petch has returned to Ft. Belvoir, Va., after passing a short furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. Earl Petch," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Pvt. Robert Petch of Fort Eustis, Va., spent a few hours Sunday with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Pvt. Robert Petch of Fort Belvoir, Va., is passing the week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "Pvt. Robert Petch, who has been ill with pneumonia at Camp Reynolds, Greenville, Pa., is reported much improved," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "Pvt. Robert Petch of Camp Reynolds, Pa., spent a few hours Sunday with is parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/18/1944. "Pvt. Robert Petch has arrived safely in England, according to word received by his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "Capt. Gardner H. Reynolds, 28, of Fayetteville has been awarded the distinguished flying cross for his services in combat over enemy-occupied Europe at an Eighth air force fighter station in England. He previously was awarded the air medal with three oak leaf clusters. Capt. Reynolds, a squadron flight leader in a Mustang group, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Reynolds, 831 Oakwood st. His wife, Mrs. Paula H. Reynolds lives in San Antonio, Tex.," The Post-Standard, 10/24/1944. "Pvt. Robert Petch...who has been serving in an English hospital after being hospitalized there, learned that Pvt. Robert Seymour was confined to another hospital in England not so many miles from where he was located. So he got busy via phone and made an appointment and visited Seymour for a few hours over the week end of Jan. 20. According to their letters home, they had a most enjoyable time swapping information they had received from their old home town..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Pvt. Robert Petch, who returned to duty only a short time ago after being hospitalized in England for several months, sustained a crushed right hand in his line of duty with the Engineering Corps. Reports are that he is recovering satisfactorily. Pvt. Petch was awarded the bronze star medal for D-Day invasion, and also the Presidential unit citation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Pfc. Robert Petch has been awarded the 'Bronze Arrowhead' according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. Earl Petch. This award is made for assault landing. Petch also has the Bronze Star medal, the Good Conduct Medal, the Presidential Unit Citation with an oak leaf cluster and three battle stars. He has been in service for about two years and overseas since March, 1944, and took part in the Normandy invasion. Pfc. Petch is now with an engineers maintenance company in Chelsenham, England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Letter from a Soldier -- Dear Editor: Would appreciate very much if the following article was published in the Eagle-Bulletin. Thank what I've typed will interest most people of our village. I receive the Eagle-Bulletin over here and enjoy reading the news; keeps one in contact with his home folks. News has reached this theater that many cities of the world are now making plans for elaborate and expensive war memorials and statues. Men and women in the armed forces of the world appreciate this gesture, I am certain, but they do not agree with it wholeheartedly. Most of them have been too much suffering, death and destruction to appreciate spending money on marble statues and memorial building. Those who have given their lives in this war gave them so that the others could enjoy a better way of life, and learn to exist in peace, together. The eyes of the world are now turned to America as a leader in the rehabilitation program that is to follow after hostilities have ceased. America cannot swing such a program alone obviously, but she can introduce a program of world child rehabilitation. It is suggested that on the great day of victory, when all peoples of the world are celebrating, each man and woman contribute what he may desire in money to be used for world-wide rehabilitation of children. This fund would be turned into supervised channels for the purpose of providing food, clothing and medical care for the millions of little children who have suffered so greatly in this world conflict. Children have provided plenty of morale building for servicemen and women throughout the world. Contact with children of war has touched them and kept them human. Many a soldier has shared, or given entirely of his last ration, that a starving child would not go hungry. Many of these boys are now dead. They have made the supreme sacrifice. What better memorial could we give to them than to help these same children? Servicemen and women will be the first to make such a contribution, I am sure. Will other people of the world give to such a fund, or would they prefer to build marble statues that will soon be forgotten? To the people of Fayetteville: 'Think it over, as our little town has contributed greatly to this war both by giving lives, and helping the children of this warn-torn world," Robert F. Petch, 480th Engr. Mn. Co.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/17/1945. "Pfc. James Petch and Pfc. Robert Petch enjoyed a get-together on Sunday, Oct. 21, according to letters received by their parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. Earl Petch of North Park street. The brothers met in Seckenheim, Germany, where Robert is stationed with the postal department. James, who is stationed in Esslingen, Germany, was given a 48-hour pass and the use of a jeep to make the 110 mile trip for the reunion with his brother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945. "Morning Mail / Seckenheim, Germany. October 25, 1945. Dear Editor: I quote first from a saying of Mrs. F. D. R. 'Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt suggested that United States soldiers in Germany may become influenced by Nazi propaganda if they are forgotten by Americans at home. Lonely boys are ready to be told a great many things, she said in a message to the National War Fund. Instead of our converting the Nazi, some of the Nazi doctrine might come to us.' This statement is agreed with whole heartedly by many boys in occupied Germany today. 'Strikes" - It seems that is all the people of America do. What would happen if the G. I.'s would strike? Think it over. 'Points' -- When a few of your congressmen get through lining their pockets with velvet, maybe the G.I's will get home. What happens? Thousands of American boys give their lives for you people at home and then you turn around and stab his comrade in the back. Is it fair? Think this over! If they would send a few of those strikers over here maybe they'd change their tune when they knew what a G.I. goes through over here. Holiday time is growing near. Many more boys would be home this year, but what happens--STRIKES HELD UP THE SHIPMENT. Would appreciation publication of this letter, or are you afraid the people will know the TRUTH. Maybe I've gone too far in some things but I am speaking for the G.I.'s and not myself alone. There are some men with over 100 points still over here. Think it over, people of Fayetteville (a peace loving village of America) or are you afraid of the TRUTH? May God bless you all, always. The best of wishes for the holiday season. Sincerely yours, Robert Petch. Ed. Note: No, Bob, the Editor is never afraid of the TRUTH," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945. "Pvt. Robert F. Petch has arrived in this country after spending nearly two years overseas in the European theater. He is expected home this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946. "Robert Petch has received notification of his acceptance in Niagara University. He will begin studies in the fall, taking a business administration course," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946.

Peters, Raymond. Minoa. "Pvt. Raymond Peters of Fort Niagara spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1942. "Pvt. Raymond Peters of Fort Belvoir, Va., spent the weekend with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Pvt. Raymond Peters of Fort Belvoir, Va., has been spending a few days with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Pvt. Raymond Peters of Camp Belvoir, Va., spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Peters, Raymond, 104 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Peterson, Irving. Kirkville. "Irving Peterson, who joined the navy and has been training in Norfolk, Va., is home for a ten-day furlough. He has gained seven pounds in weight since his enlistment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/31/1940. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Irving Peterson, was reported missing when his ship went down, but was rescued to go back into action with the navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Petree, Frank L. Fayetteville. "Frank L. Petree, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Petree of Elm street, has enlisted in the Navy and left May 15 for Great Lakes Naval Training station in Illinois where he will receive his boot training as radio technician. Petree was graduated from Fayetteville high school and completed one year at Syracuse university," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945.

Pezzati, Guiseppe. Fayetteville. "Among the foreign-born accepted were...Guiseppe Pezzati, 110 Brooklea Dr., born in England..." Post-Standard, 11/19/1942. "Inducted into service, Nov. 23, 1942, Guiseppe Pezzati, now private first class, serving in the Army air Corps Medical Division of the United States Army, is stationed at Peyote, Texas. Mr. Pezzati was born in London, England in 1906. Before he was 20 years of age he had served two years in the European army, most of which time was spent in the Alps. He was given his discharge in 1926. In 1927 he came to this country from Italy and immediately made application to become an American citizen. He came to Fayetteville to make his home with his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fietta, and had spent most of intervening time in this village until his call came for service in the Army. 'Hoe' as he was best know to people here, writes in a letter to the Fayetteville Service Committee that 'he is the proudest soldier in the U. S. Army.' He thanked the committee for their gift, and sent best regards to his old friends," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5-28, 1943. "Letters received by relatives here tells of the meeting in a USO Club in Illinois of Pvt. Thomas Dillon and Pfc. Joseph Pezzati, Pfc. Pezzati is a brother of Mrs. Robert Fietta and made his home at the Fayetteville Inn before going into service last November...Both men are in the Engineers' Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/24/1943. "Guiseppe Pezzati, who had the rank of Pfc. in the U. S. Air Corps division, has been given an honorable discharge and returned to the home of his sister, Mrs. Robert Fietta at the Fayetteville Inn. 'Joe' as he is popularly known, says he liked the Army very much, although he is glad to return to civilian life. He was inducted into service last November," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "Color guard of the Legion post (at Memorial Day services) was four discharged veterans of this war who are members of the Legion, Glenn Trinder and Joseph Pezzati, both wearing the uniform of the army; Frank Matzell, formerly in the navy, and Robert Goodfellow, a former marine corpsman," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944.

Pfohl, William Forman. Fayetteville. "Following physical examinations Tuesday, four local men were accepted for army service. Inductees under new regulations are now permitted to choose between immediate entrance into service or following a two-week leave. The inductees are William Pfohl of Fayetteville..." The Eagle Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Sgt. William F. Pfohl, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Pfohl, arrived home Tuesday returning to the States last week after 23 1/2 months overseas with the 756th Engineers in General Patton's army. He is wearing five battle stars and the good conduct medal and has been given his honorable discharge from the service" The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945.

Phelan, John F., Jr. Formerly town of Manlius. "First Lt. John F. Phelan, Jr., widely known Syracuse university athlete, and husband of Mrs. Jean Taylor Phelan of 468 Brattle rd. was killed in action Aug. 10 in France, according to a war department telegram received by his wife. He was serving with the anti-aircraft coastal artillery, and had been in the European theater of war six months. In a letter received by Mrs. Phelan a few hours after the telegram, the lieutenant told of having received the first pictures of his infant daughter, Catherine Jean, born June 29 in Syracuse. Lt. Phelan would have been 26 years old today. He had completed his sophomore year at Syracuse university when he volunteered for service July 8, 1941. After duty in Hawaii, where he served until after Pearl Harbor, he was returned to the states to attend officers' candidate school at Camp Davis, N.C. From there, he was sent overseas, arriving in England last Christmas. The young officer attended Sherrill high school and Perklomen preparatory school, Pennsburg, Pa., and the Manlius school. At Syracuse university, he was a member of Phi Gamma fraternity. He was a star football player in college, and a three-letter man at Sherrill and the Manlius school..." The Post-Standard, 8/20/1944.

Phelps, Harold A. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Harold A. Phelps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Phelps of 101 Smith street, has been inducted in the Army air forces pre-flight school for pilots at Maxwell Field, Ala," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/22/1943. "Howard E. Phelps, 22, engineer and gunner on a 15th AAF B-24 Liberator bomber in a heavy bombardment group based in Southern Italy, has been awarded the air medal for 'meritorious achievement in aerial combat' and has been promoted to technical sergeant. He is the son of Mrs. Leora J. Phelps of 311 North st., Manlius. Before arriving in Italy, he was gunner on a B-17 bomber in England engaged in attacking coastal defenses in Holland Belgium. His plane bombed industrial targets at Leipzig and Schweinfurt, Germany, and oil refiners and railroad centers in Vienna, Austria. In Italy he renewed attacks on the Vienna targets and bridges and viaducts on the important Brenner pass route in Northern Italy. Sgt. Phelps left Manlius high school in his fourth year to work for Gates Homestead Farms, Chittenango, and enlisted in the air force in March, 1942. He was graduated from aerial gunnery school at Fort Myers, Fla. in December, 1943. Prior to that, he had mechanical training at Seymour Johnson Field, N.C. He wears the distinguished unit badge with a bronze cluster as a member of a veteran group which has been twice cited by the president for 'outstanding performance of duty in armed conflict with the enemy and has three campaign stars on his European-African-Middle-East theater ribbon," The Post-Standard, 2/8/1945. "T/Sgt. Howard J. Phelps, son of Leora J. Phelps, 311 North st., Manlius, has reported to the AAF redistribution center at Atlantic City, N. J., after 12 months of service as an engineer-gunner on a B-17 and B-24 in the European theater of operations. He engaged in 17 combat missions and wears the air medal and good conduct ribbons," The Post-Standard, 8/21/1945.

Phelps, Howard F. Manlius. "Onondaga county men inducted were...Army...Howard F. Phelps, 311 North st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943. "Completing a five months course in aircraft maintenance and repair Pfc. Howard F. Phelps was graduated this week as an aircraft mechanic from this technical school of the Army Air Forces Eastern Technical Training Command, Seymour Johnson Field, N. C. The son of Mrs. Leora J. Phelps, 311 North street, Manlius, he was sworn into the Army on March 5, 1943, in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. "Sgt. Howard Phelps...has been graduated from the army air forces flexible gunnery school at Buckingham field, near Fort Myers, Fla." The Post-Standard, 1/7/1944. "Pvt. Howard Phelps is passing a few days with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "A prisoner since Feb. 7, T/Sgt. Howard F. Phelps was liberated on May 20...Sgt. Phelps was an engineer and gunner on a B-24 Liberator bomber in a heavy bombardment group based in Southern Italy. He was reported missing over Austria. Phelps has been awarded the Air medal, a distinguished unit badge and three campaign stars for the African, Mediterranean and European theaters. Before being based in Italy he was gunner on a B-17 bomber in England and took part in attacks against the coasts of Holland Belgium. He was employed on the Gates Homestead Farm at Chittenango before entering service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945.

Phillips, George. Fayetteville. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Army...George Phillips, 419 E. Genesee st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "Roger William Hoag, son of Stanley Hoag of Center street, left Monday night for the Army induction center at Fort Dix. 'Bill' enlisted in the army air corps last summer, prior to his 18th birthday and only recently received his summons to report for service. Some of the 'boys' home on furloughs dropped in for a little surprise on Bill last Thursday night and tendered him a farewell, they re Pfc. Ed Lindenmayer, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Lt. (j.g.) Joseph McGraw, Pvt. George Phillips, Pfc. Eddie O'Donnell, East Syracuse, Milton Kepler and Bob Sims," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945.

Phillips, Lawrence H. Manlius. "A prisoner of the Japs for 42 months after being captured on Bataan May 9, 1942, and liberated while at work in a steel foundry in Japan, Corp. Lawrence H. Phillips, 32, of Manlius RD 2, celebrated the New Year by marrying Miss Leslie Stone, 21, of Manlius, RD 2. Cpl. Phillips and Miss Stone, who lives on an adjoining farm near Delphi Falls...During the 42 months he was a PWW, he lost 75 pounds. He said he weighed 165 when he was captured and 95 when liberated. Corp. Phillips entered the Army in 1940. He was serving as an air forces ground crew member at Nichols Filed when the retreat to Bataan began. He was transferred from the Philippines to Japan Sept. 18, 1943. He is still in the service and expects to be called back to Greensboro, N. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/4/1946. "Corp. Lawrence H. Phillips of Manlius RD 2, an army air force member who was a Jap prisoner of war, has completed hospitalization and has accepted the air force personnel distribution command's invitation to spend two weeks of his 104-day furlo as guest of the air forces at Miami Beach, Fla. He arrived there Feb. 5," The Post-Standard, 2/10/1946. "A prisoner of the Japs for 42 months after being captured on Bataan May 9, 1942, and liberated while at work in a steel foundry in Japan, Corp. Lawrence H. Phillips, 32, of Manlius, RD 2, celebrated New Year's day by marrying Miss Leslie Stone, 21, of Manlius, RD 2, today...One thing you can count on,' Corp. Phillips said, 'and that's rice won't be served at our wedding breakfast--I don't care if I ever see it again.' Corp. Phillips entered the army in 1940. He was serving as an air forces ground crew member at Nichols Field when the retreat to Bataan began. He was transferred from the Philippines to Japan Sept. 18, 1943. He is still in the service and his petition showed he expects to be called back to Greensboro, N. C., within a few days," the Post-Standard, Bond scrapbook, n.d. (Probably town of Pompey).

Philo, Carlton. Fayetteville. "Carlton Philo of the navy, somewhere in the South Pacific, is a son of Mrs. Mary R. Philo, Fayetteville, R. D. 1. His brother, Sgt. George Philo, is an instructor on gunnery at the Army Air Base, Pyott, Tex. Carlton Philo visited his mother recently," Vail scrapbook, n.d.

Philo, George H.. Minoa/Fayetteville. "The following men were enlisted at the army recruiting station for three years service with the air corps at Jefferson barracks, Mo...George H. Philo of Minoa," The Post-Standard, 9/10/1941. "Carlton Philo of the navy, somewhere in the South Pacific, is a son of Mrs. Mary R. Philo, Fayetteville, R. D. 1. His brother, Sgt. George Philo, is an instructor on gunnery at the Army Air Base, Pyott, Tex. Carlton Philo visited his mother recently," Vail scrapbook, n.d.

Philo, Nathan A., Jr. Fayetteville. "Board 473, East Syracuse, sent 19 into the army...Nathan A. Philo, Jr., Fayetteville, R.D.," The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945.

Philo, Ora. Fayetteville. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...Ora Philo of Fayetteville enlisted for service. Philo, McGann, Harter and Decker will see service in the U. S. navy and the other draftees in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943.

Pickston, Lloyd. Manlius. "Lloyd Pickston, who recently joined the U. S. Army, is now stationed in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Sgt. Lloyd Pickston of Camp Macey, Texas, has been passing a 14-day furlough at home, returning to duty Tuesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Mrs. Lloyd Pickston and Mrs. Donald Bowers left Wednesday to join their husbands, who are now stationed at Camp Clairborne, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/17/1943. "Sgt. Lloyd Pickston and wife arrived Sunday from Camp Clairborne, La., and are visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Pickston and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Stokes. Mrs. Pickston plans to remain at her home in Manlius for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Mrs. Lloyd Pickston left Tuesday night for Battle Creek to join her husband, who is stationed at Fort Custer, Mich.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Mrs. Lloyd Pickston has returned from Michigan, where she has been spending several weeks, visiting her husband," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Sgt. Lloyd G. Pickston has arrive in England, according to a cablegram received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Pickston of 201 Pleasant st., Manlius. His wife Mrs. Elizabeth Pickston resides in Seneca st., Manlius. Sgt. Pickston is a graduate of Manlius high school and was owner and manager of the Manlius Service garage before entering the Army March 15, 1943. He received his basic training at Camp Maxey, Tex., and advanced training at Camp Claiborne, La. He was stationed at Fort Custer, Mich., before being transferred to England where he is serving with a motor pool of the military police battalion," The Post-Standard, 3/29/1944. "T/s Lloyd Pickston, now stationed in England, has written that he has been able to locate and visit many relatives. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Pickston are natives of England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "T/Sgt. Lloyd G. Pickston...has been promoted to that rank with headquarters of a military police battalion in England. He recently visited relatives of his parents..." The Post-Standard, 5/27/1944. "Sgt. Lloyd Pickston of the Army, who was stationed for two years at Okinawa, arrived home Saturday, having received his honorable discharge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Pierce, Robert W. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "More local boys who have left to join various branches of U. S. service are Robert Pierce, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Pierce of North Park street..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Robert Pierce, who is training at the Great Lakes Naval Station in Illinois, is spending a few days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "A.S. Robert Pierce, has been transferred from the Great Lakes training station to Northwestern University where he will take a radio course..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/16/1942. "Robert W. Pierce...has completed recruit training and has been selected to attend a radio school in Evanston, Ill." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/25/1942. "Robert Pierce, seaman 2nd class, has completed a course in radio at Northwestern University in Chicago and has been spending a few days with his parents...after which he left for his new post at Portsmouth, Va.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Radioman 2/c Robert Pierce, U.S.N., arrived home Sunday night to pass thirty days with his parents...Robert has been overseas two years and saw service in the African and Mediterranean areas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Radioman 2/c Robert Pierce has returned to Brooklyn Navy Yard after spending a few days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945.

Piguet, William C., Jr. Formerly Minoa. Pvt. William C. Piguet, 18, son of Mrs. William C. Piguet of 531 Clifford st., has completed basic training at the armored replacement training center, Fort Knox, KY. He was inducted. Jan. 27," The Post-Standard, 7/5/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. William Piguet have received word that their son, Corp. William C. Piguet, jr., of the armored force in Czechoslovakia, died from a gunshot wound. He entered service in January, 1944, and trained at Fort Knox, Ky., Fort Meade, Md., and Camp Chaffee, Ark., before being sent overseas in February, 1945. Piguet attended Central Square and Minoa high schools and was employed by the A. E. Nettleton Co. Besides his parents, he leaves two sisters, Mrs. Lloyd Pierce of Mallory and Mrs. Herbert Maltice of Brewerton; several nieces and nephews," The Post-Standard, 7/25/1945.

Piquet, Paul K. Fayetteville/Kirkville. PFC Paul K. Piquet was reported killed in action in France Dec. 27, according to a telegram from the war department received by his wife, Mrs. Julia Piquet of Fayetteville. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Piquet of Manlius Center. Before entering service September, 1943, PFC Piquet was employed by O. M. Edwards Co. He trained at Fort McClellan, Ala., and was sent overseas in July, 1944. Besides his wife and parents, he leaves a daughter, Joyce Marie, 21 months; a brother, PFC Travis Piquet, in training at Truax Field, Madison, Wis.; two sisters, Mrs. Richard Munger, whose husband is a prisoner of war in Germany, and Mrs. Alfred Schoolcraft," The Post-Standard, 1/24/1945. "Pfc. Paul K. Piquet (Infantry) husband of Mrs. Julia Piquet, RD 1, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, according to an announcement by the Commanding Officer, District 3, Second Service Command. Pfc. Piquet was inducted into the service Sept. 1, 1943. He was sent to Camp Upton for training. The citation accompanying the award sent to Mrs. Piquet is as follows: 'For meritorious achievement in actual combat. On December 25, 1944, when his company was held up by rifle and machine gun fire from a group of enemy situated in a school house near *** France, Pfc. Piquet crawled across 30 yards of open terrain despite the enemy small arms fire which barely missed him, and took a position from which he could fire his automatic rifle on the schoolhouse windows. Firing a burst each time an enemy showed himself, he kept them down while Bazooka men moved into position and opened fire, forcing the enemy to surrender. Thirteen Nazis were taken prisoner, three others were killed, and the company was able to continue its successful attack. Pfc. Piquet was killed in a subsequent action," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945. "...PFC Piquet crawled across 30 yards of open terrain, despite enemy small-arms fire which barely missed him, and took a position from which he could fire his Browning automatic rifle on the school house window. Firing a burst each time an enemy showed himself, PFC Piquet kept them down while bazooka men moved into position and opened fire, forcing the enemy to surrender. Thirteen Germans were taken prisoner, three others were killed, and the company was able to continue its successful attack. PFC Piquet was killed Dec. 27 in France," The Post-Standard, 6/9/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Piquet, Travis Richard. Kirkville (Manlius Center, hamlet). Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll as Piquet. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Sgt. Travis Pignet (sic), son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pignet of Manlius Center, has been granted a 15-day furlo. He entered service in October, 1942, and trained at Miami Beach, Fla. In January, 1943, he won his wings from the gunnery school at Tyndall Field, Fla. Sgt. Pignet also received training at Denver Field, Colo., at Salt Lake City, Utah, and at the armament school in Nashville, Tenn. He is now stationed at Ardmore, Okla. A 1941 graduate of Minoa high school, he was employed by L. C. Smith Co. in Syracuse before entering service. He received a special award in serial gunnery," The Post-Standard, 2/2/1944. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse as Travis Richard Piguet. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records; name spelled as Piquet.

Pitts, Hobart E. Manlius (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on Oran Honor Roll. "A memorial service for Sergeant Hobart E. Pitts who was killed in action in Germany was held Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the Methodist church here. Rev. Howard E. Adamy was assisted in the service by members of the local American Legion Post," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945. "Pvt. Hobart Pitts, 36, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Pitts of Oran, was killed in combat in Germany March 2, his wife, Mrs. Catherine O'Neil Pitts of Rome, has been notified by the War Department. Pvt. Pitts, an infantryman, was a graduate of Oran School and of Morrisville State Agricultural School. Before he joined the Army he directed the agricultural program at Rome Custodial School. Enlisting last autumn, Pvt. Pitts had been overseas less than a month," Herald Journal, 3/30/1945. Attended Manlius High School, according to Sue Goodfellow.

Platz, Harold J., Dr. Minoa. "Dr. Harold J. Platz will leave for military service the week of Aug. 9th. He will be in the 30th Medical Division, Camp Barkeley, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Dr. Platz left for military service August 15th. He will be stationed in the medical division at Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Mrs. Harold Platz left last week for Texas, where she will join her husband, Dr. Harold J. Platz," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Captain Platz is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Julius Platz of Minoa and was born in that village. He practiced as a physician in Minoa about eight years and entered active service last August at Camp Barkeley, Tex. He has been at the new field service school at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., and expects to return to Texas. He was graduated from Syracuse University in 1932 and from the College of Medicine four years later. He interned in the University Hospital of the Good Sheperd...he was graduated from Syracuse University's Medical College and had been practicing eight years," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Honorably discharged...Capt. Harold J. Paltz (sic), Minoa, The Post-Standard, 10/6/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Platz, Harold J., Dr., 118 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Plopper, Elmer, Jr. Kirkville, P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records. Possibly same as below.

Plopper, Elmer H. Formerly Fayetteville. "Word has been received by relatives in Syracuse that Pfc. Elmer Henry Plopper, 28, previously reported missing in action, was killed in combat Dec. 22 in Luxembourg. He was born in Canastota and lived formerly at 119 Concord place. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer O. Plopper of Los Angeles, formerly of Syracuse. Survivors are four sisters, Mrs. Lena Church of 107 Haffenden Road, Syracuse, and Mrs. Betty Beebe, Miss Shirley Lopper and Mrs. Nancy Hooven of Los Angeles. He also leaves two aunts, Mrs. Robert Wilson of Minoa and Mrs. Earl M. Hough of Rome, and two nephews. He leaves also a grandmother, Mrs. Emma Bell. Pfc. Plopper was a graduate of Fayetteville High School and Syracuse Secretarial School. He entered the service Aug. 4, 1941, and trained at Camp Croft, going overseas in October, 1943. Memorial services will be conducted by the Rev. Dr. Wilson D. Cole in University Methodist Church at 5 P.M. April 15..." The Herald-Journal, 3/30/1945. Possibly same as above.

Polacek, Paul. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Pollard, Harold B. Minoa. "Private Harold Pollard of Fort Knox, Kentucky, spent last Saturday with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Harold Pollard of Pine Camp visited his parents over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Completing a 14-weeks course in radio operation, the following men have been graduated from the armored force school communications department...Harold B. Pollard, son of Mrs. Iva Pollard of 129 N. Main St., Minoa," The Post-Standard," 7/31/1942. "Private Harold Pollard of Pine Camp visited his parents for the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Pvt. Harold Pollard of Pine Camp spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Pvt. Harold Pollard of Pine Camp is spending a furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fleigel of Pine Camp spent the week-end with his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "Pvt. Earl Fliegel, Pvt. Vincent Hullar and Pvt. Harold Pollard of Pine Camp spent the week-end with relatives," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Pollard, Harold B., 129 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Poole, Sidman P. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Major Sidman P. Poole of Maple drive, Fayetteville, professor of geology at Syracuse University, has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the office of the Army Chief of Staff in Washington, D. C. Dr. Poole has been on duty since November, 1940, being given leave of absence from his college duties. He was a member of the Andean Expedition from the University to South America a number of years ago. A World War veteran, he has been on reserve and joined Army maneuvers each summer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/13/1942.

Porter, Francis A., Jr. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Francis A. Porter, Jr., who has been stationed with the Air Corps in Burbank, Calif., is spending 16 days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Porter, of East Genesee street. Pvt. Porter has also trained at Amarillo, Texas, and will now go to Kingman, Arizona," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/16/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Smithers of 54 West Court street, Warsaw, N. Y., announce the engagement of their daughter, Geraldine, to Pvt. Francis A. Porter, Jr., flight engineer in the Army Air Force, and son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis A. Porter of East Genesee street this village. No date has been set for the wedding. Pvt. Porter entered the service in February, 1944, and is now stationed in Kingman, Ariz.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Pvt. Francis Porter, stationed at Chanute Field, Ill., spent a few days last week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Porter in East Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Porter, Henry. Fayetteville. "Lt. Henry Porter, stationed in Texas, was one of the escorts to the body of Lt. Coburn Snook, killed at Harlington Field, Texas, when it was brought here for burial last week. Lt. Porter spent three days at the home of his parents in Elm street, his first trip home in nearly two years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943.

Post, Donald Edgar. Fayetteville. "The army examiners inducted 30 men from East Syracuse Local Board 473...Donald Edgar Post, Fayetteville..." The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942. Re-enlisted in the Navy, Sgt. Donald E. Post, 202 Walnut St., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 12/2/1945.

Postma, Willis. Manlius. "Sheepshead Bay, N.Y. - Now in training at the U. S. Maritime Service Training Station, is Willis Postma, 19, of R. D. 2, Manlius, N.Y. Apprentice Seaman Postma will receive six weeks of basic training, including lifeboat work, fire fighting, breeches buoy, mess, sea rules and traditions, swimming, ship construction and equipment, gunnery and physical training. After completing 'boot' training he may enter deck or engine training, including three weeks of practical experience aboard a training ship at sea, or he may apply for one of the specialized schools of training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945.

Powell, Franklin, Jr. Formerly Manlius. "Mrs. Sarah Bristol, now teaching in Syracuse State School, formerly of Manlius, has written this week stating that her son, Franklin Powell, Jr., has been in the Navy since February last and is studying radio. He is stationed in Washington, D. C., and will complete his study in February, 1945," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/15/1944. "Franklin Powell, Jr., 2/c radio technician, has completed his course of study in Washington, D.C., and has been passing a week on furlough with his mother, Mrs. Sarah Bristol in Syracuse, leaving Tuesday of this week for overseas duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Franklin Powell, Jr., of the U. S. Navy, who formerly resided with his parents in East Seneca street, is now stationed in the South Pacific," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945.

Powers, David R. Formerly Manlius. "David Russell Powers, 79, of Seven Lakes, N.C., formerly of Syracuse, died Thursday at Moore Regional Hospital, Pinehurst, N.C...A 1935 graduate of Manlius High School and a 1941 graduate of the Industrial Engineering School at Syracuse University...He was a World War II Navy veteran...Surviving are his wife, the former Virginia Wolf; two sons, James T. of Bradenton, Fla., and Richard D. of Cazenovia; two daughters, JoAnne P. Urban of Hamburg and Wendy Powers of Syracuse; a sister, Barbara P. Longwell of Baldwinsville; and 10 grandchildren," obituary, Syracuse Herald-American, 9/14/1997.

Prespare, William. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men of this vicinity have been called before Selective Service Board 473 for tests at the Induction Center...William Prespare, 105 John street...These men take the places of those sent to the induction station and disqualified there or men not sent by their local boards owing to the fact that they reported too late and had enlisted in the Army, Navy or the Marine Corps. This is the second group of young men who have been sent before the Selective Service Board from this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/7/1941. "Cpl. William Prespare, who has been in the South Pacific area, is having a month's leave and is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Smith," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "Corp. William Prespare, who has been making his home with Mr. and Mrs Stanley Smith, left yesterday for Camp Butner, N. C. after a 21-day furlough. A former employee of Precision Die Casting Co., Corp. Prespare recently returned from more than two years' service in the Pacific area. One of the first to enter the service after the Pearl Harbor attack, he trained at Fort McClellan, Ala., and left for Hawaii March 30, 1942. In December, 1943, he was transferred to the Solomons and returned to the States April 25. He served with a field artillery unit," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944.

Prigoff, Jerome. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Jerome Prigoff, former physical education teacher and coach in Fayetteville High School, is now serving as physical director in the Army Camp at Sioux Falls, Wyo.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/25/1942.

Proper, Benjamin, Jr., Fayetteville. "Benjamin Proper, Jr., has enlisted in the navy and left last week for Great Lakes Naval Training Station for basic training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "A/S Benjamin Proper, Jr., stationed at Sampson Naval Base, is passing a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Proper," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "At the annual commencement exercises held in the (Fayetteville) high school auditorium Tuesday evening...William Goebel and Roland Gage, who are trainees at Bainbridge Air Base in Georgia were present to accept their diplomas and were given a big welcome. John Ragus, Benjamin Proper and Edward Hunt, members of the class who are also serving the armed services were unable to be present, and their diplomas were accepted by their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944.

Proper, Benjamin, Sr. Fayetteville. "Benjamin Proper, Sr., has enlisted in the U. S. Merchant Marines leaving Fayetteville early last week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945.

Prosser, Merle Cameron. Minoa. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors...Merel Prosser of Minoa goes into the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Pvt. Merle Cameron Prosser, son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Prosser of Kirkville, has entered the B-24 Liberator bomber mechanics school at Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss.," The Post-Standard, 5/28/1944. "Pvt. Merle C. Prosser...has been graduated from the AAF training command's B-24 Liberator bomber mechanics school, Keesler Field," The Post-Standard, 9/20/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Prosser, Merle C., 220 DeSilva St., Minoa, N.Y."

Purtell, Wayne F. Fayetteville. "Wayne F. Purtell, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Purtell of this village, has enlisted in the U. S. Navy and left May 23 for the Naval Training Station at Sampson, N. Y., where he will receive his boot training. Purtell was graduated from Fayetteville high school and was senior class president, and played end of the championship football team last year. He completed one year at Syracuse university during 1944 and was a pledged member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He was a member of the university football team. Purtell has a brother, Pfc. William Purtell, who also graduated from Fayetteville high school and completed one year at Syracuse university. He has been in service 2 1/2 years with 18 months overseas service with the 8th Field Artillery Observation Battalion of the 9th Army and of the famous 19th Corps. Pfc. Purcell has seen active duty in all the major battles from Normandy to the Elbe River," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945.

Purtell, William J., Jr. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...William J. Purtell..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Pvt. William Purtell, Jr. son of Mr. and Mrs. William Purtell of Woodchuck Hill rd., Fayetteville, finished basic training at Fort Belvoir, Va., and after spending a few weeks at Georgetown university, Washington, D. C., was transferred to Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh, Pa., for special training. When inducted he was attending Syracuse university, majoring in chemistry. He is a graduated of Fayetteville high school. During vacation he was employed at the GE plant for the J. G. White Co., " The Post-Standard, 5/28/1943. "Wayne F. Purtell, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Purtell of this village, has enlisted in the U. S. Navy...Purtell has a brother, Pfc. William Purtell, who also graduated from Fayetteville high school and completed one year at Syracuse university. He has been in service 2 1/2 years with 18 months overseas service with the 8th Field Artillery Observation Battalion of the 9th Army and of the famous 19th Corps. Pfc. Purcell has seen active duty in all the major battles from Normandy to the Elbe River," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945. Honorably discharged Monday, Pfc. William I. Purtell, Fayetteville RD, The Post-Standard, 12/5/1945.

Quinn, John A. Formerly Manlius. "John A. Quinn, now stationed at Stratford, Conn., has received his fourth promotion in as many months, this time to staff sergeant. He enlisted in the air corps Dec. 23, 1941, and studied at the air mechanics school at Keesler Field, Miss., last winter. He was transferred in the spring to a Curtiss-Wright plant in New Jersey for a special course on propellers, becoming a propeller specialist...He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school, where he was prominent in athletics and student affairs, winning four letters, including hockey and football. He later attended Colgate university," The Post-Standard, 11/8/1942. "John A. Quinn, serving with the 8th fighter command in England, has been promoted from staff sergeant to technical sergeant, according to an announcement from the command headquarters. A draftsman for Continental Can Co. before entering service, Sgt. Quinn attended Fayetteville high school and Colgate university. His wife lives at Chappaqua and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Quinn, at Cazenovia. A brother, Robert H. Quinn, formerly sports writer for The Post-Standard, is in the Pacific area with the American Red Cross," The Post-Standard, 5/9/1944.

Quirk, John C. Manlius. Honorably discharged...Corp. John C. Quirk, Manlius, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 10/8/1945.

Radigan, Maynard J. Manlius. "Miami, Fla.--Speeded toward home from overseas as part of the 'Green Project' which calls for the Air Transport Command's Caribbean Division to fly 30,000 returnees from Europe to Miami Army Air Field each month, another Manlius man is back in the states. T/5 Maynard J. Radigan, of Manlius, N. Y., was among those returned to the States Aug. 16. He had been overseas 20 months (where he) was attached to the Ordnance Branch of the 4th Armored Division and saw service in Germany. In less than 24 hours he left for Camp Blanding, Fla., by rail. From there he will go to a reception center nearer home for separation from the service or furlough prior to reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945.

Radley, Ralph S. Minoa. Inducted into the service, Ralph S. Radley, 116 Osborn ave., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 5/9/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Radley will leave Thursday to visit their son, Ralph, who is in Army service at Fort Jackson, S. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1941. "Private Ralph Radley of Fort Jackson, South Carolina, is spending a seven-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1941. "Private Ralph Radley of the Quartermaster Corps at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, spent a few days with his wife and parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1941. "Mrs. Stanley Radley and Mrs. Ralph Radley have returned from San Francisco, Calif., after visiting Private Ralph Radley who is convalescing at Letterman's Hospital," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1942. "Private Ralph Radley of El Paso, Texas, is spending a month's furlough with his wife and parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. "Private Ralph Radley has returned to California, after spending a month's furlough with his wife and parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/1/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Mrs. Glenora Radley is visiting her husband, Pvt. Ralph Radley at Louisiana," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Mrs. Ralph Radley has returned from Louisiana, where she spent several weeks with her husband, Pvt. Ralph Radley," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Mrs. Ralph Radley is visiting her husband, who is stationed at Camp Clairborne, La." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/9/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Radley, Ralph, 116 Osborne St., Minoa, N.Y."

Ragus, John F. Fayetteville. "Sixteen 17-year-old volunteers from Syracuse and vicinity, just sworn into the Air Corps Reserve by the Army Aviation Cadet Examining Board are sporting silver wings today. They were sworn in yesterday and will be called to training upon reaching their 18th birthdays. Those sworn in were...John F. Ragus and William C. Goebell, Fayetteville..." Vail scrapbook, n.d. (1943). "Pvt. John F. Ragus...has reported here (Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss.), and is now undergoing Army processing to determine his qualifications as a pre-aviation cadet. While at Keesler Field, a station of the Army Air Forces Training Command, he will be given training, classification, and medical and psychological tests. If he successfully completes this phase he will be sent to a college or university for five months further study, or depending upon his academic background, directly to a pre-flight center for cadet training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "At the annual commencement exercises held in the (Fayetteville) high school auditorium Tuesday evening...William Goebel and Roland Gage, who are trainees at Bainbridge Air Base in Georgia were present to accept their diplomas and were given a big welcome. John Ragus, Benjamin Proper and Edward Hunt, members of the class who are also serving the armed services were unable to be present, and their diplomas were accepted by their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss.--The Army Air Forces Training Command today announced the graduation of Pvt. John F. Ragus from its B-24 Liberator bomber mechanics school at Keesler Field...He has just finished a 17-week course which has skilled him in aircraft maintenance and emergency operations of the Liberator bomber. After learning the fundamentals of the plane's fuel, electrical, hydraulic and propeller systems, he spent seven days in the Flight Procedures branch where he received actual experience in the duties of the aerial engineer in several hours of flight. The training at Keesler will be followed by a second phase at another AAF station that will enable him to perform dual duties with a combat air crew," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Corp. John F. Ragus attained his present rank when he won his aerial gunners wings at graduation exercises held January 3 at Harlingen Army Air Field, Harlingen, Texas. Corp. Ragus, son of Mrs. Delia Ragus of 204 Orchard street (Fayetteville) enlisted in the air corps in October, 1943, just before his 18th birthday, and was called into service January 11, 1944. He received training at Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss., Willow Run, Ypsilanti, Mich., and Harlingen Army Air Field in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Corp. John F. Ragus, who has been training at Harlingen Field, Texas, is spending an 8-day delay enroute to Lincoln, Neb. with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bunnell entertained Cpl. John Ragus and Miss Theresa Lannon at dinner last Thursday night at their home in Walnut street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "Corp. John Ragus spent Tuesday night and a few hours Wednesday with his mother...while he was on a stop-over at the Syracuse Air Base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Cpl. John F. Ragus...an aerial gunner engineer with the Air Transport Command, while on a flight from the States to Liverpool, England, had the opportunity of stopping within 30 miles of the airfield on which his cousin S/Sgt. Willard Wein is based with the Eighth Air Force. S/Sgt. Wein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Wein, former residents of Fayetteville, has been overseas two years and the reunion with his cousin was a happy occasion, according to letters received from the boys. They spent two days and nights together and were wishing they might be able to contact Cpl. Louis Ragus, brother of John, who is with the signal corps in Campaigne, France. John expected to leave England about Aug. 4 for the States and soon after his arrival will be given a three day leave to visit his home here before reporting to his based at the Romulus Air Field in Michigan," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945. "John Ragus has been honorably discharged from the USAAF and has returned to the home of his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/31/1946.

Ragus, Louis William. Fayetteville. "Louis W. Ragus, E. R. C., son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Ragus of Orchard street, has left for Fort Dix, New Jersey, where he will be assigned to the Radio Division at Camp Edison, Sea Girt, N. J. Ragus, an enlisted reserve since Nov. 23 of last year, has been a student at Paul Smith's and the New York State Civil Service Radio School for four months prior to being called to active service on May 5," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/7/1943. "Pvt. Louis W. Ragus of 204 Orchard st., ...has started his basic training in the Signal Corps here with Company E of the lst Regiment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943. "Corp. Louis Ragus of the U. S. Signal Corps, stationed at Fort Monmouth, N. J., visited his parents...on Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Corp. Louis Ragus was home for the week-end from Ft. Monmouth, N. J.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Corp. Louis Ragus has returned to Fort Monmouth, N. J., after spending a week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Corp. Louis Ragus was home from Fort Monmouth for Christmas and the week-end,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. Arrived on the Laconia Victory in New York yesterday, T/5 Louis W. Ragus, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 1/20/1946. "Louis W. Ragus has arrived at his home in Orchard street, discharged from the Army after serving three years, two of which were spent overseas in the European theater. Mr. Ragus plans to return to the Syracuse University to complete his course in chemical engineering. He had finished his second year when he enlisted in the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/8/1946.

Raimondo, Patsy. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Ralph, Frederick W. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Sgt. Frederick Wilson Ralph, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ralph of the Knoll, Fayetteville, reported missing by the Royal Canadian Air Force in service overseas in The Post-Standard yesterday, failed to return from the great raid of May 23 on Dortmund by a British aerial armada of about 1,000 planes....Sgt. Ralph attended Central high school and Fayetteville high school, from which he was graduated, and was at Alabama university two years. Sgt. Ralph was connected with the Brown-Lipe-Chapin Co. before enlisting. He has a brother, 27, an efficiency expert with John C. Knitte Co., New Orleans, La., and a sister, Miss Marjorie Ralph, 19, who will enroll at Syracuse university in September," The Post-Standard, 7/2/1943."Sgt. Frederick W. Ralph, who was reported missing in action last June, has been listed as 'presumably dead' by the Royal Canadian air forces, according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ralph of the Knoll. An aerial gunner with the RCAF in England, Sgt. Ralph was credited with downing a German plane in combat last spring, and was to have been awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal. Sgt. Ralph was graduated from Fayetteville high school and attended the University of Alabama for two years. He was employed by the Brown-Lipe-Chapin Co. before enlisting in the Canadian Forces in February, 1941," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...One boy, Fred Ralph of Lyndon, who played with the high school group, was killed with the RCAF during one of the first big raids in Germany..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Missing since the great British raid on Dortmund last May 23, Sgt. Frederick W. Ralph of the Knoll, Fayetteville, has been listed as presumed dead by the Royal Canadian Air Forces. An Associated Press dispatch carried the Air Force announcement. His parents were notified he was missing in June. Sgt. Ralph, a former student at Central High School and a graduate of Fayetteville High School, was born in Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire, England, and came to this country at the age of 7. He attended Alabama University two years and was with the Brown-Lipe-Chapin Company at the time he enlisted in the RCAF in February, 1941. An aerial gunner, he was credited with downing a German plane in combat last spring and was to have been awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal. The aerial assault on Dortmund was one of the great British raids and close to 1,000 planes took part. His ship was one of 38 bombers shot down," Vail scrapbook, n.d. "Flight Sgt. Frederick W. Ralph, 23, RCAF, reported missing in action two years ago today, has been buried in Schoonebeek, Holland, according to a letter received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ralph of Knollwood rd., Fayetteville from the International Red Cross of Geneva. A native of Barrow in Furness, Lancashire, England, Ralph came to Syracuse when he was 10 years old. He was graduated from Fayetteville high school in 1939. In February, 1942, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian air force and went to England in September of that year. He participated in the flight of 1,000 RAF planes over Germany May 24, 1943, and was among those who did not return. While in England Ralph visited aunts and other relatives in Lancashire. A sister, Marjorie, is a pharmacist's mate second class in the WAVES and is stationed in California. A brother, Robert Ralph, Jr., is superintendent of a shipyard at Savannah, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 5/24/1945. "Flight Sgt. Frederick W. Ralph, 23, RCAF, reported missing in action two years ago today, has been buried in Schoonebeek, Holland, according to a letter received by his parents...from the International Red Cross at Geneva. A native of Barrow in Furness, Lancashire, England, Ralph came to Syracuse when he was 10 years old. He was graduated from Fayetteville high school in 1939. In February, 1942, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian air force and went to England in September of that year. He participated in the flight of 1,000 RAF planes over Germany May 24, 1943, and was among those who did not return. While in England Ralph visited aunts and relatives in Lancashire. A sister, Marjorie, is a pharmicist's mate second class in the WAVES and is stationed din California. A brother, Robert Ralph, Jr., is superintendent of a shipyard at Savannah, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 5/24/1945.

Ralph, Marjorie. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...WAVES...Marjorie Ralph, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. Marjorie, is a pharmacist's mate second class in the WAVES and is stationed in California. A brother, Robert Ralph, Jr., is superintendent of a shipyard at Savannah, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 5/24/1945.

Randall, Harry A. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Harry A. Randall...of Manlius...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Harry Randall of Kentucky has been visiting friends in Manlius while home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. Arrival on the U.S.S. Arenac in Seattle, T/3 Harry A. Randall, 103 Fayette st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 1/24/1946.

Ransier, Edward. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Rasmussen, Wayne J. Fayetteville. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors...Called from Fayetteville are...Wayne Rasmussen..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. Army release, T/4 Wayne J. Rasmussen, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 4/24/1946.

Rath, John F. Minoa. "Private John Rath of Fort Knox, Kentucky has been visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Rath," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1942. "Private John Roth of Fort Knox, Kentucky, spent an Easter furlough with parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private John Rath of Fort Knox, Kentucky, is visiting his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Miss Elnora Valentine has been visiting Corp. John Roth, of Fort Knox, Kentucky," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "Pvt. John Rath of Fort Knox, Ky., recently spent a few days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Honorably discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N. J., Wednesday...Sgt. John F. Rath, 227 Main st., Minoa," The Post-Standard, 1/4/1946.

Ratliff, Oliver. Kirkville P.O., according to the World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Rauhala, Clemens F. Fayetteville. Honorably discharged Monday, Pfc. Clemens F. Rauhala, 205 Chapel st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 12/5/1945.

Recore, Walter. Fayetteville. Fayetteville Honor Roll. "...yesterday...recruits...Walter Recore, 700 Warren st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/23/1941.

Reed, Roy E., Dr. Fayetteville. "Dr. Roy E. Reed, who has been practicing in Fayetteville for the last three months has accepted a commission as a lieutenant in the Army Medical Corps. While waiting to be called into actual service, Dr. Reed has opened an office at 113 East Genesee street, this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1942.

Reents, Arthur H. Fayetteville. "England--Arthur H. Reents, has arrived in England for further assignment in the European theater of operations as an American Red Cross assistant field director. Until his Red Cross appointment, Reents was employed by the General Electric Co., Syracuse. Previously, he taught at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La.; Harwick College, Oneonta, N.Y.; and the University of Nebraska. He is a graduate of Wartburg Academy, Clinton, Iowa; University of Iowa, A.B. 1929; and the University, M.A. and Ph.D. 1941, and also attended Wartburg College and the University of Illinois. Mrs. Reents lives at 107 West Genesee street, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Reeves, Chester B. Fayetteville. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Army...Chester B. Reeves, 110 N. Burdick St., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "The following named officers and enlisted men were discharged at Fort Dix Wednesday...Corp. Chester B. Reeves, Lyndon rd., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/28/1945.

Reeves, Edward L. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "A dozen men, specialists in the transportation field, enlisted yesterday at the army recruiting office...for eventual assignment to the 529th heavy maintenance ordnance company being formed thruout New York. At least 175 men and five non-commissioned officers, all with technical knowledge, are being sought for the unit, which ordnance officials indicated last week probably will be activated within a month at Camp Bowie, Tex...Those sworn in and placed in the enlisted reserve until they are activated were...Edward L. Reeves, 132 Academy St., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 8/27/1942.

Reeves, Paul M. Manlius. "Pfc. Paul M. Reeves, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark H. Reeves of 152 W. Seneca st., Manlius, has completed an intensive 45-day course at Fort Knox, Ky., and has been graduated with a class of qualified automotive mechanics," The Post-Standard, 8/6/1943. "Pfc. Paul M. Reeves...has graduated from a course in maintenance of jeeps and peeps in the Armored School at Fort Knox, Ky.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Miss Leone Biggs, daughter of Jesse Biggs of 1107 Midland Ave., became the bride of PFC Paul M. Reeves, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Reeves of 152 W. Seneca st., Manlius in a ceremony performed...Aug. 30...in Hopkinsville, KY....The bride is employed by the Carrier Corp. and is living with the bridegroom's parents in Manlius while the bridegroom is stationed in Kentucky," Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Reeves, Robert. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Reid, Douglas M.. Fayetteville. Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Sgt. Tech. Douglas McCaull Reid, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Reid of DeWitt Park, Fayetteville, was home recently on a 72-hour leave from Camp Atterbury, Ind., where he is stationed. Sgt. Reid, who has been in the army since May, 1941, has attended motor transport school at Fort Crook, Neb. From Nebraska he was transferred to the ninth engineers squadron at Fort Riley, Kan. Reid is now a sergeant technician in charge of an army engineers maintenance at Camp Atterbury," The Post-Standard, 10/15/1942.

Render, Carl J. Minoa. "Local Draft Board 473 called up 19 men for induction this week...The group called from this vicinity are as follows: ...Carl J. Render, South Main street, Minoa...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. "Private Carl J. Render of the 28th Field Artillery, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, is spending a holiday furlough with his mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1941. "Private Carl Render, who has been spending a furlough with his parents, has returned to Fort Jackson, N. C.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1942. "Corp. Carl Render has returned to Fort Jackson, N. C., after spending a furlough with his mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/1/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Carl J. Render, son of Mrs. Clara Render of 207 S. Main st., Minoa, has been promoted to corporal at Fort Jackson, S. C.," The Post-Standard, 7/31/1942. "Cpl. Carl Render of Camp Forrest, Tennessee has been visiting his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "TC/5 Carl J. Render...has been home on a 7-day furlo and has returned to his station at Nashville, Tenn.," Post-Standard, 11/29/1942.

Renz, Orrie F. Kirkville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...Orrie Renz...of Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Reynolds, Gardner H. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Enrolled in the latest class of aviation cadets to enter the army air forces pre-flight school at Maxwell field, Ala., are the following men from Syracuse and Central New York...Gardner H. Reynolds, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Reynolds of Maple dr., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 7/27/1942. "The aerial pounding of Fortress Europe, which softened the blow of the seaborne invasion of June 6, was part of the missions flown by these five Syracuse airmen stationed at fighter and bomber stations in England. First Lt. Gardner H. Reynolds...flew 'Little Joe II,' his P-51 Mustang, from an Eighth fighter station into Germany. He shared one twin-engine Nazi plane destroyed on the ground, damaged another, helped shoot up four more, shared a pair of enemy locomotives destroyed, and knocked out an additional locomotive. Lt. Reynolds's wife resides in San Antonio, Texas..." The Post-Standard, 6/9/1944. "An 8th Air Force Fighter Station, England-- Promotion from first lieutenant to captain has been announced here for Gardner H. Reynolds, 28, of Fayetteville, N. Y. Captain Reynolds is a squadron flight leader in the Eighth Fighter Command P-51 Mustang Group commanded by Col. John B. Henry, Jr., of San Antonio, Tex. He wears the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf clusters for his services in combat. Captain Reynolds' parents are Mr. and Mrs. Herbert G. Reynolds of 831 Oakwood St.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944. "Capt. Reynolds is visiting his parents...enroute to California to spend some time with his wife and family at their home there," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944. "Miami Beach, Fla.--Captain Gardner H. Reynolds, 29, whose wife, Paula, and his parents reside at 831 Oakwood street, has arrived at Army air forces Redistribution Station No. 2, in Miami Beach for reassignment processing. Medical examinations and classification interviews at this post, pioneer of several redistribution stations operated by the AAF Personnel Distribution Command for AAF returnee officers and enlisted men, will determine his new assignment. He will remain at the redistribution station about two weeks, much of which will be devoted to rest and recreation. Captain Reynolds, a P-51 Mustang pilot and flight leader, flew 60 missions during eight months in the European theater of operations, winning the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air medal with three oak leaf clusters," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945.

Reynolds, George Robert. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Mrs. Herbert Reynolds...was in New York City recently where she attended the graduation of her son, George Robert Reynolds, from Midshipman School at Ft. Schuyler. Ensign Reynolds was the 15th in his class of 1,395. After spending 15 days with his parents, Ensign Reynolds will report to Dallas, Texas, for training in the Navy Air Force," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945.

Rhoades, Robert B. Manlius/Oran. Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Among several of the young men who have returned for Christmas furlough are Privates Robert B. Rhoades and Loyal Pease both of this village (Manlius). Pvt. Rhoades is in the 114th Infantry, 44th Division, Company C, stationed at Fort Dix, New Jersey. He reported upon his arrival that he and his company have been undergoing daily drill. 'We have been having close order drill, bayonet practice, and have been conducting skirmish work by squads and platoons. We expect to go to the shooting range shortly after the New Year. We have been living in tents and quite a few of the fellows have been in the hospital with colds. We each have four army blankets, sheets and a comforter, and if we keep the stove going, the tent is good and warm.' Unfortunately, Pvt. Rhoades has been very ill with the flu at his home during his furlough, and was not able to return to camp at the stated time. However, he is reported to be improving rapidly," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/2/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. William Wall of Manlius, announce the engagement of their daughter, Gertrude A. Wall, to Lt. Robert B. Rhoades, U. S. A., son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Rhoades...A graduate of Manlius high school, Lt. Rhoades entered service Nov. 28, 1940 and received his commission at Fort Benning, Ga. He is stationed at Camp Maxey, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Miss Gertrude Anna Wall...became the bride of former Capt. Robert Byron Rhoades...Saturday afternoon, Feb. 16...John Rhoades, brother of the bridegroom was best man. The ushers were Robert Goodfellow and the two brothers of the bride, Robert and Joseph Wall, the latter recently discharged after 23 months service in the Navy...Mr. and Mrs. Rhoades left for a honeymoon trip to New York and Florida. Upon their return they will make their home in Ithaca, where the bride is a dietitian at Cornell University and her husband begins agricultural engineering studies on March 6," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/22/1946.

Rhoades, Walter. Manlius/Oran. Name appears on both the Manlius Honor Roll and Oran Honor Roll.

Rich, Robert. Fayetteville. "Robert Rich of East Genesee street has enlisted with the Sea Bees and will leave next week for basic training. Mrs. Rich and her little son will remain in Fayetteville for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943.

Richer, James Hawley. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Hawley Richer..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. James Richer, of 303 So. Manlius street, have received word that their grandson, James Hawley Richer, was promoted from the rank of private to Corporal Technician, 5th grade, on his return to camp, after visiting here a few weeks ago. Corp. Richer is with the 294th Q. M. Salvage Repair Company, stationed in Nashville, Tenn.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Mrs. Eva Richer, wife of James Richer, died at her home, 303 South Manlius street, Thursday morning after a long illness...Surviving besides her husband is one son, Harold Richer, of Baldwinsville, and a grandson, Hawley Richer, serving with the armed forces overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "Nine soldiers from Syracuse and Onondaga county are members of a salvage group in Northern Ireland, where practically every article of personal equipment and clothing used by American soldiers is repaired. They are...James H. Richer..." The Post-Standard, 1/25/1944."The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Hawley Richer, England..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Hawley Richer...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Ring, Norbert A. Kirkville. "Pvt. Norbert Ring, son of Mrs. Laura Ring of Kirkville, R.D. 1, is now stationed at Fort McClellan, Ala. He entered the service in September. Minoa scrapbook, n.d. Norb Ring, 19-year-old star of the packers and leader in the singles championships, is tabbed by veteran bowlers as the most outstanding prospect in the league," Minoa scrapbook, n.d.

Rita, William C. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Ritz, Gerald. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Gerald Ritz and Robert Hammond are the latest boys home from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/19/1946.

Ritz, Ralph. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Oran Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Robbins, Letitia B. Manlius. Honorably discharged...First Lt. Letitia B. Robbins, 408 Fayette st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 10/10/1945.

Roberts, Warren. Fayetteville. "Warren Roberts of 203 Brooklea Drive has been inducted into the army and left last Wednesday for the reception center at Camp Dix. Mrs. Roberts and their little daughter Anne will remain at the Brooklea Drive address for the duration," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Pvt. Warren Roberts, who has been stationed at Ft. McClellan, Ala., for the past few months, is spending a ten day furlough with his wife and daughter at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Roberts in Burdick street, after which he will report to Camp Meade," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944.

Robinson, W. W. Manlius. "Corp. W. W. Robinson of Manlius is returning to the United States for discharge aboard the USS Cape Esperance. The escort carrier left Pearl Harbor Jan.. 17 and was scheduled to arrive in San Pedro about Jan. 23," The Post-Standard, 1/29/1946.

Robinson, William, Jr. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. William Robinson are on a motor trip to Virginia where they will visit their son, who is in military training school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/8/1942. "William Robinson, Jr. left last Wednesday for Fort Niagara, having entered his country's service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Pvt. William F. Robinson, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Robinson of East Genesee street, has completed his basic training course at Fort Belvoir, Va., where he was designated for Officers' Candidate School. He is now attending Harvard University as a student in advanced engineering," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. William Robinson spent a few days with their son, who is taking a course in the service at Harvard University," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943.

Rockwell, William Carl. Fayetteville. "William Carl Rockwell of Fayetteville, has reported at Fort Dix, N. J. Before his departure he was guest of honor Friday morning at the home of Jack Chaires, Jr. of Yates pl., Chittenango. Others present were Leon Ryder of Fayetteville and Floyd Chaires of Chittenango. Jack Chaires and Mrs. Mildred Rockwell went to the station to see him off that afternoon," The Post-Standard, 10/1/1945.

Rodda, Charles, Jr. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Chicago, Ill. (Fleet News Service).--Lt. (jg) Charles Rodda, Jr., 29, of Hobson Ave., Fayetteville, N.Y., has been transferred from the Atlantic Fleet Destroyer Harold J. Ellison to a separation center for honorable discharge from the Navy after 20 months of service. Lt. Rodda is married to the former Eleanor Buock of White st., Springfield, Mass. They have two children, Bruce Edward, age four years, and Marjorie Jane, age two and a half months. He is a graduate of Springfield Technical high school, and also graduated from Massachusetts State College. Before entering the navy, he was a plant superintendent for the General Ice Cream Corp. of Syracuse, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/3/1946.

Rogers, Clark W. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Clark W. Rogers...of Fayetteville...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Clark Rogers of Plattsburg has been spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wyette Rogers at their home in Highbridge street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Pfc. Clark Rogers, who has been stationed at Ft. Dix, N. J., is passing a nine-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "Pfc. Clark Rogers has returned after 14 months overseas and is visiting his parents...while on 30-day leave. He will report to Fort Dix," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945.

Rogers, Richard. Formerly Fayetteville. "Richard (Dick) Rogers of Norwich, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Rogers of this village (Fayetteville), with whom he made his home for several years...(one of) the 59 aviation cadets who left Syracuse Monday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pfc. Dick Rogers has completed his radio course at Scott Field, Ill., and will soon enter Officers Training..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "...Richard Rogers...has been promoted to the rank of sergeant. 'Dick' is serving with the U. S. Air Force as a radio inspector, and is stationed in Southern Italy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "Sgt. Richard Rogers, recently promoted to his present rank, is at a Rest Camp near Rome, Italy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 101/3/1944. "Sgt. Richard K. Rogers, who returned home last Wednesday night from nearly two years overseas, spent the week end with his grandparents...in Genesee street. Sgt. Rogers is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Rogers of Norwich, N.Y., former residents of this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945.

Rohr, Edward. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pvt. Edward J. Rohr of Fayetteville, son of Mrs. Charles Thompson, has been assigned to duty in the medical section of the station hospital at Camp Pickett, Blackstone, Va. Inducted into the service in April, Pvt. Rohr expects to be home on his first furlo in the middle of October or first of November," The Post-Standard, 9/2/1942. "Funeral services for Edward Rohr, 31, who died in the University Hospital, Syracuse, last Sunday from a self-inflicted bullet wound, will be held Monday morning at the C. R. Eaton Funeral Home and at 9:30 at the Church of the Immaculate Conception. Rohr served in World War II in the Medical Crops and later as a paratrooper. While serving as a paratrooper he suffered severe injuries and was confined to a hospital for some months prior to his release from the service. Since returning home he has been working at the Precision Casting Co. as a welder. Before fatally injuring himself, Rohr shot and killed his mother, Mrs. Helena Thompson while she was asleep in bed. The tragedy occurred early Sunday morning at the Thompson home in Mill street, where Rohr lived with his mother and step-father. It is believed that the man's mind was unbalanced when he committed the mad act, and those who knew him said he had been acting 'queer' for some time, and of late was getting worse. No claim was made for the body, and burial will be provided for by a soldiers' fund. American Legion Post 369 will conduct a short military rite," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/22/1946.

Rolfe, William. Kirkville. "Billy Rolfe is on his way home. The boat he is on arrived in California Nov. 16. It is sailing around to the East Coast. He expects to be home for Christmas. He was in the Merchant Marine service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Rolince, Joseph B. Manlius. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Navy..."Joseph B. Rolince, Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943.

Rooney, John. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Flying on a short trip to the western part of the State yesterday afternoon, Ensign John Rooney, 24, a newly graduated U. S. Navy pilot, and Robert Nielson, prominent garage owner and local airman, were killed when their plane crashed while attempting to find a landing place during a heavy fog in the Cayuga Lake area about 5 o'clock Wednesday afternoon...Ensign Rooney, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Rooney of the Green Lake Road, Fayetteville, had just completed the training period at the Navy's Pensacola Flying School, and had just received his commission. Rooney was spending his 29-day leave with his parents here before returning to Florida to take up his duties as an instructor...Rooney is survived, besides his parents, by one brother and two sisters...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/5/1941. "A solemn High Requiem Mass for Ensign Rooney was held (Monday) from the Church of the Immaculate Conception at 9:30 Monday morning, following services at the home...A representation of Boy Scouts of Troop 51 of which Rooney was a former member, members of the Dannsville Aviation Club where he studied aeronautics and several members of the faculty of Wellsville High School where he taught Agriculture for a year, acted as honorary bearers...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/12/1941.

Root, Elester. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Pvt. Elester Root, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jay Root, has returned to his duties after passing a brief furlough at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "According to word received in a telegram to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Root, of this village (Manlius), Pfc. Lester Root has been wounded at the Allied front in France," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Jay Root, parents of Elester Root who was recently wounded in France but who is now back with his company, have received the Purple Heart which he was awarded," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/27/1944.

Rose, Bertram. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Several Manlius men who are in the armed service are at home on a brief leave, among them are...Bertram Rose..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943.

Rose, Harry. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Rowe, Roscoe A. Fayetteville. Honorably discharged, T/5 Roscoe A. Rowe, Fayetteville, RD 1, The Post-Standard, 10/18/1945.

Rupp, Frank A., Jr. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey) Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Frank A. Rupp, Jr., who has just returned from Japan and European theaters, spent Saturday night with Mrs. George M. Lewis at her home in Oran, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945.

Rupp, Frank Jr. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Russell, Charles. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Charles Russell has returned to Fort Meade, Md., after passing his furlough with his mother, Mrs. Bessie Russell in Fayetteville, and other relatives in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Mrs. Bessie Russell has received word of the safe arrival of her son, Pvt. Charles Russell, overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Mrs. Bessie Russell of Mechanic street, who received word about three weeks ago that her son has been wounded has received further information that his injuries consist of shrapnel wounds in both legs and that he is hospitalized in England. He also says that he is having good care and getting along fine," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Mrs. Bessie Russell has received word that her son who has been hospitalized in England for the past several months is being returned to the States, and will be coming home on leave in the near future," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Ryan, Thomas. Formerly town of Manlius. "Lt. C. Thomas Ryan, a former student at Manlius school, whose cousin, Edward C. Kruger, lives at 150 Malverne dr., was wounded in action on Saipan and now is hospitalized in New Caledonia," The Post-Standard, 8/27/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. Thomas Ryan are guests of Mrs. Ryan's parents, Rev. Dr. and Mrs. John T. Cowan at their home in Clinton street. Lt. Ryan has recently been released from Camp Gordon, Ga.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Ryan, William J. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Rybinski, Anthony. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Rybinski, Matthew. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "On the U.S.S.. Minneapolis in the Pacific.--Matthew Rybinski, coxswain, USNR, of Manlius, N. Y., served on this cruiser when, as part of a task force of more than 50 ships, she steamed into Jinsen, Korea, Sept. 8 to help occupy and liberate the country from the Japanese," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/19/1945.

Rybinski, Theodore. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Ryfun, Andrew. Minoa. "Pfc. Andrew Ryfun, 21, was killed in action March 10 in the Bougainville area in the South Pacific, according to a War Department telegram received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ryfun, 112 Elm St., Minoa. Following the telegram an Easter plant from the soldier was received by his mother through an East Syracuse florist. The soldier had telegraphed an order for the plant in February. Pfc. Ryfun entered service in December, 1942, and trained with the infantry at Camp Croft, S.C. before being sent overseas a year ago. He was first stationed in the Fiji Islands in the Pacific. Besides his parents, he is survived by four sisters, Mrs. John Skarupa of Solvay, Mrs. John Kicak of East Syracuse, Mrs. Fred Stone of Minoa and Miss Helen Ryfun; four brothers, Pvt. William Ryfun, awaiting shipment overseas; Pfc. Stephen Ryfun, in the South Pacific; Michael and Paul Ryfun; two nieces and two nephews," The Herald-Journal, 4/14/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...112 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y.--deceased."

Ryfun, Stephen. Minoa. Besides his parents, he (Andrew Ryfun) is survived by four sisters, Mrs. John Skarupa of Solvay, Mrs. John Kicak of East Syracuse, Mrs. Fred Stone of Minoa and Miss Helen Ryfun; four brothers, Pvt. William Ryfun, awaiting shipment overseas; Pfc. Stephen Ryfun, in the South Pacific; Michael and Paul Ryfun; two nieces and two nephews," The Herald-Journal, 4/14/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Ryfun, Stephen, 112 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Ryfun, William. Minoa. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473...112 Elm St., Minoa... The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Gerald Shanahan, William Ryfun, James Ashworth and Edward Sutton left for Army service Tuesday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. Besides his parents, he (Andrew Ryfun) is survived by four sisters, Mrs. John Skarupa of Solvay, Mrs. John Kicak of East Syracuse, Mrs. Fred Stone of Minoa and Miss Helen Ryfun; four brothers, Pvt. William Ryfun, awaiting shipment overseas; Pfc. Stephen Ryfun, in the South Pacific; Michael and Paul Ryfun; two nieces and two nephews," The Herald-Journal, 4/14/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Ryfun, William, 112 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Sahm, Keene. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "If many more local boys enlist in the United States Navy appeal should be made to Uncle Sam to at least name a battleship after the village or give the village an interest in the Navy. Three more local boys will soon don the blue sailor suit of the Navy. Keene Sahm, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sahm of Homewood tract, left this morning for Albany, from where he expects to be sent to the Great Lakes Naval Station at Chicago, Ill....Mr. and Mrs. William Hawkins, whose son, William Jr., went last week to the Great Lakes Base, entertained Tuesday night at their home in Thompson street at a farewell party for the three new 'sailors-to-be,' (Al Dykeman, James Kieley, Keene Sahm)," The Eagle Bulletin, 3/27/1941. "Keene Sahm, U.S.N., is spending a few days with his mother in Hunt Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944.

Samson, Jack. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces...Leaving on Sunday for Atlantic City for training were...Jack Samson..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Cadet Jack Samson, son of Mrs. P. J. Samson of Clinton street, is at the Buffalo University where he is studying aviation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Mrs. P. J. Samson and daughter Catherine spent the week-end in Buffalo, N. Y., guests of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Mapstone and also visited their son and brother A/C Jack Samson, who is studying aviation at Buffalo University," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Softball Team have Scored Fifteenth Victory of Season...The Fayetteville Legion softball team (composed entirely of war veterans) continued to set a hot pace in the county league by defeating the Polish Veterans Monday night at Star Park, 5 to 2...In the fifth, with Paul Nichols and Jack Samson on second and third, Jim Kieley stepped into a 3-2 pitch for a sharp single, netting two runs. In an attempt to break the deadlock, speedy Skip Honors tried to score...Many West End softball fans are planning to see Fayetteville play the U. S. Hoffman champs on Fayetteville grounds," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/26/1946. "Dave Volles Played softball for a Win with Broken Ankle...the Fayetteville Legion softball team made it three in a row by eking out a 6-5 win over Manlius at Suburban Park last Monday night. The local team scored early when Jack Samson rapped out a triple to score Paul Nichols and later scored himself on a Kiely sacrifice in the first inning. In the third Schermerhorn started out with a homer and Dave Volles brought in Langenmayer and Blaney with a rousing double," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/2/1946.

Samson, Peter. Fayetteville. "Cadet Peter J. Samson, son of Mrs. Helen Samson of 504 Clinton st., Fayetteville, N. Y. is continuing pilot training at Greenwood Army Air Field, AAFTC, at Greenwood, where he recently reported as a student in the basic phase of that training. He was graduated from Fayetteville high school, where he played basketball, baseball, and was a president of the Athletic Association. Nashville, Tenn., was the place of his acceptance as aviation cadet in July, 1943," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/25/1944. "A/C Peter J. Samson is home from Greenwood, Miss. and visiting his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "Second Lieut. Peter J. Samson...has won his wings as a pilot in the U.S.A. air forces and is being assigned to the First Fighter Command for intensive training in the operation of the P-47 Thunderbolt which is one of the principal weapons flown in combat theaters. During his stay with his command Lt. Samson will be instructed in the use of the one-man life raft; he will be given a thorough review in meteorology and he will receive advanced training in gunnery. This will include both ground and aerial firing in order that he may become thoroughly familiar with and efficient in the use of the guns with which his aircraft is equipped. Other instruction will include further training in instrument, or blind flying, as well as training in caring for himself in Arctic, torrid or temperate climes," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Second Lieut. Peter J. Samson, U.S.A.A.C., will leave today for a base in New Jersey, after spending a few days with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Mrs. P. J. Samson...and her sister, Mrs. John Rice, of Oneida, N. Y., have been spending several days in New Jersey where they visited Mrs. Samson's son, Lt. P. J. Samson of the U.S.A.A.F. and her daughter, Mrs. Edward Brooker and family in Hackensack," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/8/1944. "Second Lt. Peter John Samson, 21...has been promoted to first lieutenant, it was announced by Ninth air force headquarters in Germany. Lt. Samson, a P-47 Thunderbolt pilot with the 405th fighter group, flew 16 combat missions after joining his present outfit, Feb. 28, 1945. He destroyed four Nazi planes on the ground," The Post-Standard, 6/24/1945. "405th Fighter Group, Assembly Area Command, France--Major General O. P. Weyland, Ninth Air Force commander, pins (photo) the Air Medal on First Lieut. Peter J. Samson...during a presentation ceremony held at Camp Detroit, one of the redeployment camps in the Assembly Area Command, France. Lt. Samson was awarded the Air Medal for meritorious achievement during combat operations. He is now being redeployed with the 405th Fighter Group. Besides the Air Medal, he wears the Distinguished Flying Cross and the ETO ribbon with two Bronze Battle Stars," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945.

Sanford, Alfred J. Kirkville. "Staff Sgt. Alfred J. Sanford of Kirkville was a prisoner aboard an Italian ship in Tunis for nine days when the Americans took the city and he again found himself in the army. Sgt. Sanford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sanford, was with the first contingent of Americans to land in Africa and fought thru the battle of Tunisia. He enlisted at the age of 20 in August, 1940. A younger brother, Bertrand, expects to enlist in the navy on his 17th birthday," The Post-Standard, 7/2/1943.

Sarazen, Donald. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Sarazen, Irene H. Krzykowski. Manlius. "Twenty-five new WAC privates...left yesterday for Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., to begin army life...Mrs. Irene H. Sarazen, Manlius Rd 1..." The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces: WACS...Irene H. Sarazan, Manlius..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "A very pretty wedding took place on Wednesday, April 25 at 5 o'clock at the home of the groom's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Van Dooser of 106 Smith street, when Irene Sarazen, a member of the W.A.C. of Boston, Mass., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Krzykowski of Manlius R.D. became the bride of Pvt. Robert Van Dooser. Mr. Van Dooser recently received an honorable discharge from the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945.

Savage, Clarence. Manlius. "Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon for Mr. Delbert Savage who died last Saturday at his home in West Seneca street, following an illness due to a heart condition. Surviving are his widow, Ella Card Savage; three sons, Donald, of Johnstown; Allen, of Little Falls, and Clarence, of Camp Crowder, Mo.; one daughter, Mrs. Harry Kahanna, of Brooklyn, N.Y., The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944.

Savage, David. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Savage, Gilbert. Fayetteville. Inducted at Syracuse armory, The Post-Standard, 9/2/1943.

Savage, Marshall H. Fayetteville. "Bainbridge, Md.--Marshall H. Savage, ART 1/c, of Edwards Drive, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been honorably discharged from Naval service at the separation center, Bainbridge, Md.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945.

Schadt, Charles D. Fayetteville. "Board 474 will send 14 men into the service Monday, while board 473 will send seven the next day. Men from these two boards soon to be inducted are...Charles D. Schadt, 310 Highbridge st., Fayetteville..."The Post-Standard, 9/2/1944.

Schadt, Gerald. Fayetteville. "After serving together for two years and two months in the South Pacific, Gerald Schadt, BM 2/c and Frank Bridgette Sm 1/c...are home on leave for the first time in two-and-a-half years. Schadt, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Schadt of Fayetteville...trained together at Newport, R.I. and served together on the same ship for three years. On their overseas ribbons they are entitled to wear stars for participation in 13 major engagements, which included fighting from Guadalcanal to the Marianas. Their ship was torpedoed once in the early part of the war. The sailors are home until Aug. 26," The Post-Standard, 8/14/1944. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including...Gerald Schadt...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946.

Schadt, John D. Fayetteville. Inducted into the army, John D. Schadt, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 2/3/1943.

Schaefer, Charles A. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Pvt. Charles A. Schaefer, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Schaefer of Fayetteville, is stationed at Lowry Field, Col., after being transferred from Buckley Field, Col. Formerly of 328 Forest Hill dr., Pvt. Schaefer is a graduate of Carson Long Military school, New Bloomfield, Pa. He was stationed in Florida and Louisiana before being sent to Colorado," The Post-Standard, 4/10/1943.

Schaefer, Herbert H., Jr. Manlius. "Selective service board 473, East Syracuse, has accepted a total of 40 men for army and navy duty who will report at Fort Dix, N.J. and at Buffalo reception center respectively Wednesday for final induction. They are: Army. Herbert H. Schaefer, Jr., 229 E. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1944.

Schaff, Donald J. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private Donald Schaff of Fort Jackson, South Carolina, is spending a ten-day furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Donald Schaff of South Carolina, is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Schaff," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...302 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y.

Schauble, Joseph A. Formerly Fayetteville. "Pfc. Joseph A. Schauble, who is stationed at San Diego, Calif., with the anti-aircraft corps, is visiting his mother, Mrs. Helen Schauble, and his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Baldwin, at their home in Elm street. This is Pfc. Schauble's first visit to Fayetteville in four years. He was a former resident of this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944.

Schauweker, Orris W. Manlius. "Tech. Sgt. Orris W. Schauweker of 303 E. Seneca st., Manlius, is one of the photographers covering the New Guinea fighting area from the camera hatch of B-24 Liberator bombers, according to an Associated Press dispatch from New Guinea. A member of the combat photographers' unit in which the average flying time during August was 93 combat hours each, the sergeant was one of the 'charter' members of the photosection when it was set up at Hickam Field, Hawaii, last September. Covering Allied bombings of Jap shipping and shore installations from New Guinea, the unit has to its credit direct fighting scores, as well as outstanding aerial shots. The dispatch tells of a member of the unit, Tech. Sgt. George S. Ashworth, Jr., of Hartselle, Ala., who watched a Jap tanker thru his camera hatch after he had used all his film. Seeing a few four-pound incendiary bombs near him, he took a freehand sighting with one, pitched it out of his hatch and followed with several more. As the B-24 banked and prepared to go in for its strafing run, the tanker suddenly caught fire, and Ashworth, combat cameraman, was credited with a direct hit. Sgt. Schauweker has likewise been mentioned as crew member of successful Liberator attacks. Last February an Associated Press account of the sinking of one enemy ship and damaging of another in the New Britain area listed the Manlius sergeant as crew member. In this raid, Lt. Charles Francis Owens, son of LeRoy Owens, 301 Park st., Fulton, now holder of the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal, was the pilot. In April, Sgt. Schauweker also was mentioned in a similar Associated press account from that area in which Liberators had sunk and damaged Jap cargo vessels. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Schauweker, formerly of Syracuse, Sgt. Schauweker attended Vocational high school and was a draftsman before entering the service in February, 1940," The Post-Standard, 11/15/1943. "Tech. Sgt. Orris W. Schauweker of 303 E. Seneca st., Manlius, is one of the photographers covering the New Guinea fighting area from the camera hatch of B-24 Liberator bombers, according to an Associated Press dispatch from New Guinea...Sgt. Schauweker has likewise been mentioned as crew member of successful Liberator attacks. Last February an Associated Press account of the sinking of one enemy ship and damaging of another in the New Britain area listed the Manlius sergeant as crew member...in April, Sgt. Schauweker also was mentioned in a similar Associated Press account from that area in which Liberators had sunk and damaged Jap cargo vessels. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Schauweker, formerly of Syracuse, Sgt. Schauweker attended Vocational high school and was a draftsman before entering the service in February, 1940," The Post-Standard, 11/15/1943. "Life as an aerial photographer on a Liberator bomber in the Southwest Pacific was far from dull for T/Sgt. Orris W. Schauweker, son of Mrs. Grace G. Jackson of 303 E. Seneca st., Manlius. He crash landed three times, shot down an enemy plane, participated in a single mission on which his plane set on fire and beached a 1,000-ton cargo vessel; exploded and sank another 1,500-ton cargo ship and set a third ship on fire by strafing. The 25-year-old gunner is at the army air forces redistribution station at Atlantic City, N. J., awaiting reassignment. 'Crash landings notwithstanding,' grinned Sgt. Schauweker, 'the closest I ever came to being injured was when my camera was shot out of my hands by exploding flak. My hands were useless thru numbness for two days.' His camera was shot out of his hands over an airdrome near Medang. At another time he returned unscathed from a bombing mission on a seven-ship Jap convoy with 122 holes shot in his plane by Zeros. He recalled how he shot down a nip Zero. 'I was operating the waist guns on our ship as it made a reconnaissance flight searching for Jap shipping or installations in the Admiralty Islands. We spotted an enemy airdrome and made a neat bombing run on it. Nine Zeros attacked us. One of them headed directly for my guns in the waist of the Lib. I stopped him at 500 yards. He exploded in front of my eyes,' said the sergeant. Sgt. Schauweker was awarded the silver star for the single plane strike his Liberator made on shipping at Wewak when it beached one, sank another and set on fire a third enemy surface ship. The craft was forced to crash land on its home base. In addition he wears the air medal and cluster and the presidential unit citation, the latter being given his group for participation in the Bismarck sea battle," The Post-Standard, 4/27/1944. "Re-enlistments are...Orris W. Schauweker of Manlius..."The Post-Standard, 11/7/1945.

Schermerhorn, Frederick. Fayetteville. "Frederick Schermerhorn has entered the service in the coast guard division and left Wednesday to begin his basic training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn, Jr., and children of New York, S 2/c Frederic Schermerhorn who is stationed at Manhattan Beach, and S 2/c Irwin Schermerhorn training at Sampson, were guests on East Sunday of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn of Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Frederic W. Schermerhorn, seaman 2/c, stationed at the Coast Guard Training Station at Manhattan Beach, N. Y., arrived Tuesday to spend a week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944. "Seaman second class Fred Schermerhorn of the Coast Guard, former Syracuse University lacrosse coach, was granted a leave at his home in Fayetteville, after completing basic training at Manhattan Beach. He is in petty officer school and returns there for assignment..." Vail scrapbook, n.d.

Schermerhorn, Irwin E. Fayetteville. Inducted, Irwin E. Schermerhorn, RFD 1, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 6/8/1943. "...Irwin E. Schermerhorn, 18, is at Hobart college, a member of the navy V-12 program," The Post-Standard, 8/26/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn, Jr., and children of New York, S 2/c Frederic Schermerhorn who is stationed at Manhattan Beach, and S 2/c Irwin Schermerhorn training at Sampson, were guests on East Sunday of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn of Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944. "Irwin E. Schermerhorn, seaman 2/c is now stationed at Memphis, Tenn., in the naval Airport Technical Training Corps and is attending Radio Aerial Gunner School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/12/1944.

Schermerhorn, John J., Jr. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn, Jr., and children of New York, S 2/c Frederic Schermerhorn who is stationed at Manhattan Beach, and S 2/c Irwin Schermerhorn training at Sampson, were guests on East Sunday of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn of Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/14/1944.

Schermerhorn, Robert Henry. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Robert S. Dunt, Robert H. Schermerhorn of Syracuse road, and R. Howard Cowan of Woodchuck Hill road, members of Draft Board 473, were among the 24 Onondaga County young men who underwent final examinations Monday before being sent to Camp Upton, Long Island," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/9/1941. "Word has been received that Private Robert Schermerhorn, who has been at Camp Upton, N. J., has been transferred to Fort Hancock, N. J. He will become a member of the 245th Coast Artillery stationed at this fort," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1941. "Private Robert Schermerhorn, who is stationed at Fort Hancock, New Jersey, with the 245th Coast Artillery, was chosen from a large group of trainees to take a test for second gunner. Private Schermerhorn passed the examination with a 92 per cent rating, and received the second gunner medal and an increase in pay," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/13/1941. "Mr. and Mrs. John Schermerhorn, Jr., visited Private Robert Schermerhorn at Fort Hancock, N. J. on Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/20/1941. "Pvt. Robert Schermerhorn, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Schermerhorn, of Lyndon, visited his parents for the week end. Pvt. Schermerhorn is stationed at Fort Hancock, N. J. in the Battery M of the 245th Coast Artillery," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1941. "Private Robert Schermerhorn was at home last week for a short furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1941. "...Pvt. F. C. Robert Schermerhorn of Fort Hancock, N. J., returned to Fayetteville with his mother for the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/18/1941. "Pvt. Robert Schermerhorn of Fort Hancock, N. J. spent the week-end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Robert Henry Schermerhorn was graduated from officers candidate school at Camp Davis, North Carolina, January 23, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army, according to announcements received from the anti-aircraft Artillery School at Camp Davis, this week. Granted a few days furlough, Lt. Schermerhorn came to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn.... On Monday, Jan. 25 he and Miss Carol Beehner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August C. Beehner of Harwood Ave., Syracuse, were married at Our Lady of Solace church, and left Thursday for the bridegroom's post in Virginia. Lt. Schermerhorn entered service two years ago and went to Camp Davis for officer's training Oct. 31, 1942. Prior to October, he was doing geological survey for the government. He was graduated from Fayetteville High School and during his high school career was active in football, lacrosse, and hockey, and was a member of the camera club, sportsmanship brotherhood and the Alpha Zeta fraternity," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. "Lt. Robert Schermerhorn is passing a few days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "First Lt. Robert H. Schermerhorn, 24, ... recently received his promotion from second lieutenant at Fort Eustis, Va., where he has been an instructor in anti-aircraft coast artillery. He entered the service in January, 1941, and received basic training at Fort Hancock, N. J. He was commissioned in January, 1942, at Camp Davis, N. C. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, he was married in January to Miss Carole June Beehner of Syracuse. His brother, Irwin E. Schermerhorn, 18, is at Hobart college, a member of the navy V-12 program," The Post-Standard, 8/26/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. Robert Schermerhorn of Ft. Eustis, Va., have been visiting at the home of his parents...and at the home of Mrs. Schermerhorn's parents in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/13/1943. "Lt. and Mrs. Robert Schermerhorn have returned to Ft. Eustis, Va., after spending a week at the home of Lt. Schermerhorn's parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Lt. Robert Schermerhorn was graduated from Camp Richie, Md., on March 3 and will soon receive his captaincy in the Army Military Intelligence Division, according to his mother, Mrs. John J. Schermerhorn, of Elm street (Fayetteville). Lt. and Mrs. Schermerhorn spent a few days last week with his parents, and Robert was best man at the Lyon-Plunkett wedding on Thursday. Upon his return to camp he expects to receive overseas orders," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944.

Schleich, George C. Fayetteville. "The Fayetteville firemen gave a farewell party last night in the club rooms for Lisle Clark and George Schleich, who leave next week for training, having enlisted in the Sea Bees of the U. S. Navy. Each was presented with a gift. This makes six members of the department who have joined the colors," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. Inducted, George C. Schleich, 515 Orchard st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 6/4/1943. "George Schleich of the Sea Bees, U. S. N., stationed at Rhode Island, spent a few hours on Sunday at his home here. Mrs. Schleich and children, Beverly and Raymond, who are in Oswego, N. Y., for the summer, were also home for the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Spending a ten-day furlough at their respective homes here are...Machinist Mate 1/c George Schleich...members of the Seabees, stationed at Providence, R. I., " The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "George Schliech, machinist mate 1/c of the Navy, was called home last week on account of the serious illness of his father in Oswego, N. Y., and also visited his family here. He left for his base at Gulfport, Miss., Tuesday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943...Another meeting which, no doubt, was equally enjoyed was that on Feb. 4, of George Ebeling, S 1/c, U.S.N., with George Schleich, M.M. l/c and Lisle Clark, M.M. l/c of the U.S. Seabees, on Leyte Island. According to the story, Ebeling came ashore on Leyte on Feb. 3 and asked about the battalion with which Schleich and Clark were serving, only to learn that they had left for Samar. In some way the message reached the two Seabees and they either walked, ran or swam back to Leyte where they met Ebeling for a half hour the next day. Whether Ebeling say his brother-in-law, Charles Moynihan, who is also serving in the same battalion with Clark and Schleich, has not been learned," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Mrs. Lisle Clark and Mrs. George Schleich left Tuesday for New York City where on Wednesday they met their husbands who have just been released from the Seabees with which they have served for the past three years. They will return to Fayetteville the last of the week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/2/1945.

Schlosser, Madeline. Fayetteville. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving: WACS: Madeline Schlosser, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Selfridge Field, Mich.--Pvt. Madeleine M. Schlosser has been promoted to the grade of private, first class, at Selfridge Field, a base of the AAF. Her home is R.F.D., No. 1, Green lake road, Fayetteville, N.Y. She has been in the Army since Feb. 26, 1943. The promotion was gained through diligent service, it was announced by Barbara B. Caldwell, captain, Women's Army Corps, her immediate commanding officer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944.

Schnert, Robert W. Fayetteville. "Twenty-five men were inducted into military service from selective service board, 473, located in the municipal building, East Syracuse Friday...Army. Robert W. Schnert, 112 Center st... " The Post-Standard, 7/30/1945.

Schoonmaker, Sheldon J. Manlius. (Oran, town of Manlius). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Pfc. Sheldon J. Schoonmaker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Schoonmaker of Manlius, has been chosen to attend the parachute school at Fort Benning, Ga. He is stationed at Camp Polk, La.," The Post Standard, 10/22/1943. "The war department announced today thru The Associated Press the names of 1,601 soldiers wounded in action, including these with next of kin in New York: European area...Pvt. Pfc Sheldon J. Schoonmaker, son, Mrs. Edith Schoonmaker, Manlius, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 2/26/1945.

Schonwaker, Orris. W. Formerly Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag as Shanwaker, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "T/Sgt. Orris W. Schonwaker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Jackson of Columbus, Ohio, and nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Battle of Manlius, participated in an Allied bombing raid on Japanese shipping and airdromes in the New Guinea and New Britain area, according to a special communiqué. This was one of the largest engagements of the Pacific area. The bomber group of 41 planes sank one enemy ship, damaged another, and heavily bombed airdromes at Rabaul and Gosmta. Sgt. Schonwaker is an aerial photographer and was quoted as saying he saw flames shoot 200 ft. in the air, and believed they had direct hits on an ammunition dump. Schonwaker was born in Manlius in 1919, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Fisk of St. Petersburg, Fla., former Manlius residents. He spent some time in Manlius with his grandparents and aunt and uncle, he is well known here, being on the honor roll of Christ Church, a member of Sons of Legion, his many friends will be glad to hear news of him, and wish him good luck in his new mission," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/12/1943.

Schultz, Peter. Formerly town of Manlius. "Peter Schultz of Short Hills, N. J., who was recorded for a citation in the rescue of five sailors from the carrier Yorktown in the battle of Midway last June, is a graduate of the Manlius school, class of 1940. At Manlius Schultz was a corporal in Company A of the ROTC, a member of the school rifle team, company football and softball teams and the swimming team. He won the Second corps area rifle medal and the military merit medal. A private first class in the marine corps, Schultz was assigned to duty on the Yorktown. He and four other marines were given $500,000 and some record books by the chief petty officer, when the Yorktown was struck by a torpedo. The marines were about to lower the record books when a mate yelled that five sailors were in trouble below deck. Leaving the fortune on deck, PFC Schultz and the three other marines rushed to rescue them. Their conduct during this action is the basis of the citation," The Post-Standard, 10/16/1942.

Schultz, Robert D., Jr. Fayetteville. "Among those sworn in at the induction center on Tuesday for military service were six local men. They were...Robert D. Schultz, Jr., of 312 Elm street, into the Navy...of Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943.

Schwarzer, Carl J. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. Perry O. Schwarzer expect their son, S 2/c Carl. J. Schwarzer home from Camp Peary, Va., for Easter," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/12/1946.

Schwarzer, Perry O. Manlius. "Perry Schwarzer, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Perry O. Schwarzer of Manlius RD 1, is a member of the navy V-12 unit at Bates college, Lewiston, Me. He attended Nottingham high school and was graduated from Phillips academy, Andover, Mass. He took part in wrestling, lacrosse and track," The Post-Standard, 12/19/1943.

Scott, Harold. Manlius. "Pvt. Harold Scott, 21, whose wife lives at Manlius RD 1, has completed basic training at the armored replacement training center at Fort Knox, Ky. He was inducted Oct. 6, 1943," The Post-Standard, 3/18/1944.

Scott, Roy. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "The following named officers and enlisted men and women were honorably discharged from the army of the United States thru the 1262d separation center at Fort Dix, N.J...T/5 Roy H. Scott, RD 2, Manlius," The Post-Standard, 6/24/1945.

Seagfrid, Clifford Anthony. Kirkville. "Twenty-five men were inducted into military service from selective service board, 473, located in the municipal building, East Syracuse Friday..Army...Anthony C. Seagfrid, RD 2, Kirkville... " The Post-Standard, 7/30/1945.

"Clifford Seagfrid, who is stationed at Kentucky with the Tank Division, expects to be home for Christmas. Perhaps Clifford will write us a letter telling us about Kentucky. We have made that request," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Claude Seagfrid have received word from their son, Clifford, that he expects to be home this week, and hopes he will be able to remain until after the New Year. He is stationed at Ft. Knox, Ky.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. "Clifford Seagfrid returned to Camp New Year's Day. He has been transferred to Camp Pickett, Va., and is now waiting for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. "Clifford Seagfrid sailed from New York last Friday for Germany. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Seagfrid received a letter which he wrote as soon as he was on the ship. He sailed on the General Taylor," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946. Kirkville P.O., according to the World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Seamans, Leonard George. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Leonard George Seamans..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Pvt. Leonard Seamans of Oswego, N. Y., spent the week-end with Mrs. Seamans at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Bilyea," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "T/Sgt. Leonard Seamans of Hackettstown, N. J., is spending a week's furlough with Mrs. Seamans at their home in East Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/9/1943. "Sgt. Leonard Seamans of Trenton, N. J. spent the week-end with Mrs. Seamans at their home..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Mrs. Leona Bilyea Seamans was granted a divorce from Leonard G. Seamans on June 26th...They were married in Fayetteville on December 18, 1935...Mr. Seamans served three years in the Armed Forces and was honorable discharged on February 15 of this year," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/5/1946.

Searle, James A. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...James A. Searle...of Fayetteville...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "James Searle, who was released from the U. S. Army last week has been spending a few days with his mother, Mrs. Sebelia Searle prior to going to North Carolina where he will do defense work," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/12/1943.

Searl, Jerome H. Fayetteville. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday From Fayetteville...Jerome Searl...who will serve in the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Among the men inducted into the army as privates at the Jefferson st. armory yesterday afternoon was Jerome H. Searl of Highbridge rd., a son of Supreme Court Justice and Mrs. Clifford H. Searl. Mr. Searl was one of nearly 400 men examined. He is a member of the law firm of Stone, Marvin, Hand, Searl & Bush, with which he has been associated for about two years. Previously, he was affiliated with the firm of Searl, Langan & Searl. Mr. Searl is married and the father of three children, Peter, 7; Judith, 3 1/2, and Alexander Searl, 10 months. Mrs. Searl is the former Miss Elizabeth Lewis of Honolulu, where the couple was married in 1933. Mr. Searl is 33. He attended Williams college at Williamstown, Mass., and was graduated from Syracuse university law school in 1935. He is a member of the University club, the Onondaga Golf and Country club, the Onondaga County Bar association and Phi Upsilon and Phi Delta Phi fraternities..." The Post-Standard 1/6/1944. "Jerome H. Searl of Highbridge rd., Fayetteville, was graduated Saturday from the judge advocate general's officer candidate school. Lt. Searl is one of a class of 854 officers completing an intensive 17-week course in military law," The Post-Standard, 1/16/1945.

Sears, Jean M. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Sears, Jean M., 448 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Sears, Mahlon W. Kirkville. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Corp. Mahlon W. Sears, son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Sears of Kirkville, RD 1, has returned to his ordnance company at Camp Atterbury, Ind., after spending a 10-day furlo visiting his parents and Miss Betty Jayne Coon of 104 1/2 Davis st. A graduate of Minoa high school, he was inducted into the service April 3, 1942 and received his basic training at Aberdeen proving grounds, Md. He was alter transferred to Camp Perry, I., where he was trained as an instructor. Before entering the army he was an employee of the Lamson Co.," The Post-Standard, 7/12/1943. Kirkville P.O. List provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Sears, Wellington. Kirkville. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to the World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Sebring, Willard. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Inductees from this village (Fayetteville) who left for the reception center at Fort Niagara last Friday were...Willard Sebring, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Willard S. Sebring..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Willard Sebring, Sr., is very ill at his home in Spring street. His son, Pvt. Willard Sebring, stationed in Texas, was called home because of his father's serious condition," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943.

Seitz, Charles A. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Charles A. (Pete) Seitz, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Seitz, 306 Dewittshire rd., S., Dewitt, has arrived in Newport, R. I., where he is an apprentice seaman at the U. S. naval training station. He attended Fayetteville high school and Perkiomen school, Pennsburg, Pa., before enlisting," The Post-Standard, 7/23/1942.

Severance, Arthur Paul. Fayetteville. Inducted from Board 473...Arthur Paul Severance, Fayetteville, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942. "The army examiners inducted 30 men from East Syracuse Local Board 473...Arthur Paul Severance, Fayetteville, R.D. 1..." The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942.

Seymour, Robert Edwin. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Robert E. Seymour...of Fayetteville...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Robert Seymour of Maxwell Field, Ala., is passing a ten-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943. "Pvt. Robert Seymour...has been chosen to take part in the Army Special Training program and is attending college at Yellow Springs Antioch College at Yellow Springs, Ohio. Pvt. Seymour received his basic training at Maxwell Field, Ala., and is attached to the army medical corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1743 "Pvt. Robert Seymour is spending a five-day furlough with his parents...Pvt. Seymour is stationed at the University of Kentucky, where he is receiving training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "An additional group of a few more than 400 men have been sent to the University of Kentucky for training in the Army Specialized Training program. The unit, which was activated last May, is the 1548th Service Unit, and Col. B. E. Brewer, University of Kentucky commandant is commanding officer. Among the new ASTP students is Pvt. Robert Edwin Seymour, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Seymour, 209 Walnut street, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1/943. "Pfc. Robert Seymour, receiving training at the University of Kentucky, is passing a week with his parents...They spent Sunday with Mrs. Seymour's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Blakeslee in Fulton," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Pvt. Seymour telephoned his congratulations to his grandparents (on their 50th anniversary) and also remembered his grandmother with a very lovely corsage," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/17/1944. "Pvt. Robert E. Seymour...who until recently has been assigned to the 1548th Service Unit of the Army Specialized Training program, University of Kentucky, has been transferred to the Medical RTC, Camp Grant, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Robert Seymour..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Pfc. Robert Seymour has returned to the University of Kentucky after spending a few days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944. "Pfc. Robert Seymour spent a few hours with his parents...last Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "Pfc. Robert Seymour, who has been stationed at Camp Reynolds, Pa., spent the week end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Seymour have received official word from the war department that their son Pfc. Robert Seymour was wounded in action Nov. 25 'somewhere in France.' In the meantime, the Seymours had received word from Robert that he had been injured and was in a hospital in England. He assured them it was not too serious and expected to be up and going again in a few weeks. Pfc. Seymour has been overseas only a few months and was serving with a medical unit," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945. "Pvt. Robert Petch, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Petch, who has been serving in an English hospital after being hospitalized there, learned that Pvt. Robert Seymour was confined to another hospital in England not so many miles from where he was located. So he got busy via phone and made an appointment and visited Seymour for a few hours over the week end of Jan. 20. According to their letters home, they had a most enjoyable time swapping information they had received from their old home town..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Pvt. Robert Seymour, who was injured in action overseas and hospitalized for many weeks in England, has been returned to this country and is temporarily located at Camp Edwards, Mass., until he is assigned to a hospital for further treatment. Before leaving England, Bob was awarded the Purple Heart," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Seymour visited their son...at Rhodes hospital in Utica on Monday. Bob expects to spend a week end in Fayetteville soon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Pfc. Robert Seymour was home from Rhoades hospital at Utica on a three-day leave recently," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Seymour and son Pfc. Robert Seymour, spent Sunday in Fulton as guests of relatives and friends," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/11/1945. "Pfc. Robert Seymour has been given an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army effective at midnight Saturday, July 7. Seymour, who has served three years in the Medical Corps, was injured last November overseas and spent several months in a hospital in England before being transferred to Rhoades Hospital at Utica where he has been for the past four months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945. "Robert Seymour has returned to his studies at the Syracuse University after the holiday vacation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. "Invitations have been issued for the wedding of Miss Marion Virginia Bidwell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold V. Bidwell of Syracuse, and Robert Edwin Seymour...which will take place June 10...in St. John the Baptist Church, Syracuse...Mr. Seymour was graduated from Fayetteville high school and has completed one year of college at Syracuse University. He was honorably discharged from the armed services in July, 1945," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/7/1946.

Shanahan, Edward J. Manlius. "Among those sworn in at the induction center on Tuesday for military service were...Edward J. Shanahan of Manlius will go into...the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "...Edward Shanahan left Syracuse early Tuesday morning for Camp Upton, L. I., having recently been called for service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "According to word from the War Department received here this week, Pvt. Edward Shannahan, 19, ...is reported missing in action. Pvt. Shanahan was last known to be in France," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "Pvt. Edward J. Shanahan, 19, who had been reported missing in action in Southern France Sept. 3, is a prisoner of war in Germany. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. James F. Shanahan, of 113 High street, have been informed of his capture. Pvt. Shananhan, an infantryman, was graduated from Manlius high school, class of '43, and the following August joined the Army, training at Ft. McClellan. He was home on furlough last January. His brother, William Shanahan, is with the Army infantry in the South Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "Honorably discharged from the army of the United States at Fort Dix, N.J...Pvt. Edward J. Shanahan, 113 High st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1945. "Edward Shanahan...has received an honorable discharge and returned to the home of his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945.

Shanahan, Gerald Fay. Minoa. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, 325 N. Main St., Minoa, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Gerald Shanahan and James Ashworth were inducted in U. S. Army October 6th," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/9/1942. "Gerald Shanahan...left for army service Tuesday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. Shanahan, Gerald, 325 N. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Shanahan, William. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. William Shanahan of High street, writes home from Camp Croft, South Carolina, that army life is fine, except he is not used to the extreme heat of the South," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Miss Lora Tuttle of Manlius and Miss Lillian Burgess of Syracuse returned last Friday from Spartanburg, S. C., where they visited Pvt. Wm. Shanahan and Pvt. Otto Velsby, who are in training at Camp Croft," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "Pvt. William Shanahan, formerly of High street, Manlius, writes to friends here from somewhere in the Southwest Pacific, that they are living in truly native style. He states that they live in grass huts and bathe and wash their clothes in a stream that flows nearby. Their food is entirely from canned goods, even mashed potatoes. The mosquitoes there are most annoying according to Pvt. Shanahan and at night the soldiers sleep under nets and wear hood nets by day. Their Christmas turkey, he says, arrived in time for supper on Christmas Day. The rest of their supper menu included fresh pineapples, bananas and coconuts. Pvt. Shanahan sends an 'Hello' to all of his friends and hopes to see them all soon," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/15/1943.

Shattuck, Charles E. Formerly town of Manlius. "Announcement is made by Mr. and Mrs. William P. Clary, 2430 East Genesee street, of the marriage of their daughter, miss Carol Ann Clary, to Corp. Charles E. Shattuck, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Shattuck of Tully. The Rev. Vincent J. Donovan performed the ceremony at 9 o'clock Monday, Dec. 13, in Our Lady of Solace Church, Salt Springs Road," The Post-Standard, 12/24/1943. Co. B, Manlius School.

Shaw, Bernard. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Christ Church was decorated with Christmas greens, poinsettias, and white chrysanthemums for the wedding of Miss Mary Downton Cheney, daughter of Mrs. Walter W. Cheney of Highfield, to Bernard Shaw, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Wyman R. Shaw of Strafford, N.H. The ceremony took place on Dec. 21...The bride is a graduate of St. John the Baptist School, Mendham, N.J. and Syracuse University, and has been employed at the University Medical Center. The bridegroom, an alumnus of the University of New Hampshire, did graduate work at Cornell university. He served in the Army Air Corps with rank of lieutenant, and is now an instructor in Manlius School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/27/1946.

Shaw, Francis. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Shearer, Eleanor May. Formerly Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Shearer of Nedrow, formerly of Manlius, announce the marriage of their daughter, Corp. Eleanor May Shearer and Pfc. Joseph Henry Perna on Thursday, Aug. 17, in the Post Chapel, Parris Island, South Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Shearer have six children, five sons and one daughter, all enlisted in the U. S. service. Two sons are now in France. One son received an honorable discharge. Mrs. Shearer was the former Miss Ruth Hale, daughter of the late Homer Hale and Mrs. Cora Hale, who now resides with her daughter," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944.

Shearer, Eugene. Formerly Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Shearer, of Nedrow, formerly of Manlius, have been notified, by the War Department that their son, Eugene Shearer, had been killed in action in Germany. Eugene, who would have been 25 in December, had been overseas for two years. He has three brothers and one sister in service and another brother who received an honorable discharge from service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/3/1944.

Shearer, Leslie. Formerly Manlius. "Leslie Otis Shearer and Eugene Shearer, sons of Mr. and Mrs. W. Oliver Shearer of 119 Cedric ave., Nedrow, both former Post-Standard carrier boys, have returned to their stations after short furlos. Leslie is stationed as a cook at Fort Knox, Ky. and Eugene is with the 9th division at Fort Bragg, N. C. Both were in CCC camps before enlistment," The Post-Standard, 9/6/1942.

Shearer, Lillian B. Manlius. "Lt. Lillian B. Shearer of Salt Springs rd., Manlius, has reported for assignment in the army nurse corps at Fort Dix, N. J. She is the wife of S/Sgt. Wilbur L. Shearer of Fort Dix and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Bassett of Albany. Lt. Shearer is a graduate of Crouse-Irving hospital and was formerly the orthopedic nurse on the visiting nurse staff. She is the third member of the Shearer family to leave for service from Manlius," The Post-Standard, 2/3/1945.

Shearer, Wilbur. Manlius. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...Wilbur Shearer...of Manlius..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942."Sgt. Wilbur L. Shearer of Salt Springs rd., Manlius, has returned to Camp Chaffee, Ark., after a 12-day furlo spent with his wife, Mrs. Lillian Shearer, and mother, Mrs. Maude Shearer. He was inducted Dec. 5, 1942, and is with the engineers. Sgt. Shearer received his present rating at the completion of basic training at Camp Chaffee," The Post-Standard, 6/27/1943. Husband of Lillian B. Shearer.

Shedd, John. Minoa. "John Shedd...left for army service last Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Shedd, John C., 237 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Sheldon, Thomas D. Minoa. "Corp. Thomas D. Sheldon, husband of Mrs. Helen Sheldon of Minoa, was commissioned a second lieutenant in the signal corps at Fort Monmouth, N.J. Oct. 25. A native of Canastota, he is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sheldon of Bridgeport. He enlisted in the army July 22, 1942, and was called to active service in March, 1943. A 1942 graduate of Syracuse university, he was a physical education instructor at Spilt Rock before going into the army. He was stationed in Bermuda from March until July of this year. Lt. Sheldon is expected home on leave to visit his wife and two children, Thomas and Paul, The Post-Standard, 11/2/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Sheldon, Thomas, 145 Osborne Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Sherman, Anson G. Manlius. Honorably discharged from Rome army air field separation base, Pfc. Anson G. Sherman, Manlius, RD.

Sherman, James R. Manlius. "Pvt. James R. Sherman of Manlius, RD 2, is at Stark General hospital, Charleston, S. C., for treatment after 21 months overseas in the European theater. He has been awarded the order of the purple heart and the combat infantryman badge," The Post-Standard, 5/15/1945.

Shoemaker, Charles. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Corp. Charles Shoemaker, stationed at Miami Beach, Fla., is passing a short furlough with his parents...On Sunday night Corp. Shoemaker and Miss Mary Crockford were dinner guests of Rev. and Mrs. Roy L. Smith," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/17/1942. "In the Fayetteville Methodist church at eight o'clock in the evening on Dec. 21, Miss Mary Etta Crockford, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. King W. Crockford of Highbridge street, was united in marriage to Sgt. Charles E. Shoemaker, son of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Shoemaker, also of Highbridge street, Fayetteville...Mr. Shoemaker attended New York State Teacher's College at Oswego where he was a member of Beta Tau Epsilon fraternity. Sgt. and Mrs. Shoemaker will make their home in Belleville, Ill., where Sgt. Shoemaker is stationed with the Army Air Corps at Scott Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/5/1945. "Mrs. King Crockford, of Skaneateles, formerly of Fayetteville, has been visiting her son-in-law and daughter, T/Sgt. and Mrs. Charles E. Shoemaker, at Scott Field, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Shoemaker, Grant. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Inducted into the service, Grant L. Shoemaker, Highbridge st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 5/9/1941.

Shore, Simon William. Fayetteville. "Gunner's Mate 2/c Simon William Shore, Jr., USNR, has been killed in action, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Simon William Shore, Sr., of Fayetteville, have been notified by the navy department. Shore's ship was sunk March 26 while it was cruising about six miles off the shore of Okinawa, information revealed. Born at Oxford, Shore attended the Oxford academy. He enlisted in the navy in November, 1942, on his 17th birthday and reported to Newport, R.I., for three months' training. His next station was Washington, and he shipped from there about April, 1943. Never definite about the places his ship was fighting, Shore's family, nevertheless, knew that he had participated in battles in the European theater of war," The Post-Standard, 6/19/1945.

Shults, Daniel, Jr. Fayetteville. "S 2/c Daniel Shults, Jr., who is stationed at Sampson Naval Base has been spending a week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Shults of Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943.

Simon, Norbert. Minoa/East Syracuse. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Corp. Tech. Norbert F. Simon, 24, was killed in action June 10 in France, according to word received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Simon of East Syracuse RD 1. He entered service July 20, 1942, and received training at Fort Jackson, S.C., Camp Gordon, Ga., and Camp Gordon Johnston, Fla. He had been serving overseas since January, 1944. Corp. Simon was a graduate of Minoa high school and was employed by Patrician Silk mill before entering service. Besides his parents he is survived by a sister, Mrs. Robert Johnson of East Syracuse..." Post Standard, 7/27/1944. "Norbert Simon of East Syracuse, R.D. 1, who was killed June 10, 1944, during the invasion of Normandy, will arrive in Syracuse today from the Schenectady Army Depot....Burial will be in St. Mary's Cemetery (Minoa)...He received his training at Fort Jackson, S.C. and was sent overseas in January of 1944. He was awarded the Purple Heart and a presidential unit citation. Surviving are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Simon; a sister, Mrs. Robert Johnson of East Syracuse, R.D. 1, and several aunts and uncles," The Post-Standard, 5/25/1948.

Simon, Russell. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942.

Singleton, Asa L. Manlius. "Brig. Gen. Asa L. Singleton, superintendent of the Manlius School, delivered the principal address at the annual dinner of Pershing Rifles, Syracuse University R. O. T. C. Society...Singleton, a veteran army leader, came to Manlius last October after serving seven years at the infantry school at Fort Benning, Georgia, first as commanding officer of the 29th Infantry, later as commandant of the post," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/6/1941.

Skelton, Charles. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942.

Skinner, Leon. Manlius. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Navy...Leon F. Skinner, Manlius, R.D. 2, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944."Leon Skinner of the U. S. Navy station at Sampson, is passing a 7-day furlough at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Lynn Skinner of the U. S. navy has been given an honorable discharge on account of the illness of Mrs. Skinner," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/8/1945.

Smiley, Albert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Smiley, Robert. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Mrs. John Smiley and daughter Jane left Thursday evening for Fort McClellan, Alabama, where Mrs. Smiley will visit her son, Robert, who is serving in Army service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/24/1941. "Pvt. Robert Smiley left Friday for Fort McClellan, Ala., where he is serving in Army service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1841. "First Class Private Robert F. Smiley of Fort McClellan, Ala., is spending a 15-day furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/17/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Robert Smiley...is stationed somewhere in the Hawaiian Islands. He was formerly at Fort McClellan, Ala., and at a camp on the west coast before he was sent overseas in March. Corp. Smiley was inducted into the army in January, 1941. He is a graduate of Minoa high school and attended Syracuse university three years," The Post-Standard, 8/20/1942. "Cpl. Robert Smiley of the U. S. Army has returned to the States after serving ten months in Hawaii. He will enter officers training school at Georgia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Smiley, Robert, 128 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Smith, Anthony F. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll.

Smith, Arthur H. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Arthur Smith...Navy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Pvt. Arthur H. Smith of Camp Gordon Johnston, Fla., is passing a 10-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Smith of the Green Lake road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "Arthur Smith...has been promoted from Corporal to the rank of Sergeant somewhere in the Dutch East Indies, according to word received by his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Sgt. Arthur H. Smith...is serving with the 362d TC Harbor Craft Co. in Manila. Before entering service in March, 1944, Smith was employed by Bonded Freightways, Inc. Overseas since December, 1944, he wears the good conduct medal and the Asiatic-Pacific ribbon," The Post-Standard, 10/15/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Smith of the Green Lake Road received word recently through station WOLF regarding their son, S/Sgt. Arthur Smith who is stationed in Manila. He is with the 362 Harbor Craft Company being sent there recently from New Guinea and is chief engineer on his ship, the Q-S. S/Sgt. Smith entered the service in March, 1944, and has been overseas since December, 1944. He is authorized to wear the Good Conduct Medal, and the Asiatic-Pacific ribbon. Before entering the service he was employed by the Bonded Freight Ways in Syracuse. Smith was recently promoted to the rank of Staff Sergeant," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945. "T/Sgt. Arthur H. Smith arrived home Wednesday, after being honorably discharged at Fort Dix. He was in service two years, and overseas 18 months. He has not been home since September, 1944," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946.

Smith, Chester Leonard. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Chester Leonard Smith..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "...Three other fliers...S/Sgt. Chester L. Smith of Fayetteville...were awarded the air medal...S/Sgt. Smith, son of Eugene Smith of 107 Mill st., Manlius, is waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator heavy bomber. Before entering the army in March, 1943, Sgt. Smith was a machinist at Precision Casting Co., Fayetteville. He has flown in combat since arrival at an Eighth air force Liberator station in England in April, The Post-Standard, 8/10/1944.

Smith, Derwood L., Rev. Formerly Manlius. "Rev. Derwood L. Smith, former pastor of Manlius, N.Y. Baptist Church, has tendered his resignation in order to accept a call at chaplain of the U.S. Army. Rev. Smith volunteered as chaplain some time ago and recently received orders to report on August 18 at the Hard School of Chaplains. His wife and daughter, Ruth, will remain in Vineland, N. J. for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Rev. Derwood L. Smith, former pastor of the Manlius Baptist Church, having recently received his honorable discharge from the Service as a Chaplain has accepted the unanimous call to the pastorate of the First Baptist Church, Herkimer, N.Y. Mr. Smith served as post Chaplain at Laurinburg-Maxton Army Air Base, Maxston, North Carolina, and Malden Army Air Field, Malden, Mo. In 1943 he was commissioned first lieutenant, graduating from the Army Chaplain School, Cambridge, Mass. He was promoted to Captain in June, 1944. Since his release from the Service, Mr. Smith has been supply pastor at the Baptist Church, Earlville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/8/1946.

Smith, Earl D. Manlius, formerly Minoa. "Mr. and Mrs. Roland Smith of 327 Wadsworth st. have received the first letter from their son, Pvt. Earl D. Smith, in five months. Pvt. Smith, who is with the marines on Guadalcanal island, wrote his parents after he returned from a Jap raiding party 'back in the hills.' 'It's open season here for Japs,' he continued. 'I can't tell you how many we killed, but it was plenty.' He sent his mother some Japanese folding money as a souvenir, and asked that she forward some football scores to him. The 18-year-old marine enlisted in the corps Jan. 2. He formerly attended Minoa high school. His brother, PFC Glenn A. Smith, also is stationed with the marines somewhere in the Southwest Pacific. Following his enlistment in April, 1941, Glenn served nine months in Iceland before being transferred to San Diego and points overseas," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. "Earl D. Smith of Manlius, technical supply clerk at the B-29 base on Guam, has been promoted to sergeant. Husband of Mrs. Ruth Pavette Smith, he was employed by International Harvester Co. before entering service in August, 1942," The Post-Standard, 7/31/1945.

Smith, Eleanor, Mrs. Fayetteville. "Mrs. Eleanor Smith of 108 Spring street, who recently joined the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps, has passed her final examination and expects to be called to enter training in the near future. Mrs. Smith, who is employed at the Precision Castings Co., is the first woman from Fayetteville to join the WAACs," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/12/1943.

Smith, Floyd. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Floyd Smith was home on a 7-day furlough from Camp Shelby, Miss. to visit his wife and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Relph at their home in Highbridge street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Possibly same as below.

Smith, Floyd. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records. Possibly same as above.

Smith, George Roscoe. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Baptist Church service flag, The Eagle Bulletin, 2/27/1942. "George Roscoe Smith, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Smith, 160 Washington street, was recently graduated from the Marine aviation radio school at the marine barracks naval air station, Florida, and promoted to corporal. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in Feb., 1942," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/8/1943. "Somewhere in the South Pacific (Delayed)--A Marine torpedo bomber pilot and one of his gunners returned to their squadron today after drifting 76 hours under a scorching South Pacific sun and calmly told how they had survived on fish and birds. They crashed into the sea during a night bombing raid after being chased for one hour by a Japanese plane. Members of the crew were First Lt. Earl L. McLaughlin, Jesup, Ga., pilot, and Sgt. George R. Smith, Jr., 160 Washington street, Manlius, N. Y., gunner. Anxious comrades gathered around the pair as they told of their rescue around 7 a.m. on the fourth morning, after living on a single chocolate bar, one canteen of water, birds shot down by Sgt. Smith, and small fish scooped from the ocean in a piece of cloth. Lieut. McLaughlin, a graduate of the University of Georgia, started the story: 'Forty-two of us took off on that morning. We reached our target ten minutes ahead of schedule and had to circle the target the second time. 'On the second run, I was hopped by a Jap plane. I ducked in and out of clouds for about an hour, trying to shake him. 'I noticed I was running low on gas and decided the best thing to do was dive down just above the water and head for home. I wanted to fly about 100 feet above the surface, but as I nosed down and leveled off, I hit the water. As I hit, I immediately climbed out and gunner Smith did likewise. The valve on the life raft had frozen and it took 20 minutes before it became fully inflated. All rations, with the exception of the candy bar and canteen of water, were attached to the life raft cover. We threw these away in our haste to get to the raft. We never gave up any time during those three days. We prayed each morning and night, and several times during the day--and our prayers were answered. We crashed into the water around 4:30 a.m. and rowed until 11 a.m.; got so hot at that time we just had to eat. Sgt. Smith and myself started a conversation and I learned at that time we both were Baptists, he being a Northern Baptist, and I a Southern Baptist. About three hours after we crashed, we saw one of our planes about 200 feet off to the right. After firing a full clip of tracer bullets into the sky and failing to attract attention, we became a little discouraged and knew then it was up to us to row to land.' Lieut. McLaughlin was the first to start rowing when Sgt. Smith became ill after the crash. 'By late afternoon I was feeling much better,' said Sgt. Smith, 'and I took my turn at rowing.' 'We worked in intervals, each taking an hour with the paddle. Lt. McLaughlin was really swell. He told me right from the start to call him Mac, his nickname, since his last name was too long. 'He never at any time made a decision without first consulting me. On such things as the weather, water current, distance to land he'd always say, 'what do you think Smitty?' During the first night the pair rowed east continuously, but by morning both were practically exhausted. During the day they drifted and later learned they had been heading directly toward the Japs. 'Late afternoon a calm easterly breeze came up,' said the Marine pilot, 'we immediately began hacking at a salvaged parachute, making a crude sail. This carried us along for quite some distance. We thought sure we were going to get a storm that day and be able to catch some rain water. We were more thirsty than hungry. By nightfall two planes droned overhead and I emptied one clip of tracers and just as I got off the last one, both Smith and myself recognized the planes as Jap. We were really scared then. They came back circle over us for a few minutes, and then pulled away in the direction of Bougainville Island. We waited and waited, and did a lot of praying that they would not come back. Probably the only reason they didn't was because of a haze just overhead which prevented them from seeing us. Later that same night the Japs came in and bombed the beachhead at Empress Augusta Bay on Bougainville, and we had another terrible scare. Anti-aircraft shrapnel was raining all around us, and one shell landed about 75 feet away. During this time we nibbled on the chocolate bar and sipped from the single canteen of water. In the mornings we would wet our lips and once during each evening would take a tiny sip in an attempt to make the supply last. Although exhausted from thirst, we never were really very hungry, thanks to Sgt. Smith and his accuracy with a .45 pistol. Early on the second morning a large bird flew overhead. Smitty took two shots at him and nicked him both times. The bird fell just alongside our raft. We cleaned it the best we could and it didn't taste bad, either. Smitty was especially fond of the liver. Several times during the day we would catch small fish and eat them. Time and time again the tide would bring out coconuts, but all of them, with the exception of one, were spoiled. From that one we refreshed ourselves by drinking the milk, but could not eat the meat as it was sour.' At another time during those days of hardship, Lt. McLaughlin remembers how Sgt. Smith, although he had not qualified with a pistol during his recruit training days, proved he could hit just about anything if it was a case of necessity. At one time we saw sharks all around us. We were successful in chasing most of them off--all but one. This big fellow played around for quite a long time, all the while getting closer to our raft. He closed in and made several swishes with his tail as he went back and forth under our raft. His head popped up just a couple of feet away, and Smitty placed a bullet directly between his eyes. Around 7 a.m. of the fourth morning,' said Lt. McLaughlin, 'we saw a warship passing in the distance. I shot several tracers into the air. When we realized it was heading in our direction, we both shouted with joy--and offered a prayer of thanks.' Sergeant Smith's parents are Mr. and Mrs. George R. Smith, Sr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "T/Sgt. George R. Smith, Jr., who has been stationed at Santa Anna, Calif., has been visiting his parents...T/Sgt. Smith was expecting to leave California for overseas duty on his return," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Smith, Glenn Arthur. Kirkville. "Enlistment of Glenn Arthur smith, 19, of R. D. 1, Kirkville, in the Marine Corps today won't prevent him from continuing with his hobby of building model airplanes. Young Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roland Smith, said he will keep right on building them and at the same time try to become a pilot in the Corps air service. Wearing wings on his lapel denoting membership in the Junior Birdmen of America Club, Smith said he has been building model airplanes since he was nine years old," Minoa scrapbook, n.d.

Smith, Gordon B. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Corp. Gordon Smith of Virginia is spending a few days furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Gordon Smith," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/3/1941. "Gordon Smith, who is in the U. S. service has been spending several days furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Gordon Smith," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/30/1942. "Brussels, Belgium--Major Gordon B. Smith...has been awarded the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achievement as Chief of the Supply Branch, G-4, Chanor Base Section, from March 1 to May 8, 1945. The citation for the coveted award reveals that Maj. Smith 'was responsible for the staging accommodations and supply of thousands of troops. He gave careful consideration to each and every supply problem. With organizational ability he supervised the supply procedures for the Base Section and to him is due much credit for the successful role that the Base Section has played in the redeployment of units from the European theater of operations.' Before entering the Army four years ago, Major Smith was employed by the Penn Railroad, Philadelphia...as civil engineer. He was graduated from the Yale university. Overseas for two and a half years, Major Smith has also been awarded two battle participation stars and the Bronze Arrowhead for landing on D-Day on Omaha Beach," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Smith, Harry. Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Smith have received a telegram from their son, Tech. Sgt. Harry Smith, stating that he was enroute from California to Ft. Dix, where he expects to be honorably discharged, and will arrive home this week. Sgt. Smith has been serving with the Army in Manila. He celebrated his birthday on Wednesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/19/1946.

Smith, Howard L. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll.

Smith, Robert. Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. Bert Smith received a letter from their son, Robert, of the U. S. Medical Division, telling of his safe arrival in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944.

Smith, Stanley. Fayetteville. "Stanley Smith with the U. S. ordnance department in Iceland has just been promoted to the rank of captain, according to word received by his brother, Rev. Roy L. Smith of Clinton st. Capt. Smith has been in the service for three years, and in Iceland for a year and a half. Prior to his enlistment he was working on his doctorate in Botany at Cornell University, where he was graduated, and also received his master's degree,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/7/1944.

Smith, Thomas F. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Thomas Smith of the U. S. Army, spent a furlough with his father, Mr. Fred Smith, of Rotnour Bridge," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/20/1942.

Smith, Todd Andersen. Fayetteville. "Others from this area who have taken the navy oath are...Todd Anderson Smith, 20 E. Manlius st., Fayetteville..." The Post-Standard, 8/9/1944. "Todd Andersen Smith, grandson of Mrs. Millie Todd Smith of 203 South Manlius street, has enlisted in the U. S. Navy and left Wednesday for Buffalo enroute to the Sampson Naval Training Station where he will receive his basic training. Mr. Smith comes from a long line of Navy people. His great-grandfather, William E. Todd, saw action in the Civil war as an officer on the U. S. Gunboat Pawnee. His father was an Ensign in the last war and his mother was enlisted in the Navy at that time as a yeomanette (now called Waves) with the rank of yeoman 1st class. She has been an active member of the Dolly Madison Post of American Legion, having served as adjutant of that post. Todd Smith has been employed at the Precision Castings company and has been staying at his cottage at Green Lake with his mother, Mrs. Catherine A. Smith," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Todd A. Smith, S 2/c, U. S. Navy Seabees, of 203 South Manlius st., is spending a few days with Oliver Gridley before going to New York to visit his parents. He is on 15 days leave after completing the construction of an airport in the desert. Smith is in Co. 'D' 6th Const. Bat., Pt. Hueneme, Calif.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Todd A. Smith, M.O.M.M. 3rd cl. of 203 South Manlius street, has received his discharge from the Navy upon his return from Okinawa where he served 11 months with the 6th, 227th, and 58th battalions of the Sea-Bees and was awarded the following, Sharpshooter, American T.O. medal, Asiatic Pacific medal, Letter of Commendation, and Victory medal," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/5/1946.

Snee, Delmar. Manlius. "Delmar Snee...left last Thursday for Ft. Niagara. Word received this week stated that Mason Crowe had already left Ft. Niagara, but the other boys were remaining for an indefinite time," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. "Corp. Delmar W. Snee, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Snee of Cherry street, has returned to Kentucky after spending a seven-day furlough at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. " 'You'll never know how wonderful the Red Cross has been to us. I'll tell you about it some day,' Corp. Delmar W. Snee, 19, has written home to is mother, Mrs. J. A. Snee of Manlius, encouraging her in her work in the Manlius chapter. Writing from North Ireland where he has been stationed with the quartermaster corps since September, Corp. Snee praised the activities of the Red Cross on the transport which carried him overseas. 'Over here,' he wrote 'clubs of the USO sort are run by the Red Cross. They have all kinds of entertainment. They even have a swimming pool at the one I go to. In England on Sunday mornings after church we would go and have toast and jam and coffee there. Money given to these organizations is put to good advantage, you can be sure,' he wrote. Writing of the USO clubs in this country Corp. Snee said the finest one he had visited was located in Tennessee. 'It was very large, and there was everything imaginable in it,' he said. 'The USO clubs are grand places for a soldier to go to while traveling. You're always welcome. Corp. Snee is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Snee, of Cherry Street, Manlius. He was graduated from Manlius High School and was employed at the Socony gasoline station in Manlius before entering service in January, 1943. He trained at Camp Sutton, N.C. and in Kentucky before being sent overseas. The soldier's mother is active in Red Cross work in Manlius, where she does sewing, rolls bandages and other work," The Post-Standard, 3/18/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schwaninger (Kirkville) entertained at dinner Monday night in honor of discharge at Fort Dix, Cpl. Snee of Manlius, who returned home Monday night after receiving his discharge at Fort Dix. Cpl. Snee served 34 months in the service 28 of them overseas. He was 60 miles from Berlin at the end of the European war, he served with the First Army, also participating in D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge in Belgium. He wears ETO campaign ribbons, five battle stars, and a combat ribbon for participating in the final stages of the war. He was presented with the Presidential Citation overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. LaPointe of Fayette street, this village (Manlius) announce the engagement of and approaching marriage of their daughter Mary Louise LaPointe to Delmar Whitney Snee.... The wedding will take place in Christ Church, Manlius, Oct. 26. Miss LaPointe is a graduate of Manlius high school. Mr. Snee is also a Manlius high school graduate and has an honorable discharge following service in the Army including 28 months in the European area. He is employed by the Standard Oil Company," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/6/1946.

Snook, Carlton V. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Carlton V. Snook...of Fayetteville...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Lieutenant (Coburn) Snook (deceased) was married to a Texas girl last April who survives him, together with his parents; three brothers, Cortland, of Fayetteville, Clark E. of New Jersey, and Corp. Carlton Snook of California; three sisters, Mrs. N. P. Makanna of Long Island, Miss Josephine Snook of San Antonio, and Mrs. N. E. Robinson, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "On Monday night, Sept. 25, at 7 o'clock in the United Church, Miss Lulu Kathryn Svendsen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Svendsen of the Dry Hill road and Cpl. Carlton V. Snook of Camp Butner, N. C., son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snook of Highbridge, were united in married," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "With the 33rd Division on Luzon.--(Delayed).--Cpl. Carlton V. Snook of R.F.D. 1, Fayetteville, N. Y., has just joined the 123rd Infantry Regiment and is a member of Med. Det. Company. This regiment recently climaxed a two months campaign of rugged mountain fighting in Central Luzon by capturing Beguio, the summer capital of the Philippines. Originally composed of National Guardsmen of Illinois, the 123rd Infantry Regiment is a seasoned outfit whose veterans fought in the jungles of Dutch New Guinea. Cpl. Snook was inducted into the Army on Oct. 19, 1942 and left the States for overseas duty in May 10, 1945. Before he entered the army he was employed as a machinist," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. Arrival on S.S. Typhoon due in Seattle yesterday, S/Sgt. Carlton Snook, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 2/3/1946. Discharged Thursday from Fort Dix...S/Sgt. Carlton V. Snook, Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 2/16/1946.

Snook, Coburn B. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Another one of Fayetteville's young men became a part of our armed forces on Friday when Coburn B. Snook, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snook of Highbridge road, enlisted in the Flying Cadet Corps of the Army. Snook, along with others who enlisted at this time, will be sent to pilot training schools. His closest chum, Second Lieutenant Bert Pierson of Syracuse, was killed in a plane crash in California a few weeks ago and Snook stated at the time of his enlistment that he hoped to carry on where he left off," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1941. "Miss Josephine Snook of Highbridge went to Texas to spend Christmas with her brother, Coburn Snook, who is in service there," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/2/1942. "Three Syracuse and Onondaga county aviation cadets were graduated from the air corps training course at Kelly Field, Tex., in the past week and awarded their pilots wings and commissions as second lieutenants. They are...Lt. Coburn B. Snook of Fayetteville. They will be assigned to combat units or to instructor training posts," The Post Standard, 2/16/1942. "Lt. Coburn Snook, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snook of Highbridge was killed Monday when a medium bomber crashed and burned at Harlington Field, Texas. Ten fellowmen also perished. No further details have been received by the family as to the cause of the accident, although it is understood that the plane had hit the runway before the accident occurred. Lieutenant Snook was born in Highbridge 24 years ago. He attended Fayetteville High School, from which he was graduated in 1937 and was a student at Syracuse University for two years. He enlisted in the air corps in July, 1941 and received his wings in February, 1942. An instructor at Randolph Field, for several months, Lieutenant Snook had asked for a transfer to a unit where he might see foreign service. This was granted, and he was receiving instructions at Harlingen Army Gunnery School at the time of the fatality. His last visit to his home here was in October, 1942. The body arrived in Fayetteville this morning, accompanied by his widow and his sister, Miss Josephine Snook, who has been doing work for the government in San Antonio, Texas. Full military rites will be held at the funeral services which are tentatively set for Saturday afternoon. Lieutenant Snook was married to a Texas girl last April who survives him, together with his parents; three brothers, Cortland, of Fayetteville, Clark E. of New Jersey, and Corp. Carlton Snook of California; three sisters, Mrs. N. P. Makanna of Long Island, Miss Josephine Snook of San Antonio, and Mrs. N. E. Robinson, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "...Surviving Lieutenant Snook besides his parents, is his wife, Mrs. Aubrey Snook of Combes, Tex...Mrs. Snook is a former resident of San Antonio, Tex...from Fayetteville High School to Syracuse University where he attended the College of Applied Science two years...," The Herald-Journal, March 1943, Vail scrapbook. "Lt. Henry Porter, stationed in Texas, was one of the escorts to the body of Lt. Coburn Snook, killed at Harlington Field, Texas, when it was brought here for burial last week. Lt. Porter spent three days at the home of his parents in Elm street, his first trip home in nearly two years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943. "We wish to extend our sincere thanks to all of those who assisted in any way during our recent bereavement, the death of our son, husband and brother, Lt. Coburn B. Snook, and also to those who sent floral pieces and furnished cars. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snook and Family; Mrs. Coburn Snook and son," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/2/1943.

Snyder, Richard. Fayetteville. "Dick Snyder of the Sampson Naval base is spending a week's furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snyder of Chapel street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. "Dick Snyder, seaman 2/c, who has been stationed in Washington, D. C. for the past few weeks is passing several days with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Richard Snyder, electrician mate, 3/c U. S. N. spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snyder, at their home in Chapel street. Dick received his present rating three weeks ago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Two...local men had a chance meeting in France, recently. They were T/5 Leigh A. Wadsworth and Electricians Mate 3/c Dick Snyder. They spent some time together, exchanging news events from the old home town," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944. "Richard 'Dick' Snyder, EM 2/c, U.S.N., arrived home Sunday to spend 32 days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snyder. Dick has been overseas in the European theater for sixteen and one-half months and he says he has seen 'plenty'. At the end of his furlough he will return to Norfolk, Va., for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/22/1944.

Soltau, Jean. Manlius. (Town of Pompey) "Gene Salto (sic), stationed at Sampson Naval Base is at home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Gene Soltan (sic) of the U. S. Navy is at home on a 10-day furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945.

Sortor, Ralph F. Fayetteville. "Board 474 will send 14 men into the service Monday, while board 473 will send seven the next day. Men from these two boards soon to be inducted are...Ralph F. Sortor, Huntleigh Ave., Fayetteville..."The Post-Standard, 9/2/1944.

Spencer, Carl McLennan. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following registrants with their order numbers in selective service district 473, comprising the towns of Dewitt, Manlius and Salina, will be inducted into the army today: ...Carl McL. Spencer, 506 S. Manlius st., Fayetteville..." The Post Standard, 3/19/1942. "Pvt. Carl M. Spencer, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Carl Spencer of 508 Manlius st., Fayetteville (was) graduated recently from the Chanute field school of the army air forces technical training command," The Post-Standard, 7/31/1942. "Carl M. Spencer...who is a C. N. T. instructor at Davis-Monthan Field at Tucson, Ariz., has been promoted to the rank of sergeant, according to word received by his parents. Mr. Spencer will be married on Friday, Nov. 27 to Miss Ruth Henry, daughter of Mr. Joseph Henry of Syracuse, in Grace Episcopal Church in Tucson," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "Joseph Henry of Syracuse announces the marriage of his daughter, Ruth Marie, to Sgt. Carl McLennan Spencer...The wedding took place on November 27...The couple will live at 423 East Fourth street, Tucson, where the bridegroom is an instructor attached to the 32nd Air Base at Davis-Monthan Field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Carl M. Spencer of Tucson, Ariz., are visiting Mr. Spencer's father, A. Carl Spencer, and his sisters, Mrs. William Clyne and Mrs. Robert Cossatt. Carl has been honorably discharged from the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/28/1945.

Spencer, Orton F. Fayetteville. "Among others preparing for the immediate future through the recently established War Service College at (Syracuse) University are John D. Kronen and Orton F. Spencer, son of M. Lyle Spencer, dean of the college, both residents of Fayetteville. Continuing in their respective schools would have meant a more liberal but less immediately or 'pre-industrial training' for the Hill students. The courses will be three or four semesters in length and present brief, technical training. Of major importance to those youths entering military or industrial careers, the college is run on a 'war-time' basis. Aware of the vital need for trained men and women in the fields of industry, engineering and mechanics, the courses are keyed to the highest pitch in efficiency, thoroughness and speedy completion. Started as more or less of an experiment, the War Service college is wholly new to University curriculum. Unusually technical and accelerated in its schedule, the college like all war institutions of the present, has tried the mettle of today's youth and has found them apparently worthy of the hard task before them," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. Fayetteville. "Among graduates of the class of '43 from Fayetteville high school who have already gone into military training are...Orton Spencer, who left yesterday for Union College, Schenectady, will study under the Navy V 12 program..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Midshipman Orton F. Spencer, who is spending a leave with is parents, Dean and Mrs. M. Lyle Spencer, will return to Northwestern university after the Thanksgiving holiday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Mrs. M. Lyle Spencer has returned from Chicago, Ill., where she went to attend the graduation of her son, Ensign Orton Spencer. Ensign Spencer returned to Fayetteville with his mother for several days," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "Great Lakes, Ill.--Orton F. Spencer, 18, son of Dean and Mrs. M. Lyle Spencer, 222 Salt Springs street, Fayetteville, N.Y., was commissioned an Ensign in the U. S. Naval Reserve when he graduated recently from the Naval Reserve Midshipmen's School at Abbott Hall, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill. His completed four-month course consisted of instruction in navigation, seamanship, damage control, communications, ordnance and gunnery. The newly commissioned Ensign will now see action with the fleet as a deck officer," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "Dean M. Lyle Spencer spent a few days this week with his son Orton Spencer at West Point," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945.

Spendle, Donald. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Spendle, Donald, Central Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Spendle, John A. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Pvt. John Spendle of the U. S. army is spending a furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Stephen Spendle, car repairman for the New York Central Railroad, died at his home, 136 Central avenue, Minoa, last Friday evening. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Eva Spendle; four sons, Pfc. John Spendle, now serving overseas; Pfc. Michael Spendle of Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.; Ronald and George Spendle; four daughters, Mrs. George Ducar; Mrs. Elmer Okoniewski of Fulton; Miss Sophie and Miss Helen Spendle; and two grandchildren," The Eagle Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Three army engineers from this vicinity, who have been toughened by the battles of the North African campaign, have arrived in England to help train other engineers preparing for the invasion of Western Europe. They are Pvt. John A. Spendle, 27, of 136 Central Ave., Minoa..." The Post-Standard, 3/18/1944. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Spendle, John, Central Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Spendle, Michael. Minoa. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. "Michael Spindle, who is in army service at Fort Niagara, spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Pvt. Mike Spendle of the U. S. army, visited his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "Pvt. Mike Spendle has been visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Spendle," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/4/1942. "Stephen Spendle, car repairman for the New York Central Railroad, died at his home, 136 Central avenue, Minoa, last Friday evening. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Eva Spendle; four sons, Pfc. John Spendle, now serving overseas; Pfc. Michael Spendle of Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.; Ronald and George Spendle; four daughters, Mrs. George Ducar; Mrs. Elmer Okoniewski of Fulton; Miss Sophie and Miss Helen Spendle; and two grandchildren," The Eagle Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Pfc. Mike Spendle has been visiting his mother and will return to California this week," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Spendle, John, Central Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Spereau, Harry. Fayetteville. "Lt. Harry Spereau is on leave from Rhoads Hospital and will pass the remainder of the month at his home here.

Stafford, Raymond H. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pvt. Ray Stafford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stafford of Dewitt Park, Fayetteville, is now stationed with the medical corps hospital at Pine Camp. Pvt. Stafford is the youngest soldier in his outfit, having just passed his 18th birthday," The Post-Standard, 7/17/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stafford of Dewitt park, Fayetteville have received word that their son, Pvt. Ray (Jerry) Stafford has been awarded the bronze star for medical and surgical aid beyond the line of duty and under enemy fire. Stafford has been awarded the bronze star for medical and surgical aid beyond the line of duty and under enemy fire. Stafford has been overseas since December, 1942, with the 61st station hospital, serving in Africa, Sicily and Italy," The Post-Standard, 7/25/1945. "The following are scheduled to arrive in the States after service overseas, according to lists prepared by The Associated Press...On Abe Lincoln due in Newport News Nov. 17...Pvt. Raymond H. Stafford, Dewitt Park, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/19/1945.

Stanier, Henry Kessler. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Henry K. Stanier...of Manlius...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Henry Kessler Stanier of Fayetteville Road, Fayetteville, N. Y., arrived at Bradley Polytechnic Institute in Peoria to begin a course in basic engineering under the Army Specialized Training program. With classes starting August 9, the 400 men assigned to Bradley will study mathematics, physics, chemistry, history, English, and geography for three 12-week terms. The trainees have come to Bradley from almost every State in the Union with every type of educational and social background. Chosen on the basis of high ratings in Army classification tests, the soldiers are all being trained for technical proficiency and leadership at government expense and under Army discipline," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Pfc. Henry K. Stanier has returned from overseas duty in the European theater of war and is spending a 30-day leave with his mother, Mrs. Wilbur McCaslin, at her home on the Syracuse Road. Pfc. Stanier went into service in November, 1942, and was overseas 10 months. He was with the 104th infantry (Timberwolf Division) and participated in campaigns in Belgium, Holland and Germany. He wears three battle stars and was awarded the Combat Infantryman's Badge and the Purple Heart. Wounded in the hand, Stanier spent several weeks in a hospital in England. Prior to this he was First Scout of Company G of the 104th infantry and after being returned to combat was driver of a jeep. The 104th was the first to travel directly from the States to France. A month after landing, the Timberwolves, led by Maj. Gen. Terry Allen, went into the line and remained in continuous combat for more than six months. The final phase of the Timberwolf combat in Germany saw the men of the 104th racing to the Mulde River where the last remnants of the Wehrmacht were crushed between the Russians and the American First Army, making that sector the first in Germany to be cleared completed and conquered," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945. "The following named officers and enlisted men were discharged Friday at Fort Dix...Pfc. Henry K. Stanier, Fayetteville rd., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/16/1945. "Announcement is made by Mrs. Glenn F. Trinder of Brooklea Drive, of the engagement of her daughter, Miss Francis Louise Trinder, to Henry Kessler Stanier, son of Mrs. Wilbur R. McCaslin of Fayetteville...Mr. Stanier is a graduate of Pebble Hill School and attended Cornell university before entering the army. He was discharged last fall after three years in the infantry, serving in the ETO. He is now a student in the College of Business Administration, Syracuse university," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1946.

Stanton, George. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Stanton, Joseph, Jr. Fayetteville. "Joseph Stanton, Jr. has been accepted in the U.S.N. and left Wednesday night for the Great Lakes Naval Training Station," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945. "Joseph Stanton, Jr., S 1/c has completed his boot training at Great Lakes Naval Training Station in Illinois and is spending a week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Stanton," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Stanton, Robert. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Starowitz, Cesmer. Manlius. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Navy..." The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "Four men from this area have been granted leaves following completion of basic training at the U.S. Naval station, Sampson...Cesmer Starowitz, husband of Dorothy Starowitz of 139 E. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 6/8/1843.

Starowitz, Charles. Manlius. "Mrs. Charles Starowitz and mother Mrs. Goodmore, Mr. and Mrs. John Starowitz, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Goodmore and infant son, visited Charles Starowitz at the Sampson naval Base on Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943. "Charles Starowitz of the U. S. Navy, has received an honorable discharge and returned to his home in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/30/1944.

Starowitz, John. Manlius. "Mrs. John Starowitz left Friday of last week to visit her husband who is now stationed in North Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "Mrs. Michael Stickney of Geneva and Mrs. John Starowitz of Manlius left Wednesday by auto to spend several weeks with their husbands who are at Keesler Field, Miss. They will reside at Biloxi, Miss., near the camp," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "Pvt. John Starowitz of the Army Air Corps has returned to his study in Baltimore, Md., having been called home by the death of his father in Utica," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Mrs. John Starowitz is visiting her husband, Pvt. Starowitz of the Air Corps who is now stationed in Georgia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "Pvt. John Starowitz of the U. S. Air Corps has been transferred from Georgia to Panama, Fla. Mrs. Starowitz has accompanied her husband to his new location," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "John Starowitz of the U. S. Army is passing a furlough with Mrs. Starowitz at their home in East Seneca street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "John Starowitz has received an honorable discharge from the Army and returned Monday to his former position at Easy Washer Co.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/31/1946.

Steele, Russell H. Manlius. Army release...Pfc. Russell H. Steele, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 2/14/1946.

Stempien, Henry. Manlius. "Local Draft Board 473 called up 19 men for induction this week. They will be examined by the board of which Jesse W. Clarke is chairman and Collin Armstrong and Matthew F. O'Brien. The group called from this vicinity are as follows: ...Henry Stempien, 139 Washington street, Manlius...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941.

Story, Charles. Fayetteville. T/Sgt. Charles Story has returned to his base at Camp Berkley, Texas, after passing a few days leave with his mother, Mrs. Eloise Story, at her home in East Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945.

Straub, Alfred M. Fayetteville. Inducted into the navy, The Post-Standard, 6/4/1943.

Straub, Raymond E. Fayetteville. "More local boys who have left to join various branches of U. S. service are...Raymond E. Straub, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Straub, who enlisted in the Air Corps and left Monday for the training center at San Antonio, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Naval Aviation Cadet Raymond Straub...has successfully completed the intensive 11-week course at the U. S. navy Pre-Flight School here. He has been promoted to primary flight training at the naval Air Station at Glenview, Ill. Cadet Straub attended Syracuse University, class of '45. At the pre-flight school his course included physical conditioning, athletics, military drill, instruction in the essentials of naval service and ground school subjects. After three months of primary flying and three additional months of advanced flying, he will be eligible for a commission as an ensign in the U. S. naval Reserve or second lieutenant in the Marine Corps Reserve, and the coveted 'Gold Wings' of a naval aviator," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Ensign Raymond E. Straub...was recently graduated from the naval training center, Corpus Christi, Tex., and will report for further training at Daytona Beach, Fla. He attended Syracuse university before beginning training at Cornell university March 8, 1943. He took pre-flight training at Chapel Hill, N.C. and primary at Glenview, Ill.," The Post-Standard, 7/28/1944. "Ensign Raymond E. Straub, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. Straub of 112 Center st., Fayetteville was killed Saturday when his plane crashed near the Deland, Fla. naval air station..."The Post-Standard, 8/15/1944. "Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 p. m. at the Methodist church for Ensign Raymond E. Straub, 22, latest Fayetteville casualty of World War II. The body will lie in state for one hour before services. Rev. Roy L. Smith, pastor of the Fayetteville Methodist church, will officiate. Ensign Straub met death last Saturday when his plane crashed near Deland, Florida. He had been stationed at Daytona Beach for further training after being graduated from the Naval Training Center at Corpus Christi, Texas, last month. He began his training at Cornell university March 8, 1943, and took pre-flight training at Chapel Hill, N. C., and primary training at Glenview, Ill., before going to Texas. Straub is the third Fayetteville high school graduate to be killed in an airplane crash in this country within the last six months and the ninth F. H. S. graduate to die in the service of this country. John E. Mapstone was killed last March in Georgia and Theodore Lamprecht met his death in Florida last April. An outstanding student especially in art, throughout his high school career, Straub was awarded a competitive scholarship in art at Syracuse university where he studied nearly two years before going into service. He also had an outstanding personality and sense of humor and all indications pointed towards a most promising future for this outstanding young citizen. Surviving Ensign Straub are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Straub, his sister, Mrs. Edward Hillenbrand, his brother, Alfred M. Straub of Center street, also his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Chambers, of Fayetteville, and Mrs. Isabelle Straub, of Binghamton, N. Y., Ensign Robert Bracey, also stationed at Daytona Beach, accompanied Ensign Straub's remains to his home here. Funeral arrangements are by C. R. Eaton of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944.

Strauss, Raymond A. Manlius. "Board 473, East Syracuse, sent...four into the navy...Raymond A. Strauss, Manlius, RD 2..." The Post-Standard, 4/29/1945.

Stringham, Marjorie. Fayetteville. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...Marie Stringham, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Strong, Maxon. Fayetteville. "On Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock at the United Church rectory, Miss Anne Grave Teske, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Teske of the Green Lake Road, became the bride of Ralph Lucien Strong of this village (Fayetteville), son of Mr. Maxon Strong of Fulton, N.Y. The bridegroom, inducted into service last week, left (the following) Tuesday for Albany to await assignment to a naval base. The bride will continue her work at the Precision Castings Co., and reside with her parents for the duration," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/16/1943.

Strong, Ralph L. Fayetteville. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Navy...Ralph L. Strong, Fayetteville, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943.

Sturick, Anthony. Minoa/Kirkville. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Private Anthony Sturick of Fort Devens, Mass., spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Pvt. Anthony Sturick of Camp Musterfield, Mass., spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Pvt. Anthony Sturick of Fort Knox, Kentucky, spent the week end with his family," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Pvt. Anthony Sturick of Pine Camp visited his parents over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/9/1942. "Pvt. Anthony Sturick of Pine Camp has been spending a furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "Corp. A. B. Sturick of Minoa is attending dental training school at Lawson General hospital, Atlanta, Ga. He is a graduate of Minoa high school and formerly was employed at Stickley's in Fayetteville. He has been in the service 18 months," The Post-Standard, 1/3/1944. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Sullivan, Arthur. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pvt. Arthur Sullivan of Fort Jackson is spending a furlough with his mother, Mrs. Frances Sullivan," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Pvt. Arthur Sullivan of the U. S. Army is spending a furlough with his mother, Mrs. Frances Sullivan at her home on the Lyndon-Highbridge Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/12/1943. "Corp. Arthur Sullivan, who has recently returned from the Africa theater of war, is passing a furlough with his mother, Mrs. Frances Sullivan of Highbridge-Lyndon Road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943.

Sullivan, Earl. Fayetteville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were...Earl Sullivan...of Fayetteville..." (Highbridge Rd.) The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942.

Sullivan, George. Fayetteville. "Lt. (jg) George Sullivan, of Boston, Mass., spent a few days recently at his home in Brooklea Drive with his wife and children, and attended the wedding of his brother on Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/1/1944.

Sunderman, Edward A. Manlius, Wilcox Ave., Accepted into the Navy, "The Post-Standard, 12/4/1943.

Sutton, Edward James. Minoa. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "...Edward Sutton left for army service Tuesday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Sutton, Edward, 512 Central Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Sutton, Robert J. Manlius. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Svendsen, Carl H. Formerly Fayetteville. "Lt. Carl H. Svendsen...was graduated Dec. 4 from bombardier school at Deming army air field, Deming, N. M. and commissioned a second lieutenant. He attended State Teachers college in Albany," The Post-Standard, 12/8/1943. "Lt. Carl H. Svendsen, 27, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Svendsen of the Dry Hill road, bombardier on a B-17 flying fortress, has been awarded the silver star and purple heart for gallantry displayed on a mission over Europe April 28. An official report of the action was as follows: 'On a mission over enemy-occupied Europe, April 28, during the bombing run, but prior to reaching the point of release, a fragment of flack struck Lt. Svendsen in the throat severely wounding him. He was knocked from his position, where he was preparing to release his bombs. The navigator hastened to his side intent on administering first aid. With blood gushing from his throat, Lt. Svendsen, unable to speak, struggled free of the navigator and returned to the bombsight. Holding one hand on his throat to partially stop the flow of blood, he released his bombs precisely with the lead plane, closed the bomb-bay doors and then collapsed. Only then was the navigator able to check the hemorrhage and administer first aid treatment.' After almost three months in the hospital, Lt. Svendsen is back at his base awaiting assignment to another crew. His original crew was shot down over France two days before he returned. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, he was employed in Rochester before entering the service in August, 1942. His wife, Mrs. Eloise McNally Svendsen, and son, Donald William, reside at 484 Alexander street, Rochester. He was commissioned a bombardier in December, 1943, at Deming, N. M., and went overseas on April 11, 1944," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944.

Swain, Lester, Jr. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Lester Swain, Jr. has returned to duties in the U. S. Navy after passing a 10-day furlough with his wife and parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/30/1942.

Swanson, Hilda. Formerly Fayetteville. "Miss Hilda Swanson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Victor Swanson, of Syracuse, former residents of Fayetteville, and widely known golfer, has taken the oath of enlistment in the Waves, and will leave next month for six weeks training at Hunter College. Miss Swanson is a graduate of Fayetteville high school. She holds the women's championship of Green Lake Golf Club, city driving championship and hole-in-one championship. The golfer has asked for one of two assignments, recruiting duty or Specialist S, which is directing recreation programs and acting as counselor to trainees," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944.

Swartner, Carl. Fayetteville. "David Gregory, Cady Kepler and Carl Swartner have enlisted in the U. S. Navy and expect to be called for boot training in the near future," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Sweet, Charles. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara...Charles Sweet...from Fayetteville" The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Pfc. Charles Sweet has returned to Savannah, Ga., after passing a 15-day furlough with his mother..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Funeral services for Charles Sweet, 80, who died last Thursday, were held at 2 o'clock last Saturday afternoon...Born in Erieville, Mr. Sweet had lived most of his life in this village (Fayetteville). He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Squires Sweet, two daughters, Mrs. Carl Cooper of East Syracuse, and Mrs. Eugene LeRue of Syracuse, one son, Charles, with the U. S. Air Force, and nine grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Sgt. Charles Sweet of Savannah, Ga., has been spending a five-day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Mary Sweet," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "Cpl. Charles H. Sweet, son of Mrs. Mary Sweet, 106 North street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been promoted to the rank of sergeant, it was announced today by Col. L. L. Koontz, Commanding Officer, Hunter Field, Georgia. Sgt. Sweet entered the service at Syracuse on Aug. 19, 1942. Prior to entering the service he was employed by the Precision Castings Co.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Honorably discharged Tuesday S/Sgt. Charles H. Sweet, 106 North st., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 10/25/1945.

Sweet, William J., Jr. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. William Sweet, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Sweet of Pleasant street, has been stationed at the Chemical Warfare Arsenal at Maryland for the last three months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. "Private William Sweet of Edgewood Arsenal, Md., spent the week-end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/18/1941. "Pvt. William Sweet, lst Chemical Co. Lab., Edgewood Arsenal, Md., has written this week to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Sweet, Sr., telling of his advancement to the rank of acting technical sergeant," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/5/1941. "Private William Sweet of 302 Pleasant street, Manlius, has been commissioned at Edgewood Arsenal, Md., for especially meritorious and outstanding service during the first Army maneuvers. Private Sweet's commendation mentioned exceptional qualities of initiative and resourcefulness in emergencies," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/23/1942. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Sweet, Sr. of 302 Pleasant street, are the proud possessors of two ceremonial Swastika flags and a binocular sight from a German '88', which was sent to them by their son, Capt. William J. Sweet, Jr., of the famous 'F' Co., 2nd Bn. 504 Parachute Infantry now stationed in Germany. Capt. Sweet, a veteran of engagements in Sicily, Naples, Foggia, Rome, Anzio, Ardennes, Central Europe, Holland and the Rhine, is at present in France. He has been awarded the Purple heart and Silver Star for bravery in action. Although over his quota of points for retirement, he volunteered to continue in service. Captain Sweet states that he expects that the 82nd will be made one of the permanent bodies to occupy Germany," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/22/1945. "Word comes from Maj. Gen. James M. Gavin that the Silver Star Medal has been awarded to Capt. William J. Sweet, Jr., of the 504th Parachute Infantry...The award was made for gallantry in action on Feb. 2, 1945, near Neuhof, Germany. Personally leading his company in an attack on strongly defended pillboxes and fortifications of the Siegfried line, Capt. Sweet so inspired his men by his courage and gallantry that they swept forward undaunted by the intense fire, neutralized the positions, and took 30 prisoners. When the enemy counter-attack threatened to split the battalion, Captain Sweet so committed his company as to confuse the enemy and disorganize their attack. Although wounded, he refused to be evacuated and continued to expose himself fearlessly as he directed the efforts of his men. The gallant leadership of Captain Sweet was a prime factor in the success of his battalion was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Airborne Forces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/3/1945. "Arrival on George Washington, due in New York today...William J. Sweet, Jr., 302 Pleasant st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 12/22/1945. "Capt. Sweet, first man from Onondaga county inducted into the army under the selective service act, has also been awarded the purple heart for wounds sustained in action in February, in the break through the Siegfried line. With the 82d airborne division, he has been action in Sicily, Cassino, Anzio, France, Holland and Germany. He received his commission in April, 1942, and was inducted as a volunteer Nov. 29, 1940," The Post-Standard, Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Capt. William Sweet, who arrived Christmas Eve to pass a well-earned furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Sweet, Sr., of Fayette street, will spend the week in New York, where he will participate in the 82nd Airborne parade on Saturday. Capt. Sweet will return home to complete his furlough and will report on Feb. 10 at Ft. Bragg. He expects to remain in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. "Mr. and Mrs. William Sweet, Sr., have returned from Fort Bragg, N. C. where they attended the wedding of their son, Capt. William Sweet, Jr.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/17/1946. "Capt. William J. Sweet, Jr., operations officer of the Second Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, has received his regular army commission as first lieutenant. Capt. Sweet entered service in November, 1942, and received his commission in the A.U.S., Oct. 19, 1942. He was promoted to the rank of captain Mar. 16, 1945. Serving with the 82d Division in Sicily, Italy, Central Europe, Holland, and German campaigns, Capt. Sweet was awarded the Silver Star, Soldiers' Medal, Bronze Star, Combat Infantryman's Badge, Netherlands Militaire Willems Orde, and Belgian Fourraguerre, in 1940, and the French Fourraguerre to the Croix de Guerre, 1935-1945. Capt. Sweet expects his wife, Mrs. Eleanor B. Sweet, who resides in Myrtle Beach, S. C. to join him this month. They will make their home in the American Community Center in Frankfurt-Am-Main..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/4/1946.

Swetman, Earl L. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "PFC Earl L. Swetman is now serving overseas in Wales, according to word received by his wife, Mrs. Doris Swetman of 205 Kittell Rd., Fayetteville. He is assigned to special service work with an infantry outfit. He has been in service 18 months and was formerly employed as manager of an A&P store," The Post-Standard, 12/11/1944.

Taffner, George E. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Taffner, George E., 112 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Tailby, John, Sr. Minoa. "The story of Seabee John Tailby, Gm1c, of Minoa, hero of World War I, who re-enlisted July 8 'to get another crack at the war mongers and help finish the job right this time' is told in BeeLines, official newspaper of Camp Peary, NCTS, Williamsburg, Va...He was sent to Camp Peary from the Syracuse naval recruiting station," The Herald-Journal, 9/29/1943. "Williamsburg, Va., Oct. 5--A veteran who was orderly to Winston Churchill in World War I and has a record of going over the top 47 times during that war is back in uniform at Camp Peary, training center of the navy's construction battalions near Williamsburg. He is John Tailby, 49, gunner's mate first class, who enlisted last July at Minoa, where he resided with his wife and two children. Tailby is a former Onondaga County deputy sheriff. Being an explosives expert in civil life, Tailby has been assigned a demolition job with his battalion. Recently he shot a sharpshooter score on the rifle range, which showed that he hasn't lost the keen eye and steady hand he developed at the front from 1914 to 1918. The first time Tailby volunteered was in August, 1914, while attending college in Scotland. In just a month's time he was in France, fighting with the Royal Scot Fusiliers. During April, 1915, after his regiment had been badly cut up, a lieutenant colonel named Winston Churchill was sent in to bolster the officer ranks and Tailby, then a sergeant, was appointed his orderly. Tailby continued in this capacity for more than two months, becoming well acquainted with the officer who later was to be prime minister of Great Britain. Churchill's constant concern for his men's well-being aroused a deep admiration for him throughout the ranks, Tailby says. After leaving Churchill, Tailby participated in the major Allied offensives. Twice he was wounded. Once, when his troopship was torpedoed en route to Egypt, he was given up for dead," The Post-Standard, 10/5/1943. "...When he enlisted, he left his wife working in a war plant, his daughter, Mrs. Carrol Hayden of Canastota, whose husband is overseas, and his son, John Tailby, Jr., working on a farm engaged in food production for the army. In civilian life, Tailby was an explosive expert, and according to BeeLines, will have a demolition job in his battalion and, says he, hoped he 'will be able to help blow the whole Axis crowd sky-high.' He was sent to Camp Peary from the Syracuse naval recruiting station," Manlius scrapbook, n.d. "Fayetteville--A letter has been received by the Eagle-Bulletin from an Emil Lapolla, of the U. S. naval Construction Center at Camp Peary, Va., regarding John Tailby, well known Minoa man and a former deputy sheriff of Onondaga County, who enlisted in the Seabees last July and has been associated with him in boot training since that time. He says of Tailby: 'He is one of the finest men I have ever met. Everyone likes him, and everywhere you go someone is asking, 'Where's Scotty?' He has just been made chief petty officer, a rank he is sincerely entitled to and well deserving of' ...Mr. Lapolla also sent to the Eagle-bulletin a copy of a 'Blue Book' which Scotty compiled. It contains the names, addresses and a fitting description of the men who trained in the 117th under Ensign John F. O'Brien and called themselves 'O'Brien's Babies.' In it there was also a fine tribute to Ensign O'Brien written by Tailby for members of the battalion. Mr. Tailby's wife and two children reside at 204 Elm street, Minoa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/19/194.3 "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Tailby, John Sr., 208 Elm St., Minoa, N.Y."

Talbot, Charles. Fayetteville. "Inducted into selective service by Draft Board 473 last week were three men from Fayetteville and several from nearby villages. They will leave for the reception center on Saturday. Included in this latest group of draftees are...Charles Talbot of Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942.

Talley, Dyer S. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pfc. Dyer S. Talley of 8 Lynacres, Fayetteville, has completed the 12 weeks radio operators' course at the marine corps base at Camp Lejeune, New River, N.C. A son of Dr. Dyer B. Talley, he enlisted in the marines last July 28. Pvt. Talley is now ready for advance schooling or assignment to communications duty with the fleet marine force," The Post-Standard, 1/30/1943. "Corp. Dyer S. Talley of Lynacres, Fayetteville, is among the marines who take a few minutes off to drink coffee which is served daily from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Okinawa. Fighting continues while the marines drink coffee from tin cups or cans while standing or sitting on supply barrels," The Post-Standard, 6/15/1945.

Tallon, Charles A. Manlius. "Pvt. Charles A. Tallon, previously reported missing in action, was killed in action in Germany on May 5, 1945, according to a telegram the war department sent to Mrs. Clayton Scott of Manlius RD 2. He was a member of an airborne division," Post Standard 11/14/1945.

Tardio, Matthew. Manlius. "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Navy...Matthew Tardio, 106 Fayette st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943. "Aboard the U.S.S. Concord En Route Home from Japan (Delayed).--Matthew Tardio, storekeeper 3/c, USNR, of 106 Fayette street, Manlius, N. Y., is en route home aboard this light cruiser after taking part in the original naval occupation of northern Japan. The Concord sailed from an Aleutians base to join the occupation forces, after having served through the rugged campaign in the North Pacific in which the cruiser made 10 successful forays against Japanese shipping and shore installations in the Kurile Islands. Seventy-eight enlisted men in the ship's company received special commendation from the Commanding Officer at a ceremony just before the ship sailed to northern Japan for her occupation assignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945. Navy release at Sampson, Matthew Tardio, SK 2/c, 106 Fayette st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 10/24/1945.

Taylor, Bernard J. Fayetteville/Manlius. Name appears on both the Fayetteville Honor Roll and Manlius Honor Roll. "Robert Gravelle and Bernard Taylor, two Manlius high school students, who enlisted for service, are now located at Savannah, Ga. Their address is Recruiting Detachment, Savannah Air Base, Savannah, Ga.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/1/1941. "Pvt. Robert Gravelle has written, giving a change of address: Bomb-Gun Range Dept., Savannah Air Base, Savannah, Ga. Gravelle and Bernard Taylor, both former Manlius high school pupils, have enrolled in the vocational high school. Robert is expecting to complete his senior year and is studying Spanish, English and history. (We are proud of our two boys and wish you success in your study)," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1941. "Sergeant Bernard J. Taylor, formerly of Fayetteville, now living in Manlius, is home on a 15-day furlough from U. S. Air Base, Atlanta, Ga., staying with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton B. Taylor of Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/25/1942.

Taylor, Earl. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Earl Taylor, who volunteered for military service and was inducted into the army on December 4, 1943, is home on furlough after having completed his training at Camp Blanding, Fla. Pvt. Taylor resides at 608 Walnut street with his wife and three children, and is now a number one gunner on a machine gun in a heavy weapons company. He can also act as a gunner on the 81 m.m. mortar, having qualified in this after special training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Strutting their stuff before an estimated crowd of 10,000 spectators, the Fayetteville Legion Drill Team was awarded 1st prize for marching and showmanship at Chittenango Field Day...With their present roster composed of 12 veterans including Earl Taylor...More veterans are need to round out this team," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/9/1946. On Queen Elizabeth due in New York City yesterday, Earl H. Taylor, Fayetteville, The Post Standard, 10/10/1945.

Taylor, Hugh. Fayetteville. "Among inductees from Board 473 for the month of April, are...of Fayetteville...Philo, McGann, Harter and Decker will see service in the U. S. Navy and the other draftees in the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943.

Taylor, Leonard C. Kirkville, Pools Brook Rd. "Local men were among the 56 accepted for services in the armed forces this week. Army...Leonard C. Taylor, Pools Brook Rd., Kirkville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. Found qualified for pre-aviation cadet basic training and ordered to Miami Beach, Fla., Leonard C. Taylor, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 11/3/1943. "Second Lt. Leonard C. Taylor, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chester G. Taylor of Kirkville, received his commission and bombardier-Navigator wings at San Angelo army air field, Tex., last week in graduation ceremonies," The Post-Standard, 6/25/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Taylor, Marie. Fayetteville/Kirkville. "Miss Marie Taylor, who has been a resident of this village for the past several years and an employee of the Precision Casting Co., has enlisted in the Waves and will leave soon for basic training. Co-workers from the Precision Castings Co. and friends gave her a farewell dinner party...Miss Taylor was presented with a traveling bag and a sum of money. Among those present were T/S. June Donegan of the WACs, who is visiting her parents in Syracuse, and Mrs. Patricia Gould, both former employees in the Precision office," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...Marines...Marie Taylor, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "In addition to the 13 names listed in the May 5 issue of the Eagle-Bulletin, the following girls from this area are also serving: WACS: Madeline Schlosser, Fayetteville. Nurse: Leola Hirsch and Joan McNally, Fayetteville; Elizabeth Hale, Manlius. WAVES: Betty Jane LaPoint, Teresa Caterina (Catterino) of Manlius, and Christine Hutchins, Kirkville. Marines: Margaret Taylor, Kirkville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944.

Tedd, Clifford Edward. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Aviation Cadet Robert N. Tedd, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Tedd of East Seneca St....has a brother who is a warrant officer in Hawaii and another brother in the Army in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "CWO Clifford E. Tedd of 159 Norwood ave., overseas 39 months in the South Pacific, is spending a 30-day leave with his wife and daughter. He had a reunion with his brother, Lt. Robert N. Tedd, who was fighting on the other side of the world. They hadn't seen each other in two years. CWO Tedd has five battle stars and a spearhead. A younger brother, William, has served 15 months and has been honorably discharged," The Post-Standard, 8/19/1945.

Tedd, Robert Nelson. Manlius/Minoa. Manlius Honor Roll. "Aviation Cadet Robert N. Tedd, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Tedd of East Seneca st., has received his wings and is a liaison pilot of the air corps at Fort Sill, Okla. He was recently promoted to staff sergeant. He has a brother who is a warrant officer in Hawaii and another brother in the Army in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Second Lt. Robert Nelson Tedd and his wife, have returned to Fort Sill, Okla., after spending a 17-day leave with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Tedd, of Manlius and Mr. and Mrs. George F. Kippley of Minoa. Lt. Tedd is a liaison pilot and received his commission last month. His brother is a warrant officer stationed in Hawaii," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "A division taxi and courier service has been opened by Piper Cub pilots of the Fifth infantry divisions' 'air forces,' of which Robert N. Tedd is one of the original members. He is...husband of Mrs. Agnes A. Tedd of 128 Edgerton st. During 10 months of combat the group flew more than 6,500 operational miles. The Cubs, each with a spare gas tank attached, were flown from northern Ireland to Normandy on July 10, 1944. At the war's end the 11-plane force daily transported division staff officers to meetings with high Russian officers. They now fly officers to conference at corps and army headquarters, in addition to flying important courier messages and contacting Russian troops in and around the division area. In combat, perhaps the most notable bit of observation occurred northeast of Vianden, Germany, where Red Diamond airmen spotted a German assembly area chock full of vehicles and equipment trying to escape from the bulge in January, 1945. A location of the area was sent immediately to the air corps and the same day Allied planes strafed and bombed the area, knocking out approximately 1,400 vehicles. The planes returned the following day to complete the kill," The Post-Standard, 7/15/1945. "Lt. Robert Nelson Tedd...is spending a 30-day leave with his wife and son whom he had never seen. He served 22 months in the European theater of operations, beginning with the campaign in Normandy. He has the air medal with seven oak leaf clusters and the silver star. Lt. Tedd was with the New York national guard trained at Fort McClellan and Santa Ana, Calif. He became a liaison pilot at Fort Sill, Okla., and left for overseas in September, 1943. He has 143 points. He will return to camp for further orders Aug. 21. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Tedd reside at 306 E. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 8/19/1945. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Tedd, Robert, 128 Edgerton St., Minoa, N.Y."

Tedd, William Lloyd. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Pvt. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Aviation Cadet Robert N. Tedd, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Tedd of East Seneca St....has a brother who is a warrant officer in Hawaii and another brother in the Army in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "...has served 15 months and has been honorably discharged," The Post-Standard, 8/19/1945.

Tellman, Campbell. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Campbell Tellman...." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Campbell J. Tellman, formerly of Churchill Lane, Fayetteville, N. Y., now stationed at the Ordnance Replacement Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., was recently promoted to the rank of corporal," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Corp. Campbell J. Tellman of Fayetteville, now stationed at the Delaware ordnance depot, Fredrickstown, N. J. has been promoted to technician, fourth grade," The Post-Standard, 5/21/1944.

Templar, Donald L. Manlius. "Pvt. Donald Templar is convalescing following an operation for appendicitis at the camp hospital. Donald was stricken soon after his return from a furlough with his family in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/18/1943. "Pvt. Donald Templar of Camp Forest, Tenn., has been passing a ten-day furlough with his wife and son at the home of his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/3/1943. "...Donald L. Templar is with an engineers combat battalion in the South Pacific . He entered service Jan. 11, 1943, and received basic training at Camp Phillips, Kan. He also went on Tennessee maneuvers," The Post-Standard, 4/9/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Templar have received word that their son, Donald L., has been promoted to the rank of corporal. Corporal Templar is now serving in New Guinea," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944. "Donald L. Templar,...member of an engineer battalion in the South Pacific, has been promoted to corporal. Corp. Templar has been overseas almost a year. He took basic training at Camp Phillips, Kan. His wife and son are living with her parents in Cazenovia. A brother, PFC Robert H. Templar, 23, visited Rome on a recent furlo. He served with an aviation engineers' regiment in Africa and Italy for 20 months. In service two years, he took basic training at Camp Belvoir, Va.," The Post-Standard, 9/27/1944. "Donald Templar, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Templar of Smith street in a recent letter to his parents stated that he had met his uncle, Anthony Romano in the Philippines. Mrs. Romano and Mrs. Templar are sisters," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/25/1945. "Finding that they were stationed only a short distance apart through letters from home, a nephew and his uncle were granted furloughs in the South Pacific to have a reunion. Corp. Donald Templar, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Templar of 107 Smith st., Manlius, was overjoyed to see his Uncle, Pvt. Anthony Romano, 1319 Cumberland Ave. Templar has served 18 months in the Pacific while his uncle has been 12 months in an adjoining territory. Corp. Templar's wife, Katherine, and son, Donald, are living with her parents. Pvt. Romano's wife is keeping the home fires burning in their new home built just before he enlisted," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Donald Templer has received an honorable discharge from the Army and is making his home with his wife and son in Cazenovia. They have been visiting for several days with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Templar, of Indian Hill road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946.

Templar, Robert Henry. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Mrs. Paul Wright will give a family part Monday night at her home in high street in honor of her brother, Robert Templar, who expects to leave August 5 for service and will be stationed for the present at Ft. Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "The following young men from this area were accepted for army duty at the induction station in Syracuse Wednesday, and in two weeks will go to the reception center at Fort Niagara...Henry Templer from Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Templar of Smith street were happily surprised with a week-end visit from their son, Pvt. Robert Templar. Robert is feeling fine and enjoyed his furlough at home, returning to Ft. Belvoir, Va., Sunday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/25/1942. "Pvt. Robert Templer recently returned to camp after spending a ten-day furlough with his wife and son at the home of his parents..." The Eagle Bulletin, 6/11/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Templar of 107 Smith street are entertaining Miss Peggy James, Arlington, N. J. fiancee of their son, Pfc. Robert Templar," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/12/1943. "Pfc Robert H. Templar, 22, ...has been serving with the aviation engineers regiment in overseas duty for 17 months. He entered service in August 1942, and received basic training at Camp Belvoir, Va. Three months later he saw service in Africa before going to Italy. An older brother, Donald L. Templar, is with an engineers combat battalion in the South Pacific..." The Post-Standard, 4/9/1944. A brother (of Donald L. Templar) , PFC Robert H. Templar, 23, visited Rome on a recent furlo. He served with an aviation engineers' regiment in Africa and Italy for 20 months. In service two years, he took basic training at Camp Belvoir, Va.," The Post-Standard, 9/27/1944. "Catching a large German truck convoy completed by surprise, a group of RAF Spitfires of the coastal command recently destroyed over 70 of the vehicles. The patrol was winging its way over Yugoslavia when they sighted the convoy. That was the way the communiqué read, but the real credit for the destruction of those trucks belongs to two New Yorkers, T/5 Charles V. Hess, son of Rev. and Mrs. Charles Hess, of Canastota, and Pfc. Robert H. Templar, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Templar of Manlius. Two weeks previous to this communiqué, Corporal Hess and Pfc. Templar and members of a special engineer task force boarded LST craft and set sail from an Adriatic port for a mountainous island in the same sea. Many partisans were on hand to greet the Yanks at the only level spot on the shoreline. 'We are gong to build an airfield, here,' the Americans said, ' and we are going to do it in 10 days.' It can't be done, the partisans told them. But, it was not an easy task. However, with the aid of the partisans the task was completed in the time specified and the RAF Spitfires swooped onto the field, refueled and took off on the first Allied mission to be flown from Yugoslavia territory. Their work finished, the engineers and helpers took off amid the cheers of Yugoslav patriots showing their gratitude to the Americans who had built their sorely-needed air field," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/17/1944. "Miss Peggy James of Marlton, N.J., was a week-end guest of Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Templar. Miss James is the fiancee of Pfc. Robert Templar, now stationed in Italy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945. "Robert Templar...has received an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army and with his fiancee, Miss Peggy James, of New Jersey, is visiting relatives and friends here. They have been feted on several occasions in Manlius and Syracuse. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wright gave a dinner in their honor at the Rod and Gun Club. Mr. and Mrs. Templar entertained at a family dinner," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/28/1945. "The wedding of Miss Margaret James, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Ellis, of Detroit, Mich., and Robert Templar...took place Wednesday, Oct. 3, at 12 o'clock noon in the Manlius Methodist Church...the couple will make their home for the present with the bridegroom's parents...The bridegroom recently received an honorable discharge from the Navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Terwilliger, Earl. Manlius. "Pvt. Earl Terwilliger of Fort Sheridan, Ill., has been spending a five-day furlo at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Terwilliger, Manlius, RD 1," The Post-Standard, 7/24/1942. "Corp. Earl Terwilliger of Manlius is now stationed overseas with the army, according to word received by Clarence Terwilliger of Manlius RD 1. Corp. Terwilliger wishes all his Syracuse friends a Happy New Year," Post-Standard, 12/30/1942.

Thompson, Malcolm T. Formerly Fayetteville. "Cadet Malcolm T. Thompson, 25, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Cooper, 262 Powers st., Syracuse was graduated from Fayetteville high school and Syracuse university in 1941. He played football and was on the boxing team. Prior to joining the air forces, he was employed by the Curtis Publishing Co.," The Post-Standard, 4/3/1943.

Thompson, Richard V. Mack. Manlius Name appears on both the Manlius Honor Roll and Oran Honor Roll. "Pvt. Richard V. (Mack) Thompson, 24, a paratrooper, formerly of Manlius, has been killed in action, the war department announced yesterday through The Associated Press. Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Battle of Manlius, with whom he had made his home for almost two years before going into service, received a telegram from the war department in August informing them that Richard had been wounded in action on July 11 in the invasion of Sicily by a bomb concussion. After being hospitalized in the North African area, he returned to combat in August. He died in Italy on Nov. 5. Born in Syracuse, a son of the late Mrs. Mary Mack, he moved to Oran as a child when his mother married the late Seward Thompson of that village. His mother died about seven years ago and his stepfather more than a year ago. As amateur boxer, he started in Manlius in matches sponsored by the American legion boxing committee. While at Fort Benning, Ga., in 1941, he was regimental boxing champion. While boxing at Benning, he won 84 bouts out of 115. Pvt. Thompson joined the CCC service in 1937. He enlisted in the army in 1938 and was attached to the sixth field artillery at Madison barracks for a year. He moved to the first division at Fort Benning, Ga., in 1940. He also trained at Camp Edwards, Mass.; Spartanburg, S. C., and Camp Croft, S. C. He went overseas in May, 1943...A brother, Aviation Cadet William Mack (Thompson), 21, is studying at Penn State college. He has been in the army four years, having served two and a half years in Puerto Rico. Both brothers attended Manlius high school. He also leaves two stepbrothers, Robert Thompson, 14; John, 13, and a stepsister, Delores Thompson, 10, of Monroe; his grandmother, Mrs. Ida Thompson of Oran and Syracuse, and several aunts," The Post-Standard, Feb. 5, 1944. "...Pvt. Richard V. (Mack) Thompson, 24, a paratrooper, formerly of Manlius, has been killed in action...(his brother) Aviation Cadet William Mack, 21, is studying at Penn State college. He has been in the army four years, having served two and a half years in Puerto Rico. Both brothers attended Manlius high school," The Post-Standard, Feb. 5, 1944. "...Mr. and Mrs. Battle were informed in August that Pvt. Thompson had been wounded in action by a bomb explosion on July 11 in the invasion of Sicily. After being hospitalized in the North African area he returned to combat in August. He died in Italy on Nov. 5...." Vail scrapbook, 2/5/1944.

Thompson, William Mack. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Methodist Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. Corp. William Thompson, son of the late Seward S. Thompson, auctioneer and real estate broker of Manlius, is home on furlough from Puerto Rico for the first time in two and a half years. He enlisted in November, 1940, and was sent to Puerto Rico with the coast artillery...On his chest he wears campaign ribbons designating foreign service in the Caribbean, a year's service before Pearl Harbor and another for good behavior. Corp. Thompson is a graduate of Manlius high school, " Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Pfc. William Mack Thompson spent Sunday at the home of Mrs. George M. Lewis at Oran. Pfc. Thompson has just returned from overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/12/1945.

Tifft, Harold. Minoa. "Sgt. Walter Tifft, son of Henry Tifft of Minoa, has been cited by Maj.-Gen. Willis Hale for saving the life of a seriously wounded pilot in the South Pacific by administering oxygen and blood plasma while the ship in which the pilot was being evacuated from a forward base struggled against rough weather for 14 hours. Sgt. T has the Asiatic-Pacific ribbon with one star and the good conduct medal. A brother, PFC Harold Tifft, is with the army in Italy," The Post-Standard, 7/21/1944.

Tifft, Robert Earl. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village board minutes, Honor Roll - Village of Minoa only...Tifft, Robert Earl, 222 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Tifft, Walter. Minoa. "Sgt. Walter Tifft, son of Henry Tifft of Minoa, has been cited by Maj.-Gen. Willis Hale for saving the life of a seriously wounded pilot in the South Pacific by administering oxygen and blood plasma while the ship in which the pilot was being evacuated from a forward base struggled against rough weather for 14 hours. Sgt. Tifft has the Asiatic-Pacific ribbon with one star and the good conduct medal. A brother, PFC Harold Tifft, is with the army in Italy," The Post-Standard, 7/21/1944.

Tobin, Richard D. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village board minutes, Honor Roll - Village of Minoa only...Tobin, Richard D., 308 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

?Todd, Albert. Fayetteville. "Pfc. Albert Todd is spending a ten-day furlough with his wife at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Goodfellow in Burdick street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/16/1945.

Todichini (Todeschini), Albert. Fayetteville. "Albert Todeschini, who entered the service a few weeks ago is stationed at Atlantic City, N. J. He is with the army air force ground crew. Mrs. Todeschini will make her home with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Goodfellow for the duration," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/11/1942. "Letters From Our Boys In Service / Mr. Dillon: Perhaps this letter will be a little strange to you, but I hope you'll find time to read it. I'm Albert Todeschini (sic) (better known in Fayetteville and bowling circles as Todd). Yes, Fayetteville is my home, I'm proud to say. I married a girl from there. I used to work at the Precision Castings Co. Here in Ontario, Calif., where I'm stationed, I read the Eagle-Bulletin every week. I enjoy reading about local news and happenings. It makes a fellow feel sort of closer to home, when he reads about it. The air base here is a P-38 training base for the 4th Air Force unit. All the different hours of day or night all you hear is the roaring of 38s. I met a few fellows from home, Syracuse and vicinity since I have been here. Before long I expect to have a furlough, then I'll drop in the office and have a pow-wow with you. Before I forget, my wife, Gertrude, is the one that sends me the Bulletin. Well, I'll say so long. Sincerely yours, Pfc. A. Todichini (sic), 443rd A.A.F. base unit, Sqd. "A" OAFF, Ontario, Calif. Editor's Note: 'Todd' sent us a clever cartoon, and we are going to forward it to his wife, Gertrude," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Towe, Edward, Jr. Formerly Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Edward Thomas Towe, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Towe of Syracuse, formerly of this village, has enlisted in the navy for a full six years, and left Sunday for Newport, R. I., for training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "AMM 1/c Edward Thomas Towe, reported missing in action three weeks ago, was a crew member of the carrier USS Bismarck Sea, which was sunk by Japanese planes Feb. 22 off Iwo Jima, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Towe of 327 Plymouth dr., revealed yesterday. The 22-year-old machinist's mate, veteran of 17 months service in the Pacific on two carriers, probably was among the helpless men who were strafed in the icy water by enemy planes after the ship went down, his parents believe. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, Towe worked for the army intelligence corps at Paterson Field, N. J., until he enlisted in the navy in August, 1942. He returned to the west coast last February to board his new ship, the Bismarck Sea, but was unable to visit his parents, they said," The Post-Standard, 3/25/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. Edward Towe of Plymouth Drive, Syracuse, have received an official notice from the War Department confirming the death of their son AMM 1/c Edward Towe who has been reported missing since the latter part of February. Eddie was killed in the service of his country when the carrier, Bismarck Sea, was sunk in the attack on Iwo Jima. The Towe family formerly lived at 405 Salt Spring street, moving to Syracuse about two and one half years ago. Edward attended Fayetteville high school from which he was graduated in 1941. He was employed by the army intelligence corps at Paterson, N. J., prior to enlisting in the navy. A memorial Mass for Edward will be held at 9 a.m. Monday in the Church of the Blessed Sacrament, Syracuse. Besides his parents he leaves one sister, Jane," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945.

Towne, Sheldon. Manlius. "Sheldon Town, U. S. Navy, stationed at Sampson naval base, has been passing a brief furlough at home, returning Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Mrs. Sheldon Towne and infant daughter, Karen Ellen, have returned from Crouse-Irving hospital to the home of Mr. Towne's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Towne in Washington street. The new daddy is serving in the U. S. Navy and is now studying at the Texas A. & M. College," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Sheldon Towne, petty officer 3/c, is at home on a leave of absence and has been assigned as instructor in a Palaroid Gunnery school in Brooklyn," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/31/1944. "Sheldon Towne, petty office 3/c, of Brooklyn, spent Easter weekend with Mrs. Towne in Fayetteville and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Towne in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. Released from Sampson naval base, Sheldon W. Towne, SAD 2/c, Manlius, The Post-Standard, 12/6/1945.

Traver, Donald. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Donald E. Traver, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Traver, has enlisted in the U. S. Coast Guard and is at present stationed in Oswego, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/31/1942. "Donald Traver, seaman, 2nd class of the U. S. Coast Guard, stationed in Rochester, is spending a 16 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Traver of Beech street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/26/1943. "Donald E. Traver, yeoman, 3/c, of the Coast Guard, has returned to his station after spending a 17-day leave with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "Petty Officer Donald E. Traver of the U. S. Coast Guard, has returned to Boston, Mass., after spending a week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Petty Officer Donald E. Traver of the U. S. Coast Guard, spent Easter with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/26/1946.

Tridente, Bartholomew. Manlius. "Board 473 is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Navy...Bartholomew Tridente, 139 W. Seneca st., Manlius, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944. "Aboard the Tanker Manokin, Jinsen, Korea. (Delayed).--Bartholomew Tridente, seaman first class...served on this gasoline tanker when she moved into Jinsen in September as part of a task force of more than 50 ships, to help occupy and liberate the country from the Japanese. Crews of the ships also took part in the repatriation of American prisoners of war, many listed as missing, when the 15,000 American sailors and soldiers going ashore assembled them for identification and started them on their way home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/9/1945.

Trinder, Arthur C. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Arthur Trinder, who enlisted in the Air Corps Reserves in February, was called to report for active duty at Fort Dix, July 31. He will go from there to Keesler Field, Miss., for basic training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss.--Having arrived at Keesler Field, Miss., Pvt. Arthur Collin Trinder, son of Mrs. Martha C. Trinder, 325 Brooklea Drive, Fayetteville, N. Y., is now being examined by the AAF Training Command station Medical and Psychological Unit to determine his qualifications as a pre-aviation cadet. Flying officer training as a pilot, bombardier or navigator will be given Pvt. Trinder upon successful completion of the processing he is undergoing at Keesler Field. A series of medical and psychological tests will indicate the type of air crew training for which he is best suited by aptitude and personal characteristics, while other classifications tests will measure his technical skills and aptitudes. The period of his stay here will also include a number of phases of military training, and when his qualifications have been determined he will go to the proper Army Air Forces Training command station to begin his actual air crew training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. "Pvt. Arthur Trinder has been transferred from Truax Field, Madison, Wisconsin, and is now training at Chanute Field, at Rantoul, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Pvt. Arthur C. Trinder is spending 15 days at his home in Brooklea Drive while on delay enroute from Boca Raton Field in Florida to Williams Field in Phoenix, Ariz. Pvt. Trinder expects to go to Japan in the army of occupation," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Trinder, Glenn F., Jr.. Manlius. "...Onondaga County men accepted yesterday were...Glenn F. Trinder, Jr., R.D. 1, Manlius..." Post-Standard, 11/19/1942. "Color guard of the legion post (at Memorial Day services) was four discharged veterans of this war who are members of the Legion, Glenn Trinder and Joseph Pezzati, both wearing the uniform of the army; Frank Matzell, formerly in the navy, and Robert Goodfellow, a former marine corpsman," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944.

Tripdette, Maurice. Manlius. "Seaman 2/c Maurice Tripdette of Sampson is at home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/15/1945.

Trivelpiece, Clifford P. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Clifford P. Trivelpiece, 34, formerly of Manlius, serving with the 11th air force in Alaska, has been promoted from technician fifth grade to sergeant. He entered the service in May, 1942, and received basic training at Camp Wheeler, Ga. Prior to his entry into the service, he was employed by the Continental Can Co., His parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Trivelpiece, live at 130 W. Second st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 10/14/1943.

Trivelpiece, Meredith C. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Meredith C. Trivelpiece...has been promoted from private first class to technician fifth grade. He was employed by Precision Die Casting Co., prior to induction April 3, 1942," The Post-Standard, 6/27/1943. "The wedding of Miss Martha Adelia Lifsey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. Lifsey of Blackstone, to Meredith C. Trivelpiece, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Trivelpiece of West Seneca street, Manlius, was solemnized...Sept. 14 in Blackstone Christian Church...The bridegroom has returned from the European theater where he served 18 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/4/1946.

Truck, Harrison A. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "One of the first enlisted men to receive flight training with the Army Air corps, aviation student, Harrison A. Truck, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Truck of St. John avenue, will soon receive his wings as a staff sergeant at Ellington Field, Texas. Truck formerly attended Syracuse University," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/3/1942. "Harrison A. Truck, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Truck of St. John avenue, has been promoted from staff sergeant to flight officer at the Army Air Force Bombardier school, in Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/1943. "...a flight officer wears the regulation officer's uniform and his insignia in a single bar with a blue background in gold," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Lieut. Harrison A. Truck and Mrs. Truck (Rena E. Rose) announce the birth of a daughter on Friday, April 13. The little daughter has been named Andrea Elizabeth. Mrs. Truck and little daughter are making their home with Lt. Truck's parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Tubbs, Seldon Eugene. Fayetteville. "Onondaga county men inducted were...Army...Seldon E. Tubbs, 104 W. Genesee st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Seldon Eugene Tubbs..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Mrs. Selden Tubbs will leave Saturday for Atlantic City, where she will spend some time. Her husband, Pvt. Selden Tubbs, is receiving basic training at the Atlantic City base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Pvt. and Mrs. Selden E. Tubbs of Atlantic City, N. J., spent Easter with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Tubbs, and Mr. and Mrs. Chester R. Eaton, in this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Mrs. Selden Tubbs left yesterday for Wake Forest, N. C., where she will join her husband Pvt. Selden Tubbs, who has been transferred from Atlantic City to Wake Forest College for a course in advanced finance. Mrs. Tubbs has been spending a week with her parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Corp. Seldon Tubbs and wife of Wake Forest, N. C., spent the week-end with their parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Mrs. C. R. Eaton returned home Monday afternoon after spending three days with her son-in-law and daughter, Cpl. and Mrs. Selden Tubbs in New York City," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Corp. and Mrs. Selden Tubbs of New York City were week-end guests of their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/1/1943. "Corp. and Mrs. Selden Tubbs who came from New York to spend a week's furlough with their parents...left for Chicago, Ill., where Corp. Tubbs has been transferred," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/22/1943. "Mrs. Selden Tubbs spent a couple of days this week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chester R. Eaton, leaving Tuesday night for Dayton, Ohio to join her husband, Cpl. Tubbs who has recently been transferred to that city," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Cpl. and Mrs. Selden Tubbs are now located in Ogden, Utah," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Selden Tubbs, who spent the week-end with their parents...have returned to Rome, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Selden E. Tubbs has accepted a position with his father-in-law, Chester R. Eaton, in his undertaking establishment in West Genesee street, beginning duties July 8. Mr. Eaton has conducted the business here for over 35 years. Mr. Tubbs has been a resident of Fayetteville for the past seven years, coming here from Manlius. He was graduated from Manlius high school, and attended Powelson Institute. He served three years in the Counter Intelligence Corps of the U. S. Army, being honorably discharged Feb. 14 of this year. Prior to entering the service Mr. Tubbs was claim adjuster for the Aetna Casualty & Surety Co. in their Syracuse office," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/19/1946.

Turk, Wesley. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll..

Turverey, Ralph C. Manlius. "The oldest and youngest sons of Mrs. Lottie Turverey of Manlius will leave for the armed services tomorrow. Ralph Turverey, formerly employed by Precision Castings company, and the oldest of five children, was inducted on December 9th. Raymond Turverey, youngest of the family, formerly employed by Crouse-Hinds, enlisted in the signal corps reserve on July 9 and has been called to active duty. He will report to Fort Monmouth, N.J.," Post-Standard, 12/15/1942. "The oldest and youngest sons of Mrs. Lottie Turverey of Manlius will leave for the armed services tomorrow. Ralph Turverey, formerly employed by Precision Castings company and the oldest of five children, was inducted on Dec. 9. Raymond Turverey, youngest of the family, formerly employed by Crouse-Hinds, enlisted in the signal corps reserve on July 9 and has been called to active duty. He will report to Fort Monmouth, N.J.," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Word has been received that Raymond D. Turverey has been promoted to the rank of sergeant. Sergeant Turverey also received the good conduct medal. He is connected with the Civil Affairs Office in North Africa. Also of the same family, Pfc. Ralph C. Turverey received his first stripe recently. He is stationed at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas, where he received a medal for expert marksmanship with the automatic pistol," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Mrs. Lottie Craft Turverey, 62, widow of Jesse Turverey, died Monday morning at her home, 514 Pleasant street...She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. William Gorman of Jamesville and Miss Coreva Turverey of Manlius; three sons, Pfc. Ralph Turverey of the U. S. Army, Fort Sill, Okla., Guilford Turverey of Fulton, and Sgt. Raymond Turverey of the U. S. Army now in Africa; a sister and a brother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "Pfc. Ralph C. Turverey, stationed at Fort Sill, Okla., returned yesterday to camp, where he is attending the artillery school. He was called home by the sudden death of his mother. PFC Turverey formerly was stationed at Cam Chaffee, Ark.," The Post-Standard, 6/15/1944.

Turverey, Raymond D. Manlius. "The oldest and youngest sons of Mrs. Lottie Turverey of Manlius will leave for the armed services tomorrow. Ralph Turverey, formerly employed by Precision Castings company and the oldest of five children, was inducted on Dec. 9. Raymond Turverey, youngest of the family, formerly employed by Crouse-Hinds, enlisted in the signal corps reserve on July 9 and has been called to active duty. He will report to Fort Monmouth, N.J.," Post-Standard, 12/15/1942. "Word has been received that Raymond D. Turverey has been promoted to the rank of sergeant. Sergeant Turverey also received the good conduct medal. He is connected with the Civil Affairs Office in North Africa. Also of the same family, Pfc. Ralph C. Turverey received his first stripe recently. He is stationed at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas, where he received a medal for expert marksmanship with the automatic pistol," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Mrs. Helen Turverey of 514 Pleasant st., Manlius, wife of Sgt. Raymond D. Turverey, who is serving with the signal corps in North Africa, holds their son (photo), David Norman, three and a half months old. The photo will be sent to...Sgt. Turverey by V-mail. Mothers may make appointments to have photos taken of themselves and their babies, born after their husbands left for duty overseas, by calling or writing Miss Sweeney, The Post-Standard 2-1431. There is no charge for the service," The Post Standard, 11/21/1943. "Mrs. Lottie Craft Turverey, 62, widow of Jesse Turverey, died Monday morning at her home, 514 Pleasant street...She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. William Gorman of Jamesville and Miss Coreva Turverey of Manlius; three sons, Pfc. Ralph Turverey of the U. S. Army, Fort Sill, Okla., Guilford Turverey of Fulton, and Sgt. Raymond Turverey of the U. S. Army now in Africa; a sister and a brother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/2/1944. "Sgt. Raymond Turverey, formerly of Manlius, now residing at 636 West Onondaga st., Syracuse, has just completed a 42-day furlough with his wife and son, David, whom he saw for the first time. Sergeant Turverey serviced 2 1/2 years overseas in the North African and Italian theaters as a member of the signal intelligence corps. He will report to Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Tuttle, Seymour. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Contingents of selectees from East Syracuse local board 473 and Adams local board 421 were enlisted into the armed forces yesterday at the Syracuse induction station...Army...Seymour H. Tuttle, Dewey ave., Fayetteville" The Post-Standard, 4/7/1943.

Tuttle, Walter. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Walter Tuttle, local insurance agent, has enlisted in the U. S. Navy and expects to leave Manlius about Sept. 5," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Walter Tuttle is at home on a 17-day furlough. On his return he will enter the Officers' Training School at Boston, Mass.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/16/1942. "Walter Tuttle, apprentice seaman, has been transferred from Newport, R. I., where he has completed his basic training, to Boston, for a course which will qualify him as machinist mate," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/6/1942. "Walter Tuttle, apprentice seaman, has been transferred from Newport, R.I. where he has completed his basic training to Boston for a course which will qualify him as machinist's mate. Employed by the Metropolitan Life Insurance company before his enlistment Sept. 6, Seaman Tuttle spent an 18-day leave at the home of his sister, Mrs. Clyde Norris of Manlius, a short time ago," Post-Standard, 11/3/1942. "Walter Tuttle, apprentice seaman, has been transferred from Newport, R.I., where he has completed his basic training, to Boston for a course which will qualify him as machinist's mate. Employed by the Metropolitan Life Insurance company before his enlistment Sept. 8, Seaman Tuttle spent an 18-day leave at the home of his sister, Mrs. Clyde Norris of Manlius, a short time ago," The Post-Standard, 11/3/1942. "Walter Tuttle of the U. S. Navy, stationed at Boston, was home for a three-day furlough, returning to his base Sunday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/ 1943. "Walter Tuttle was in town over Sunday and expects to spend this week-end at home," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Walter Tuttle has completed a four-month course in naval school in Boston with a rating of machinist mate 2nd class, and has been sent to advanced school at the New York Edison Co. plant in New York City to study steam turbines," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/26/1943. "Walter Tuttle, machinist mate, is at home on a 7-day furlough, expecting to leave for overseas on his return," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/26/1943. "Walter Tuttle, M. M., 2c, U. S. S. Charles Laurence, enjoyed a 60-hour liberty, home from sea duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Walter Tuttle, machinist mate, in the U. S. navy, has been at home on a short leave," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "Walter Tuttle M.M. w/c has received an honorable medical discharge and is convalescing at the home of his brother and sister in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944.

Twichell, Lewis. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Walter Tuttle, who enlisted for service is stationed at A. F. Company 537, U. S. naval training station, Newport, R. I.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Lt. Lewis Twichell is passing a ten-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence F. Twichell..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/29/1943. " 'It's Louie, dad. There's no doubt about it.' The excited children of C. H. Twichell of 420 Elm St. pointed to an official Coast Guard photo published in yesterday's Herald-Journal. They had identified their brother, Lt. Lewis F. Twichell, in a group of Army officers pictured crossing the Pacific to combat areas. He was known to have left San Francisco four weeks ago for overseas duty. Mr. Twichell called at the Herald-Journal office today and made positive identification," The Herald-Journal, Vail scrapbook, n.d.

Tygert, Elliott M. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt. Elliott M. Tygert of the Army Air Field at Amarillo, Texas, is spending a 20-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Tygert on the Manlius-Fayetteville road," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944.

Vail, Hildreth K. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Lt. Hildreth K. Vail, 117 Washington Street, Manlius, was promoted to his present rank at Yale University. After a 10-day furlough with his wife and mother, he reports for duty at Mountain Home, Idaho," The Post Standard, 9/7/1943."Lt. Hildreth K. Vail, pilot, who is stationed at Mt. Home, Idaho, is at home for over the holidays with his wife and mother," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/24/1943. "Second Lt. Hildreth Vail, on a hospital leave from Idaho, a pilot in the Army air forces, was entertained at a family dinner party by Mr. and Mrs. Milton Young of 318 Stinard Ave., Syracuse. Lt. Vail is a cousin of Mrs. Young. Mrs. Vail was among the guests," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944. "Mrs. Clarence Vail and daughter-in-law, Mrs. Hildreth Vail, have closed their home in Washington street and left Monday by auto for Tonopah, Nev., where they expect to make their home for the duration, near Lt. Hildreth Vail," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/28/1944. "Hildreth K. Vail, 31, son of Mrs. C. J. Vail...has been promoted to first lieutenant at Tonpah army air field, Nevada. Lt. Vail attended Manlius high school and was employed as a machinist at Lipe-Rollway Corp. before entering service Oct. 6, 1942. He attended armament school at Lowry Field, Denver, Col., and officers candidate school at Valley Forge, Pa. He was graduated Aug. 5, 1943, from Yale university and was commissioned. He is base armament inspector with the Fourth air force at Tonpah Field. His wife, Mary, resides with him in Tonpah," The Post-Standard, 9/10/1944. "Hildreth Kenneth Vail of the U. S. air corps has been promoted from 2nd to lst lieutenant. The promotion was announced officially on Tuesday by the War Department. His home is at 117 Washington St., Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. "Lt. and Mrs. Hildreth Vail have returned from Nevada where they have been spending the past two years and are visiting Mrs. Vail's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bracken," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Valentine, Charles L. Kirkville. Accepted into the Navy, "The Post-Standard, 12/4/1943.

Van Alstine, Arthur. Fayetteville. Selectee, The Post-Standard, 6/4/1941.

Van Alstine, Beverly. Manlius. "Beverly Van Alstine has written his parents from Camp Selby, Miss. He states he expected to be transferred to Louisiana," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943.

Van Alstyne, James L. Manlius. "Morning Mail / Dear Sir: A buddy of mine who served with me in the army is now in a sanitarium where he will be a patient for many months. Being confined to his bed because of the nature of his disease, he finds that the time passes very slowly and he is quite without means of keeping himself occupied other than by reading, which soon becomes monotonous. To relieve this monotony, he has expressed a desire to collect stamps and being a collector myself in a small way, I have given him some help and encouragement. But much more can be done, and I am seeking the co-operation of others in this matter. Any readers of this letter who may have neglected stamps laying around either loose or on envelopes, are invited to send this material to the address below. Of, if that is not convenient, a post card, inviting me to call for same, will receive a speedy reply. I trust the readers of the Eagle-Bulletin will extend their co-operation to this disabled veteran. Very truly yours, James L. Van Alstyne, 317 E. Seneca street, Manlius, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/10/1946.

Van Brocklin, Clarence. Formerly Manlius. "Pfc. Clarence Van Brocklin, of Cazenovia, formerly of Manlius, has written of his safe arrival in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/23/1944. "Mrs. K. C. Copenhaver of El Paso, Texas, has announced the engagement of her daughter, Virginia Watson Copenhaver to Pfc. Clarence B. Van Brocklin of Cazenovia, N. Y. Mr. Van Brocklin is the son of Bert W. Van Brocklin of Genoa, N. Y., and the late Mabel W. Van Brocklin, former residents of Manlius. He is a graduate of Simmons' School of Embalming in Syracuse, and before entering the service he was in business with Daley & Evans Funeral Home in Cazenovia. He also studied voice at Syracuse University...At the present time Pfc. Van Brocklin is serving as a surgical technician with a Field Hospital in France," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/22/1944. "Miss Virginia Watson Copenhaver, daughter of Mrs. Karl C. Copenhaver, formerly of Marion, Va., became the bride of Clarence B. Van Brocklin, of Syracuse, at a ceremony held at the family residence, 2801 Pershing Drive, El Paso, Texas on November 22...Mr. Van Brocklin received his education in the schools of New York State, and was graduated from Simmons School of Embalming, Syracuse. He also is a musician, having studied voice at the University of Syracuse under Dr. Howard Leyman, choral director of the School of Fine Arts. He was a member of the University chorus. Following a brief honeymoon trip including a visit to relatives in Virginia, the couple will make their home in New York State," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Van Dooser, Robert. Manlius. "Mr. and Mrs. William VanDooser visited their son, Robert, in Virginia over the week-end. Robert has recovered from his recent illness and has returned to duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/23/1943. "Pvt. Robert Van Dooser son of Mr. and Mrs. William Van Dooser, has receive an honorable discharge from the Army, and returned to his home in Smith street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/3/1943. "A very pretty wedding took place on Wednesday, April 25 at 5 o'clock at the home of the groom's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Van Dooser of 106 Smith street, when Miss Irene Sarazen, a member of the W.A.C. of Boston, Mass., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Sarazen, of Manlius R.D. became the bride of Pvt. Robert Van Dooser. Mr. Van Dooser recently received an honorable discharge from the Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/4/1945.

Van Etten, Arthur W. Fayetteville. "Arthur W. Van Etten, Highbridge Road, Fayetteville, who has recently been released by the U. S. Air Forces as a Field Service Engineer, has been appointed a distributor for Cooper-Built buildings, garages and airplane hangars in Northern and Central New York State. All buildings are prefabricated and delivered complete with fittings, bolts, nuts and lock-washers. In appearance they resemble wood construction. They are quickly and securely erected," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945.

Van Malderghem, E. J. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village board minutes, Honor Roll - Village of Minoa only...Van Malderghem, E. J., 320 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Van Ornam, Helen. Manlius. "Miss Helen Van Ornam, daughter of Mrs. Ebba H. Van Ornam of Troop K road, has arrived in Australia to serve with the armed forces as an American Red Cross staff assistant. Prior to entering the Red Cross she was secretary to the maintenance supervisor of the Seneca Flying School," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "Mrs. Ebba H. Van Ornam of Troop K Road announces the engagement of her daughter, Miss Helen Van Ornam, to Lt. Perry B. Rauch, USMC, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rauch, of 106 Dewittshire Road, Dewitt. Miss Van Ornam is the daughter of the late Dr. V. G. Van Ornam of Syracuse. She attended Syracuse university and was graduated from the Modern School of Applied Art in Boston, Mass. She recently returned from the South Pacific where she served as staff assistant in the American Red Cross. Lt. Rauch received his bachelor's degree from Syracuse university where he was a member of Phi Gamma Delta, graduating from the College of Law. Before entering the service he was associated with the law firm of Murphy and Young and the Seneca Flying School. He now is on active duty in the South Pacific," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/2/1945.

Van Ornam, James. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Van Schaick, Carlton E. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Second Lieut. Carlton E. VanSchaick, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Van Schaick of Minoa was ordered to report June 8 to Fort Ontario, N.Y. He graduate from Clarkson College of Technology on May 11, and received his degree as Bachelor of Electrical Engineering and as second lieutenant in the Officers' Signal Corps Reserve of the U. S. Army," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Lieut. Carlton VanSchaick of Fort Ontario, N.Y., spent the week-end with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. VanSchaick visited their son, Lieut. Carlton Van Schaick at New York City last week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...VanSchaick, Carlton E., 351 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Van Schaick, F. Ellsworth. Minoa. "Pvt. F. Ellsworth Van Schaick, who has been stationed at Mitchell Field for nearly a year, has been transferred to a radio school at Scott's Field, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Staff Sgt. F. Ellsworth Van Schaick, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Van Shaick of Minoa, who has been in service in Australia and New Guinea 18 months, has received an honorable discharge from service. He contracted a severe case of malaria and was being treated at Hoff hospital, Santa Barbara, Calif. before discharge. Sgt. and Mrs. Van Schaick have been spending two weeks at Minoa and will leave Friday for Wilmington, Del., where they will make their home," The Post-Standard, 9/9/1943. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Van Schaick, Ellsworth F., 351 S. Main St., Minoa, N.Y."

Van Velde, Clifford. Fayetteville. "Sgt. Russell Van Velde, son of Mrs. Lottie Van Velde of Hunt dr., Fayetteville, has returned to Trenton, N.J., where he is stationed with the MPs after a furlo at home. He was formerly employed by the 108th national guard unit in the armory. His wife, Mrs. Betty Edwards Van Velde, is with him in Trenton. His brother, Pvt. Clifford Van Velde, husband of Mrs. Molly Milber Van Velde of 2215 Lodi st., was recently inducted and is at Fort Dix. He was formerly employed by City Taxi Co. The soldiers' mother is a nurse," The Post-Standard, 12/30/1944.

Van Velde, Russell. Fayetteville. "Sgt. Russell Van Velde, son of Mrs. Lottie Van Velde of Hunt dr., Fayetteville, has returned to Trenton, N.J., where he is stationed with the MPs after a furlo at home. He was formerly employed by the 108th national guard unit in the armory. His wife, Mrs. Betty Edwards Van Velde, is with him in Trenton. His brother, Pvt. Clifford Van Velde, husband of Mrs. Molly Milber Van Velde of 2215 Lodi st., was recently inducted and is at Fort Dix. He was formerly employed by City Taxi Co. The soldiers' mother is a nurse," The Post-Standard, 12/30/1944.

Vedder, Allison Winchell. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Allison Vedder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Vedder, was inducted last week at the Syracuse Induction Center and is now at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/4/1941. "Corp. Allison Vedder, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Vedder of Clinton street, has been visiting his parents on a three-day leave from Fort Hancock, N. J. Corp. Vedder left Fort Hancock Tuesday for Virginia where he will enter Officers Training School at Fort Monroe," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/3/1941. "Allison Winchell Vedder, formerly a corporal in the 52d coast artillery, was graduated from the officers' candidate course of the Coast Artillery school at Fort Monroe, Va., Christmas eve, and was commissioned a second lieutenant, Lt.-Col. C. D. Hindle, press relations officer, announced yesterday. His home is at 304 S. Clinton st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/26/1941. "According to recent announcements, Allison W. Vedder...who was inducted into service in March, 1941, has been promoted to first lieutenant and made battery commander at Fort Davis where he will be retained as an instructor. Lieut. Vedder was graduated from Fayetteville high school and Colgate University, he majored in mathematics prior to joining the federal forces. He was first assigned to Fort Eustis, Va., in coast artillery and transferred to Ft. Hancock, N. J., July 1, 1941. Promoted to corporal, Vedder was selected to take officers' training at Fort Monroe, Va., where he completed the course and was commissioned second lieutenant Dec. 24. Assigned to Fort Monroe as instructor, he was later transferred to Camp Davis in the anti-aircraft division. His ability to teach mathematics prompted superior officers to retain him as an instructor," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/10/1942. "First Lt. Allison Winchell Vedder...stationed at Camp Davis, has been promoted to captain and has been assigned as battery commander in the anti-aircraft division, friends have been informed. He attended Fayetteville high school and Colgate university, majoring in mathematics. He was inducted into federal service March, 1941, and was promoted to corporal in the 52d coast artillery. Later he was graduated from officers' candidate school at for Monroe, Va., Christmas eve, 1941. He was promoted to first lieutenant in June and served at Fort Eustis, Va., and Fort Hancock, N.J. Assigned to Fort Monroe as instructor he later was transferred to Camp Davis. He has applied several times for service overseas, but his ability to teach mathematics has resulted in his retention for training of others," Post-Standard, 12/19/1942. "Capt. Allison W. Vedder...is attending the Anti-aircraft Artillery School at Camp Davis, North Carolina," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Miss Aline Wood Foster of White Plains, N. Y., and Capt. Allison Vedder...were married Mar. 23, at the Little Church Around the Corner in New York City...On Friday afternoon Capt. Vedder left for Jefferson Barracks in Missouri where he is flak analyst with the Air corps. Mrs. Vedder will remain at her home for the present," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/31/1944. "A 7th AAF Heavy Bomber Base in the Marianas (Delayed)--As a member of the famed 11th heavy Bombardment group of the 7th AAF, Capt. Allison W. Vedder, of Fayetteville, N. Y., has been commended by Maj.-Gen. Robert W. Douglas, Jr., commanding the 7th AAF, for his part in the campaigns which have taken a large section of the Pacific from the enemy's hands.' It precision-bombed northward through the Gilberts, the Marshalls, the Carolines, the Marianas, brining such targets as Truk, Tarawa and Guam within its bombsights. Now the Bonin and Volcano Islands are the targets for its attacks. Capt. Vedder is the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Stanley Vedder of 301 Clinton street. His wife, Aline resides at White Plains, N. Y. He was graduated from Colgate University in 1939, and entered the service March, 1941," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "Major and Mrs. Allison Vedder spent a week recently with Mr. Vedder's parents...after which they left on a vacation trip to Palm Beach, Fla. Maj. Vedder is on terminal leave having recently returned to this country from the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/18/1946.

Verbeck, Guido F., Jr. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Guido Verbeck of Quantico, Va., is spending ten days leave with Mrs. Verbeck at the home of her mother, Mrs. Wilbur S. VanDuyn, in Cazenovia," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/2/1941. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Two former Manlius men, veterans of the marine corps fighting in the Solomon islands area, have been promoted to the rank of major, the marine corps headquarters announced yesterday in Washington. They are Maj. Robert S. Howell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Howell of North st., Manlius, and Maj. Guido F. Verbeck, Jr., son of the late Col. Guido F. Verbeck, former headmaster of Manlius school, and grandson of the late Gen. William Verbeck. Howell took part in the battle of Santa Cruz, stationed on a warship. Verbeck has been in the Guadalcanal area thruout the fighting there," The Post-Standard, 30/20/1943. "Capt. Guido F. Verbeck, Jr., son of Mrs. Guido Verbeck, has been promoted to major in the Marine corps. Major Verbeck has been with the Marines on Guadalcanal throughout the long struggle. "Mrs. Katherine Jordan Verbeck, widow of Gen. William Verbeck, head of the Manlius school from 1888 to his death on Aug. 20, 1930, and mother of Col. Guido F. Verbeck, head of the school from his father's death to his own death in 1940, died at 12:40 a.m. Wednesday at her home on the Manlius school grounds in Wilcox avenue, to which she and the general moved a year before his death...Among those surviving are two sons, Karl Verbeck of Manlius and Col. William Jordan Verbeck of the U. S. army. Col. Verbeck was awarded the Legion of Merit in June for his 'important contribution to the expulsion of the enemy from the Aleutian Islands.' " He personally led a reconnaissance party over Amchitka when it was not known whether it was occupied by the Japanese. Col. Verbeck is now assistant chief of staff and intelligence in the Pacific. Also surviving are a sister, Mrs. Harry W. Quinby of San Francisco; eight grandchildren, two of whom, Maj. Guido F. Verbeck, Jr., U. S. marine corps, and Maj. Samuel Sumner Verbeck, U. S. field artillery, are in service overseas, and six others; five great-grandchildren, and four nieces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Lt.-Col. Guido F. Verbeck, Jr., has been appointed assistant treasurer of the Quanity Trust Company of New York, upon his return from five years active duty in the Marine Corps Artillery. He spent four years in the Pacific theater and was awarded the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, and the Presidential Unit Citation for service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/8/1946. "Karl Verbeck, aged 45, son of the late Gen. William and Mrs. Verbeck, and brother of the late Guido Verbeck, died in New York City July 3...Surviving, besides his wife, are two sons, Channing and Peter, one brother, Col. Wm. J. Verbeck, two nephews, Lt. Col. Samuel S. Verbeck and Lt. Col. Guido F. Verbeck," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/12/1946.

Verbeck, Samuel Sumner. Manlius. "On January 3, 1941, First Lieut. Samuel S. Verbeck, commanding officer of Battery A, Syracuse, will leave for Fort Sill, Okla., to attend the U. S. Army School of Fire," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1940. Manlius Honor Roll. Captain. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Mrs. Katherine Jordan Verbeck, widow of Gen. William Verbeck, head of the Manlius school from 1888 to his death on Aug. 20, 1930, and mother of Col. Guido F. Verbeck, head of the school from his father's death to his own death in 1940, died at 12:40 a.m. Wednesday at her home on the Manlius school grounds in Wilcox avenue, to which she and the general moved a year before his death...Among those surviving are two sons, Karl Verbeck of Manlius and Col. William Jordan Verbeck of the U. S. army. Col. Verbeck was awarded the legion of merit in June for his 'important contribution to the expulsion of the enemy from the Aleutian Islands." He personally led a reconnaissance party over Amchitka when it was not known whether it was occupied by the Japanese. Col. Verbeck is now assistant chief of staff and intelligence in the Pacific. Also surviving are a sister, Mrs. Harry W. Quinby of San Francisco; eight grandchildren, two of whom, Maj. Guido F. Verbeck, Jr., U. S. marine corps, and Maj. Samuel Sumner Verbeck, U. S. field artillery, are in service overseas, and six others; five great-grandchildren, and four nieces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "Karl Verbeck, aged 45, son of the late Gen. William and Mrs. Verbeck, and brother of the late Guido Verbeck, died in New York City July 3...Surviving, besides his wife, are two sons, Channing and Peter, one brother, Col. Wm. J. Verbeck, two nephews, Lt. Col. Samuel S. Verbeck and Lt. Col. Guido F. Verbeck," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/12/1946.

Verbeck, William Jordan. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears on the Manlius Christ Church service flag, The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/17/1942. "Mrs. Katherine Jordan Verbeck, widow of Gen. William Verbeck, head of the Manlius school from 1888 to his death on Aug. 20, 1930, and mother of Col. Guido F. Verbeck, head of the school from his father's death to his own death in 1940, died at 12:40 a.m. Wednesday at her home on the Manlius school grounds in Wilcox avenue, to which she and the general moved a year before his death...Among those surviving are two sons, Karl Verbeck of Manlius and Col. William Jordan Verbeck of the U. S. army. Col. Verbeck was awarded the legion of merit in June for his 'important contribution to the expulsion of the enemy from the Aleutian Islands." He personally led a reconnaissance party over Amchitka when it was not known whether it was occupied by the Japanese. Col. Verbeck is now assistant chief of staff and intelligence in the Pacific. Also surviving are a sister, Mrs. Harry W. Quinby of San Francisco; eight grandchildren, two of whom, Maj. Guido F. Verbeck, Jr., U. S. marine corps, and Maj. Samuel Sumner Verbeck, U. S. field artillery, are in service overseas, and six others; five great-grandchildren, and four nieces," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/18/1944. "The American grandson of a citizen of Japan this week led American scout forces in the capture of an island from Japan, one of the unusual occurrences of the present war. The American occupation of Amchitka, an island of the Rat group in the Aleutians, only 70 miles from Kiska, was preceded by a unit of combat scouts led by Lt. Col. William J. Verbeck, former member of the faculty of the Manlius School, and a son of the late Brig. Gen. William Verbeck, head of the school for many years. Col. Verbeck is the grandson of the late Dr. Guido F. Verbeck, the only white man ever made a citizen of Japan. Dr. Verbeck was born in Holland, did not live there long enough to become a citizen, came to America but did not stay here long, and went to Japan 'a man without a country.' He became adviser to the Emperor and was made a citizen by special act of the Japanese Diet. Dr. Verbeck bought the first warship Japan ever had, and its first cannon. His son, the late general was born in Nagasaki, but came to this country at an early age. After serving at Manlius School as professor of military science and tactics, Lieutenant Colonel Verbeck went to Japan in 1938 to study the language. He was an 'exchange officer,' a Japanese Army man coming here to study in similar manner. With war clouds hovering, Verbeck feared internment in the event of hostilities, and prevailed upon the authorities to give him the status of military attaché, exempt from internment when war came..." Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "How Lt. Col. William J. Verbeck of Manlius used his mastery of the Japanese language to trick Jap soldiers on Attu, as the English-speaking Japs had tricked our boys on Guadalcanal, was related in a letter written by him to his brother, Carl Verbeck, and passed by the censor. The letter was written on June 2, and reached Mr. Verbeck at Manlius today. Col. Verbeck said that, after landing, he and Sgt. Oldshausen passed the first night at a point far in advance of the American forces who had made the first landing. In the night, he said, they were challenged several times in Japanese and he responded to the challenge in the same language, with the result that the Jap exposed himself and 'the unfortunate challenger was killed.' Col. Verbeck, then a captain in the United States Army, was sent to Japan in 1938 to learn the language. He remained until the outbreak of war, having, 'when things began to get hot,' been made a military attaché of the American Embassy, which gave him diplomatic status when war did come. He speaks Japanese fluently and grammatically. In his letter to his brother, the colonel says he obtained the first Japanese war flag on Attu from a Japanese major 'after a little dispute in which the major died.' A motion picture was made of the presentation of the flag at American headquarters and the film is being shown now in theaters in the United States," Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Col. William J. Verbeck of Manlius earned the doubtful honor of being the first American casualty of the Mindanao invasion--all because he was obeying orders to be cautious. Known as a hard-fighting front-line soldier, the regimental commander in the 24th division had been wounded three times before and had been ordered to remain at his command post, instead of rushing toward the front. Four hours after the landing, a sniper nicked Verbeck in the back with a bullet that might have killed him if the officer had not been leaning over at the time. As it was, he received a flesh wound and returned to duty a few hours later, according to an AP report for Mindanao. When wounded, Col. Verbeck was sitting in his command post, per orders, several miles behind advance positions...He was graduated from Manlius School and then entered the U. S. military academy at West Point, where he was graduated in 1927. The colonel's wife resides in Brooklyn. During the Pacific war Col. Verbeck has served in Alaska where he earned the legion of merit award for 'invaluable service in the expulsion of the enemy from the Aleutian islands,' and on Leyte island in the Philippine where he personally ended a one-man Jap charge with a well-aimed bullet from his .45 pistol," The Post-Standard, 5/29/1945. "Col. William Verbeck has been appointed as chief-of-staff of the 24th division, known as 'Victory Division.' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Verdow, Byron. Manlius. "PFC Harold L. Verdow died Nov. 23 as a result of wounds sustained Nov. 22 in action in Germany, his sister, Mrs. William H. Baird of 900 Glencove Rd., and stepfather, Ernest Verstraete of Eagle Village, have been notified by the war department. PFC Verdow died in a hospital in France, after serving with the infantry in France and Germany since the invasion of Normandy. He was awarded the bronze star for heroic action with the infantry on D-day. Entering service in November, 1940, PFC Verdow went overseas to England two years ago, then was sent to North Africa, Italy and Sicily, before going into France. He attended Eagle Village school. Three brothers and a half-brother also are in service: Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner of war in Germany; PFC Byron, serving in Holland, Sgt. George stationed in Georgia, and PFC Vincent E. Verstraete serving in England, Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Verdow, Edwin. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "PFC Harold L. Verdow died Nov. 23 as a result of wounds sustained Nov. 22 in action in Germany, his sister, Mrs. William H. Baird of 900 Glencove Rd., and stepfather, Ernest Verstraete of Eagle Village, have been notified by the war department. PFC Verdow died in a hospital in France, after serving with the infantry in France and Germany since the invasion of Normandy. He was awarded the bronze star for heroic action with the infantry on D-day. Entering service in November, 1940, PFC Verdow went overseas to England two years ago, then was sent to North Africa, Italy and Sicily, before going into France. He attended Eagle Village school. Three brothers and a half-brother also are in service: Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner of war in Germany; PFC Byron, serving in Holland, Sgt. George stationed in Georgia, and PFC Vincent E. Verstraete serving in England, Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Verdow, George. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "PFC Harold L. Verdow died Nov. 23 as a result of wounds sustained Nov. 22 in action in Germany...Three brothers and a half-brother also are in service: Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner of war in Germany; PFC Byron, serving in Holland, Sgt. George stationed in Georgia, and PFC Vincent E. Verstraete serving in England, Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Verdow, Harold L. Manlius. Manlius Honor Roll. "PFC Harold L. Verdow died Nov. 23 as a result of wounds sustained Nov. 22 in action in Germany, his sister, Mrs. William H. Baird of 900 Glencove Rd., and stepfather, Ernest Verstraete of Eagle Village, have been notified by the war department. PFC Verdow died in a hospital in France, after serving with the infantry in France and Germany since the invasion of Normandy. He was awarded the bronze star for heroic action with the infantry on D-day. Entering service in November, 1940, PFC Verdow went overseas to England two years ago, then was sent to North Africa, Italy and Sicily, before going into France. He attended Eagle Village school. Three brothers and a half-brother also are in service: Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner of war in Germany; PFC Byron, serving in Holland, Sgt. George stationed in Georgia, and PFC Vincent E. Verstraete serving in England," Post-Standard, 12/23/1944. "Services for PFC Harold L. Verdow, whose body has been returned from overseas where he died Nov. 23, 1944, as a result of wounds suffered in action in Germany the previous day, will be conducted at Park Presbyterian church, Newark. ...burial will be in Newark cemetery, with full military rites by members of the VFW. Pvt. Verdow, brother of Mrs. Catherine Baird of 900 Glencove rd. had served with the infantry in France and Germany since the invasion of Normandy. He was awarded the bronze star for heroic action with the infantry on D-Day and was awarded posthumously the purple heart. Entering service in November 1940, Pvt. Verdow went overseas to England in 1942 and then was sent to North Africa, Italy and Sicily before going into France. He attended Eagle Village school and the Manlius school. Surviving besides Mrs. Baird are another sister, Mrs. Jane Prutzman of Newark; six brothers, George Verdow of Cazenovia, Byron Verdow of Newark, Edwin Verdow of Minoa, Vincent Verstraete of East Syracuse, Ernest Verdow of Avon, and Winfield Verdow of Johnson City, and his stepfather, Edward Verstraete of Manlius," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "Pfc. Verdow joined the Army in October, 1940, training at Fort Devens, Camp Blanding and Indiantown Gap. He had been overseas about two years and took part in action in Africa and Sicily and for his gallantry in the invasion of Normandy he was awarded the Bronze Star. He leaves four brothers...Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner of war of Germany; Pfc. Byron Verdow, now in Holland; Sgt. George Verdow in Georgia and Pfc. Vincent Verstraete, a half brother, now in England. He leaves two other brothers, Winfield of Binghamton and Ernest Verdow of Rochester; two sisters, Mrs. Baird of Syracuse and Mrs. Jane Prutzman of Newark, and his step-father, Edward Verstraete of the Manlius School, The Post-Standard, 11/23/1944. "The purple heart awarded posthumously to Pfc Harold L. Verdow, killed in action Nov. 23 in Germany, has been sent to a sister, Mrs. William Baird of 900 Glencover Rd. A half-brother, Pvt. Vincent E. Verstraete, was wounded in action in Belgium Jan. 13, according to a telegram received by his father, Edward Verstraete of Manlius. Three other brothers are in service: Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner in Germany; Pfc. Byron Verdow, Holland, and Sgt. George Verdow at Moody Field, Ga. Pfc. Harold Verdow also leaves two other brothers, Winfield of Johnson City and Ernest of Rochester, and a sister, Mrs. Jane Prutzman of Newark," The Post-Standard, 2/4/1945.

Verstraete, Vincent E. Manlius. "PFC Harold L. Verdow died Nov. 23 as a result of wounds sustained Nov. 22 in action in Germany, his sister, Mrs. William H. Baird of 900 Glencove Rd., and stepfather, Ernest Verstraete of Eagle Village, have been notified by the war department...Three brothers and a half-brother also are in service: Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner of war in Germany; PFC Byron, serving in Holland, Sgt. George stationed in Georgia, and PFC Vincent E. Verstraete serving in England, Bond scrapbook, n.d. "PFC Vincent E. Verstraete of Eagle Village was slightly wounded in action in Belgium Jan. 13 (1945), according to word received from the war department by his father, Ernest Verstraete, night watchman at the Manlius school. PFC Verstraete is a member of an airborne division," The Post-Standard, 2/4/1945. "Pvt. Vincent E. Verstraete, Manlius, who was wounded in Belgium Jan. 13, 1945, has been released from the hospital and has rejoined his unit, the 17th airborne division, in France. He has been in service since April 7, 1943. He is a son of Edward Verstraete, who is employed at the Manlius school. Mr. Verstraete has three other sons in service, Pvt. Byron Verdow, Pvt. Edwin A. Verdow and Sgt. George D. Verdow. Another son, Pvt. Harold L. Verdow, was killed in Germany Nov. 23, 1944," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "The purple heart awarded posthumously to Pfc Harold L. Verdow, killed in action Nov. 23 in Germany, has been sent to a sister, Mrs. William Biard of 900 Glencover Rd. A half-brother, Pvt. Vincent E. Verstraete, was wounded in action in Belgium Jan. 13, according to a telegram received by his father, Edward Verstraete of Manlius. Three other brothers are in service: Pvt. Edwin Verdow, a prisoner in Germany; Pfc. Byron Verdow, Holland, and Sgt. George Verdow at Moody Field, Ga. Pfc. Harold Verdow also leaves two other brothers, Winfield of Johnson City and Ernest of Rochester, and a sister, Mrs. Jane Prutzman of Newark," The Post-Standard, 2/4/1945. "Pvt. Vincent E. Verstraete, Manlius, who was wounded in Belgium Jan. 13, 1945, has been released from the hospital and rejoined his unit, the 17th airborne division, in France. He has been in service since April 7, 1943..."The Post-Standard, 3/16/1945.

Vert, Howard M.. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Local Draft Board 473 called up 19 men for induction this week....Howard M. Vert, 405 Clinton street, Fayetteville...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/27/1941.

Vininski, Andrew. Kirkville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include...Andrew Vinski (sic) of Kirkville. Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records; name spelled as Vininski.

Vininski, John. Kirkville. "Pvt. John Vinski, son of Mrs. Helen Vinski of Kirkville, RD 1, has been promoted to Pvt. 1/c and has been enrolled in Keesler Field B-24 Liberator bomber mechanics school at Biloxi, Miss.," The Post-Standard, 9/3/1943. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records; name spelled as Vininski.

Vininski, Paul. Kirkville. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records; name spelled as Vininski.

Vinson, Jane. Fayetteville. "Miss Jane Vinson, S 1/c Yeoman, who has been hospitalized at Bethesda, Md., for four weeks with scarlet fever, has been spending a leave with her mother, Mrs. Anna Vinson, in Genesee street. She expects to return to Washington, D. C. today and report for duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945.

Visser, Sylvester. Kirkville. "The local draft board has called ten more young men from this area to the colors, five of them are Kirkville men. They are...Sylvester Visser...all selected for the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Vogel, Arnold. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Arnold E. Vogel of Maple dr., Fayetteville, has reported for duty as an instructor at Scott Field, Ill. Vogel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Vogel, 201 Onondaga ave., was graduated from Syracuse university in 1936, and received his master's degree in education in 1937. He is a member of Kappa Phi Kappa, national honorary educational fraternity. For three years he was on the faculty at Waterloo high school as head of the science and mathematics department," The Post-Standard, 5/29/1942. "Second Lt. (USMCR) Arnold E. Vogel, formerly of Maple Drive, Fayetteville, has successfully completed a special course of instruction at the Signal Corps school at Camp Murphy, Fla., Lt. Vogel was selected for this specialized training on the basis of his aptitude as measured by a written examination. He graduates from the school well-fitted for more important service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/29/1943. (Town of Dewitt).

Volles, David. Fayetteville. "Corp. David Volles will arrive today to pass a short furlough with is parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Volles, of Thompson street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Cpl. David Volles is home from San Bernadino, Calif. on a 21-day leave and is visiting his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Army fliers who were formerly in the uniform of the band include...David Volles..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Volles have received word from their son, Corp. David Volles, in England, that he is confined to a hospital recovering from injuries received when a bomb exploded within a few feet of his bunk while he was sleeping. His injuries comprise a double fracture to one leg, an injury to his right arm, and several small wounds caused from small pieces of shrapnel. Dave is serving with the ground crew of the air force and was sent overseas about the middle of May," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/28/1944. "Miss Anna Jane Volles spent the week end in New York City and visited her brother, Corp. David Volles, who is undergoing treatment at Mitchell Field Hospital for injuries received in England," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/29/1944. "Capt. David Volles, who has been recuperating in a hospital at Pawlings, N. Y., from wounds received while overseas, spent the week end with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "Nine service men from Fayetteville and vicinity had an unexpected reunion last Friday night (or rather Saturday morning) when they dropped into the Chef's diner for a before-going-to-bed-snack. Who was there first doesn't matter, but one by one or two by two they came in, greeting with each with 'Hi you old son of a gun' or 'What's cooking in Honolulu?' Looking them over, I saw Cpl. (Pete) George Bacel, A. T. (Billy) Goebel, Cpl. (Goody) George Goodfellow, Cpl. (Davey) David Volles, Cpl. (Bud) Collin Armstrong, Lt. Burt Hopstein, Cpl. Aden Marquisee, Pfc. (Lindy) Edward Lindenmayer, and Lt. (Joe) Joseph McGraw of Dewitt. The boys were enjoying reminiscing over the good old days at school and swapping 'big ones' about recent experiences. Bacel, Goodfellow, Lindenmayer and McGraw have seen service in the Pacific area," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/19/1945. "Cpl. David Volles, of Pawlings, N. Y., is spending the week with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/2/1945. "Corp. David Volles, of Pawlings hospital, spent the week end with his parents...Sgt. Al Leri, also of Pawlings, accompanied David home for the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945. "Cpl. David Volles is passing a furlough with his parents...prior to reassignment to duty after being hospitalized for several months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/6/1945. "Atlantic City, N.J.--Cpl. David A. Volles...has reported to the AAF Redistribution Station No. 1 here after six months of service in the European theatre of war. Corporal Volles served as armorer on an A-20 while overseas. Before he leaves the Redistribution Station for his next Air Force assignment, the Corporal will be examined by doctors and interviewed by personnel specialists to determine where he can best fit in the AAF set-up and aid the war effort. While here, he will have an opportunity to go fishing, golfing, horseback riding, bicycling on the boardwalk and indulge in many other sports and recreation activities. Corporal Volles is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Volles...and with whom he has been spending a three-weeks' leave. Entering the service on Nov. 7, 1942, he underwent training at Denver, Col., prior to his shipment overseas on May 7, 1944. He attended Fayetteville high school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/11/1945. "Funeral services for Miss Anna Jane Volles were held Tuesday afternoon at her late home in Thompson street followed by services in the United Church...Miss Volles is survived by her parents; three sisters, Betsy and Patricia, of Fayetteville, and Second Lt. Leola C. Hirsch, of Fort Dix, N.J.; a brother, Corp. Daid A. Volles, of Atlantic City, N.J., and her maternal grandmother, Mrs. David Jones, of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/6/1945. "Cpl. David Volles is spending a short leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Volles," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/21/1945. "Cpl. David Volles has been honorably discharged from the Army and is expected to arrive home this week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946. "The largest crowd ever to assemble for a softball game was on hand for the Minoa-Tipperary Hill contest. The event was a thriller, and was won in an extra inning, after two men were out. Dave Volles had a perfect day at bat, getting four for four, including a home run, two triples, and a double," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/21/1946.

Vollmer, Bernard B. Fayetteville. "Those accepted for army service at the induction center Monday include: Bernard B. Vollmer...of Fayetteville...Most of the group took a two-week furlough before going to the reception center at Fort Niagara," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Corp. Bernard Vollmer of Boca Raton, Fla., is passing a five-day leave with his parents...Corp. Vollmer is connected with the Medical division of the Army Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943. "Corp. Bernard Vollmer of Boca Raton, Fla., is passing a nine-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "T/5 Bernard B. Vollmer, of Fayetteville, N. Y. who is now stationed at Boca Raton Field, a technical school of the AAF Training Command, has been promoted to the grade of Corporal. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William B. Vollmer, 227 Salt Springs road, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/3/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. D. T. Brennan of Spring street have announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Barbara Brennan, to Corporal Bernard Vollmer...Corporal Vollmer is stationed in Florida. No date has been set for the wedding," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/15/1944. "Bernard Vollmer has been honorably discharged from service and has returned to his home in this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/13/1946.

Wade, William. Fayetteville. "First Lieut. Wm. Wade of Fayetteville, former assistant sales manager of agency of L. C. Smith and Corona typewriters, is one of hundreds of executives of specialized businesses and industries now being trained at the new Air corps Officers Training School, Miami Beach, Fla., to direct vital administrative and supply operations of the rapidly expanding Army Air Corps ground forces. In a six weeks course in military instruction and physical conditioning...responsible positions they held in commerce and industry. The Air Corps Officers Training School was established specifically for the purpose of enlisting the services, as commissioned officers, of civilian specialists. Its training program will provide Army flyers with expertly-directed ground support and relieve Air Corps Pilot Officers of non-flying duties that have kept them grounded. Lieut. Wade's wife, Mrs. Elsie Groat Wade, lives at 302 N. Manlius street, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "There's a lot to be said about fishing and First Lt. William Wade of Fayetteville, now stationed at Baer field, army air base near Ft. Wayne, Ind., has ample proof. Lt. Wade received one of the longest letters on record at the air base earlier this week from several former business associates in Syracuse and vicinity--and it was all about fishing. The officer's friends didn't forget him when they went on their annual fishing trip to Henderson Harbor, Lake Ontario. The letter was from former associates at the L. C. Smith and Corona Typewriter Company, Inc., where he was assistant sales manager. Lt. Wade, a son of Mrs. Margaret S. Wade of Dewitt rd., married Miss Elsie Groat of Syracuse in 1935. They have three children and reside at 302 N. Manlius st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 7/11/1942. "Lieutenant William F. Wade, 302 Manlius St., Fayetteville, has been promoted to the rank of captain in the Army at Baer Field, Ft. Wayne, Ind. Captain Wade is the son of Mrs. Margaret S. Wade of Dewitt Rd. and married Elsie Groat of Syracuse in 1935. They have three children," Post-Standard, 11/22/1942. "Capt. William Wade of Harrisburg, Pa., has been passing a few days with his family..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Capt. William Wade, combat intelligence officer for a troop carrier command squadron, has been missing in action since Sept. 17 over Holland, according to a telegram from the war department received by his wife, Mrs. Elsie Groat Wade of 302 N. Manlius st., Fayetteville, yesterday. Capt. Wade, a member of the army air forces, participated in the air invasion of Normandy and it is believed that he was serving with Lt.-Gen. Lewis H. Brereton's airborne army that invaded Holland at the northern tip of the Siegfrid line with air transport and glider loads Sept. 17, the day he was listed missing. Before receiving a first lieutenant's commission in the air forces in April, 1942, Capt. Wade was assistant sales manager of L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters, Inc., in this city. He was promoted to captain in December, 1942, at Baer Field, Fort Wayne, Ind. Capt. Wade, son of Mrs. Margaret S. Wade of 129 Dewitt st., and the late Frank E. Wade, attended public schools in Syracuse and Hotchkiss school, Lakeville, Conn. He continued his studies at Lycee Mechelet, Paris, France, and was graduated from Yale university in 1930. Capt. and Mrs. Wade were married in 1935 and have three children, Michael, 7, Wendy, 4, and Sharon, 3," The Post-Standard, 10/11/1944. The War Department yesterday informed Mrs. Elsie Groat Wade of Fayetteville that her husband, Capt. William Wade, who had been listed missing since Sept. 17, 1944, is now presumed to be dead," The Post-Standard, 9/25/1945. "The widow and three children of Capt. William Wade, a combat intelligence officer for a troop carrier command, who was lost over Holland, Sept. 17, 1944, in the invasion at the northern tip of the Siegfried line, are beneficiaries under his will filed with Surrogate Charles R. Milford, Jr., this week for probate in Syracuse...Mrs. Elsie Groat Wade...receives all realty, furnishings, automobiles, jewelry and personal effects left by her husband. Other provisions for her benefit are a bequest of $2,500 and one-half of Capt. Wade's inheritance interest in certain trust funds. The funds were established by the will of Capt. Wade's father, the late Frank E. Wade, whose estate was appraised at $1,686,000 in 1933. The will designated Capt. Wade as one of the eventual beneficiaries in distribution of the funds at deaths of beneficiaries receiving life income from the funds. Trust funds totaled approximately $900,000. The remaining one-half share of Capt. Wade's interest in the trust funds passes by his will to his children, Michael Sedgwick Wade, Wendy Wade and Sharon Groat Wade, who are minors...Capt. Wade executed the will Dec. 31, 1942, and named Mrs. Wade and Attorney John H. Hughes of Mackenzie, Smith & Mitchell, executors," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/28/1945.

Wade, Wilson. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Wadsworth, Dean. Formerly Fayetteville. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth of Camp Edwards, Mass., spent Saturday night and Sunday with Mrs. Wadsworth and his father, Ashler Wadsworth. Pvt. Dean Wadsworth of Monmouth, N. J. and Mrs. Wadsworth of Painted Post, N. Y., also visited Pvt. Wadsworth's father on Saturday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. "Mrs. Edyth Wadsworth of Painted Post, N. Y., has joined the Woman Marines and is undergoing boot training. Her husband, Dean Wadsworth is with the armed forces in Italy. The Wadsworths were former residents of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "Allied Force Headquarters, Italy--Signal property used by Allied Force Headquarters in the Mediterranean theater of operation is procured, stored, issued and repaired by the 3140th Signal Service Platoon. This platoon is a unit of the 3141st Signal Service Group, which is responsible for the complex communication facilities in this theater. Men of the platoon are highly trained and skilled in processing, testing and repairing complicated and technically intricate radio, teletype and telephone equipment used in the vast signal system of Allied Force. Included in this military unit is Technician 5/g Dean W. Wadsworth, husband of Mrs. Edythe M. Wadsworth, 329 E. High St., Painted Post, and son of Mr. and Ashler Wadsworth, Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/2/1945. "Leigh A. Wadsworth has bee given an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army and has returned to his home here after three years in service, 17 months of which had been spent in the European theater. He arrived in New York harbor aboard the Abraham Lincoln on Aug. 29, just three years to the day from the time he entered the service. He was given his discharge last Saturday and arrived home early Sunday morning. Leigh says he is going to take it easy for a few days and do some looking around before 'getting back on the job.' Dean Wadsworth, his brother has also been given an honorable discharge from the army and he arrived in Boston, Mass., two days after Leigh's arrival. Dean, a former resident of Fayetteville, left for service from DeWitt, N.Y., three years ago this month and has been overseas two years. He was serving with the signal corps in Italy. Arriving in Syracuse Wednesday night, Dean is stopping at the home of this sister, Mrs. Ted Barnes, in Syracuse for the present. The discharged men are sons of Ashler A. Wadsworth of 123 Elm street this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945.

Wadsworth, Edythe. Formerly Fayetteville. "Mrs. Edyth Wadsworth of Painted Post, N. Y., has joined the Woman Marines and is undergoing boot training. Her husband, Dean Wadsworth is with the armed forces in Italy. The Wadsworths were former residents of Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/14/1944. "Pfc. Edith Wadsworth, a former resident of this village and Dewitt, has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. James Everson of East Genesee street and also visited her father-in-law, Ashler Wadsworth, at his home in Elm street. Mrs. Wadsworth is serving with the Women Marines," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/14/1944.

Wadsworth, Leigh. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "More local boys who have left to join various branches of U. S. service are Robert Pierce...and Albert Weeks...who enlisted in the Navy Reserve...; Leigh Wadsworth, who enlisted in the Amphibian Command and left Tuesday for Rochester from where he expects to go to Camp Edwards in Massachusetts, and Raymond E. Straub...who enlisted in the Air Corps..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Robert Forney and little daughter, Barbara Lee, have moved from 113 Mechanic street to 123 Elm street, where they will take up residence with Mrs. Forney's sister, Mrs. Leigh Wadsworth while Mr. Wadsworth is in service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Mrs. Leigh Wadsworth spent the week-end with her husband in Boston, Mass. Pvt. Wadsworth is stationed at Camp Edwards, Mass. having been transferred there from Camp Pickett, Va., two weeks ago," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth of Camp Edwards, Mass., returned to his base Sunday after passing a three-day furlough with his wife and father at their home in Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/27/1942. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth returned yesterday to Camp Edwards, Mass., after spending a six-day furlough at his home in Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth of Camp Edward, Mass., spent Friday and Saturday at his home in Elm st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/12/1943. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth of Camp Edwards, Mass., spent the week-end with Mrs. Wadsworth and his father Ashler Wadsworth of Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth was home from Camp Edwards, Mass., over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/14/1943. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth returned today to Camp Edwards, Mass., after spending a week with his wife at their home here," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth of Camp Edwards, Mass., spent Saturday night and Sunday with Mrs. Wadsworth and his father...Pvt. Dean Wadsworth of Monmouth, N. J. and Mrs. Wadsworth of Painted Post, N. Y., also visited Pvt. Wadsworth's father on Saturday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943. :Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth was home from Camp Edwards, Mass., over the week-end," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Mrs. Leigh Wadsworth has returned to Phoenix, N. Y., where she will resume duties as English teacher in Phoenix high school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Pvt. Leigh A. Wadsworth spent last Friday and Saturday with his wife and father at their home here. Pvt. Wadsworth is stationed at Martha's Vineyard," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/5/1943. "Pvt. Leigh A. Wadsworth spent the week-end with Mrs. Wadsworth at the home of her parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Pvt. Leigh Wadsworth of Camp Edwards spent Christmas and the weekend with his wife and father," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "Corp. Leigh A. Wadsworth has arrived overseas, according to a cablegram received by Mrs. Wadsworth on Wednesday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "Miss 'Bea' Havill of (Fayetteville) was instrumental in bringing two local boys together in the South Pacific through correspondence which she carried on with each of them. In a letter to Seaman 1/c Burle Whorrall of Manlius, she told him the number of the ship that Emil Bahouth, Jr., of Fayetteville, as a seaman 1/c, was on. Whorrall investigated and found that Bahouth's ship was in a bay about three miles from where his own was docked. A meeting was arranged and the boys, who were good friends at home, had a happy reunion. They said the meeting was short but worthwhile, and they are planning another get-together. Two other local men had a chance meeting in France, recently. They were T/5 Leigh A. Wadsworth and Electricians Mate 3/c Dick Snyder. They spent some time together, exchanging news events from the old home town," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944. "Leigh A. Wadsworth has been promoted from the rank of T/5 to Sergeant, according to word received by his family. Sgt. Wadsworth is serving in France with the 334th Harbor Craft Company of the Amphibious Command and has been overseas one year. He entered the service in August, 1942, and trained at Camp Edwards, Mass., and Camp Gordon Johnston, Fla., before going overseas. Announcement of Sgt. Wadsworth's promotion was made on a WFBL program Wednesday morning," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "S/Sgt. Leigh A. Wadsworth arrived in the States Wednesday from Europe where he has spent 17 months with the 334th Harbor Craft Company. He will be given an honorable discharge and expects to be home in a few days, he said in a telephone call to his wife Wednesday night," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. "Leigh A. Wadsworth has bee given an honorable discharge from the U. S. Army and has returned to his home here after three years in service, 17 months of which had been spent in the European theater. He arrived in New York harbor aboard the Abraham Lincoln on Aug. 29, just three years to the day from the time he entered the service. He was given his discharge last Saturday and arrived home early Sunday morning. Leigh says he is going to take it easy for a few days and do some looking around before 'getting back on the job.' Dean Wadsworth, his brother has also been given an honorable discharge from the army...The discharged men are sons of Ashler A. Wadsworth of 123 Elm street this village," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/7/1945. "Their Plea. It's such a little thing, they ask,/These men who gave their lives,/Who died to live in memory,/Of us who have survived./They had no choice when they were called,/They went--light-hearted boys;/They felt the awfulness of wars--/The filth, the fear, the ceaseless noise./What do they ask, our heroes dead?/We won the war," they came from high;/It's up to you to win the peace,"/"So kids of ours won't have to die./'We won the war,' they say again,/Our task we could not close,'/In awful voice they speak to us,/As tolerance they would propose./'Make out a brotherhood of man/From the key we give to you;/No race is more important here--/Nor creed, nor rank, nor hue,/We leaned the Golden Rule on earth,/Now you who taught it--us it!/Don't let your fallen comrades down,/Don't flinch; or don't excuse it/When colored men earn your respect,/Or creed, you learn, means loving God,/Be proud; we too, will be/In our high place above your sod./It's WAR we hate,' the dead speak on;/'Of you, we only ask one thing--/To ban it from the earth for good;/Of peace, fair peace, sweet peace to sing./Then shall the debt be paid in full;/The price, you'll find, won't be too great./We'll sleep in peace; you'll live in peace/And war will meet its proper fate.'/Can we refuse this ardent please?/They gave to us a worthwhile task,/They gave the only thing they had--/It's such a little thing they ask?/ Helen Griffin Wadsworth. Poem written by Mrs. Leigh Wadsworth, read by Rev. Smith on Memorial Day, 1946, published by request in The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/7/1946. "Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Wadsworth have moved into their apartment at 123 Elm street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/14/1946.

Wafer, Donald J. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Don J. Wafer, carpenter's mate, second class, who has been spending a leave with his mother, Mrs. Hazel Wafer, of 304 E. Seneca st., Manlius, married Miss Marjorie Culver on April 6 at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emory Peck of 153 W. Manlius st., Manlius...They returned yesterday to his base where Mrs. Wafer will remain until he receives orders," Bond scrapbook, n.d.

Wager, Leila. Fayetteville. "Fayetteville has five women serving their country....Leila Wager in the Nurses Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/21/1944. "The following girls and women from this vicinity have entered the Women's Reserve of the armed forces...Nurses...Leila Wager, Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944.

Wainwright, Freeman J., Jr. Manlius. "Onondaga county men inducted were...Army...Freeman J. Wainwright, Jr., 101 Scoville ave., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943. "Pvt. Freeman Wainwright, Jr., who has been visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Wainwright, Sr., of Scoville Avenue, returned Tuesday and will be stated in California in the radio division of the Air Corps," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "Pfc. Freeman Wainwright, Jr., has been transferred from Fresno to Glendale, Calif., the Grand Central Air Terminal," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/4/1944. "Corp. Freeman Wainwright, who has been passing 17 days in Manlius visiting his parents Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Wainwright, Sr., and brother-in-law and sister Mr. and Mrs. Donald Dailey and other relatives and friends, left Syracuse Monday night to return to his base at the Santa Rosa Air Field in California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/27/1945. "Corp. Freeman Wainwright, Jr., of the U. S. Army, who was stationed in Austin, Texas, has received an honorable discharge and returned Friday to his home in Scoville avenue. Corp. Wainwright has spent three years in service, and for a time was located on the Pacific coast," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/1/1946.

Waldron, Norman S. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Wales, Milton George. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. 112 Seneca St., Manlius. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942. "Ray M. Wales, Manlius business man, died March 20, at his home in Eat Seneca street, following a stroke, which he suffered on Saturday. Surviving are his wife, Sarah Loy Wales, one son, Milton G., of Camp Bowie, Texas; his father, G. H. Wales of Sherburne; one brother, W. W. Wales, of Sherburne; two sisters, Mrs. P. c. Case of Wolcott; Mrs. Earl Towne of Rome, N.Y., and several nieces and nephews, "The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/24/1944.

Walker, Charles "Jack". Kirkville. "Mrs. Charles Walker and daughter, Grace, returned last Monday from a very delightful trip. Jack Walker, who is stationed at Ft. Bliss, Texas, spent the Christmas holidays at his home here. He made the trip home by auto. Mrs. Walker and daughter returned to Texas with her son. Returning home she and her daughter visited relatives in Chicago and another son, Bill, who is stationed at Green Bay Camp on the Great lakes," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Walker, Hugh. Fayetteville. "Capt. Hugh L. Walker of 204 Clinton st., Fayetteville, and Lt. Oliver D. Burden, Jr., of Highbridge rd., Fayetteville, have completed a six-week course of military instruction and physical conditioning at the air forces officer training school at Miami Beach, Fla.," The Post-Standard, 4/27/1943. "Maj. Hugh Walker, who has been stationed in North Carolina has been spending a few days with his wife and children at their home in Clinton street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/19/1944. "Burma (hq. 10th Air Force). Award of the Bronze Star Medal for 'meritorious service' to Major Hugh L. Walker, 44, husband of Mrs. Eleanor D. Walker, 204 Clinton street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been announced by Maj. Gen. Howard C. Davidson, Commanding General of the Tenth Air Force. Maj. Walker is assistant staff communications officer of the Tenth, which is waging an all out war against the Japs in Burma. He is a graduate of Tampa, Fla., high school and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, class of 1924, where he played baseball, tennis and golf. He has been in the armed forces 23 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945. "Award of the bronze star medal 'for meritorious service' to Lt.-Col. Hugh L. Walker, 44,...has been announced...Member of a communications staff of the 10th air force that operates against the Japs in the India-Burma theater, Lt.-Col. Walker has been in the armed forces 25 months, having spent the past 10 months in that theater of operations. He is a graduate of Tampa, Fla. high school and Massachusetts Institute of Technology..."The Post-Standard, 3/29/1945. "Hqs. Tenth Air Force in Burma--Award of the Bronze Star Medal 'for meritorious service' to Lt. Col. Hugh L. Walker, of 204 Clinton street, Fayetteville, N.Y. has been announced by Maj. Gen. Howard C. Davidson, commanding general, Tenth Air Force. A member of a communications staff of the Tenth Air Force that operates against the Japs in the India-Burma theater, Lt. Col. Walker has spent ten months in this theater of operations," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945.

Walker, Nelson M. Manlius. "Brig. Gen. Nelson M. Walker, professor of military science and tactics at the Manlius School from 1938 to 1940, was killed in action last week in Normandy, according to word received in Pittsfield, Mass. Gen. Walker was widely known in Syracuse and vicinity. His son, Perrin Walker, graduated from Manlius in June, 1942, is a first lieutenant, serving as aid to the Eighth Division commander, the division in which his father commanded a brigade at the time of his death. Born in Pittsfield, Mass., in 1891, Gen. Walker entered the army in 1917, served with the 47th Infantry, Fourth Division, during the first World War, and saw action in the Aisne, Marne, St. Mihiel and Argonne offensives. He was promoted to major in 1935. A former member of the Army general staff, he had served in China, Hawaii, Panama and the Philippines and for four years was instructor in tactics in the War Department infantry school. After being in charge of the R.O.T.C. at Manlius, Gen. Walker was stationed at Camp Howzer, Tex. before being transferred to England with the Eighth Division," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944.

Walker, Oscar A. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Walker, Charles "Jack". Kirkville. "Mrs. Charles Walker and daughter, Grace, returned last Monday from a very delightful trip. Jack Walker, who is stationed at Ft. Bliss, Texas, spent the Christmas holidays at his home here. He made the trip home by auto. Mrs. Walker and daughter returned to Texas with her son. Returning home she and her daughter visited relatives in Chicago and another son, Bill, who is stationed at Green Bay Camp on the Great lakes," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Walker, Perrine. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Brig. Gen. Nelson M. Walker, professor of military science and tactics at the Manlius School from 1938 to 1940, was killed in action last week in Normandy...His son, Perrin Walker, graduated from Manlius in June, 1942, is a first lieutenant, serving as aid to the Eighth Division commander, the division in which his father commanded a brigade at the time of his death..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944.

Wall, Joseph W. Manlius. "Joseph Wall has been passing a ten-day leave of absence at home, returning Tuesday to Sampson naval base," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944. "Mr. Joseph Wall and Miss Gertrude Wall returned recently from Norfolk, Va., where they sent several days visiting Joseph W. Wall, S 2/c. "Mrs. Joseph W. Wall has received a cablegram from her husband, Joseph W. Wall S2/c that he has arrived safely overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Joseph Wall, who is stationed in North Africa, has been promoted to Seaman 1st Class," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/9/1945. "Word has been received by Mrs. Joseph W. Wall that her husband is still at the same base in North Africa and that he has been given a new rating of S.P. (S), 3/c," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945. "Fred Jones, AMM 3/c, and Mrs. Jones, of Syracuse, visited Mrs. Joseph M. Wall last week. Mr. Jones has recently returned from North Africa where he was stationed for 19 months at the same base with Joseph W. Wall S. P. (S) 3/c, and he brought a message to Mrs. Wall from her husband," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945. "Joseph Wall, who has served 20 months in the navy overseas, expects to receive his discharge soon after which he will return to his home in Manlius," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946. "Joseph Wall of the navy, received his honorable discharge at Lido Beach and returned to his home in Smith street Saturday," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946. "Miss Gertrude Anna Wall, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Wall of Manlius, became the bride of former Capt. Robert Byron Rhoades, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Rhoades, Manlius, in Saturday afternoon, Feb. 16...John Rhoades, brother of the bridegroom was best man. The ushers were Robert Goodfellow and the two brothers of the bride, Robert and Joseph Wall, the latter recently discharged after 23 months service in the Navy...Mr. and Mrs. Rhoades left for a honeymoon trip to New York and Florida. Upon their return they will make their home in Ithaca, where the bride is a dietitian at Cornell University and her husband begins agricultural engineering studies on March 6," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/22/1946. "Joseph Wall has accepted a position with the G.L.F. at Adams, N.Y., and began his work April 1. Mrs. Wall and son, Billy, will move to Adams about May 1," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/5/1946.

Walter, John F., Jr. Manlius. "John F. Walter, Jr., son of John F. Walter, Sr. of Manlius RD 1, and grandson of Mrs. M. V. Stout of 126 Wayne st., has completed training in aviation machinist's mate school, naval air technical training center, Memphis, Tenn. Walter, 30, enlisted April 12, 1943, and received boot training at Parris Island, S. C. A graduate of north high school, he attended Syracuse university extension school. He was a machinist for L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters, Inc.," The Post-Standard, 5/11/1944.

Walters, Elton J. Kirkville. Listed as in the service, Minoa scrapbook, n.d. no further information. "Twenty-five men were inducted into military service from selective service board, 473, located in the municipal building, East Syracuse Friday...Army...Elton J. Walters, R.D. 2, Kirkville.,... " The Post-Standard, 7/30/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Walters, William L. Kirkville. Inducted at Syracuse armory, army, The Post-Standard, 9/2/1943. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records. Killed in action according to the Army's first postwar list of dead and missing, May 27, 1941 - Jan. 31, 1946.

Walworth, Fayette C. Fayetteville. "Fayette Walworth has been inducted into service and has left for the reception center at Fort Niagara. Mr. Walworth will go from Ft. Niagara to Camp Hale, Pando, Colorado, where he will train for a ski-trooper. Mrs. Walworth will remain with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Hungerford for the duration," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Mrs. Fayette Walworth has been transferred from Syracuse to Providence, R. I., in the interest of the Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., and went by plane Sunday to her new post. Her husband, Pvt. Walworth, is stationed at Camp Hale Pando, Col.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Corp. and Mrs. Fayette C. Walworth have returned to Camp Hale Pando, Col. after spending the Christmas holidays with Mrs. Walworth's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Hungerford," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/31/1943. "Mrs. Fayette C. Walworth has received word from her husband, S/Sgt. Walworth, that he has arrived safely in Italy..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/12/1945. "S/Sgt. Fayette C. Walworth, who is serving with the 10th Mountain Division in Italy, has received the Combat Infantryman's badge. Mrs. Walworth and infant daughter, Pamela, are living with Mrs. Walworth's parents.." The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "With the Fifth Army, Italy. (Delayed)--Staff Sergeant Fayette C. Walworth, whose wife, Shirley H. lives at 572 East Genesee street, Fayetteville, N. Y., has been cited by the 86th Mountain Infantry Regiment of the Fifth Army's 10th Mountain Division and awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge for actual participation in combat against the enemy in Italy. Standards for the badge are high. The decoration is awarded to the infantry soldier who has proved his fighting ability in combat. The handsome badge consists of a silver rifle set against a background of infantry blue, enclosed in a silver wreath,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945. "Mrs. Fayette C. Walworth and daughter Pamela Joy, are spending some time with S/Sgt. Walworth's parents, Mr. an Mrs. Roy E. Walworth, at Delmar, N. Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/29/1945. "S/Sgt. Fayette C. Walworth, who is serving with the 10th Mountain division in Italy, has received his combat infantryman badge. His wife and daughter, Pamela, live at 572 E. Genesee st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 4/16/1945. "S/Sgt. Fayette C. Walworth has returned to the United States after serving eight months with the 10th Mountain Division in Italy, and is spending a 30-day furlough with his wife and six months old daughter Pamela Joy, whom he saw for the first time. Sgt. Walworth wears the Bronze Star, the Combat Infantry Badge, the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with two bronze stars and the Good Conduct Ribbon. Before entering the service in May, 1942, he was associated with the Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. in Syracuse. Sgt. Walworth is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Walworth of Delmar, N.Y..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/24/1945. "S/Sgt. and Mrs. Fayette Walworth has returned home after spending ten days in Gananoque and Montreal, Canada," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945. "S/Sgt. and Mrs. Fayette C. Walworth are spending a week in New York City. Sgt. Walworth, a member of the 10th Mountain Division, reported to Fort Dix, N. J. on Sept. 13 for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945. "A/Sgt. Fayette C. Walworth, who is stationed at Camp Carson, Col., is spending a fifteen day furlough with his wife and daughter, Pamela Joy.." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/5/1945. "Fayette C. Walworth has been discharged from the Army at Fort Dix, N. J., and has joined his wife and daughter, Pamela, who are living at the home of Mrs. Walworth's parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/30/1945. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Ward, Wilbur. Minoa. "Private Wilbur Ward, who is stationed at Camp Davis, North Carolina is spending his Christmas furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/26/1941. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942.

Warren, Harris. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Harris Warren..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Harris Warren..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Pfc. Harris C. Warren of Fayetteville rd., Fayetteville, was awarded the expert infantryman's badge for proficiency as an infantryman at Camp Cooke, Calif. After a series of rigid tests PFC Warren's average was found to be in the higher bracket entitling him to wear the coveted badge. PFC Warren, son of Mrs. Diana Warren of Highland, is a graduate of Owensboro high school, Owensboro, Ky., and attended Syracuse university two years. He was inducted into the army in January, 1943, and is on duty with the 97th infantry division at Camp Cooke, Calif..," The Post-Standard, 12/9/1944. "Pfc. Harris Warren who has just returned from the European War Area spent 10 days of his furlough with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Bedford, of DeWitt park, with whom he made his home before going into service. Pfc. Warren attended Fayetteville high school and studied two years at the College of Forestry at Syracuse university. He is now visiting friends in the states of Wyoming and Nebraska, and at the end of his furlough he will report to Camp Dix," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/27/1945.

Weaver, Mansfield F. Fayetteville. "Pfc. Mansfield F. Weaver, son of Christian R. Weaver, Fayetteville rd., Fayetteville, is a student at the armored force school communication department at Fort Knox, Ky.," The Post-Standard, 4/13/1943. "Pfc. Mansfield F. Weaver, son of Christian R. Weaver, Fayetteville rd., Fayetteville has been graduated from the comm. dept. of the armored school at Fort Knox, Ky," The Post-Standard, 7/27/1943.

Weber, John R. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Deep sea fishing trips along the famous Great Barrier reef, Zane Grey's favorite grounds, are being conducted by John R. Weber, Red Cross field director, for patients of an army hospital in Australia, according to word received through the American Red Cross by his wife, Mrs. Alice M. Weber of 1030 E. Genesee St. The reef, between the extremes of Biamble Cay and Lady Elliot island, extends 1,200 miles and follows the coast along the northeast line of Australia between New Guinea and Cape Townshend. Mrs. Weber is a social worker with the department of public welfare and her husband, who has been overseas two years, is with the Third air task force and lives in a hut built of palm trees. He charters the boats, provides fishing tackle and bait, cold soft drinks and reading material for the weekly excursions for the army patients who are accompanied by a medical attendant. Weber wrote to his wife several weeks ago: 'The Red Cross recently acquired an area that will be under the jurisdiction of my work. The place is a lovely small town which has been established as a rest center for men from the front (air corps personnel). The facilities there are provided cooperatively by the army and Red Cross and are the men well taken care of! Boy, what a set-up! 'The Red Cross has taken over the largest hotel in town for billeting the men...a wonderful kitchen and a dining room is operated. The food is excellent and there are seconds if the boys want them. Plenty of fresh pasteurized milk and how the boys do go for it, as they are without it all the time where they come from. Most of the boys gain seven to 10 pounds during a 10-day stay. They are weighed in on arrival and departure. 'Twenty-four hour laundry service is available with pressing and dry-cleaning. The hotel also has a barber shop and shoe shine parlor. A recreation program is maintained that is a honey; trips to the beach twice a day, horseback riding, fishing trips by boat, roller skating, and dancing every other night in the recreation hall - all free! Swimming trunks and towels are provided to boys who don't have them and most of them don't. Athletic equipment is also provided. For those who like tennis. Red Cross has taken over some courts and provided rackets, balls and shoes. Almost anything a soldier wants to do is at his disposal...I recently ran into Dr. Fred Silverman of Syracuse, Howard Mott of Manlius, Moss Hamilton, Fabius , and Lt. Grant Murray of Seneca Tnpk.. and our meeting developed into a wonderful friendship. It was swell to see someone from home. 'The most important thing in the minds of all the boys is the thought of going home. They develop all sorts of phrases and the latest around here is -- MOM'S DOOR in 44! If the folks at home could only see what their dollars to the Red Cross are doing for the boys overseas it would do their hearts good. In this place I don't know what the soldiers would do without Red Cross. 'We have good facilities for feeding, housing, recreation and social services rendered thru the field office. It's a pleasure to be a part of an American organization helping American boys overseas. Of course, we have our headaches, plenty of them. But the work is definitely worthwhile.' " John L. Weber, well known dry goods merchant in this village, died Wednesday in the University hospital, in Syracuse, after an illness of two years. He was 63 years old...He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Bigley Weber, and two sons, John, who is with the American Red Cross in the Philippines, and Francis Elwyn, of Syracuse, two sisters and two grandchildren," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/9/1945.

Weeks, Albert. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "More local boys who have left to join various branches of U. S. service are...Albert Weeks, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks of Warren street, who enlisted in the Navy Reserve and left last Friday for Great Lakes Training base in Illinois..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/28/1942. "Albert Weeks, stationed at the Great Lakes Training Base is passing a nine-day furlough with his parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/2/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks are entertaining their two sons who are serving Uncle Sam and were fortunate enough to get furloughs at the same time. They are Seaman 1/c Albert Weeks, who has seen service in the South Pacific for the past 18 months, and Sgt. Edwin Weeks, Army Ordnance Dept., at MacDill Field, Tampa, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Other navy men now include...Albert Weeks, aboard a carrier at sea..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Albert Weeks, recently discharged from the Navy, has accepted a position at the Precision Castings Co.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Weeks, Charles G. Fayetteville. "Among Syracuse men in the army reserve who will receive orders starting Saturday are the following...Charles G. Weeks,, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 2/23/1943.

Weeks, Edwin. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pvt. Edwin Weeks of MacDill Field, Fla., is passing a short furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks, of Warren st.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/18/1942. "Corp. Edwin Weeks has been spending a few days with his parents...Corp. Weeks, has just graduated from air-craft ammunition school at Santa Anita, Cal., and has been transferred to MacDill Field, Tampa, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks have received word of the promotion of their son Edwin, from the rank of corporal to sergeant. Sgt. Weeks is stationed at MacDill Field, Tampa, Fla., in the base ordnance office," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/25/1943. "Corp. Edwin Weeks of MacDill Field, Tampa, Fla., is spending a few days furlo with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/30/1943 "Sgt. Edwin Weeks has returned to MacDill Field, Fla., after passing a 15-day furlough with his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks are entertaining their two sons who are serving Uncle Sam and were fortunate enough to get furloughs at the same time. They are Seaman 1/c Albert Weeks, who has seen service in the South Pacific for the past 18 months, and Sgt. Edwin Weeks, Army Ordnance Dept., at MacDill Field, Tampa, Fla.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bessee of 119 W. LaFayette ave. announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Shirley Seymour, to Sgt. Edwin E. Weeks, Jr....The bride-elect was graduated from Onondaga Valley academy and Sgt. Weeks is a graduate of Fayetteville high school. He is stationed in Florida. No date has been set for the wedding," The Post-Standard, 4/5/1944. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Edwin Weeks..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "Miss Shirley Seymour, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bessee, of 119 LaFayette avenue, Syracuse, and Corp. Edwin Weeks, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Weeks of Warren street this village, were married Monday morning, Aug. 7 at 10 o'clock by Rev. J. W. Woessner at his home in the Ambassador Apartments in Syracuse...Miss Madeline Thornton and Cpl. Charles Mallott attended the bridal couple...The couple will leave the latter part of the week for Tampa, Fla., where they have their apartment all ready to move into. The bridegroom and Corp. Mallott, whose home is in Fayetteville, are stationed at MacDill Field near Tampa," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/11/1944. "Lt. Edwin Weeks, formerly stationed in Florida, has gone to Camp Robinson, Ark., after spending ten days with his parents...Mrs. Weeks, who also visited here with her husband, will remain with her parents in Syracuse until her husband's discharge from the service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946.

Wein, Willard Raymond. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Inductees from this village (Fayetteville) who left for the reception center at Fort Niagara last Friday were: Willard Wein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Wein..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/24/1942. "Pvt. Willard R. Wein...is in the aviation mechanic school at Keesler Field, Miss. He is a graduate of Fayetteville high school and a former employee of American District Telegraph company. He was inducted July 17, and sent to Fort Niagara," The Post-?Standard, 8/29/1942. "Many Central New York men were among those graduated last week from the airplane mechanics school at Keesler Field, Miss. They were:...Pvt. Willard R. Wein of 104 Salt Springs rd., Fayetteville..." Post-Standard, 12/7/1942. "Pvt. Willard Wein, a student in aviation mechanics at a training school on Long Island, spent a few hours Saturday night and Sunday with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Wein. Pvt. Wein made the trip via plane," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/15/1943. "Pvt. Willard Wein returned to Camp Groton, in Connecticut, Wednesday, after passing a five-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Wein," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/21/1943. "Cpl. John F. Ragus, son of Mrs. Delia Ragus of Orchard street, an aerial gunner engineer with the Air Transport Command, while on a flight from the States to Liverpool, England, had the opportunity of stopping within 30 miles of the airfield on which his cousin S/Sgt. Willard Wein is based with the Eighth Air Force. S/Sgt. Wein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Wein, former residents of Fayetteville, has been overseas two years and the reunion with his cousin was a happy occasion, according to letters received from the boys. They spent two days and nights together and were wishing they might be able to contact Cpl. Louis Ragus, brother of John, who is with the signal corps in Campaigne, France. John expected to leave England about Aug. 4 for the States and soon after his arrival will be given a three day leave to visit his home here before reporting to his based at the Romulus Air Field in Michigan," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/10/1945.

Welch, Matthew J. Minoa. Honorably discharged...Pfc. Matthew J. Welch, The Post-Standard, 5/2/1946.

Wells, Carl K. Fayetteville, 110 Burdick st. Inducted at Syracuse armory, The Post-Standard, navy, 9/2/1943.

Wells, Paul A. Formerly Fayetteville. "Lieut-Com. Paul A. Wells of Syracuse, who left Tuesday for Norfolk, Va., to begin service as an officer in the U. S. Navy is a native and former resident of this village (Fayetteville), and a brother of John Wells of South Manlius street. He is a son of the late Dana S. Wells and Mrs. Lillian Wells, now of Manlius, and was graduated from Fayetteville High School. Later he attended prep school, after which he was graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. Commander Wells, prior to his being commissioned, was second deputy commissioner of parks in Syracuse, where he has lived for the past several years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942.

Wescott, Alfred H. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey) Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll. "Pfc. Alfred Wescott, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Wescott of Oran, was home yesterday en route to Camp Edwards, Mass., after graduation from the Elgin Watchmakers college, Elgin, Ill. A former student at Manlius high school, he entered the service March 15, 1943," Bond scrapbook, n.d. "PFC Alfred Wescott, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Wescott of Oran, spent a 10-day furlo with his parents and at Elgin, Ill., visiting friends. He is with the coast artillery at Camp Stewart, Ga.," The Post-Standard, 10/13/1944. "PFC Alfred H. Wescott, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Wescott of Oran, was killed in action Feb. 21 in Germany, according to a war department telegram received Wednesday by his parents. He entered service in November, 1942, shortly after graduation from Manlius high school. PFC Wescott went overseas in November, 1944. Besides his parents, he leaves a sister, Miss Mary Louise Wescott; and several uncles and aunts," The Post-Standard, 3/9/1945.

West, Walter M. Manlius. "Walter M. West, S.F. 1/c, of 409 East Seneca street, who has been serving with the 38th Naval Construction Battalion overseas, has been home on furlough. Mr. and Mrs. West Spent several days in Boston visiting their nephew Adrian West who is attending radar school at Harvard. Mr. West left Friday for Camp Parks, California," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/16/1944. "Walter West, ST 1/c, who has been at home on furlough, returned Wednesday to Camp Parks, Calif., accompanied by Mrs. West who will make her home in San Francisco for the present. Mr. West has spent 16 months in service in the Aleutians and Alaska," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/25/1944.

Wetzel, Milton G. Formerly town of Manlius. "Capt. Milton G. Wetzel of the regular army infantry, has been transferred from Fort Niagara to become executive officer in charge of training for men taking the army specialist course at University of Buffalo Medical School. Capt. Wetzel, who attended Manlius school, has served as post athletic special services and general mess officer at Fort Niagara," The Post-Standard, 7/2/1943.

Wheeler, Carl. Fayetteville. "...Onondaga County men accepted yesterday were...Carl D. Wheeler, Fayetteville, 206 Brooklea Dr., Fayetteville..." Post-Standard, 11/19/1942. "Inductees leader, Carl (Tiny) Wheeler of Fayetteville, six feet, five inches tall, weighing 290 pounds, led a contingent of Draft Board 473 inductees, leaving Syracuse today..." Bottrill scrapbook, n.d. "Pvt. Carl Wheeler of Fort Niagara spent Christmas and the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wheeler," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/1/1943. "Sgt. Carl Wheeler, who has been stationed at Fort Knox, is passing a 14-day furlough with his parents...Upon his return Sgt. Wheeler will go to officers training school," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943. "Carl D. Wheeler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wheeler, 206 Brooklea Drive, Fayetteville, was recently promoted from private to corporal at the Armored Force Replacement Training Center. Corp. Wheeler, a former employee of the Precision Die Casting Co., is teaching trainees the art of armored warfare," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/2/1943. "Corp. Carl Wheeler returned to Fort Knox, Ky., Saturday, after spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wheeler, of Brooklea Drive," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/17/1943. "Sgt. Carl (Tiny) Wheeler arrived home last Friday after 29 months in the Pacific area. Tiny saw plenty of action, took part in two invasions and three major battles. Sgt. Wheeler has re-enlisted in the Army and after three months leave, will report for duty and will be assigned to instruct in Buffalo," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/25/1946. "Sgt. Carl Wheeler is spending a few days with friends in Cincinnati, Ohio," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/8/1946. "The engagement of Miss Ida Mae Birkenmeier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. Birkenmeier of St. Bernard, Ohio, to 1st Sgt. Carl. D. Wheeler...has been announced...Sgt. Wheeler graduated from Fayetteville High School and attend Syracuse university. He served 21 months in the Army in the Southwest Pacific, after which he re-enlisted, and is now stationed at Greenhaven Detention Barracks.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/14/1946. "In the Church of the Immaculate Conception ...Saturday morning...Miss Ida Mae Birkemeier...became the bride of Sgt. Carl D. Wheeler..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/23/1946. "Sgt. and Mrs. Carl Wheeler have rented an apartment in Poughkeepsie where they are residing since Sgt. Wheeler's return to duties at Pawlings, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/13/1946. "Sgt. and Mrs. Carl D. Wheeler of Poughkeepsie, N.Y. passed the week-end with Mr. Wheeler's parents..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/18/1946.

Wheeler, Oswald B. Fayetteville. "The first 1944 draftees from this area were inducted at Syracuse on Wednesday From Fayetteville are...Oswald Wheeler...111 North st., who will serve in the Army..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/7/1944.

Wheelock, Avery H. Manlius. "Staff Sgt. Avery Wheelock of Ft. MacDill, Florida, has been at home on furlough," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/20/1943. "Tech. Sgt. Avery M. Wheelock and Mrs. Wheelock of Battle Creek, Mich., are passing a 20-day furlough with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Avery Wheelock, and Mr. and Mrs. Ray Smith in Fabius and visiting other relatives and friends," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/8/1944. "Tech. Sgt. Avery M. Wheelock and Mrs. Wheelock, who have been at home on furlough, left Sunday for Battle Creek, Mich.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/15/1944. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Whiteley, John. Fayetteville. Inducted at Syracuse armory, The Post-Standard, navy, 9/2/1943. "John Whiteley returned to Sampson Naval Station on Sunday after spending a week end leave with his wife Ruth Whiteley and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Whiteley. Monday morning he was graduated from the Postal Service School with the rating of Specialist 3/c. He has been assigned to the fleet postoffice in San Francisco for further training," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/11/1944. "Mrs. Theresa Whiteley, wife of Harry Whiteley of James street...died last Saturday at the home of her daughter in Syracuse after a long illness. She was 54 years of age, and had been a resident of this village for many years. Surviving besides her husband is the daughter, Mrs. William Merle, of Syracuse; and three sons, John of the U.S.N.R., of Shoemaker, Cal; Curtiss G., of DeWitt, and H. Donald Whiteley, of Fayetteville; also four sisters, Mrs. N. D. Redmond, Mrs. David Schenker and Mrs. Mamie Buff, all of Syracuse, and Mrs. Lyman Burdick, of Manlius; five brothers, Nelson and Charles Nash, of Jamesville, Robert and Arthur Nash, of Manlius, and Clement Nash, of Kirkville; two grandchildren, nieces and nephews," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/13/1945. 209 Thompson St., Jamesville, town of Dewitt; wife - Ruth, 1940 Fayetteville Directory.

Whittaker, Charles D. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Mrs. Charles Whittaker and children, William, Joy and Thomas, returned Monday from a vacation on DeRuyter Lake and will leave soon for Fort Jackson, S. C., where Mr. Whittaker, a second lieutenant, is stationed with the 56th Signal Battalion," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1941. "Lieut. Charles Whittaker spent last week visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Whittaker, 207 Smith street, Manlius. Lieut. Whittaker is with the amphibian division of the 287th Signal Corps, stationed at Camp Edwards, Mass. He stated that the boys of the camp are enjoying the best of health, with fine food and quarters and in high spirits," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/4/1942. "2nd Lt. Charles D. Whittaker, 207 Smith St., Manlius, learned that he had been advanced to lst Lt.," The Post-Standard, 9/7/1942. "Mrs. F. W. Whittaker...received word that her son, Charles D. Whittaker, somewhere in the Southwest Pacific area, has received a captain's commission, the second promotion in nine months. Capt. Whittaker recently left the hospital where he was confined for some time, recovering from severe burns received in line of service. He states food is excellent, weather hot, but boys in high spirits and all looking for mail from friends," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/27/1943. "Capt. Charles D. Whittaker, 31, ...was promoted to that rank as of Aug. 5, according to a letter received by his wife, Mrs. Beatrice Whittaker, now living in Pulaski. Capt. Whittaker, who was formerly in the signal corps, has been transferred to the chemical warfare division. Called to active service April 15, 1941, he has been in the South Pacific since February, when he left for Australia. He attended Syracuse university for three and a half years and was employed at Precision Castings Co., Fayetteville, prior to going into the army as a second lieutenant. Capt. Whittaker attended the chemical warfare school at Edgewood arsenal, Md. For a year his wife and three children, William, 6; Joy, 4, and Thomas, 3, were staying at the home of Mrs. Whittaker's mother, Mrs. W. E. Ruetsch of Bridgeport, "The Post-Standard, 9/5/1943.

Whitworth, Walter. Formerly Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. William J. Orman announce the marriage of their daughter, Marion Louise Orman to Walter Thomas Whitworth, son of Thomas A. Whitworth of Syracuse...Mr. Whitworth, a former resident of this village, is in the U. S. Navy and while at his present post, the couple will live at 1897 Otrobardo Ave., Norwich Town, Conn," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/23/1942. "For meritorious services in action in the performance of duties in a submarine during a war patrol, Walter T. Whitworth, chief torpedoman's mate, USN, has been awarded the bronze medal by Fleet Adm. C. W. Nimitz. Whitworth's wife, Marian, and son Walter T., jr., live at 100 South st., Fayetteville. His mother, Mrs. W. F. Paxton, lives at 355 Fulton st., San Francisco, Ca.," The Post-Standard, 8/2/1945.

Whorrall, Burle J. Manlius. Inducted into the Navy October 5, 1943, The Post-Standard, 10/6/1943. "Several Manlius men who are in the armed service are at home on a brief leave, among them are...Junior Whorral..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/10/1943. "Twelve men from this area have completed basic training at Sampson and are on leave. All seamen second class, they are Burle Whorrall, Jr., of 110 North st., Manlius," The Post Standard, 12/1/1943. "Miss 'Bea' Havill of (Fayetteville) was instrumental in bringing two local boys together in the South Pacific through correspondence which she carried on with each of them. In a letter to Seaman 1/c Burle Whorrall of Manlius, she told him the number of the ship that Emil Bahouth, Jr., of Fayetteville, as a seaman 1/c, was on. Whorrall investigated and found that Bahouth's ship was in a bay about three miles from where his own was docked. A meeting was arranged and the boys, who were good friends at home, had a happy reunion. They said the meeting was short but worthwhile, and they are planning another get-together..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/24/1944.

Whorrall, Richard. Manlius. "Pvt. Richard Whorrall is now stationed at Newport, R. I., until January 4th," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/2/1942.

Whorrall, Thomas C. Manlius. 203 Pleasant St.; accepted into the Navy, "The Post-Standard, 12/4/1943. Basic training at Fort Bragg, and secondary training at Camp Edibury near Indianapolis. In the Battle of the Bulge, he served as a forward observer, radioing information from the front line back to the artillery. In March 1944, he was wounded and spent three months in a hospital in Paris. About the time he was discharged, his unit was returning to America. Following his discharge, he organized the civil defense unit in Manlius village by request of Mayor Bert Rose. Recipient of the Purple Heart. Chief of Police, Manlius Village from 1957 to retirement in 1984. "Arrivals on the SS Enterprise due in New York yesterday...T/5 Thomas C. Whorrall, Manlius," The Post-Standard, 12/24/1945.

Wilber, James E. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village board minutes: Honor Roll - Village of Minoa only...Wilber, James E., 300 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Wilber, Thomas M. Minoa. "1952 Minoa Village board minutes: Honor Roll - Village of Minoa only...Wilber, Thomas M., 300 East Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Wilbur (Wilber), Everett. Kirkville. "Mrs. Everett Wilbur received a letter from her husband last week. This was the first word she had received from him in a month. He is now an M. P. stationed in Shimoneski, Honshu, Japan," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. "Pvt. Everett W. Wilber, whose wife, Mrs. Henrietta Wilber, lives at Kirkville, has been awarded the combat infantryman badge for satisfactory performance of duty in combat. With the 32d infantry division in Northern Luzon, Wilber has served as a rifleman," The Post-Standard, 8/27/1945.

Wilbur, Merwin. Kirkville. "Cpl. Merwin Wilbur who has served overseas nearly a year, arrived in Boston on Thursday morning of last week. He sailed from LeHavre, France He is now at Camp Dix waiting for his final discharge. On his return home, he is expecting to visit his sister, Mrs. Bernard Crawford," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. Possibly Thomas M. Wilber.

Wilcox, Ivor E. Manlius. "Sgt. Ivor E. Wilcox, son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. A. McDonald, Manlius, has reported to the army air force redistribution station at Atlantic City, after 48 months of service in the Asiatic-Pacific theater of war, as a mess sergeant. He entered service Oct. 8, 1940 and went to Hawaii Nov. 23, 1940," The Post-Standard, 1/30/1945.

Wilcox, William O. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Pvt.. William O. Wilcox, son of Mrs. B. D. Wilcox, 409 Pleasant St., Manlius has completed the air mechanics course at the Rising Sun School of Aeronautics, Philadelphia, Pa. He will return to Camp Edwards, Mass. Saturday after a furlo in Syracuse," The Post-Standard, 8/17/1942. "Lt. William O. Wilcox...has been graduated as a bombardier at Victorville army air field, Victorville, Calif.," The Post-Standard, 9/21/1943. "Lt. William O. Wilcox, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Vaughn Wilcox, 409 Pleasant st., Manlius, is a bombardier on a heavy bombardment crew training at the army air base, Casper, Wyo. He was graduated from Victorville army air field, Victorville, Calif., in September, being commissioned a second lieutenant," The Post-Standard, 12/21/1943. "Miss Claire Hossbein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hossbein, became the bride of Lieut. William Wilcox...last Tuesday, Nov. 30...Following the ceremony, an information reception was held. The couple left for Casper, Wyo., where Lieut. Wilcox will be stationed...Lieut. Wilcox, prior to his enlistment in the Army Air Corps, attended Michigan State University," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/23/1943. "Second Lieut. William O. Wilcox, 23, ...is a bombardier on an English A. A. F. B-24 Liberator. Mrs. Wilcox...lives at Kirkville. Before entering the A. A. F. in March, 1942, he was employed by the Gates dairy of Chittenango," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/4/1944. "First Lieut. William O. Wilcox and wife and little daughter Kay were dinner guests on Tuesday at the home of his parents in Pleasant street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945. "First Lieut. William O. Wilcox, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn Wilcox of Pleasant street, has returned from completing 35 missions as bombardier while stationed in England. Lt. Wilcox is passing his 21-day furlough with his wife and 2-months-old baby daughter Kay, whom he had never seen. He will return March 2 to Atlantic City for reassignment," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/23/1945.

Willey, Claude E. Fayetteville. "The local draft board 473 listed a group of young men who will report on Thursday for induction. Claude E. Willey, 113 Chapel street, Fayetteville...," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/10/1941.

Williams, David G. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll.

Williams, Ernest. Fayetteville. "During the month of January, seventeen young men from this village have been inducted into service and many more have had their physical examinations and are awaiting the word that will make them a member of the armed forces. Among those who left earlier in the month were...Ernest Williams..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/5/1943. "Pvt. Ernest Williams is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Williams of South street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/28/1943. "The front page of a Dec. 17 Post-Standard returned to Syracuse from Australia last week, after it had been read and autographed by 19 soldiers from the Syracuse area. The men, who have been together since their induction in November, 1942, enclosed the page in a letter written Feb. 5...James S. Williams, Highbridge st., Fayetteville..." The Post-Standard, Manlius scrapbook, n.d.

Williams, Robert Martin. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Private Robert M. Williams, R. D. 1, Fayetteville, has left Fort Niagara for the Field Artillery Replacement Center at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, it was learned here from Army officials. In civilian life, he was employed as a Spanish tutor at Michigan State University. He is a graduate of Eastwood High School, Syracuse University and Michigan State University," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/7/1941. "Robert Martin Williams, Fayetteville, was graduated this week from the officer Candidate School here, and has been commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Field Artillery of the U. S. Army. Lt. Williams, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Williams, reported to Fort Sill from Fort Lewis, Wash., and has been assigned to the Military Intelligence Training Center, Camp Ritchie, Maryland," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/6/1942.

Williamson, Buell O. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Onondaga county men inducted were...Army...Buell O. Williamson, Miles Ave., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 3/6/1943.

Willis, John H. Formerly Manlius. "Rev. John H. Willis, former pastor of the Manlius Methodist church, and until recently a chaplain in the U. S. Army, will be the speaker on Sunday morning in the Methodist church," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/31/1946. Formerly Manlius. "Rev. John H. Willis, former pastor of the Manlius Methodist church, has been appointed to a newly-formed office area, representative of Methodist Commission on Veteran's Affairs. He was recently retired as Army chaplain," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/7/1946.

Wilsey, Bruce. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Wilsey, Bruce, 225 Esther St., Minoa, N.Y."

Wilsey, Clarence. Minoa. "Board 474 will send 14 men into the service Monday, while board 473 will send seven the next day. Men from these two boards soon to be inducted are...Clarence E. Wilsey, 225 Esther st., Minoa..."The Post-Standard, 9/2/1944. Pvt. Clarence Wilsey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wilsey of Ester Street, Minoa, was granted a furlough from Amarillo Air Field, Texas. On expiration of the furlough his new assignment will be at San Antonio, Texas," Minoa scrapbook, n.d. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Wilsey, Clarence H., 225 Esther St., Minoa, N.Y."

Wilsey, Floyd H. Kirkville. "The following naval personnel have been discharged at the separation center at Sampson...Pfc. Floyd H. Wilsey, Kirkville, RD 2," The Post-Standard, 12/22/1945. Arrival on the Aaron Wellman to San Francisco Thursday, Floyd H. Wilsey, Kirkville, The Post-Standard, 12/6/1945.

Wilsey, Wesley F. Kirkville. "12th Armored Division, 7th Army, in Germany--Pfc. Wesley F. Wilsey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Wilsey of RD 2, Kirkville, N.Y., was among the first in the 12th Armored Division to receive Presidential recognition after the Division entered Germany. He is a member of the Medical Detachment in the 23rd Tank Battalion which, by direction of the president, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Plaque for the period from Oct. 1, 1944 to March 31, 1945. The Medical Detachment won recognition through 'a superior performance of duty in supporting the unit during its operations at Rohrbach and Herrlisheim, France; while clearing the enemy from France in the vicinity of Colmar; during the conquest of Southern Germany west of the Rhine river and during the initial stages of the pursuit across the Rhine.' The citation further stated that 'the outstanding degree of teamwork displayed by the Detachment under the supervision of the Division Surgeon Lieut. Col. Alf T. Haeram, Story City, Iowa, made possible a great conservation of the fighting strength of the Division.' The 12th Armored Division was activated on Sept. 15, 1942 at Camp Campbell, Kentucky, and is commanded by Maj.-Gen. Roderick R. Allen, Marshall, Texas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/18/1945.

Wilson, Arthur. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Pfc. Arthur B. Wilson, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Wilson of Fayetteville, has been promoted to corporal. Corp. Wilson is stationed at Mitchell Field, L. I., The Post-Standard, 6/5/1942. "Sgt. Arthur B. Wilson, Jr., is home on furlough, after 22 months overseas," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/5/1944. "PFC Arthur B. Wilson, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Wilson of Fayetteville, has been promoted to corporal. Corp. Wilson is stationed at Mitchell Field, L.I.," The Post-Standard, 6/5/1942.

Wilson, Donald. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn, from Kirkville records.

Wilson, Eugene. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Wilson, Frank. Kirkville. "Sgt. Frank and John Wilson, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilson, returned home Monday. They both served in the South Pacific, returning from Saipan. Their boat docked at San Francisco, they returned East by train by way of the Rockies. Both have been honorably discharged. Their brother, Frederick, who is with the Merchant Marine, and had been in the South Pacific, is now home on leave. Frank has left to join his wife at Constantia, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Wilson, Frederick. Kirkville. "Sgt. Frank and John Wilson, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilson, returned home Monday. They both served in the South Pacific, returning from Saipan. Their boat docked at San Francisco, they returned East by train by way of the Rockies. Both have been honorably discharged. Their brother, Frederick, who is with the Merchant Marine, and had been in the South Pacific, is now home on leave. Frank has left to join his wife at Constantia, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Wilson, George A. Kirkville. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Wilson, John. Kirkville. "Sgt. Frank and John Wilson, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilson, returned home Monday. They both served in the South Pacific, returning from Saipan. Their boat docked at San Francisco, they returned East by train by way of the Rockies. Both have been honorably discharged. Their brother, Frederick, who is with the Merchant Marine, and had been in the South Pacific, is now home on leave. Frank has left to join his wife at Constantia, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Wilson, Theodore. Fayetteville. Name appears on Fayetteville Honor Roll. "Corp. Ted Wilson, who enlisted in the army April, 1941, has received a citation and stripe for his conduct during the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7. Corp. Wilson is stationed with a military police detachment in the Hawaiian islands. He was previously at Fort Eustis, Va., before being transferred to overseas duty in August, 1941. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Wilson, Sr..." The Post-Standard, 10/13/1942. "S/Sgt. Ted Wilson is spending a 21-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Wilson...Sgt. Wilson has only recently returned to the States after being in the Pacific area for over 3 years," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/23/1945. "Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Wilson have returned from Lake Placid where they took their son and daughter-in-law, Lt. and Mrs. Ted Wilson. Lt. Wilson will spend two weeks at a rest camp at Lake Placid after which he will be reassigned to duty," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/13/1945. "...the marriage of Miss Betty E. Jones, daughter of Mrs. Marguerite Jones of 350 Valley Drive, Syracuse, and Mr. A. E. Hones of Harrisburg, Pa., to S/Sgt. Theodore W. Wilson, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Wilson of 114 Chapel street, Fayetteville, on March 21 at Bellevue Heights Methodist Church, Syracuse...her husband graduated from Fayetteville high school, and has recently returned from Hawaii, where he has been stationed for 3 1/2 years. The young couple spent their honeymoon at Lake Placid," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/20/1945. "Ted Wilson...has been honorably discharged from service after serving four years with the M. P.'s in the Pacific area. Mr. Wilson and his wife are living in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/14/1945.

Winans, Edward. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Winans, Floyd A. Kirkville. "The following registrants with their order numbers in selective service district 473, comprising the towns of Dewitt, Manlius and Salina, will be inducted into the army today: ...Floyd Winans, RD 2, Kirkville..." The Post Standard, 3/19/1942. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snyder of Chapel street (Fayetteville) have announced the engagement of their daughter, Kathryn Anne, to Pvt. Floyd Winans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Winans of Kirkville...Mr. Winans is a graduate of Minoa High School and of Chanute Field Technical School, and is Link Trainer Instructor at Stewart Field, at West Point," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/11/1942. "The Church of the Immaculate Conception was the scene of the wedding of Miss Kathryn Snyder, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snyder of Chapel street and Corp. Floyd A. Winans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Winans of Kirkville....The bridegroom will return to his post (after a wedding trip to the Adirondacks) at West Point, where he is an instructor, and Mrs. Winans will pass the summer with her parents. She will return to Narrowsburg Central School in the fall, where she will resume teaching of mathematics and science," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/16/1943. "Sgt. Floyd A. Winans...has completed an advanced course in Link trainer instruction at the AAF training command school at Randolph field to instruct cadets. Sgt. Winans' wife resides at Narrowsburg," The Post-Standard, 6/17/1944."Sgt. Floyd A. Winans, after serving 44 months in service, was honorably discharged last Wednesday. He had been instrument flying instructor at Stewart Field, West Point. At present he and his family are making their home with his mother, Mrs. Bertha Winans. In the near future they will occupy the Winans apartment on Main street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/14/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Windhausen, Robert. Manlius. (Oran, town of Pompey). Name appears on the Oran Honor Roll.

Winter, George. Fayetteville. "The New York National Guard returned Monday from ten days of intensive training at Camp Smith at Peekskill, N. Y. and with them were nine men from this area. The contingent from here included Capt. George Winter, with the Headquarters detachment...of Fayetteville...all members of Company A...their training consisted of regimental problems, chemical warfare, gunnery, etc., and demonstrations of various gasses were given by the Second Service Command. Two full days were allocated to firing on the range where the men used sub-machine guns, shot guns, and U. S. Rifles. Sgt. Gage was high man in the company on the submachine gun, however, most of the men qualified," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/21/1944.

Winzeler, Everett R. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt). "Among those sworn in at the induction center on Tuesday for military service were six local men. They were...Everett Winzler, 2 Lynacres, who were accepted into the Army...all of Fayetteville..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/6/1943. "Pvt. Everett Ross Winzeler, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. G Winzeler, 2 Lynacres Blvd., Fayetteville, has been rewarded for his excellent marks on Army mechanical aptitude tests with enrollment in Keesler Field's B-24 Liberator bomber mechanics school. Pvt. Winzeler will undergo a rigid and comprehensive 17-week course at this unit (Keesler Field, Biloxi, Miss.) of the Army Air Forces Training Command. He then will be qualified for active duty with one of the AAF's B-24 units, or will attend a factory or gunnery school. The Keesler Field airplane mechanics course includes instruction in B-24 fundamentals, structures, fuel and electrical systems, propellers, instruments, hydraulic systems engine operation and airplane inspection," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/21/1944.

Winzeler, Forrest G. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "Ensign Forrest G. Winzeler, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Winzeler, 2 Lynacres blvd., Fayetteville (was) commissioned ensign in the United States naval reserve when (he) graduated last week from the midshipman's school at Chicago," The Post-Standard, 1/30/1945. "Ensign Forrest G. Winzeler, who was commissioned at the midshipman school at Northwestern university, Chicago, Ill., has reported to Fort Pierce, Fla., after visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Winzeler of 2 Lynacres, Fayetteville. A graduate of Fayetteville high school, he won a scholarship to Hobart college, Geneva, where he played on the football team. In his sophomore year, he enlisted in V-7, continuing his studies at Hobart. He was at Asbury Park, N. J. before transfer to Northwestern. His father served in world war 1 as a musician in the U. S. navy band," The Post-Standard, 2/3/1945.

Woessner, Francis Randall. Fayetteville. "Men from the Fayetteville Postoffice area, who were inducted into the Army last Friday and left today for the reception center at Fort Niagara include...Francis Randall Woessner..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/12/1943. "Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Hopstein have returned from a trip to Texas, where they visited their son A/C Burt Hopstein at Bruce Field, Ballinger, Texas. While in Texas they also visited Pvt. Francis Woessner at Camp Maxie, and enroute home stopped to see Corp. Aden Marquisee at Camp Crowder, Mo., both local boys, who are in service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/30/1943. "Pfc. Francis Woessner, son of Rev. and Mrs. J. H. Woessner, is now stationed at Camp Claiborne, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/10/1943. "Pfc. Francis Woessner has been spending a several day furlough with his parents, Rev. and Mrs. John W. Woessner. He is stationed at Camp Clairborne, La.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/8/1943. "The Fayetteville high school band, outstanding in years before the war in State and Legion competition, has gone to war, according to reports, it's fighting as well as it played. Almost to the man...the boys who made the local organization a prize winning band before the war, are serving in some branch of the armed forces...Among those serving in the army are...Francis Woessner, England..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/9/1944. "T/5 Francis Woessner, who has been with the 751st M. P. Bn. in Europe for the past year and a half, is spending a 30-day furlough with his parents, Rev. and Mrs. John Woessner, at their home in Syracuse and is also visiting old friends in Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/31/1945.

Wolford, Frederick P. Kirkville. "Arrival on the General Aulfmandue in Portland, Oregon October 11, Corp. Frederick P. Wolford, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 10/17/1945. Honorably discharged Tuesday, Corp. Frederick P. Wolford, Kirkville, RD 1, The Post-Standard, 10/25/1945.

Wolven, Francis J. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Francis J. Wolven, 25, who has been reported missing in action in the battle of Java, was widely known in Manlius. The youth, son of Mrs. Alma Wolven of 125 Mill Street, was a graduate of Manlius High School and active member of the village Boy Scout troop and a communicate of St. Ann Church. In a telegram from the War Department Mrs. Wolven learned that her son, a first class seaman, is missing following naval action in Java waters. When last heard from he was a member of the crew of the U. S. S. Langley, an aircraft carrier which was listed officially as having been sunk. Before his enlistment 19 months ago, Wolvern had been employed at the Precision Die Casting plant, Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 1942. "Three Gold Star mothers were present at the dedication (of the flag presented by the Archie Van Patten Post American Legion at the Honor Roll plaque in East Seneca street, Manlius), two from Minoa and one from Fayetteville. "Mr. and Mrs. DeRyke, whose son was reported missing in action, attended the exercises and was presented with a small flag from the Memorial wreath. Mrs. Wolvern was not present, but a similar flag was reserved for her," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/4/1943. "S 1/c Francis John Wolven, son of Mrs. Alma L. Wolven, 125 Mill st., Manlius, missing in action since February, 1942, is presumed dead, according to a Navy Department message received by his mother. A graduate of Manlius High School, Wolven enlisted in the Navy Oct. 19, 1940. He was aboard the aircraft carrier Langley when it was torpedoed in Java waters. Besides his mother, he leaves three sisters, Mrs. Robert Frohn of New York City, Mrs. Michael Farlicola of Auburn and Mrs. Paul Doxstader of Manlius," The Herald-Journal, 12/21/1945.

Woodruff, James. Fayetteville. Name appears on the Fayetteville Honor Roll.

Woolridge, James. Kirkville. "Board 473 of East Syracuse is sending 66 men into service tomorrow," Navy...James Woolridge, Kirkville, R. D. 1, The Post-Standard, 4/6/1944.

Woolson, Ronald G. Formerly Manlius. "Ronald G. Woolson, formerly of Manlius, and his buddies at Camp Polk, La., started on the chimney when they dismantled a candy house sent by his mother, Mrs. Noel Baldwin of Utica...Woolson, former employee of the Central New York Power Corp., entered service April 3, 1942. He was a musician and played with dance orchestras. He is serving with a hospital detachment. His aunt, Mrs. Lester Schlacter, lives at Clay RD 1," The Post-Standard, 11/25/1943.

Wozniak, Stanley. Formerly Manlius. "Mr. John Wozniak, aged 65, a former Manlius resident, died Aug. 15 in Crouse-Irving hospital, Syracuse. Surviving are three sons, Joseph and Edward, of Syracuse, Pvt. Stanley Wozniak of West Camp Clairborne, La.; three daughters, Mrs. Julius Makowski, Mrs. Jennie Sibble, Mrs. Carl Becker, all of Syracuse; one brother, five grandchildren. Burial was made in St. Mary's Cemetery," The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/21/1942.

Wright, Duane. Fayetteville/Manlius. "Corp. Duane Wright recently spent a brief furlough with his wife and children at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jay Wright, of Manlius-Fayetteville road. Corp. Wright is now stationed at Chanute, Ill.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/7/1945.

Wright, Fayette J. Fayetteville/Manlius. "Fayette Wright was one of the Manlius young men recently called to service," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1941. "T/4 Fayette J. Wright has returned to Camp Gruver, Okla., after a furlo at his home in Fayetteville. Mrs. Wright accompanied him to St. Louis, Mo., on his return trip, and spent a week there with relatives," The Post-Standard, 6/9/1944.

Wunder, Donald R. Kirkville. "Others enlisting yesterday were...Donald R. Wunder, Kirkville," The Post-Standard, 11/28/1944.

Wunder, Raymond W. Kirkville. "...Onondaga County men accepted yesterday were...Raymond W. Wunder, R.D. 1, Kirkville..." Post-Standard, 11/19/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Wunder, William. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Wychules, Vincent. Manlius. "Sgt. Eva Albanese, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Albanese of 126 W. Seneca st., is the ninth member of her family to serve in the armed forces.... The WAC sergeant, who observed her second anniversary last month, is backing up five brothers and two brothers-in-law in the army, navy and marines...Pvt. Vincent Wychules, San Diego marine base, and Corp. Ray Nichols, somewhere in England..." The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/13/1944.

Yakawak, William. Minoa. Name appears in Minoa Boys with the Colors as William Yakawak, The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/29/1942. Name appears on the Minoa Honor Roll as William Yakawak. "1952 Minoa Village Board minutes: World War II Honor Roll - Village of Minoa Only...Yakawiak, William, 124 Central Ave., Minoa, N.Y."

Yeakel, Edward P. Fayetteville. "The following enlisted personnel were discharged yesterday at the U. S. naval separation center, Sampson...Edward P. Yeakel, CHAMN, 201 Homewood dr., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 11/6/1945.

Young, Avery McKinley. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. 305 E. Seneca St., Manlius. Inducted, Syracuse Board, 473, The Post-Standard, 10/7/1942.

?Young, Carl J. Manlius. "C. J. Young, 1/c Pharm. Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va., and his wife, the former Iva Smith, spent the week-end with their parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/15/1943. "C. J. Young, 2nd class pharmacist at the Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va., was transferred to Treasure Island, Calif., last week, according to word received by his wife, Mrs. Iva Smith Young. For the present, Mrs. Young will take up her former duties at the Crouse-Irving Hospital,' The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/17/1943. "Ph. M. 1/c Carl J. Young, U.S.N., has returned from the Pacific area and has been given an honorable discharge. Mr. Young and his wife, Iva Smith Young, have taken up residence in Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945.

Young, John W. Manlius. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse.

Young, Phillip T. Manlius. Name appears on the Manlius Honor Roll. "Phillip T. Young, 105 West Seneca street, this village, and a junior member of the law firm of Murphy & Young, has received his appointment as a second lieutenant in the Army Air Corps, with orders to report at Miami Beach, Fla., where he will attend a corps training school, after which he will go to Harrisburg, Pa., where he will report to the air intelligence school for duty. Mr. Young is a graduate of Manlius School, Syracuse University and Syracuse University College of Law. He was admitted to the bar January 15, 1931 and since that time has been engaged in law practice in Manlius and Syracuse," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/19/1942. "Five officers from Syracuse and vicinity have completed a six-weeks course of military instruction and physical conditioning at the air forces officer training school at Miami Beach, Fla. and have been graduated from the school. Each man will take over executive duties in air forces maintenance. They are...Second Lt. Philip T. Young of 105 W. Seneca st., Manlius," The Post-Standard, 8/14/1942. Stationed at Camp Dix before going overseas in November, 1942. Prior to going into service Capt. Young was associated with the law firm of Murphy & Young, in which firm a brother, John C. Young, is associated," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/26/1944. "Capt. Phillip T. Young, of this village, and his Marauder Group in the Mediterranean theatre, have been cited by Gen. Charles de Gaulle and the provisional French government for outstanding achievement during April, May and June when the Marauders flew in direct support of French forces. Intelligence officer for his squadron, Capt. Young has been overseas for 22 months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/6/1944. "Seven men from Syracuse, serving with a 12th AAF B-26 Marauder bomber group based in Corsica are entitled to wear the distinguished unit badge, mark of the highest citation awarded units of the American armed forces. They are Capt. Philip T. Young, 37, of 105 W. Seneca st., Manlius, overseas since November, 1942...Marauders from the group have flown more than 350 missions during the African, Sicilian, Italian and France campaigns. The group has also received the Croix de Guerre from Gen. de Gaulle and the provisional French government," The Post-Standard, 11/24/1944.

Young, William Chase, Jr. Fayetteville. "With U. S. Forces in Belgium--Much of the enormous amount of gasoline that propels two air forces and three armies in their fight against the enemy is supplied by a petroleum distribution depot, located in Belgium. Operated by the 3594th Quartermaster Supply Company, the thousands of gallons of gasoline daily, making it a vital hub in the American supply system on the continent. Members of the company, who work on this vast program of distribution and supply, include Pfc. William C. Young, of 115 East Genesee street, Fayetteville. The company commander, Capt. Arthur E. Tiemann, of Boston, Mass., said, 'We've operated several supply depots, but the size and importance of the present plant far surpasses anything ever before tackled,' " The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/30/1945. "T/4 William Chase Young, Jr., in the service for 30 months and overseas nearly two years, was honorably discharged at Fort Dix last week. He is now at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. Chase Young, in East Genesee street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 3/1/1946.

Zerveck, Richard J. Fayetteville. (Town of Dewitt) "An American Axis-blasting bomber will one day follow the victory course charted by 2nd Lt. Richard J. Zerveck, 22, student officer, now training to become a 'fingerman of the compass' in the army air force class for navigators at Ellington Field, Tex. Lt. Zerveck, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Zerveck of 304 Hurlburt rd., is a graduate of Manlius high school and attended the United States Military academy, West point, for one year. He was a senior at Syracuse university when he signed up to become an 'Axis smasher.' Lt. Zerveck earned his commission thru reserve officers training course for college men. From Ellington Field, he will be sent to an advanced school for navigators," The Post-Standard, 6/13/1942.

Ziemba, John. Fayetteville. "Pvt. John Ziemba...is with the infantry as a military policeman in North Africa. He entered service Feb. 12, 1943. He was stationed at Camp Croft, S. C., and transferred to Chenango, Pa., before going overseas. A graduate of Pompey high school, he was formerly employed by Sanderson works, Crucible Steel Co. of America," The Post-Standard, 2/5/1944. "Mrs. and Mrs. John Ziemba of 200 Spring street, this village, have received a telegram from the war department stating that their son, Pvt. John Ziemba, was slightly wounded in action on Oct. 31, and is now recovering in an Army hospital in Southern France," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/1/1944. "Pvt. John D. Ziemba, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Ziemba of 200 Salt Springs, Fayetteville, who was wounded in action, has been returned to the United States on an army transport and is a patient at Woodrow Wilson General hospital, Staunton, VA. He served in N. Africa, Italy and France, and has won the purple heart, good conduct medal, and the European theater of operations ribbon. He received both blood plasma and penicillin for his wounds. Pvt. Ziemba was inducted February 5, 1943 and served overseas a year and a half," The Post-Standard, 1/12/1945.

Zimmerman, Ralph E. Fayetteville. "European area wounded...Sgt. Ralph Zimmerman, son of Ruth Zimmerman, Fayetteville, "The Post-Standard, 2/28/1945. Honorably discharged, Sgt. Ralph Zimmerman, Highbridge rd., Fayetteville, The Post-Standard, 10/30/1945.

Zyon, Walter J. Fayetteville. "Honorably discharged through the 1262d separation station, Ft. Dix, N.J...First Lt. Walter J. Zyon, 310 Elm st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 10/5/1945.

* * *

Post V-J Day or Missing Enlistment Date:

Adams, Ronald. Manlius. "Ronald Adams S 1/c has written his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Adams of his safe arrival in Shanghai, China," The Eagle-Bulletin, 7/12/1946. No date of service entry. "Miss Barbara Miller received a phone call Saturday night from Ronald Adams who is serving with the Navy in Yokosuska, Japan. The telephone call was made in Tokyo. Adams said everything was fine there and he would be home in about five months," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/29/1946.

Badgley, Morgan. Manlius. "Morgan Badgley has been inducted into the service and left Wednesday for the reception center," The Eagle-Bulletin, 4/19/1946.

Crowe, John P. Manlius. "John P. Crowe, 17, son of Mrs. Mary E. Crowe of 410 Fayette street, Manlius, .Y., has reported for recruit training at the Naval Training Center, Bainbridge, Md., Crowe, who enlisted for two years, entered Naval service July 30 at Albany, N.Y. Before this he worked for the Precision Castings Co., Fayetteville," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/20/1946.

Dodge, Robert. Fayetteville. "T/S Robert Dodge is spending a months' furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John S. Dodge of 509 Clinton street . Sgt. Dodge is stationed at Fort Monmouth, N. J.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/6/1946. No date of enlistment.

Eischen, Martin D. Fayetteville. "Pvt. Martin D. Eischen has been spending a seven-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Martin C. Eischen at their home in Burdick street. Pvt. Eischen is enroute to Camp Stoneman, Calif., having been transferred from Camp Lee, Va." The Eagle-Bulletin, 8/30/1946. No date of enlistment.

Failey, George. Fayetteville. "Pvt. George Failey is passing a seven-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Failey in Redfield avenue, after which he will go to Florida where he was recently transferred," The Eagle-Bulletin, 12/27/1946.

Forth, Thomas. Manlius. "Seaman 2nd class Tommy forth, now stationed at Maryland, is passing a 12-day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Forth," The Eagle-Bulletin, 6/28/1946. Date of enlistment not known.

Francoeur, Howard William. Fayetteville. "Ten men were inducted into the army from board 473, East Syracuse, it was announced yesterday...Howard William Francoeur, 203 Washington st., Fayetteville," The Post-Standard, 12/19/1945.

Harter, Ralph G. Manlius. "Ralph G. Harter, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Harter, R. D. 1, Manlius, has enlisted for service in the U. S. Army. Ralph is a graduate of Cazenovia Central School and has been associated with his father in business," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/11/1946.

Kelly, Jack. Manlius. Was in the service; may have enlisted after V-J day.

Kelly, William. Manlius. Was in the service; may have enlisted after V-J day.

Kinsella, Frances. Fayetteville. "Frances Kinsella, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Kinsella, who was inducted into service two weeks ago is now stationed at Ft. McClellan, Ala., according to letters received by his parents," The Eagle-Bulletin, 5/3/1946.

Knapp, Lansford E. Manlius. "Lansford E. Knapp, 17, son of Lansford E. Knapp, Jr., 311 Pleasant st., Manlius, N.Y., reported for recruit training at the United States Naval Training Center, Bainbridge, Md. Knapp, who enlisted for a minority term, entered the Naval Service July 20, 1946, at Syracuse, N.Y. Before this he worked for the Precision Die Casting Co., Fayetteville, N.Y.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 9/13/1946.

Lamb, John. Manlius. "John Lamb, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fordyce Lamb of 106 Academy st., has enlisted for service and left last week for Camp Dix," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/26/1945.

Lenning, Glen. Kirkville. "Glen Lenning, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Lenning, left Sunday morning for Albany to take his physical for the navy," The Eagle-Bulletin, 1/11/1946. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Smith, David K. Manlius. "Pvt. David K. Smith of Company C., son of Mr. and Mrs. DeAlton Smith of Broadfield Road, who left recently for Ft. Knox, Kentucky, writes that he spent a week-end on pass in Louisville where he received excellent service at the U. S. O.," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/25/1946.

Stafford, Donald. Manlius. Was in the service; may have enlisted after V-J day.

Stark, Charles B., Jr. Fayetteville. Charles B. Stark, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stark of 108 Green street, and George Twichell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Twichell of Elm street, were sworn into the regular army on Friday, Nov. 16 and left Saturday for Fort Hancock. Both young men are graduates of Fayetteville high school, class of '45. Twichell has been attending Colgate university in the meantime and Stark has been employed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Thorp, Nellis Howard. Kirkville. "Ten men were inducted into the army from board 473, East Syracuse, it was announced yesterday...Nellis Howard Thorp, Kirkville RD 1," The Post-Standard, 12/19/1945. Kirkville P.O, according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Travers, Walter R. Fayetteville. Enlisted, Pfc. Walter R. Travers, Fayetteville.

Twichell, George. Fayetteville. Charles B. Stark, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stark of 108 Green street, and George Twichell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Twichell of Elm street, were sworn into the regular army on Friday, Nov. 16 and left Saturday for Fort Hancock. Both young men are graduates of Fayetteville high school, class of '45. Twichell has been attending Colgate university in the meantime and Stark has been employed," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/23/1945.

Vowles, Stanley, Jr. Fayetteville. "Stanley Vowles, Jr., has enlisted in the Army and left last week for reception center at Camp Dix, N. J. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Vowles of North Manlius street," The Eagle-Bulletin, 10/11/1946.

Walker, William. Kirkville. Enlisted in Navy, William W. Walker, on 12/1/1945. "Mrs. Charles Walker and daughter, Grace, returned last Monday from a very delightful trip.... Jack Walker, who is stationed at Ft. Bliss, Texas, spent the Christmas holidays at his home here. He made the trip home by auto. Mrs. Walker and daughter returned to Texas with her son. Returning home she and her daughter visited relatives in Chicago and another son, Bill, who is stationed at Green Bay Camp on the Great lakes," The Eagle-Bulletin, 2/1/1946. Name appears in "Military Discharges, Onondaga Co.," Onondaga Co. Courthouse. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

Walters, Roy. Kirkville. "Pvt. Roy Walters was sworn into the armed forces on Oct. 11. On the following day he left for Mississippi where he is stationed with the Air Force at Keesler Field. Mrs. Walters is making her home with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Walter," The Eagle-Bulletin, 11/16/1945. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list provided by Ella Dunn from Kirkville records.

11/19/1942. Kirkville P.O., according to World War II veteran list