Town of Pittstown

The following information is from Historical and Statistical Gazetteer of New York State by J. H. French, published in 1860. Ray Brown's website Ray's Place has town histories as published in Landmarks of Rensselaer County by George Baker ANDERSON (Syracuse, NY: D. Mason & Co., Publishers, 1897). For Chapter XXIII, Town of Pittstown, click here.

Pittstown was erected as a township by patent, July 23, 1761, and was formed as a town, March 7, 1788. Its boundary was changed Feb. 14, 1793. It lies in the center of the w. part of the co. Its surface is mountainous in the s. and e. and declines into a moderately hilly region in the n. The highest summits, in the s. e., are 800 to 1,000 feet above tide. The soil is principally a gravelly and slaty loam. Flax is extensively cultivated1, and there are several manufactories in town.2 Johnsonville (p.v.) contains 35 houses, Tomhannock (p.v.) 40, Raymertown (p.v.) 27, Pittstown Corners (Pittstown p.o.) 22, Boynton 20, Pittstown Station (Valley Falls p.o.) 16, North Pittstown 20, and Cooksborough (Haynerville p.o.) 10. Shermans Mills is a hamlet. Settlement was commenced about 1650.3 The first church (Bap.) was formed in 1784; Elder Isaac Webb was the first preacher.4

1 The census of 1855 reports that, in 1854, more than 250,000 lbs. of flax and 7,000 bush. of flaxseed were raised, and that there were 13 flax mills in town.
2 There are two manufactories of cotton bags at Shermans Mills, a paper mill at Valley Falls, and manufactories of cordage and axes at Johnsonville.
3 Wm. Prendergast, Stephen Hunt, and Edmund Aiken were among the first settlers near Johnsonville; Ludovicus Viele at Valley Falls, in 1772; and Christian Fisher and Michael Vandercook at Cooksborough. In 1770, Wm. Shepard (from New England) settled on 500 acres; in 1778-80, Benj. Aiken (from Dutchess co.) on 950 acres; and in 1785, Alex. Thompson, on 500 acres. Wm. Hammond kept a school at N. Pittstown in 1785, and Rebecca Thompson at Sherman Mills in 1789.
4 The census reports 15 churches: six Methodist Episcopal, three Presbyterian, two Christian, one Baptist, one Evangelical Lutheran, one Society of Friends (Quakers) and one Union.


The following information is from Gazetteer and Business Directory of Rensselaer County, N. Y., for 1870-71, compiled by Hamilton Child in 1870.

Pittstown was created as a township, by patent, July 23, 1761, and was formed as a town March 7, 1788. Its boundary was changed February 14, 1793. It lies in the center of the north part of the county. The surface is mountainous in the south and east, and declines into a moderately hilly region in the north. The highest summits in the south-east are 800 to 1000 feet above tide. The soil is chiefly a gravelly and slaty loam. Flax is extensively cultivated, and manufacturing is carried on to some extent.

The village of Johnsonville is a station on the Troy and Boston R. R. and contains a Presbyterian church, a school house, a hotel, the Johnsonville Ax and Tool Manufactory, a twine and linen factory, a flax mill, four stores, a grist mill, a planing mill, a carriage and sleigh factory, two blacksmith shops and about 500 inhabitants. There are three temperance organizations, viz., Eureka Lodge, No. 784, I. 0. of G. T.; Morning Star Lodge, No. 31; Temple of Honor; and Sons of Temperance.

The village of Valley Falls is a station on the Troy and Boston R. R., fourteen miles from Troy. It lies on both sides of the Hoosick River, in the towns of Pittstown and Schaghticoke. It contains a Methodist church, a school house, two hotels, three stores, a paper mill, the Eagle Mower Works, a grist mill, a plaster mill, a twine factory, a carriage factory, and about 650 inhabitants. The Valley Falls Lodge, No. 856, I. 0. of G. T., is established here.

The village of Tomhannock is situated in the north-west part of the town and contains two churches, viz., Presbytcrian and Methodist; a hotel, three stores, a grist mill, two saw mills, three flax mills, a wagon shop, three blacksmith shops, a harness shop, a cooper shop and about 250 inhabitants.

The village of Raymertown is situated in the south part of the town and contains a Lutheran church, a hotel, a store, two grist mills, two saw mills, two flax mills, three blacksmith shops, a wagon shop and about 150 inhabitants.

The village of Pittstown, in the south part of the town, contains three churches, viz., Baptist, Methodist and Disciples; a store, two blacksmith shops, a wagon shop, two cooper shops, a saw mill and about 200 inhabitants.

The village of Boyntonville, in the south-east part, contains two churches, viz., Methodist and Christian; a hotel, three stores, three blacksmith shops, a harness shop, a cooper shop, a wagon shop and about 150 inhabitants.

Pittstown was settled at a very early date. William Pondergrast, Stephen Hunt and Edmund Aiken were among the first settlers near Johnsonville. Ludovicus Viele settled at Valley Falls in 1772, and Christian Fisher and Michael Vandercook, at Cooksborough, the same year. In 1770, William Shepard, from New England, located on 500 acres ; Benjamin Aiken, from Dutchess Co., located on 950 acres, about 1778 or '80, and in 1785 Alexander Thompson located on 500 acres.

William Hammond kept a school at North Pittstown in 1785, and Rebecca Thompson taught at Sherman's Mills in 1789.

The first church (Baptist) was organized in 1784; Elder Isaac Webb was the first preacher.

The farm now owned and occupied by Leo V. Reed was purchased at a very early day, by a man named Tinsler, of an Indian chief. The tract contained about 180 acres, for which he gave an ax.

In looking over the files of the Northern Budget, in the Library of the Troy Young Men's Association, the following reminiscence of Pittstown was discovered:

"THIEVES TAKE NOTICE!
"The thievish brood, both small and great,
Who pilfer early, pilfer late,
Remorseless, graceless, shameless, cruel,
My timber, fit for sale or fuel,
Namely, my beeches, maples, walnuts,
And trees which bear, spontaneous, all nuts,
Had better be a little easy,
Or else, I trow, they'll soon feel queasy.
Should they hereafter hew and hack,
I'll frighten all the filching pack
With thing that many a rogue has bit,
Which vulgar people call a writ,
(Though counselors with solemn air
Pronounce and publish and declare
A capias ad respondendum)
That quickly to the Dó I will send em,
If they on surface of bare ground,
In sheriff's bailiwick can be found,
Tied neck and heels, they'll all be dragged
(Hand-cuffed and choked, lacerated, gagged)
To solitude of common jail,
'Mid hungry demons, fierce and pale,
Where luckless wights, at last outwitted,
For misdemeanors are committed,
Cursing with bitter execration
The dreary Sabbath of starvation.

J. H. Price, Pittstown, Dec. 15, 1806."

Whether this effusion had the effect to protect his timber from thieves, we are unable to say, but think they must have been incorrigible if this failed to make them honest.

The population of the town in 1865 was 3,831, and its area 39,513 acres.


The following information is from History of Rensselaer Co., New York by Nathaniel Bartlett Sylvester, published in 1880.

It is not known exactly when the first settlers came to the Pittstown area of Rensselaer County; however, it is known they were Dutch. In 1761, after Dutch rule had been replaced by English, a patent was granted for Pittstown by King George III in honor of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, then one of England's leading statesmen. There is no record of his ever having been in America. This patent comprised the valley of Tomhannock Creek south to Rensselaerville, making Pittstown the largest township in the county with 39,513 acres. The township's present boundaries were established by legislative act in 1788.

The early villages were practically self-sufficient, each with its own grist mill, saw mill, cider mill, blacksmith shop and combined grocery and dry goods store.

Tomhannock, which took its name from an Indian tribe, enjoyed early importance. It not only had the usual industries of a town of that period but also was at the junction for the stagecoach from Bennington to Troy. It was also the intellectual center of the area. In 1869 there were several debating societies where such topics as these were discussed at length: "Whether early marriages are more productive of happiness than those contracted at a later date"; "Which is a greater nuisance to society, a thief or a drunkard"; "Whether man is more influenced in the observance of law by the dread of punishment or hope of reward"; "Is mankind bound by a fatal necessity to act as he does". Although these subjects were never resolved, there is evidence that a flourishing society for the apprehension of horse thieves met with some success.

In 1904 several farms were confiscated and the land flooded to form the Tomhannock reservoir, which supplies pure water for the city of Troy.

By the early 1830s there were a cotton mill (later turned into a paper mill), a grist mill, a flax mill, an oil mill and a foundry. In 1862 a mowing-machine factory was added. There was also a cigar factory where C.A.S. cigars were made by hand.

Early Settlers

Abbott, Royal, Sr. Aikin, Benjamin Aikin, Edmund Baldwin, Joseph Jackson, James
Bimpson, Thomas Bostwick, Robert Brayton, David Brownell, David Brownell, Simon
Button, Simeon Button, Zaccheus Carpenter, Isaac Carpenter, James Chase, Charles
Clapp, Stephen Cole, Daniel Comins, Alexander Comins, James Comins, Jonathan
Crabb, John Crosby, Josiah Dagett, Thomas Darling, Ebenezer Davenport, John
Denton, Nathaniel Douglass, Joseph, Jr. Douglass, Samuel Downing, Roger Eddy, Gilbert
Elliott, Daniel Ellis, Marvin Filkins, Henry Fisher, Christian Follett, William
Fowler, Benjamin Francisco, John Francisco, Thomas Gage, George Gale, John
Ghery, Anthony Gifford, Joseph Gilbert, Eleazar Glen, Anthony Goes, Peter D.
Hall, Thomas Halsted, Jonas Halsted, Joseph Harder, John Haskins, Enoch
Head, Lovett Herman, Jacob Hicks, Thomas Hinckley, Gershom Hoag, Peter
Hogeboom, James Horton, Thomas Humphrey, Evans Hunt, Jasper Hunt, Stephen
Hurder, Theophilus Hyde, Eliphalet Jackson, William Ketchum, Abijah Kniffin, Charles
Lambson, Thomas Lee, John McCleaver, William Milks, Benjamin Miller, Abijah
Miller, Noah Mosher, Lemuel Newcomb, Daniel Newcomb, James Newcomb, Simon
Nichols, Benjamin Norton, David Paddock, Judah Parker, Amos Pendergast, Thomas
Pendergast, William Pike, Benjamin Prendergast, James Putnam, Asaph Ray, William
Reed, Col. Leonard V. Rouse, Caspar Rowan, Caspar M. Saxon, Stephen See, David
Shearman, Caleb Shepard, Hazael Shepard, William Sherwood, Stephen Slaughter, Isaac
Snyder, John Stanton, Lodewick Stearns, Stephen Stitt, James Stoughton, Isaac
Stoughton, Levi Tarbell, John Thompson, Alexander Thompson, Israel Tinsler, Solomon
Van Arnam, Abraham Van Name, Abner Van Name, William Van Veghten, Harmon Vandercook, Henry
Vandercook, Michael Vandercook, Simon Vanderhoof, Henry Viele, Lodewick Viele, Lodovicus
Wadsworth, Joseph Wallis, Nathaniel, Jr. Wallis, Nathaniel White, Benjamin Williams, Gilbert
Williams, Thomas Wiltsey, Cornelius Witson, Ebenezer Wolf, John

Early Churches
St. Paul's (Protestant Episcopal) Church at Johnsonville, incorporated Nov. 4, 1872
The Baptist Church of Pittstown, 1846, organized Dec. 25, 1846
The Baptist Church of Pittstown, fellowshipped March, 1787
The Christian Church of Pittstown, incorporated July 25, 1855
The Church of Christ (Disciples'), organized October, 1838
The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Raymertown, organized Aug. 27, 1840
The Methodist Episcopal Church at Cooksborough, incorporated Jan. 20, 1815
The Methodist Episcopal Church at North Pittstown (Millertown), incorporated April 8, 1851
The Methodist Episcopal Church at Pittstown Corners, incorporated Sept. 5, 1843
The Methodist Episcopal Church at South Pittstown, formed May 18, 1835
The Methodist Episcopal Church at Tomhannock, organized about 1833
The Methodist Episcopal Church at Valley Falls, organized about 1825
The Presbyterian Church at Johnsonville, organized Feb. 11, 1856
The Presbyterian Church of South Pittstown, organized 1816
The Presbyterian Church of Tomhannock, organized October 3, 1819
The Reformed Dutch Church of Pittstown, organized about 1800
The Second Baptist Church of Pittstown, organized about 1797
The Society of Friends in Pittstown, organized prior to 1800

Revolutionary War Soldiers
At the time of the Revolutionary War Pittstown was considerably populated, but how many soldiers of that war went from Pittstown is difficult to determine. A few names have come to light, remembered by family or local tradition and not by written records or company rolls. Among those names are:

Eddy, Gen. Gilbert; Ray, William; Van Woert, Isaac; and Van Woert, Lieut. John

War of 1812 Soldiers
It is known that several men from Pittstown were in the army during the War of 1812, and that many shared in what is known as the "Eddy expedition", when the entire militia of this section were called out just before the Battle of Plattsburgh. Gen. Gilbert Eddy was a resident of the southern part of Pittstown. The following names are mentioned as having been in the service:

Agan, Lyman Baker, Samuel Bennett, Wheeler Bosworth, Nathaniel (Gen. Eddy's staff)
Brownell, Peckham Chapman, Wm. Douglass, George Eddy, Winslow
Eycleshimer, Nicholas Griffin, William Harwood, Abel Hunter, Jeremiah
Hyde, Samuel S. Manchester, Castle Penny, Wm. Ray, Evans
Reed, Benjamin Rowe, Erastus Snyder, Jacob A. Stitt, James
Van Namee, James T. Welch, Daniel

Civil War Soldiers

SECOND NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, Col. Carr, commanding:
Alexander, Daniel, enl. Co. F; disch. for disability; re-enl. in 169th Inf.
Brownell, Charles H., enl. 3d NY Regt., Co. G, Capt. J. H. Ten Eyck; served full time; disch. with regt.
Conway, Patrick, served full time; disch.; re-enl. in Griswold Cav.
Downing, Lavinus, enl. Co. B, Capt. Hayner; served full time; disch. with regt.
Gardner, Daniel E., enl. Co. F; wounded and remained disabled.
Gardner, George H., enl. Co. F; taken prisoner at second battle of Bull Run; exchanged; served full time; disch.; re-enl. in 15th H. Art.
Gardner, Jacob, enl. Co. F; taken sick; disch; afterwards re-enl. in 104th Inf.
Halpine, John; wounded at second battle of Bull Run; disch.; re-enl. in Griswold Cav.
Hard, Ovid, enl. Co. B, Capt. Armitage; disch. after a short time for disability.
Hawver, David, enl. Co. F; served full time; disch. with regt.
Herrick, Ambrose, enl. Co. F; taken prisoner at second battle of Bull Run; exchanged; disch. with regt.
Higgins, Theodore, served full time; disch.; re-enl. in a Western regt.
Keeler, John, Co. F; disch. for disability; re-enl. from Petersburgh in 169th Inf.
Lownes, Norman, enl. Co. K; disch. for disability.
McGraff, Patrick, Co. K, Capt. Arts; slightly wounded at second battle of Bull Run; taken prisoner; exchanged; disch. with regt.
Newcomb, John P., enl. Co. F; taken prisoner at second battle of Bull Run; exchanged; served full time; disch.; re-enl. in Griswold Cav.
Oatman, Henry, disch. for disability; re-enl. in 125th Regt.
Ray, Peter P., II, enl. Co. F, Capt. Parks; taken prisoner at second battle of Bull Run; exchanged; wounded in the hand at Bristoe Station; disch. with regt.
Riley, Hugh, enl. Co. D.
Riley, John, enl. Co. D, Capt. Cassidy; served full time; disch. with regt.
Russell, Joel H., enl. Co. F; taken sick; disch.
Sears, Daniel, disch. for disability.
Sullivan, Thomas, enl. Co. D; served full time; disch. with regt.
Williams, Benj. F., enl. Co. F; taken prisoner at second battle of Bull Run; exchanged; disch. with regt.
Wilson, Edward S., served fulll time; disch. with regt.; re-enl. in Griswold Cav.

BLACK HORSE CAVALRY, founded in Rensselaer County; never mounted; sent to Washington, but disch. in about eight months:
Baker, Charles.
Chapman, Andrew, enl. 1st U. S. Inf.; served nine months; disch. for disability.
Clapper, Darius, re-enl. in Griswold Cav.
Clifford, Allen B., enl. Oct. 2, 1861.
Connell, Charles.
Crandall, Elias.
Donahue, James, died in the service.
Doty, Andrew, re-enl. in 125th Inf.
Eldred, Caleb, enl. 15th H. Art.
Files, Timothy, enl. 6th NY Regt.; served full time; re-enl. in a Western regt.
Graff, Augustus F.
Higgins, Theodore, re-enl. in Griswold Cav.
Laribee, Meritt.
Lohnes, Adam, regt. unknown; killed.
McMurray, John, died in the service.
Miller, Henry, enl. Oct. 2, 1861; re-enl. in 125th Inf.
Miller, William.
Newcomb, Simon, enl. 93d NY Regt.; pro. to 2d lieut., Co. C, and to 1st lieut.
Niven, John M.
Ray, Theodore.
Rice, Gilbert.
Simons, George, enl. 15th NY Regt.; disch. for disability; re-enl. in Griswold Cav.
Todd, Thomas, regt. unknown.
Welch, ____, enl. in a cavalry company in New York City.

104TH NEW YORK REGIMENT
Burch, Harper, enl. Co. K; served full time; disch.; re-enl. in same regt. and co.
Lyons, John, enl. Co. K; killed at the battle of Bull Run.
Slocum, William, enl. Co. K; killed at the battle of Antietam.
Smalley, Isaiah H., 2d sergt., enl. Co. K; lost an arm in the battle of Fredericksburgh; disch.

NEW YORK HARRIS CAVALRY
Kipp, Rufus, 2d sergt.; died at Painesville of typhoid fever; body brought home for burial.
Lohnes, Alonzo, sergt.; served two years; re-enl. same regt. and co.
May, Theodore, 1st sergt., enl. Co. E, twenty-three yers old; served eighteen months; died of typhoid fever; body brought home for burial.
Snyder, George; afterwards enl. in a Vermont regt.
Williams, Christopher, Co. E.

125TH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS
Company K
Boshin, Emory.
Brownell, Charles H.; killed at Gettysburgh.
Brownell, George.
Burch, Ezra.
Bushy, L. B.
Byron, Timothy O.
Clark, George.
Crawford, Levi W.
Doty, Andrew J.
Doty, Harvey Horton.
Fields, Timothy.
Griswold, E. B.
Hoyt, Warner.
Maconkey, John H., taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry; exchanged; wounded in the right arm at the battle of Petersburg.
McMurray, Michael.
Miller, Henry W, sergeant; wounded in the battle of the Wilderness.
Mills, David W.
Mooney, Michael.
Philardo, Onesimus, injured by the cars at Johnsonville and died.
Sinnikan, Thomas.
Slocum, Joseph.
Slocum, Josiah.
Thompson, Smith.
Wilson, John.
Wix, Donite.

Company C
Barrels, Martin.
Brown, George, enl. in Capt. Myer's company.
Brown, John, enl. in Capt. Penfield's company.
Burch, Ira.
Cutbush, Simeon J.
Dorrity, Charles.
Grady, James.
Hall, Jordan G; died in service.
Hall, Romaine.
Jones, Alonzo; died in the batle at Gettysburgh.
Rogers, Patrick.
Sipperly, Martin.
Smith, Lewis, color-bearer; killed at the battle of Gettysburgh July 2, 1863.
Wager, Albert, Co. G, enl. Feb. 1864; killed at Spottsylvania.
Wix, George, enl. in Capt. Penfield's company.

Company D
Borden, John J.
Brown, Luke, drummer.
Card, Stephen, enl. in 9th Vermont Regt.
Cass, Matthew.
De Wittt, John, enl. in Corcoran's Brigade.
Galusha, Clark, enl. in Mass. regt.
Gillette, G. B.; disch. for disability.
Hall, Oscar, enl. in 9th Vermont Regt.
Hiscox, Marshall; killed in battle at Gettysburgh.
Hyde, Thaddeus.
Johnson, George, enl. in Mass. regt.
Johnson, William, enl. in Mass. regt.
Ketchum, George, enl. in 123d NY Vols.
McKinney, Charles, enl. 1st Mounted Rifles, NY.
Oatman, Henry.
Potter, Silas.
Pysu, Theodore P.; wounded at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania; brought home and died.
Rice, William; served one year; disch. for disability.
Russell, Henry.
Sherman, Stearns; previously member of the Black Horse Cav.
Smith, Henry H.
Smith, Hiram H.
Smith, William H., enl. in Staunton Legion, New York City.
Toppy, Henry.
Tully, William; disch. for disability.
Wager, John A.
Wager, John, enl. Aug. 1, 1862; killed at Spottsylvania.

169TH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS
Company E
Alexander, David.
Baker, Claudius, enl. Aug. 30, 1862.
Brock, Ira B.
Brownell, George.
Brundage, Edwin; came home sick.
Brundage, Levi B., enl. Sept. 16, 1862; came home sick and died.
Crandall, David, enl. Sept. 6, 1862.
Crandall, Wm., enl. Aug. 31, 1862.
Crane, Thomas, 4th corp., enl. Aug. 30, 1862.
Davis, Aaron B., enl. Aug. 30, 1862.
Davis, Robert, enl. Aug. 30, 1862.
Elwell, Charles, enl. Aug. 27, 1862.
Hester, George, enl. Sept. 3, 1862.
Karmon, Martin, enl. Aug. 30, 1862.
Kavinegar, James.
Keeler, John.
Keller, David, enl. Sept. 4, 1862.
Martinett, Charles R., 3d corp., enl. Sept. 6, 1862.
Martinette, Harmon J.
Newcomb, Cyrenus W., enl. Aug. 30, 1862.
Perry, Edward.
Soldiner, George, enl. Sept. 2, 1862.
Tarbell, Frank W., 1st lieut., pro. to capt.; wounded at the battle of Gettysburgh; disch. following October for disability.
Warren, Jonas H., sergt., enl. Aug. 1862.
Welch, Michael, enl. Aug 27, 1862.

GRISOLD CAVALRY, 21ST REGIMENT
Clapper, Darius.
Conway, Patrick; had before served two years.
Halpine, John; had before served in 2d Inf.
Hayner, Eugene.
Higgins, Theodore; had served in Black Horse Cav.
Kautz, Jacob.
Mandeville, Ebenezer.
Newcomb, John P.; had before served two years in 2d Inf.
Simons, George; had before served in the 15th Inf.
Willson, John.
Wilson, Edward S.; had before served two years in 2d Inf.

In November 1862 the following recruits were procured from outside town. Their assignment to a regiment was not listed.

Becker, Storm S. Burnap, Joseph Claffer, James Daley, Robert Davidson, Charles M.
Douglass, R. Dowd, Michael Farrelly, Owen Gaviett, John Bryce Gifford, James E.
Goodrich, Henry B. Gorey, Joseph Gregory, Reuben Hall, Samuel Henny, Joseph
McCoy, Daniel Mosher, Howard C. Nasholds, David Nasholds, Jeremiah Ogier, Charles
Otridge, Thomas C. Pernan, John C. Rielly, Edward Rust, Henry Sherwood, Wm. H.
Simpson, Clark Smith, Abbott C. Smith, Henry V., Jr. Spooner, James Sweeney, Wm. H.
Termain, James W. Weidman, Hiram Zinn, Matthew

September 2, 1864 a draft was made upon the town at the provost-marshall's office in Troy. Ninety-one were drafted, but many were exempted by reason of disability, previous service or otherwise, and substitutes were procured by the town equal in number to those who were held for service. The following are recorded as having gone into service. Their assignment to a regiment was not listed.Dawson, John; McKarney, John; Smith, Thomas; and Watson, James.

In January 1864 the following men enlisted. Their assignment to a regiment was not listed.

Akin, Richard Ames, Ashley Barett, Napoleon Barns, Theodore Baxter, Samuel
Bennett, Sullivan C. Bradley, Elliott Conners, Dennis Daliber, James Duel, Philip H.
Eggleston, George Flynn, Francis French, Daiel H. Gavel, Dennis Handy, William
Harrison, Christopher Honan, Thomas Houch, Alphonso Jackson, Andrew Keitt, John
Lawrence, F. A. Mark, Michael Martinette, Frederick Martinette, John McQuade, Jerry
Morehuse, Ira Morett, Hawry Mussey, Albert J. Nachman, James Nichols, Major H.
O'Bryan, Michael O'Donald, James O'Neil, John Porter, Stillman H. Prime, Alexander
Quinn, Daniel Sanders, James Sayer, Hosea T. Shean, Patrick Simpson, John
Sweet, Edwin E. Wart, John P.

The following is a list of names of those who elisted from August 1864 through March 1865.

Babille, Henry, enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 10th US Inf.
Barker, Charles, enl. Sept. 6, 1864, 5th US Art.
Boucher, Oliver, enl. Feb. 8, 1865.
Brown, James, enl. Sept. 8, 1864.
Coons, Reuben A., enl. Aug. 30, 1864.
Crandall, John P., enl. Feb. 23, 1865.
Dibble, Charles H., enl. Aug. 30, 1864.
Drake, Charles A., enl. Feb. 21, 1865.
Eigot, Patrick, enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 6th US Cav.
Fuller, Thomas, enl. Aug. 19, 1864.
Gaumnity, Herman, enl. Sept. 6, 1864, 5th US Art.
Heindenwick, Fred., enl. Sept. 7, 1864, 12th Inf.
Henry, Patrick, enl. Feb. 14, 1865.
Howe, Charles W., enl. Feb. 23, 1865.
King, John, enl. Sept. 6, 1864, 5th US Art.
Lamb, Jefferson P., enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 10th US Inf.
Miles, Charles W., enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 5th US Art.
Miller, Jesse, enl. Aug. 30, 1864.
Nelson, Robert, enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 6th US Cav.
O'Neill, John, enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 10th US Inf.
Parker, Louis, enl. July 24, 1864, 5th US Art.
Reed, William H., enl. Feb. 13, 1865.
Remington, Allen, enl. Aug. 29, 1864.
Reynolds, Charles E., enl. Aug. 30, 1864.
Rhoads, George D.
Roercker, Frederick, enl. Sept. 7, 1864, 5th US Art.
Shaver, John, enl. March 27, 1865.
Shepard, Evans, enl. Feb. 22, 1865.
Sherwood, James, enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 10th US Inf.
Steensend, John, enl. Nov. 10, 1864, 10th US Inf.
Tidback, John, enl. Sept. 6, 1864, 5th US Art.
Waters, Charles M., enl. March 27, 1865.
Wicks, Charles, enl. Aug. 30, 1864.



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