Descendants of THOMAS ROYCE


Continued from Part I

*Please note that on many of the dates you see six numbers.  The first four are the year and the last two correspond with the endnotes at the bottom of the page.
 

Generation No. 8

54.  MIRIAM8 RICE (ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 1784 in CT41, and died 184741.  She married DANIEL PEASE 181641. 

Children of MIRIAM RICE and DANIEL PEASE are:
 i. LEVI9 PEASE.
 ii. ALFRED PEASE.
 iii. AMOS PEASE.
 iv. NANCY PEASE, m. ______ PLUMB.

55.  ARVIN8 RICE, SR. (ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born June 25, 1786 in Cheshire, CT41,42, and died October 13, 1878 in Village of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY43,44.  He married (1) POLLY COTTON March 181245.  She was born Abt. 179146, and died August 03, 1841 in Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY47,48.  He married (2) LYDIA DADA COWLES Aft. 184149.  She was born Abt. 180150, and died May 18, 1864 in Village of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY51,52.  He married (3) JANE CRYSLER Aft. 186453.  She died January 1901 in Denver, CO54.

Notes for ARVIN RICE, SR.:
 Arvin Rice was a young eleven year old boy when his father Asa Rice moved his family from Whitestown, Oneida County, to a lot in the wilderness he had acquired located on the shore of Lake Ontario three miles west of the Village of Oswego in what was then the Military Township of Hannibal.  Arvin later wrote an extensive description of their journey which started on September 26, 1797, and is described here in his own words:

 "The first day we reached the boat on the Mohawk (River), and the next day moved up the river and found a large number of Irishmen digging the canel across from the Mohawk to Wood Creek, a distance of two miles.  We passed the carrying place and entered Wood Creek, two other boats being in our company, and were three days in reaching Oneida Lake, the water being low in some places, and all hands dragging the boats, one after another, over the shoals.  My brother, Heman, then two years old, fell overboard.  He had on a red dress, and we could see him in the water, and soon got him out.  Where Wood Creek empties into Oneida Lake, the boat struck a log and I fell into the water and was helped out by my father.
 We reached the lake at evening and at 2 o'clock a.m. reached Rotterdam (now Constantia).  The next day we reached Threee River Point, where lived Esq. Bingham, who professed to be a pilot, and the next morning he took charge of our boat to conduct it down Three River Rift (opposite the present Village of Phoenix.  In going down, the boat struck a rock in the middle of the river, and whirled around across the stream, the bottom upon the rock.  The upper side sunk, and the boat filled with water washing off many light articles which never were recovered.  All the goods were thoroughly drenched except the upper drawer of the bureau, in which were the writings.  The family were fortunately were placed upon the shore previous to reaching the rift, and staid in a fisherman's camp opposite the boat, where we remained three or four days through a tremendous northwest storm.  After the storm a light boat came along and helped get our things out and our bost righted.  We then came down the river, and at Oswego Falls found a carrying placed of about a mile, thence down the river to the lake and along the shores of father's lot.  It was October 6th, 1797, at 2 o'clock p.m., we arrived at Four Mile Creek, and father said:  "This is our land," and turned the boat towards the shore.  I got to the bow and when the boat touched the shore, I jumped and said "I'll be the first to take possession."
 The goods were taken out upon the beach and the boatmen went back.  It was a beautiful day and the first business was to open the goods and spread them out to dry.  Not a bush had been cut towards a clearing, but father had borrowed at the garrison (Fort Ontario) in Oswego a tent, 7 x 10 feet, which he raised for a temporary shelter a few rods back from the beach.
 Towards night the wind blew hard off the lake and it began to lighten and thunder, and a little after sundown it rained and stormed very hard, while we, a family of ten, crept into the little tent and staid all night.
 The next day, father went back about thirty rods from the shoreand cut some logs and made a pen 7 x 10 feet and placed the tent on top and put some boards  or pieces of boats he found on the lake shore across, making a chamber for the boys.  Soon afterward we built of poles 12 feet long, a pen about 6 feet high and made a roof by putting hemlock boughs on the rafters, and the family moved into it.  About that time, mother and one of the children were taken sick with fever and ague.  The boatmen who left us the day we landed were to have returned in three weeks with provisions for the winter, but did not return for six weeks.  We had a little bag of flour, about twenty pounds, and father caught a salmon and took another one from an eagle.  That was all the provisions we had.  Father went to Oswego and bought, for $6, a barrel of flour which had been under water and was wet and mouldy; no light bread could be made from it, and it made the children sick when they ate it.
 When the boatmen returned (probably about November 20th), they helped father build a log house, 16 x 18 feet, covered with bass-wood bark, about 100 rods back from the lake, and then the family moved in, drawing our sick mother upon a sled, as winter had already set in.  After we had moved in, the boatmen said we must name the village, and they drank wine and named it Union Village".

 Arvin Rice also related that the following hymn was also sung on this occasion:

 "Where nothing dwells but beasts of prey,
 Or men as fierce and wild as they,
 He bids the opressed and poor repair,
 And builds them towns and cities there;
 They sow the fields and trees they plant,
 Whose yearly fruit supplies their want;
 Their race grows up from fruitful stocks,
 Their wealth increases with their flocks."

 "In February 1798, my brother Horace died, aged about one and one half years.  During the winter, my brother Joseph, aged 14, and myself cleared about 4 acres, and in the spring some corn and potatoes were planted, and a pair of oxen and a heifer were brought from Whitestown.  Once during the summer, the cattle strayed away and were gone some three weeks.  On the 4th of July, 1798, Joseph and I went to the fort at Oswego and returned home at dusk.  Lois, aged 10, and Ira, aged seven, had been sent to hunt for the cattle and had not returned.  We searched till late in the evening, but did not find them; the next morning we went out again, and as we called they answered.  They had spent the night lying between the roots of two large birch trees.
 During the first winter, but one family remained at Oswego, and a man by the name of Hudson lived up the river about a mile, and hunted through the winter.  From Oswego west to Big Sodus Bay, thence south to the Seneca River and down the river to Three River Point and thence to Oswego, there were only two or three families and they were at the Point and the Falls.
 In the fall of 1798, the children were all taken sick with lake fever, and father, who was of feeble constitution, was sick for three months.  In 1799, the family were well and some progress was made in clearing.  For two years we pounded corn in a maple log for our bread and pudding.  In 1800, the family were all sick again.  About this time, the bears began to trouble us by catching calves and pigs.  We also suffered for lack of clothing, and the ticking of our beds and pillows was cut up, the feathers being emptied into barrels and boxes.  Wild game and fish were then plenty and we began taking grain to the mill to be ground, sometimes to Sodus Point, or to Ellisburg in Jefferson County and once to Oswegatchie, now Ogdensburg.
 Once father and mother and one child started to go to Oswego in a log canoe, and there being a south wind hoisted a sail.  When they were about a half a mile out, the wind shifted and the canoe was turned bottom upwards; they got upon the canoe and a boat went after them, so they arrived safely at home.
 The first plow my father had was made by a Mr. Church, and when I was about 15 years old, I walked up to Van Walkenburg's (probably near Fulton) and carried the plow share to be repaired.  For ten years after our first arrival, there was no opportunity  for school, and then it was at Oswego, three miles from our home.
 In 1798, the townships of Hannibal, Lysander and Scipio (now Cicero) were organized into one town, and Asa Rice, my father was Supervisor.  He reported fifteen inhabitants and the valuation of taxable property at $1,500.  He continued  (as) Supervisor until 1806.  The first marriage in the town was of Augustus Ford and my sister Damaris Rice, in the year of 1800."

 On one occasion, Arvin set a trap for a rabbit or a fox, and on going to it found caught therein a large wild cat, which flew at him as far as the chain would allow.  The little stick he had was not sufficient, and he had to bring large stones from the lake and stone it to death.  The wild cat was very vicious and would have done him serious injury if it had been able to reach him.
 Another time, he was washing his hands in the house, when someone yelled,  "There is a bear."  He took down the gun and stepping out saw the bear up yonder hill, some 30 rods away.  He thought he would shoot anyway and raising the gun fired it.  The bear turned his head a little, but kept on and went over the fence.  Arvin walked up to the fence and found the bear which soon died from loss of blood.  It seems that the bullet had struck a little above the tail and had passed lengthwise nearly through the body.
 In 1804, a small schooner named the Fair American was built at Oswego by a Mr. Wilson.  Either Arvin or his brother Joseph drove an ox team and drew timbers for it across the the river on the ice every day, except Sundays, in the month of March.
 For ten years after the arrival of the family, there was no opportunity for schooling.  However, Arvin was determined to acquire some form of education.  He worked two seasons to save up enough money to pay his way to a school in Constableville in Lewis County.  He was over 21 years of age, when he set out on foot and walked all the way to Constableville, a distance of over 60 miles, to enroll in the school.  At the start of the school session, he was one of oldest ones there and was at the bottom of the class.  However, at the end of the term in the spring, he was at the top of the class.  Once the school term was over, he once again set out on foot and walked all the way back home.
 In 1809, Arvin acquired 100 acres of land on Lot 58 on the outskirts of the future Village of Hannibal.  In May or June of that year, he commenced clearing the land starting at sunrise and working as long as he could see at night.  He constructed himself a log cabin on what is now Oswego Street approximately where Virginia Goodale currently resides.  He also erected the first barn, set out the first orchard and used the first iron plow in the area.
 Arvin was a volunteer in the War of 1812, and in later years, was considered an authority on local involvement in that conflict.  Unfortunately, his accounts were either not written down or if they were, lost in the ensuing years.  However, it is natural to assume that he may have been one of the defenders of Oswego during the seige by the British.
 After the war, Arvin became prominent in local affairs.  When the towns of Granby and Oswego were set apart from the rest of the Hannibal Township in 1818, it was through his efforts that the name, Hannibal, was retained.  He served as Justice of the Peace in 1829, and Hannibal Town Supervisor during 1829-30.  He was elected New York Assemblyman representing Oswego County in 1838.  He again served as Hannibal Town Supervisor in 1840.  When the Oswego County Agricultural Society was organized in Oswego on February 1, 1840, he was elected its first Vice-President.
 Arvin Rice was a strong vigorous man.  He was earnest in the cause of temperance and other matters of public welfare.  He was a strong anti-Mason.  He was of an independent mind and passionately believed that no man should be a slave to another.  Therefore, it was only natural that he would have ties to the Abolitionist Movement.  It is said that his house was a station on the Underground Railroad and that a certain old gray horse he had, knew well the road to Oswego on the darkest night.
 Arvin lived a rich full life reaching the ripe old age of 92 before his death in 1878.

More About ARVIN RICE, SR.:
Burial: 1878, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY55
Elected: 1829, Justice of the Peace
Military service: 1812, NY Volunteer

More About POLLY COTTON:
Burial: 1841, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY55

More About LYDIA DADA COWLES:
Burial: 1864, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY55

Notes for JANE CRYSLER:
 Before her marriage to Arvin, Jane was previously married to a McCool who apparently died leaving her a widow.  After Arvin died, she moved in 1893 to Denver, CO, to live with her daughter, apparently from her first marriage, Mrs. S.M. Allen.  Jane is buried in Hairmount Cemetery.

Children of ARVIN RICE and POLLY COTTON are:
63. i. DR. ALFRED9 RICE, b. May 06, 1817, Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY; d. November 20, 1897, Village of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY.
 ii. CORNELIA RICE, m. H. DUNHAM.
64. iii. JACKSON RICE, d. May 19, 1860.
 iv. ELIZA RICE, m. ISAAC E. HULL.
 v. NATHAN RICE, b. Abt. 182355; d. March 23, 1846, Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY55.

More About NATHAN RICE:
Burial: 1846, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY55

Child of ARVIN RICE and LYDIA COWLES is:
65. vi. ARVIN9 RICE, JR., b. March 23, 1845, Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY; d. 1914, Fulton, Oswego Co., NY.

56.  LOIS8 RICE (ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 1787 in CT56, and died 183356.  She married STEPHEN BRACE 180756. 

Child of LOIS RICE and STEPHEN BRACE is:
 i. LUCRETIA9 BRACE, m. A. OGDEN HAYWOOD.

Marriage Notes for LUCRETIA BRACE and A. HAYWOOD:
  Lucretia and her husband settled in Ohio after they were married.

57.  MEHITABLE8 RICE (ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 1789 in CT56, and died 184756.  She married MONTGOMERY PERRY 181156. 

Child of MEHITABLE RICE and MONTGOMERY PERRY is:
66. i. ELIZA9 PERRY.

58.  POLLY8 RICE (ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 179256, and died 182756.  She married ERASTUS TODD 181356. 

Child of POLLY RICE and ERASTUS TODD is:
67. i. LAURA9 TODD.

59.  THOMAS JEFFERSON8 RICE (ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 1803 in Fruit Valley, Town of Oswego, Oswego Co., NY56, and died 187556.

Child of THOMAS JEFFERSON RICE is:
 i. DR. ALFRED B.9 RICE.

Notes for DR. ALFRED B. RICE:
 Dr. Alfred B. Rice spent a large part of his life in Chicago, IL, where he conducted a sanitorium.  He later resided in Vineland, NJ.

60.  ASA8 RICE (BARNABAS7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born February 21, 1798 in Rome, Genessee Co., NY57, and died June 29, 1867 in Ypsilanti, MI57.  He married SUSAN SMITH. 

Children of ASA RICE and SUSAN SMITH are:
 i. WATSON HARVEY9 RICE, b. 182457.
 ii. ELIZABETH RICE, b. 182957.
68. iii. JOHN S. RICE, b. 1832.
 iv. LUCY RICE, b. 183457.
 v. WILLIAM RICE, b. 183957; m. SARA CLEMENS.
 vi. RALPH RICE, b. 184157.
69. vii. FANCENIA RICE, b. September 02, 1853; d. June 17, 1906.

61.  BETSY8 RICE (BARNABAS7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  She married HARVEY WATSON. 

Children of BETSY RICE and HARVEY WATSON are:
 i. CAROLINE9 WATSON.
 ii. CHARLES WATSON.
 iii. LUTHER WATSON.

62.  CATHERINE8 HARRIS (NAOMI7 RICE, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born April 09, 179358, and died 1853 in Cuyahoga Co., OH58.  She married JOEL B. LAWRENCE. 

Child of CATHERINE HARRIS and JOEL LAWRENCE is:
70. i. ORRIN CHARLES9 LAWRENCE.
 

Generation No. 9

63.  DR. ALFRED9 RICE (ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)59 was born May 06, 1817 in Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY60,61, and died November 20, 1897 in Village of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY61.  He married (1) CAROLINE GREY Abt. 1842.  She was born Abt. 182261, and died August 08, 1849 in Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY61.  He married (2) CAROLINE E. DUDLEY Aft. 1849.  She was born Abt. 182361, and died February 11, 1862 in Village of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY61.  He married (3) HARRIET A. WILSON 186562.  She was born June 15, 1826 in Town of Menz, Cayuga Co., NY62,63, and died January 24, 1910 in Village of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY64,65.

Notes for DR. ALFRED RICE:
Dr. Alfred Rice (1817-1897), Surgeon in 110th NY. Vol. Inf.

Dr. Alfred Rice's earlier days were spent on his father's farm.  He was encouraged to cultivate his taste for books and was graduated from Union College in Schenectady in 1840.  He then taught a year in Kentucky; travelling there on foot with two of his classmates. One of those was a famous Boston physician - Dr. Thayer. 
 Then he enrolled in medical school in Castleton, VT, where he studied medicine for two years.  While at medical school,  Alfred met his first wife, Caroline Grey from Dorset, VT.  They married upon his graduation. 
 Dr. Rice established his practice in Hannibal, NY, and joined the Oswego Medical Society in 1843.  He was Commissioner of Common Schools for the Town of Hannibal in 1845.  He was appointed Postmaster of Hannibal on June 2, 1849, and served as Town Supervisor in 1855.
      Dr. Rice's first wife died in 1849.  He then married Miss Caroline Dudley who in turn died in 1862.  At the time, the country was engaged in the midst of the Civil War.  In 1862, Dr. Rice enlisted in the Company F of the 110th NY Volunteer Infantry as Assistant Surgeon.  Company F was under the command of Captain Edwin Boyd while the regimental command was commanded by Col. D.C. Littlejohn. The regimental surgeon soon resigned and Dr. Rice replaced him. 
 Dr. Rice saw service in Louisiana and on the Louisiana/Texas border before the regiment was transferred to the island of Dry Tortugas off the coast of Florida in 1864.  He was stationed at the prison hospital there for approximately 18 months.  Dr. Rice was considered like a father to most of the men and he was the only regimental officer who remained with his command to the end of the war.  The regiment was mustered out on August 25, 1865, but Dr. Rice returned home in poor health and practiced his profession but little after that.  The service Dr. Rice rendered his country during the Civil War made him one of the best known men among soldiers in Oswego County.  Dr. Rice was a prominent figure in the Hannibal GAR, Post No. 447.
  For many years, Dr. Rice was a prominent member of the Hannibal Presbyterian Church having frequently served in the capacity of Trustee.  In 1877, he was elected Village President.  Over the years, the doctor's health steadily deteriorated, both physically and mentally, until his death in 1897.  His funeral was held at his home on Oswego Street and he laid to rest in the Hannibal Village Cemetery. 
 Dr. Alfred Rice's residence was located next door to what is now the Hannibal Community Center, but in those days it was the Hannibal Baptist Church.  The house in recent years has been the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eckersley.  In anticipation of retiring and moving south, Mr. Eckersley most recently sold the house to Eugene Gauger, Jr.

Home of Dr. Alfred Rice located on Oswego Street in the Village
     Home of Dr. Alfred Rice located on Oswego Street in the Village
of Hannibal, NY.

More About DR. ALFRED RICE:
Burial: 1897, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY66
Education: Medical School, Castleton, VT
Graduation: 1840, Union College, Schenectady, NY
Military service: 110th NY Volunteer Infantry
Religion: Presbyterian

More About CAROLINE GREY:
Burial: 1849, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY67

More About CAROLINE E. DUDLEY:
Burial: 1862, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY67

Notes for HARRIET A. WILSON:
 Harriet was a member of the Presbyterian Church in the Village of Hannibal and was one of the original members of the Women's Missionary Society.
 Her funeral was held at her home on Oswego Street in the Village of Hannibal on Wednesday, January 26, 1910, at 2 PM, with Dr. W.A. McKenzie officiating.

More About HARRIET A. WILSON:
Burial: 1910, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY68
Cause of Death: Pneumonia
Medical Information: Harriet died at home at 7 AM, Monday, Jan. 14, 1910.

Marriage Notes for ALFRED RICE and HARRIET WILSON:
 Harriet Wilson was a widow when she married Dr. Rice, her first husband having died before the Civil War.

Children of ALFRED RICE and CAROLINE DUDLEY are:
 i. FRANK10 RICE, b. 1853, Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY69; d. November 02, 1855, Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY69.

More About FRANK RICE:
Burial: 1855, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

71. ii. CAROLINE E. RICE, b. 1855, Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY; d. January 04, 1903, Oswego, Oswego Co., NY.
 iii. ____ RICE, m. CHARLES G. PLUMB.

More About CHARLES G. PLUMB:
Residence: Red Creek, NY

Child of ALFRED RICE and HARRIET WILSON is:
 iv. ERNEST WILSON10 RICE, b. 1869, Village of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY69; d. December 21, 193269; m. AMY SYKES; b. 186969; d. 194269.

Notes for ERNEST WILSON RICE:
 Ernest lived for a time in Brooklyn, NY.

More About ERNEST WILSON RICE:
Burial: Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

More About AMY SYKES:
Burial: Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

Marriage Notes for ERNEST RICE and AMY SYKES:
 Amy and Ernest were married by Rev. Dr. Meeker.  They honeymooned in the Thousand Islands and Montreal, PQ.

64.  JACKSON9 RICE (ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) died May 19, 186069.  He married CAROLINE M..  She died January 31, 185869.

More About JACKSON RICE:
Burial: 1860, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

More About CAROLINE M.:
Burial: 1858, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

Children of JACKSON RICE and CAROLINE M. are:
 i. THURLOW10 RICE, d. 184369.

More About THURLOW RICE:
Burial: Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

 ii. THEODORE RICE, b. Abt. 184369; d. February 28, 184569.

More About THEODORE RICE:
Burial: 1845, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

 iii. ARABELLA RICE, b. 184869; d. September 01, 184869.

More About ARABELLA RICE:
Burial: 1848, Hannibal Village Cemetery, Oswego Co., NY69

65.  ARVIN9 RICE, JR. (ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born March 23, 1845 in Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY70,71, and died 1914 in Fulton, Oswego Co., NY72.  He married (1) ELIZABETH GIDDINGS August 05, 186873.  She was born July 184773, and died October 17, 186973.  He married (2) FANNIE S. HOWE October 16, 187373.  She was born  in Town of Granby, Oswego Co., NY73, and died January 2674.

Notes for ARVIN RICE, JR.:
Arvin Rice, Jr. (1845-1914), Attorney in Fulton, NY

Arvin Rice was brought up on his father's farm in Hannibal and educated at Falley Seminary in Fulton, NY.  He later read the law with Hon. G.W. Cowles; a relative of his mother, at Clyde, NY.  In 1868, he was admitted to the bar and immediately took up the practice of law with H.C. Howe in Fulton, NY.  He later became a partner in the firm.   Upon the death of Mr. H.C. Howe in 1889, Arvin Rice and Giles S. Piper became partners; a few years later, Robert Pendergast was admitted to the firm.
 At various times in his life, Arvin was elected Special Surrogate of Oswego County  and Supervisor, Town Clerk and Justice of the Peace for the Town of Volney.  He was President of the Fulton Savings Bank and served on its Board of Directors for a number of years.  He was also a member of the Cemetery Association in Fulton and the Fulton Presbyterian Church.
 His funeral was attended by friends and relatives and members of the Fulton and Oswego Bar.  Rev. G.W. Wellburn officiated.

More About ARVIN RICE, JR.:
Admitted to the Bar: 1868, Clyde, NY
Burial: Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton, Oswego Co., NY
Occupation: Lawyer, Banker, Town Supervisor of Volney, NY
Religion: Presbyterian (Elder)

Notes for FANNIE S. HOWE:
 Fannie attended Falley Seminary in Fulton, NY, and later taught school in nearby districts.  She was prominent in church and was  socially active in Fulton and throughout Oswego County.  She was 70 years old when she died.

More About FANNIE S. HOWE:
Burial: Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton, Oswego Co., NY75
Residence: 184 South Third Street

Children of ARVIN RICE and FANNIE HOWE are:
 i. CORNELIA HOWE10 RICE.
 ii. ANN VIRENA RICE.
 iii. ARVIN LEWIS RICE.

Notes for ARVIN LEWIS RICE:
 Arvin was an attorney like his father.

 iv. GEORGE BENJAMIN RICE.

66.  ELIZA9 PERRY (MEHITABLE8 RICE, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  She married ____ CASEY. 

Marriage Notes for ELIZA PERRY and ____ CASEY:
 Eliza and her husband resided in Auburn, Cayuga Co., NY.

Children of ELIZA PERRY and ____ CASEY are:
 i. NICHOLAS10 CASEY.
 ii. FRANK CASEY.

67.  LAURA9 TODD (POLLY8 RICE, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  She married ______ JOHNSON. 

Children of LAURA TODD and ______ JOHNSON are:
 i. HENRY A.10 JOHNSON.

Notes for HENRY A. JOHNSON:
 Henry lived in Douglas, Nebraska.

72. ii. FRANCES JOHNSON.

68.  JOHN S.9 RICE (ASA8, BARNABAS7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 183275.  He married CORNELIA COOK. 

Children of JOHN RICE and CORNELIA COOK are:
 i. ESTELLA10 RICE.
 ii. JENNIE RICE.

69.  FANCENIA9 RICE (ASA8, BARNABAS7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born September 02, 185375, and died June 17, 190675.  She married CALVIN L. NUGENT.  He was born 187275.

Child of FANCENIA RICE and CALVIN NUGENT is:
 i. ASA10 NUGENT.

70.  ORRIN CHARLES9 LAWRENCE (CATHERINE8 HARRIS, NAOMI7 RICE, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  He married JANE DANALD. 

Child of ORRIN LAWRENCE and JANE DANALD is:
73. i. HELEN MARY10 LAWRENCE.
 

Generation No. 10

71.  CAROLINE E.10 RICE (ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 1855 in Town of Hannibal, Oswego Co., NY75, and died January 04, 1903 in Oswego, Oswego Co., NY75.  She married CHAUNCEY CLARK PLACE May 05, 187575, son of BENJAMIN PLACE and JANETT CLARK.  He was born February 22, 1851 in Town of Oswego, Oswego Co., NY75, and died 193175.

Notes for CAROLINE E. RICE:
 Caroline was a member of the West Baptist Church in Oswego, NY.  Her funeral service was held at the family home at 74 West Cayuga Street in Oswego, NY.

More About CAROLINE E. RICE:
Burial: 1903, Rural Union Cemetery, Town of Oswego, Oswego Co., NY75
Cause of Death: Complications from stroke suffered 10 years previous.
Medical Information: Death occurred at her home on W. Cayuga St. in Oswego, NY, at 9:30 PM.

More About CHAUNCEY CLARK PLACE:
Residence: Fruit Valley/Oswego , NY

Children of CAROLINE RICE and CHAUNCEY PLACE are:
74. i. HARRY BENJAMIN11 PLACE, b. 1881, Oswego, NY; d. July 28, 1939, Buffalo, NY.
 ii. JESSIE LOUISE PLACE, b. Abt. 188275.

Notes for JESSIE LOUISE PLACE:
Known as "Louise" ?

72.  FRANCES10 JOHNSON (LAURA9 TODD, POLLY8 RICE, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  She married D.W. BEADEL. 

Notes for FRANCES JOHNSON:
 Frances and her husband lived in Syracuse, Onondaga Co., NY.  Her husband was pastor of the West Genessee Street Methodist Church in Syracuse until his health failed and retired from the active ministry.
 Frances died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Andrew H. Pond at 115 College Place, Syracuse, NY, at 7:15 AM on a Sunday morning.  She was 65 years old and had lived in Syracuse for 31 years.

Children of FRANCES JOHNSON and D.W. BEADEL are:
 i. EDWARD11 BEADEL.
 ii. CHARLES W. BEADEL.
 iii. HENRY C. BEADEL.
 iv. _____ BEADEL, m. ANDREW H. POND.

73.  HELEN MARY10 LAWRENCE (ORRIN CHARLES9, CATHERINE8 HARRIS, NAOMI7 RICE, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  She married CHARLES BYRON GARDNER. 

Child of HELEN LAWRENCE and CHARLES GARDNER is:
75. i. WILLIAM H.11 GARDNER.

*For more information on the following generations, please contact the Town Historian, Lowell Newvine. 

Generation No. 11

74.  HARRY BENJAMIN11 PLACE (CAROLINE E.10 RICE, ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1) was born 1881 in Oswego, NY75, and died July 28, 1939 in Buffalo, NY75.  He married (1) CARRIE BARSTOW, daughter of CHARLES BARSTOW.  She was born in Oswego, NY.  He married (2) ISABELLE J HINCKLEY September 27, 192675.  She was born March 02, 1900 in Oswego, NY75, and died March 10, 1943 in Parishville, NY75.

More About HARRY BENJAMIN PLACE:
Occupation: Abt. 1913, Salesman for Oswego Tool Co.

More About ISABELLE J HINCKLEY:
Burial: Parishville, NY75
Residence: Parrishville, NY

Children of HARRY PLACE and ISABELLE HINCKLEY are:
76. i. HARRY BENJAMIN12 PLACE, 
77. ii. ALFRED RICE PLACE, 
78. iii. BARBARA ANN PLACE, 
 iv. DAVID AUGUSTUS PLACE, b. June 27, 1933; d. June 195975.

More About DAVID AUGUSTUS PLACE:
Burial: Parishville, NY75

79. v. CAROLINE PLACE
80. vi. CORNELIA PLACE
81. vii. ALAN PLACE

75.  WILLIAM H.11 GARDNER (HELEN MARY10 LAWRENCE, ORRIN CHARLES9, CATHERINE8 HARRIS, NAOMI7 RICE, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  He married ALEEN MERTIE RISELY. 

Child of WILLIAM GARDNER and ALEEN RISELY is:
82. i. HELEN MARY12 GARDNER.
 

Generation No. 12

76.  HARRY BENJAMIN12 PLACE (HARRY BENJAMIN11, CAROLINE E.10 RICE, ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1).   He married MARY ROSE. 

Children of HARRY PLACE and MARY are:
 i. GARY RICHARD13 PLACE.
 ii. HARRY BENJAMIN PLACE III.
 iii. RICHARD ALAN PLACE.
 iv. GERALD MICHAEL PLACE.

77.  ALFRED RICE12 PLACE (HARRY BENJAMIN11, CAROLINE E.10 RICE, ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1).  He married (1) MARY KATHLEEN.  She was born January 14, 1929 in Madrid, St. Lawrence Co., NY75, and died July 13, 1983 in Albany, NY75.  He married (2) MARGARET ANN,  daughter of CHARLES ______ and MARGARET_______. 
More About ALFRED RICE PLACE:

More About MARY KATHLEEN BESWICK:
Burial: Bethlehem Cemetery, Delmar, NY75

Children of ALFRED PLACE and MARY BESWICK are:
83. i. RICHARD ALAN13 PLACE
84. ii. DEBORAH LEE PLACE

78.  BARBARA ANN12 PLACE (HARRY BENJAMIN11, CAROLINE E.10 RICE, ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1).  She married THOMAS RICHARD _____. 

Children of BARBARA PLACE and THOMAS ___________ are:
85. i. STEVEN RICHARD13 
86. ii. KATHRYN 
87. iii. LUCIEN PETER 
 iv. DONALD EDWARD 

79.  CAROLINE12 PLACE (HARRY BENJAMIN11, CAROLINE E.10 RICE, ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1).  She married LEONARD ________ . 
 

Children of CAROLINE PLACE and LEONARD ___________ are:
88. i. PATRICIA ANN13 
89. ii. LINDA JEAN 

80.  CORNELIA12 PLACE (HARRY BENJAMIN11, CAROLINE E.10 RICE, ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)   She married ROBERT E. ____. 
 

Children of CORNELIA PLACE and ROBERT __________are:
 i. DAVID MATTHEW13 
 ii. BARBARA ANN 
 iii. JEROME 

81.  ALAN12 PLACE (HARRY BENJAMIN11, CAROLINE E.10 RICE, ALFRED9, ARVIN8, ASA7, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1).  He married VIOLET DIANE ___ . 
 

Children of ALAN PLACE and VIOLET ____________ are:
 i. KEITH ALLAN13 PLACE. 
 ii. TODD PATRICK PLACE.
 iii. DIANE ELIZABETH PLACE.

82.  HELEN MARY12 GARDNER (WILLIAM H.11, HELEN MARY10 LAWRENCE, ORRIN CHARLES9, CATHERINE8 HARRIS, NAOMI7 RICE, ASA6 ROYCE, ISSAC5, SAMUEL4, ROBERT3, ROBERT2, THOMAS1)  She married FLOYD BARRANCE ___________. 

Child of HELEN GARDNER and FLOYD ___________ is:
90. i. WILLIAM HENRY13. 
 

Endnotes:

1.  Lindsey DiCosola.
2.  Families of Ancient New Haven - D.L. Jacobus.
3.  New London Vital Records.
4.  Lindsey DiCosola.
5.  Earl Families of Wallingford CT.
6.  Lindsey DiCosola.
7.  Earl Families of Wallingford CT.
8.  Lindsey DiCosola.
9.  Earl Families of Wallingford CT.
10.  Lindsey DiCosola.
11.  Earl Families of Wallingford CT.
12.  Lindsey DiCosola.
13.  Earl Families of Wallingford CT.
14.  Lindsey DiCosola.
15.  Earl Families of Wallingford CT, P. 286, Listing the children of Samuel Royce.
16.  Lindsey DiCosola.
17.  Wallingford CT Vital Records.
18.  Lindsey DiCosola.
19.  Genealogy of Central NY- Lewis Historical Pub. c.1912, 311.
20.  Lindsey DiCosola.
21.  Genealogy of Central NY- Lewis Historical Pub. c.1912, 311.
22.  Lindsey DiCosola.
23.  Landmarks of Oswego Co. -1895, pg 640.
24.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
25.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Sr.
26.  Slosek, Anthony M., "Oswego, New York and the War of 1812", pg. 37, 1989.
27.  Slosek, Anthony M., "Oswego, New York and the War of 1812", pg. 39, 1989.
28.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
29.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Sr.
30.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
31.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Sr.
32.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
33.  Lindsey DiCosola.
34.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
35.  Lindsey DiCosola.
36.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
37.  Lindsey DiCosola.
38.  J. Deborah Jaquays Thomas.
39.  1790 Census Litchfield CT.
40.  J. Deborah Jaquays Thomas.
41.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
42.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
43.  Newspaper Obit - Arvin Rice, Sr..
44.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
45.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
46.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
47.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
48.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
49.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
50.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
51.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
52.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
53.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
54.  Newspaper Obit - Jane Crysler Rice.
55.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
56.  Newspaper article - personal recollections of  Arvin Rice, Jr.
57.  Lindsey DiCosola.
58.  J. Deborah Jaquays Thomas.
59.  Official Army Registry 1861-1865 Vol. !!, 605.
60.  Newspaper Obit - Dr. Alfred Rice.
61.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
62.  Newspaper Obit - Harriet A. Wilson Rice.
63.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
64.  Newspaper Obit - Harriet A. Wilson Rice.
65.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
66.  Vital Statistics Records, Hannibal Town & Village Hall.
67.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
68.  Newspaper Obit - Harriet A. Wilson Rice.
69.  Gravestone in Hannibal Village Cemetery.
70.  Lindsey DiCosola.
71.  Newspaper Obit - Arvin Rice, Jr..
72.  Newspaper Obit - Arvin Rice, Jr., Oswego Newspaper Clippings.
73.  Lindsey DiCosola.
74.  Newspaper Obit - Fannie Rice.
75.  Lindsey DiCosola.


Hannibal Family Index

Hannibal Historical Society

Oswego County, N.Y. Gen Web



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