Town of Petersburgh

The following information is from Historical and Statistical Gazetteer of New York State by J. H. French, published in 1860. Ray Brown's website Ray's Place has town histories as published in Landmarks of Rensselaer County by George Baker Anderson (Syracuse, NY: D. Mason & Co., Publishers, 1897). For Chapter XXVI, Town of Petersburgh, click here.

Petersburgh1 was formed from Stephentown, March 18, 1791. Its boundary on the line of Berlin was changed, Jan. 4, 1793; parts of Berlin and Lansingburgh were taken off in 1806, and parts of Nassau and Grafton in 1807. It lies upon the e. border of the co., N. of the center. Its surface consists of two precipitous mountain ridges separated by the narrow valley of Little Hoosick River. The highest peaks are 1000 to 2000 feet above tide. The mountain regions are barren and almost inaccessible. The Hoosick River breaks through the Taghkanick Mts. in the n.e. part. The soil in the valley is a gravelly loam. Petersburgh, (p.v.) formerly "Rensselaer Mills," contains 40 houses, and Petersburgh Four Corners (p.v.) 12. The first settlers were Dutch, who came in about 1750, as tenants under Van Rensselaer.2 A few years later, many families came in from Rhode Island. The census reports 3 churches.3

1 Named from Peter Simmons, one of the first settlers. 2 Among the early settlers were Wm Prendergast, John Brimmer, Jacob and Godfrey Brimmer, John Spencer, Hans and Peter Bachus, Johannes Ruyter, Henry Litcher, Hans Lautman, Barent Hogg, Jacob Best, Petrus Vosburg, Bastian Deel, Frans. Burn, Juriah Kreiger, Henry Young, Schoolmaster Watson, and Long Andries. John Spencer built a log gristmill before the Revolution, at S. Petersburgh; and Barber & Murray built a carding mill about 1800. Several of the settlers were killed or taken prisoners during the French War, - probably by the same party that destroyed the Hoosick settlements in 1754. 3 2 M. E., Seventh Day Bap.


The following information is from Gazetteer and Business Directory of Rensselaer County, N. Y., for 1870-71, compiled by Hamilton Child, 1870.

Petersburgh, named in honor of Peter Simmons, was formed from Stephentown March 18, 1791. Its boundary on the line of Berlin was changed January 4, 1793; parts of Berlin and Lansingburgh were taken off in 1806, and parts of Grafton and Nassau in 1807. it lies on the east border of the county, north of the center. The surface consists of two precipitous mountain ridges, separated by the narrow valley of Little Hoosick River. The highest peaks rise from 1,000 to 2,000 feet above tide. The mountain regions are precipitous, barren and almost inaccessible. The Hoosick River breaks through the Taghkanick Mountains in the north-east part. The soil in the valley is a gravelly loam. The hills are well adapted to pasturage, and large numbers of sheep are kept. The Troy and Boston R. R. extends through the north-east part, and the Lebanon Springs R. R. through the central part, along the valley of Little Hoosick River. Upon a mountain, in the south-east part of the town, is a deep cavity, called "Snowhole", where snow and ice remain during the whole year.

Petersburgh contains three churches, two hotels, four stores, a saloon, three blacksmith shops, a grist mill, a saw mill, a flax mill, a carriage shop, a cabinet shop, a harness shop and about 250 inhabitants. This village was formerly called Rensselaer Mills.

The village of North Petersburgh in the north part of the town, on the Troy and Boston Railroad, contains a Methodist church, two stores, two hotels, two blacksmith shops and about twenty dwellings.

This town was first settled about 1750, by Dutch tenants under Van Rensselaer. A few years later a number of families came in from Rhode Island. On a map of Rensselaerwyck from a survey by John R. Bleeker, in 1767, we find the following names of settlers, most of whom were located on the north side of Hoosick River, viz: Peter and Hans Bachus, Johannes Ruyter, Henry Litcher, Hans Lautman, Barent Hogg, Jacob Best, Petrus Vosburgh, Bastian Deel, Frans Burn, Juria Kreiger, Henry Young, Scholemaster Watson, Long Andries, Devoet and _____ Primmer. The last name probably designates John George Brimmer, who with his family settled in 1754 in the north part of the town, where Henry J. Brimmer now lives. William W. Reynolds came from Rhode Island and settled in 1780. He had six children, viz: Howard, Thomas, Benjamin Elijah, Parker and Amy, numerous descendants of whom still reside in the town. Ichahod Prosser, from Vermont, settled soon after the war, where A. Prosser now lives. He was at the Battle of Bennington. Joshua, Thomas and Benjamin Randall, Abraham Lewis, Augustus Lewis, Oliver Spencer, Stephen Card and Sylvanus Stephens settled at Lewis's Hollow at an early day. Asa and David Maxon, from Rhode Island, settled in 1794, where Clark Maxon now lives. They purchased 150 acres at five shillings per acre. Sterry Hewett, from Conn., settled soon after the Revolution, where T. L. Nichols now lives. He was a soldier of the Revolution and came to this town with an ox team. Stanton Bailey, from Conn., settled previous to the war, where W. B. Odell now lives. Gideon Clark settled where J. G. Clark now lives; he was a soldier of the Revolution and drew a pension. Joseph Allen, from Rhode Island, settled about 1790, where Clark Peckham lives; he was a soldier of the Revolution. William Hiscock, from Rhode Island, settled about 1788, where Livingston now lives. James Weaver, from Rhode Island, settled where Henry Weaver now lives; he was a Revolutionary soldier and at the Battle of Bennington. Thomas Phillips, from Rhode Island, settled soon after the Revolution, where J. G. Phillips now lives.

On the 15th of June, 1754, Mr. John G. Brimmer was at work in the field with his sons, George, Godfrey and John, when Indian blankets were discovered. Mr. B. immediately started for the house, telling his sons to unharness the horses and follow him. Before they could comply with their father's request, four Indians were discovered coming towards them. They immediately grasped their guns, and George and one of the Indians fired at each other, George falling dead. Godfrey, seeing his brother fall, ran and hid behind a brush fence. While concealed he saw two Indians looking for him. He drew up his gun to fire, but a leaf falling upon the sight, he changed his position and was discovered by the Indians. He and one of the Indians immediately exchanged shots, but without effect. Perceiving the other Indian about to fire, he dropped the butt of his gun upon the ground, placed one hand over the muzzle and extended the other towards the Indian in token of surrender. The Indians came to him, one of them grasped him by the collar and passed around him three times with one finger within his shirt collar, then laid his hand upon his head, signifying "You are my prisoner." The Indians took John prisoner also, though he fled to an island in the river on their approach and threw stones at them. He was sixteen years old, and Godfrey was twenty-one. They immediately started for Canada and proceeded to Lake Champlain, where they took the skiffs which they had previously left. The prisoners were taken to St. Johns, where they were met by about three hundred Indians, who formed a circle around them and ordered them to sing. They refused and were ordered the third time, but they still declared that they could not sing. The Indians being exasperated were about to strike, and had their clubs already raised for the purpose, when Godfrey discovered, in the crowd, an Indian who had partaken of the hospitalities of his father's house. He spoke to the Indian, who recognized him and intervened to save the prisoners from torture. They remained at St. John's for six weeks, and were then sold to the French, by whom they were treated as slaves, suffering greatly from the tyranny of their masters. After servitude of more than five years, they secured their freedom on the surrender of Quebec to the English in 1759. They immediately started for Albany, and at Lake George were taken by the British and thrown into prison. They were soon released through the influence of Mr. Van Rensselaer, and made their way to Albany. They there learned that their parents had removed to Rhinebeck and had heard nothing from them since their capture. The family afterwards removed back to the Hoosick Valley, where a numerous posterity now reside.

The early settlers were obliged to go to Albany to mill, and endure many other hardships incident to a new country.

About 1780, John, Nathaniel, Hannah and Elizabeth Church settled where Peter Church now lives. Peter Church was born in this town in 1787, is still living, and is probably the oldest person in the town who was born there. He has raised a family of eleven children, all of whom are now living.

The first grist mill was erected by George Rosenburgh, about 1770, on the creek below Peter Church's. The first school was kept by Hall; the first tavern was kept by Cornelius Litcher, and the first store was kept by Benjamin Hanks. A log grist mill was erected at South Petersburgh by John Spencer, previous to the Revolution, and a carding mill was erected by Barber & Murray in 1800. The first church was erected by the Lutherans, at North Petersburgh, about 1798.

The Methodist Church was organized about 1798, under the labors of Rev. Joseph Sawyer. Ebenezer Washburn was converted and made the leader of a class, consisting of his wife, John Prosser and wife, and John G. Croy and wife. Before the close of the year the number increased from half a dozen to over thirty. Rev. Lorenzo Dow also preached here about this time. Mr. Washburn afterwards became a preacher. Rev. Peter Van Nest and Daniel Bromley were among the other preachers at an early day. Rev. Elisha B. Hoff is the present pastor. A Methodist church was formed at South Petersburgh, by Joseph Mitchel, in 1800. Services were held at the house of George Springer. Their church edifice was erected in 1820.

A Christian church was organized by Rev. John Spoon, about 1828. It consisted of fourteen members. The present edifice was erected in 1843, the number of members is 89, and the present pastor is Rev. W. B. Haight.

Dr. Hiram Moses was an early physician of this town, and, with his son, Hiram, is still practicing.

Mrs. Mary Wilcox, the wife of Nathan Wilcox, committed suicide in December 1869. She was partially insane and had not left her room for nearly a week previous to her death. She went to the garret and, with the sleeves of a Garibaldi waist about her neck, attached it to the bed post, and was found dead a few hours afterwards.

Mrs. Thomas Carr, a resident of the Prosser Settlement, left her house one day at 2 P. M., with three little children, aged three and a half, two years and five months. The house took fire, and before aid arrived, the children were burned to death. The two oldest were taken from the fire clasped in each other's arms. Nothing but the bones of the youngest was found.

In July 1848, a most atrocious and cold-blooded murder was perpetrated in the south part of the town, by Andrus Hall. The victims were Noah Smith and his wife, aged respectively 80 and 72 years. Hall had been in the employ of Smith, but left and went to Troy. He returned on Friday night and stopped at Hewitt's barn. Early in the evening he went to Smith's house with a handspike and found the door bolted. He told Smith there were cattle in the meadow, back of the barn. Smith came out and Hall accompanied him to show him where the cattle were. As they were walking along quietly, Hall struck him upon the side of the head, killing him instantly. He then cut his throat and dragged him into the thick grass and left him. Hall then went to the house, told Mrs. Smith that her husband had sent him for an ax to fix the fence. She procured the ax, which he took, and with it struck her upon the side of the head. She fell to the floor, groaning mournfully. Hall lit the candle, which had become extinguished on falling from Mrs. Smith's hand, and struck her another blow. She still continued groaning, and Hall then took a knife and stuck it in her neck. He then barred the door and began the search for money, first putting a sheet before the window. He searched various places in the house, finding a considerable amount of money, including bills and specie. Mrs. S. continued groaning, and Hall stuck the knife into her neek again. Perceiving the gold beads upon her neck, he cut the string and put the beads in his pocket. Hearing a noise he left the house, and after going to Mr. Smith and covering his body with grass, started for Troy. Hall was executed at Troy, March 15, 1849, at the age of 24. Previous to his execution he made a full confession of this crime and others, showing that he was one of the most depraved of criminals. He had previously murdered a boy named Franklin Brown, in Hoosick, for a few dollars in money and a silver watch. The bones of the boy were found where Hall had concealed the body. Mrs. Smith's gold beads led to his detection for his last crime.

The wife of Henry Laker was murdered a few years since by a man named Coon, who was afterwards executed for his crime.

The population of the town in 1865 was 1,670, and its area 25,238 acres.


The following Information is from History of Rensselaer Co., New York by Nathaniel Bartlett Sylvester, published in 1880.

Petersburgh lies upon the eastern border of the county. It is bounded on the north by Hoosick, on the east by Pownal, Vermont and Williamstown, Massachusetts, on the south by Berlin and on the west by Grafton. The date of the first entry upon this portion of the Van Rensselaer manor is given as 1750. It was originally included in the civil organization known as Rensselaerswyck. In 1784 Stephentown was formed, and for seven years people living in Petersburgh were under the jurisdiction of that town. Petersburgh was formed March 18, 1791.

Early Settlers
Allen, Joseph
Backus, Peter and Hans
Bailey, Stanton
Best, Jacob
Brimmer, Alvin and John George
Burns, Franz
Card, Stephen
Church, John, Nathaniel, Hannah and Elizabeth
Clark, Gideon and William
Cole, Aaron
Coon, Hezekiah
Croy, John G.
Deel, Bastian
Devoet, _____
Gardner, George
Greene, John
Hanks, Benjamin
Hewitt, Sterry
Hiscox, William
Hoag, Barent
Hustis, David
Irish, Ichabod
Jones, Evan and Laban
Kreiger, Juria
Lantman, Hans
Letcher, Henry
Lewis, Abraham and Augustus
Maine, Lyman
Maxon, Asa and David
Nichols, John
Odell, Simeon
Phillips, Thomas
Potter, Stephen
Prosser, Ichabod
Randall, Joshua, Thomas and Benjamin
Reynolds, William W.
Ruyter, John
Spencer, Oliver
Stephens, Sylvanus
Thomas, Archibald
Vosburgh, Petrus
Watson, Schole Martes
Weaver, James
Young, Henry

Early Churches
Lutheran Church at North Petersburgh (no information about when it was organized or when it became extinct)
Baptist Church at Petersburgh, incorporated July 20, 1822
Christian Church of Petersburgh, incorporated Sept. 10, 1855
First Methodist Episcopal Church of Petersburgh, incorporated March 7, 1822

Revolutionary War Soldiers
Clark, Gideon
Hewitt, Sterry
Maine, Lyman
Prosser, Ichabod
Weaver, James
Worden, Arnold

War of 1812 Soldiers
Andrus, Raper, Capt.
Armsbury, Christopher
Babcock, Benjamin
Brimmer, John S.
Buddington, Oliver
Chesebro, Spicer
Church, Peter
Clark, Luther
Coon, William, Capt.
Grogan, Charles
Hakes, George
Henning, Cornelius
Henning, John
Hewitt, Lewis
Hewitt, Sanford
Jones, Josephus
Lamphere, Amasa
Maine, Gardner
Maine, Isaac B.
Miner, William
Nolton, Justus
Nolton, Nathan
Randall, Benjamin B.
Randall, Thomas
Waite, Silas W.
Weaver, Benjamin
Worthington, Aaron, Capt.

Mexican War Soldiers
Coffin, Robert
Sweet, John

Civil War Soldiers
Allen, George G., enl. Dec. 30, 1864, 16th H. Art.
Atherton, Francis, enl. 1862, 8th Mounted Rifles
Avy, Peter, enl. 31st Mass.; never returned to town
Babcock, Edmond, enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 16th H. Art.
Baker, Benjamin F., enl. Jan. 12, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Bass, George W., enl. Oct. 14, 1861, 7th Cav.; discharged; re-enl. in 34th Mass.; wounded, losing a leg
Bass, Henry, enl. Jan. 6, 1862, 30th Inf.; lost his life from disease
Baxter, Samuel, enl. Jan. 4, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Brimmer, Darius M., enl. Sept. 11, 1862, 169th Inf.; died in service
Brimmer, Leonard, enl. Aug. 12, 1862, 169th Regt.
Brimmer, Lyman, enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 16th H. Art.; killed Oct. 7, 1864 at Petersburg, Va.
Brimmer, Stephen, enl. Dec. 1861, 93d Regt.
Brimmer, Washington, enl. 93d Regt.; killed in battle
Brock, Almon, enl. Sept. 10, 1861, 7th Cav., Co. C
Brock, Edwin H., enl. Aug. 25, 1864, 169th Inf. died in the service
Brown, Clark L., enl. Aug. 1862, 125th Regt., Co. I; killed in the battle of the Wilderness; Mr. Charles E. Sweet was by his side when he fell
Brown, Jerome, enl. aug. 5, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A
Burdick, George R. M., enl. Jan. 4, 1863, 116th Regt.
Burton, Charles F., enl. Nov. 20, 1861, 31st Mass., Co. A
Carmody, Bartholomew, enl. 125th Regt., Co. A; killed at Gettysburg
Carr, Daniel, enl. Aug. 1861, 125th Inf., Co. A; prisoner at Andersonville for several months
Carter, Thomas, died soon after return, of disease contracted in the army
Church, Clark, enl. Aug. 1862, 125th Inf.
Church, John W., enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 169th Regt.
Church, Noel R., enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 169th Regt.
Clark, John, enl. Nov. 20, 1861, 31st Mass, Co. A; disch. to re-enl. Feb. 13, 1864
Cobb, Daniel L., enl. Aug. 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A
Cook, Reuben, enl. July 1863, 21st Cav.
Coon, Leland, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A
Coon, Stephen, enl. Aug. 29, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles
Cruikshank, David, enl. Aug. 29, 1864, 169th Inf.; killed at Fort Fisher
Davis, Eugene, enl. Jan. 22, 1864, 125th Regt., Co. A; killed June 1864 in Va.
Dean, John A., enl. 2d Regt.; died soon after his return
Delaney, John, enl. Mounted Rifles
Dill, Almon, enl. 125th Inf.
Eldred, Andrew J., enl. Oct. 22, 1861, 2d Cav., Co. C
Everts, Levi W., enl. Jan. 12, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Goodell, King, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 169th Inf., Co. H
Graham, David, enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. B
Green, Charles W., enl. Sept. 8, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles
Green, Henry R., enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 104th Inf.; disch. for disability Aug. 16, 1862; died at home of chronic dysentery, Sept. 18, 1862
Hakes, Henry E., enl. Dec. 28, 1863, 16th H. Art.
Hakes, William F., wounded and draws a pension
Hall, Clark W., enl. Sept. 7, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles; died of disease at Fort Monroe, Oct. 26, 1864
Hart, George, enl. Sept. 7, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles
Hartshorn, Edwin A., Capt., enl. Aug. 1862, 125th Inf., Co. E.
Hartshorn, William S., Lieut., enl. Aug. 1862, 169th Inf.
Hogan, James, enl. Jan. 22, 1864, 16th H. Art.
Holmes, Coonradt, wounded and died in Va., Sept. 19, 1864
Holt, Phineas, enl. Aug. 29, 1864, 169th Inf.
Hurley, Thomas, enl. Jan. 14, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Jones, Amos, enl. Jan. 1864, 85th Inf.; disch. June 10, 1863; prisoner at Andersonville
Jones, Edwin, enl. Aug. 26, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles
Jones, Hazard, enl. 85th Inf.; prisoner at Andersonville
Jones, Porter e., Sergt., enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.; killed at Alexandria, La., May 1, 1864
Jones, William A., enl. Nov. 14, 1861, 85th Regt.
Jones, William Aaron, enl. Jan. 1, 1864, 16th H. Art.; had served in 85th Regt.
Keeler, John P., enl. Aug. 29, 1864, 169th Inf.
Kibby, N. H., enl. Jan. 14, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Lee, Farrel, enl. Jan. 13, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Letcher, Theron, enl. Oct. 30, 1861, 53d Inf.
Love, Robert, enl. Jan. 22, 1864, 16th H. Art.
Main, Hiram, enl. Dec. 27, 1861, 104th Regt., Co. K
Main, James A., enl. Nov. 20, 1861, 31st Mass., Co. A; disch. Feb. 13, 1864 to re-enl.
Maine, Charles H., enl. July 17, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. A
Maine, Clark, enl. 1861, 2d Regt.
Maine, Hiland A., enl. Sept. 1861, Harris Cav.; lost an arm; was prisoner several months in Libby Prison
Maine, Ichabod D., enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.
Maine, James A., enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.; disch. to re-enl. Feb. 13, 1864; killed at Pleasant Hill, La., April 10, 1864
Manchester, Charles F., wounded; taken prisoner; died at Salisbury, Aug. 1864
Mattison, Harlow L., enl. July 23, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. A; disch. for disability
Mattison, Martin Van Buren, enl. 125th Regt., Co. A; pro. 1st Sergt.
Mattison, Squire J., enl. Sept. 1, 1862, 10th Inf.
McAndrew, James, enl. Aug. 3, 1864, 61st Inf.
McAndrew, Thomas
McDermott, Andrew, killed in the service
McGann, Michael, enl. Aug. 29, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles
McGregor, Thomas H. D., 3d Sergt., enl. Aug. 15, 1862, 169th Inf., Co. H; pro. Lieut.; killed at Fort Fisher, Jan. 16, 1865
Merrithew, Horace R., enl. Dec. 25, 1861, 104th Inf, Co. K; killed at Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1862
Merrithew, Samuel, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 125th Regt., draws a pension for disability
Moses, Solon W., musician, enl. Sept. 1861, 23d Inf.
Muldoon, Michael, enl. Jan. 12, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Niles, John R., Corp., enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. A
Nugent, Thomas, enl. Sept. 7, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles
Odell, Charles A., enl. Sept. 7, 1861, 27th Mass. Inf.; disabled and draws a pension
Odell, Daniel, enl. Aug. 1864, 169th Inf.
Odell, Harvey H., enl. Sept. 11, 1862, 169th Inf.; supposed lost in battle, never heard from
Odell, L. E., enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 169th Inf.; killed at Fort Fisher, Jan. 16, 1865
Parks, George N., enl. Sept. 1, 1863, 176th Regt., died a prisoner at Salisbury
Parks, Rufus J., enl. Jan. 22, 1864, 16th H. Art.
Parsons, William S., enl. Sept. 15, 1862, 169th Inf.
Patterson, R. N., enl. Jan. 14, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Peckham, Adelbert, enl. 125th Inf., Co. I; died Feb. 8, 1863 at Union Mills, Va.
Phillips, Manser G., died in the service
Phillips, Samuel E., enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.
Randalll, William H., enl. Jan. 1, 1864, 16th H. Art.
Ready, Edward, enl. Dec. 29, 1863, 16th H. Art.; killed Oct. 27, 1864 at Piedmont, Va.
Reynolds, Albert, Jr., enl. 11th Inf.
Reynolds, Alfred, enl. Sept. 1861, Black Horse Cav.; re-enl. in 125th Inf.; pro. to Lieut. and resigned
Reynolds, Fern., musician, enl. 2d Inf.; died of dieease contracted in the army
Reynolds, Silas E., 2d Lieut., enl. Sept. 1861, Black Horse Cav.; disch.; re-enl. Aug. 1862, Mounted Rifles; pro. 1st Lieut. and Capt. and Breveted Major, March 13, 1863, by the President, for meritorious conduct during the war
Reynolds, William H., enl. Dec. 1863, 125th Regt.; a prisoner at Andersonville for several months and suffered severely
Russel, Joseph W., enl. Dec. 1, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.
Scriven, Daniel E., enl. Aug. 28, 1862, 169th Inf.; had previously served in 2d Mounted Rifles, Co. q.m.-sergt., enl. first, Sept. 13, 1861
Scriven, Perry W., enl. Oct. 1864, 4th Mass. Cav.
Scriven, Thomas Scriven, William W., enl. Sept. 1864, 12th Cav.; had previously served in 2d Cav., enl. Sept. 16, 1861
Seeley, William
Shaffer, Lewis, died at Fort Schuyler, Oct. 24, 1865
Shumway, George, Corp., enl. Sept. 16, 1861, 7th Cav.
Shumway, Hiram, Jr., enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. B
Smith, Aaron P., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. I; disabled; draws a pension
Spencer, William, enl. Aug. 20, 1864, 169th Inf.
Steward, Addison D., enl. Nov. 25, 1861, 34th Mass. Inf.
Steward, Columbus, enl. Sept. 2, 1862, 169th Inf., Co. H; died at U. S. Gen. Hospital, Sept. 29, 1864
Steward, Elias, enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.; disch. for disability April 9, 1862
Steward, Hiram E., enl. Aug. 26, 1862, 169th Regt.
Street, Henry, enl. sept. 10, 1862, 169th Regt.
Sweet, Alonzo, enl. 1861, 2d Inf.; disch. for disability
Sweet, Charles E., enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 125th Inf.; wounded
Sweet, Ira N., enl. 125th Regt., Co. A
Sweet, Silas E., Sergt., enl. Aug. 19, 1863, 2D Vet. Cav; came home sick and died at Petersburgh, NY, Feb. 7, 1863
Thomas, Ebenezer R., enl. Sept. 2, 1862, 169th Inf.
Thomas, Noel R., enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 169th Inf.; wounded; draws a pension
Thornton, Joseph, enl. Aug. 15, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A
Thurber, Limes W., enl. Aug. 15, 1862, 169th Inf.; died of fever at Washington, DC, Feb. 16, 1863
Thurber, William H., enl. Nov. 20, 1861, 31st Mass., Co. A; disch. Nov. 20, 1864
Thurber, William, enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.
Tucker, Stephen H., enl. Aug. 15, 1862, 169th Regt.
Van Ervin, Roger, enl. Jan. 21, 1864, 16th H. Art., Co. K
Waite, Ewing S., enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A
Waite, Reuben, enl. Jan. 1, 1864, 16th H. Art.
Whipple, George W., regiment not given
Whipple, George, enl. Aug. 16, 1862, 169th Inf.
Whipple, Stephen, enl. Nov. 19, 1861, 31st Mass. Inf.; disch. June 17, 1862; re-enl. in Co. E, 2d Cav; disch. April 3, 1864
Whipple, Stephen, enl. Nov. 20, 1864, 31st Mass., Co. A; disch. for disability June 17, 1862
Whipple, Willington W., enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. A; died in Emporia, Ks., of disease contracted in the army
Wilcox, Stanton, enl. Aug. 29, 1864, 169th Inf.; killed at Fort Fisher
Worthington, Elliot, enl. 16th H. Art.
Worthington, Elliot, enl. Sept. 6, 1864, 1st Mounted Rifles
Yandan, Benjamin, enl. Aug. 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A; killed at Burton's Station



Send comments or suggestions to:
Debby Masterson

Go Back to Cities, Towns, Villages and Hamlets
Go Back to Home Page