Town of Schaghticoke


The following information is from Historical and Statistical Gazetteer of New York State by J. H. French, 1860.

Ray Brown's website Ray's Place has town histories as published in Landmarks of Rensselaer County by George Baker ANDERSON (Syracuse, NY: D. Mason & Co., Publishers, 1897). For Chapter XXI, Town of Schaghticoke, click here.


Schaghticoke1 - was formed as a district, March 24, 1772, and as a town, March 7, 1788. Pittstown was taken off, March 7, 1788, and a part of Lansingburgh in 1819. It lies on the Hudson, in the n.w. corner of the co. The surface is primarily a rolling upland, about 200 feet above the river. The summits of the hills in the s. are 800 feet above tide. Hoosick River, flowing through the n. part, is bordered on a portion of its course by steep banks 200 feet high. On this stream, at the mouth of Tomhannock Creek, is a beautiful circular valley, three-fourths of a mi. in circumference, and bounded on nearly every side of steep hills.2 The soil is generally a fertile, sandy or gravelly loam. Considerable manufacturing is carried on in town.3 Schaghticoke Point (Schaghticoke p.o.) contains a pop. of 1148. Schaghticoke Hill contains 25 houses, The Borough 8, Junction (p.v.) 17, and Old Schaghticoke 6. About 1640, Gov. Andros settled a remnant of the Pequots and other Eastern tribes, under the name of "Schaghticokes," in this town, on land given them by the Mohawks, as a barrier against the Northern Indians.4 By the charter of 1686 the city of Albany was allowed to purchase of the natives 500 acres of land in this town; but, neglecting to do so, Hendrick Van Rensselaer obtained the same privelege in 1698. He sold his right to the city the next year, and in 1707 and Indian deed was obtained for a tract 6 mi. square, mostly within the limits of the town. In Oct. 1709, the city conveyed the land to actual settlers.5 The early settlements suffered greatly from Indian hostilities. A fort was built in 1746 at Old Schaghticoke and garrisoned by 2 companies of soldiers. The whole settlement was abandoned on the approach of Burgoyne; but, through the influence of the royalists, the place was not burned, through held for some time by the British and Hessian outposts.6 The Schaghticoke Seminary was incorp. May 4, 1836. The first church (Ref. Prot. D.) was formed in 1714.7

1 Pron. "Skat-i-kook." In old documents it is variously spelled "Schetekoke," Schactekoke," "Scahwahook," and "Schagcoque." It is said to be an Algonquin word, meaning "landslide." The Stockbridge Indians called it [the rest of this line is illegible].
2 A small stream called the Dwaas Kil (stream running both ways) flows from the Hudson into the mouth of the Hoosick. When Hoosick River suddenly rises, the current of this stream is often changed; and it is not uncommon to see it running n. in the morning and s. at night. - Fitch's Ag. Surv. Wash. Co., 1849, p. 939.
3 The manufactures consists of cotton and linen goods, flax, powder, plaster, and agricultural implements.
4 A portion of these removed to Kent, Conn., in 1728, and the remainder, numbering 400, joined the French in Canada.
5 These were Johan de Wandelaer, Jr., John Heermans Vischer, Corset Voeder, Daniel Kittlehuyn, Johan Knickerbacker, Louis Viele, and Derick Van Veghten, who went there to reside, and were joined soon after by Martin de Lamont, Wouter Quackenbosch, Peter Yates, David Schuyler, Wouter Groesbeck, Philip Livingston, Ignace Kip, Cornelius Vandenberg, and many others, whose descendants still reside in the vicinity.
6 Col. John Knickerbacker, of this town, raised a regiment during the Revolution.
7 A new church was built in 1760, and Rev. Elias Bunschooten was installed pastor. This quaint edifice was 60 by 40 feet, with low side walls and a high pitched mansard roof and turret, surmounted by a weathercock over the southern gable. There was no burial ground attached, and the oldest of that of the Knickerbacker family, on the site of an Indian cemetery. The first European burial occurred in 1715. A few rods s.e. of this spot is the "Wittenagemote," or "Countil Tree," a remarkably vigorous and symmetrical oak, more than 15 feet in circumference. The census reports 8 churches; 2 Ev. Luth, 3 M. E., 1 Presb., 1 Ref. Prot. D., and 1 R. C.


The following information is from Gazetteer and Business Directory of Rensselaer County, N. Y., for 1870-71, compiled by Hamilton Child, 1870.

Schaghticoke was formed as a district, March 24, 1772, and as a town, March 7, 1788. Pittstown was taken off March 7, 1788, and a part of Lansingburgh in 1819. It lies on the Hudson, in the north-west corner of the county. The surface is principally a rolling upland, about 200 feet above the river. The summits of the hills in the south are 800 feet above tide. Hoosick River, flowing through the north part, is bordered on a portion of its course by steep banks 200 feet high. On this stream, at the mouth of Tomhannock Creek, is a beautiful circular valley, three-fourths of a mile in circumference, and bounded on nearly every side by steep hills. A small stream, called the Dwaas Kil, flows from the Hudson into the mouth of the Hoosick. When the Hoosick suddenly rises, the current of the stream is often changed, and it is not uncommon to see it running north in the morning and south at night. The name, Dwaas Kil, signifies "stream running both ways." The soil is generally a fertile, sandy or gravelly loam. Manufacturing is carried on to some extent in the town.

The village of Hart's Falls (formerly Schaghticoke Point) is situated on Hoosick River, four miles from its junction with the Hudson and about three-fourths of a mile from Schaghticoke Station, on the Troy & Boston R. R. The village contains three churches, viz., Methodist, Presbyterian and Roman Catholic, three district schools, three hotels, a woolen factory, two paper mills, a twine and bagging factory, a marble factory, the Schaghticoke Powder Mill and about 1,100 inhabitants. At this place is one of the finest water-powers on the Hoosick River. The whole fall is about 96 feet, including a perpendicular fall of 32 feet. A large part of this power is still unoccupied. Victor Lodge, No. 680, F. & A. M., and Phoenix Lodge, No. 776, I. 0. of G. T., at this village, are in a flourishing condition.

The village of Junction, situated on the Deepi Kil, about a mile from Grant's Junction, on the Troy & Boston R. R., contains a store, the Grant Fanning Mill and Cradle Manufactory, and about twenty houses.

Schaghticoke Hill, situated on Tombannock Creek, one mile from the station on the Troy & Boston R. R., contains a Methodist church, two stores, a saw mill, a grist mill, a twine and cordage mill, a scutching mill, the Schaghticoke Powder Keg Mill and about 150 inhabitants.

Old Schaghticoke is a name applied to a section about six miles square, lying in the north-west part of the town. This valley, like the territory generally along the eastern bank of the upper Hudson, was formerly occupied by the Algonquin race, who after many years of hostility were at last conquered and driven northward. For several years the country remained nearly unoccupied, but about 1670, through the exertions of Sir Edmond Andros, the Colonial Governor, a remnant of the Pequots were settled here under the name of Schaghticokes, the land having been given by the Mohawks as a barrier to the incursions of the northern tribes. About 1728 a division of the Tribe took place, the main body remaining until the "Seven Years War," when they joined their kindred in Canada. Small bodies of the Schaghticokes have until within a few years continued to visit their ancient burial place and counsel tree, near the banks of the Hoosick River, in "Old Schaghticoke." They were accompanied by a very aged woman of the Royal race, named Bathsheba. She died in 1854, aged more than one hundred years.

By the charter of 1686, the City of Albany obtained the right to purchase of the natives five hundred acres of land in this town, but neglecting to improve this privilege immediately, the right was given to Hendrick Van Rensselaer, in 1698. The next year he sold his claim to the City, and in 1707 an Indian deed was obtained of a tract six miles square, lying chiefly in this town. The consideration for this valuable tract was "two blankets, two body coats, twenty shirts, two guns, twelve pounds of powder, thirty and six pounds of shot, eight gallons of rum, two casks of beer, two rolls of tobacco, two gallons of Madeira wine and some gin," to them in hand delivered by the Mayor, Recorder and Common Council of the City of Albany. In 1709 the City conveyed the land to the following settlers, viz., John de Wandelaer, Jr., John Heermans Vischer, Corset Voeder, Daniel Kittlehuyn, John Knickerbocker, Louis Viele and Derick Van Veighten, who went there to reside, and were soon followed by Martin de Lamont, Wouter Quackenbosch, Peter Yates, David Schuyler, Wouter Groesbeck, Philip Livingstone, Ignace Kip, Cornelius Vandenburgh and many others, whose descendants still reside in the vicinity.

In 1714 Schaghticoke was organized into a parish of the Dutch Church. Having no regular minister residing there, the services were performed alternately by the ministers of Albany and Schenectady. A log church was erected the same year, and a small block-house in which the inhabitants took refuge in times of danger. The parish suffered greatly from incursions of French and Indians, who several times destroyed their church and dwellings, and carried into captivity many inhabitants. In 1746 the Government erected a fort at old Schaghticoke, and garrisoned it with two companies of soldiers until the close of the Seven Years War. After the conquest of Canada by the English, there was greater security and the population increased rapidly. In 1760 a new church was built, which was a good specimen of the quaint style of church architecture common in the middle of the last century. It was sixty by forty feet, with low side walls and a high pitched Mansard roof, ending at the eastern gable in a bulbous turret, surmounted by a weather cock. The pulpit, which had its canopy and sounding board, was mounted on a high pedestal, beneath which was a small desk for the "Voorlieser," or clerk, in front of which was a communion table equally quaint. There was no burial ground attached to this church, and the oldest in the neighborhood is that of the Knickerbacker family, on the site of an Indian cemetery. The first burial of a European occurred in 1715. A few rods south-east of this spot is the "Witenagemote," or "Council Tree," a remarkably vigorous and symmetrical oak, the trunk of which measures twenty feet in circumference. The first installed pastor of the Church was Rev. Elias Van Bunschooten. He was the clergyman whom tradition reports as having performed the marriage service while the parties were on the opposite side of the Hoosick River from the minister. It occurred at a ford about a mile above the junction of the Hudson and Hoosick Rivers. After the appointment was made, the river became sudden1y swollen by rain, so that it was impassable for either party. But as marriages cannot well be postponed without great inconvenience to the parties, the minister took his station upon one bank of the river, and the parties to he united on the other, while the ceremony was duly performed according to the ritual of the Dutch Church. The Dominie informed the happy bridegroom that if the guilder was left at a neighboring house, it would be duly received.

At the commencement of the Revolution a regiment was raised and placed under the command of Col. John Knickerbacker. He had charge of the fort at this place and accompanied the regiment to Ticonderoga. On the approach of Burgoyne, most of the inhabitants fled to Albany, leaving their dwellings to the mercy of the British and Hessian soldiers, who occupied them for some time, but through the influence of the Tories did not burn the place.

The following advertisement was copied from the Northern Budget of July 1805:

"SCHAGHTICOKE POINT. The subscriber, thankful for the large share of custom brought to his machine by the public, and being desirous of giving them all the accommodation in his power, has set up an additional machine in his mills at Schaghticoke Point, and is now able to give them double dispatch in the business of carding wool. He has a machine for picking wool which performs that part of the business better than it can be done by hand. His prices for picking, greasing and carding, to persons furnishing their own grease, is six cents per pound, or he will find oil and do it for eight cents. One pint of oil or one pound of grease is sufficient for eleven pounds of wool. They may depend upon having their work done punctually and in the best manner. C. Joy, July 1, 1805."

In 1777, Derrick Van Veghten was shot and scalped by the Indians. His tobacco box was perforated by the ball which killed him; it is still in the possession of his descendants. His father, Herman Van Veghten, was shot by the Indians in 1746. At the close of the war, the inhabitants returned to their agricultural pursuits.

John J. Bleecker was one of the early settlers of this town, locating there previous to the Revolutionary War. On the approach of Burgoyne, Mr. Bleecker went to Albany to seek a place of safety for his family. He had scarcely been gone a day when Mrs. Bleecker received intelligence that the enemy were within two miles of the village, burning and murdering all before them. Greatly terrified, she immediately took her youngest child in her arms, while another one about four years old walked by her side, accompanied by a young mulatto girl, and heaving her house and furniture to the mercy of the enemy, started on foot for Albany. The roads were crowded with carriages loaded with women and children, but none could afford her any assistance. After walking four or five miles she obtained a seat for the children upon one of the wagons while she continued her journey on foot to Lansingburgh, then called Stone Arabia, "where she expected to find many friends; but she was deceived; no door was open to her whose house by many of them had been made use of as a home. She wandered from house to house and at length obtained a place in the garret of a rich old acquaintance, where a couple of blankets stretched upon some boards were offered as a bed. She however sat up all night and wept, and the next morning, Mr. Bleecker, coming from Albany, met with them and returned to that city, from whence they set off with several other families by water." [Mem. of Mrs. Bleecker.]

They went to Red Hook, and, after the surrender of Burgoyne, returned to their former home, where they enjoyed tolerable tranquility until August 1781, when Mr. Bleecker, with two other men, was taken prisoner while engaged in the harvest field, and, with their captors, started for Canada. Mrs. B. awaited with anxiety the return of her husband, and, at length, apprehensive that something unusual had occurred, dispatched a servant who soon returned with the account that the men were nowhere to he seen, but the horses and wagon were in the road, tied to a tree. As small parties from Canada were known to be skulking in the woods, Mrs. B. was at no loss to account for the absence of her husband. The neighbors were immediately alarmed and the woods searched, but no trace of the prisoners or of their captors could be found. Though it was near night, Mrs. B. started immediately for Albany, giving up her husband as lost. Fortunately Mr. B. was retak en by a party from Bennington, and returned to his wife in a few days. Mrs. Bleecker appears to have been a lady of considerable talent as a writer, a volume of her writings, in connection with her memoirs, being published in 1793.

Among the instances of barbarous captivity and massacre during the French and Indian War, none is more shocking than that of the Kittle families. Mr. Kittle settled in this town before the War, about the year 1736, where they enjoyed all the comforts which the country afforded. About a year after their marriage they were blessed with a daughter who became a favorite with the Indians as well as with her parents and friends. When Anna, for that was the daughter's name, was about twelve years old, she had the pleasure of greeting a little brother. When the news of the horrid massacres and depredations of the savages reached the ears of Mr. Kittle, he became alarned at the danger of his brothers then residing near Fort Edward, and invited them to reside with him during the War. Scarcely had his brothers become settled with him, when the incursions of the savages in the country approaching their own residence, sparing neither age nor sex, so alarmed them that they resol ved to remove to the vicinity of Albany. While packing up and making ready for their journey, several Indians whose wigwams were in the vicinity and who had always appeared well disposed towards the English, called and assured Mrs. Kittle that she should be apprised in case of danger, and to make her more confiding in his friendship, one of them presented her with a belt interwoven with silk and beads, as a token of friendship. Though Mr. K. appeared less inclined to trust the Indians than did his wife, they decided to suspend their journey to Albany for a few days. The next day, according to previous arrangement, Mr. K. and his brother Peter went on a hunting excursion, not without some forebodings of the evils that awaited them. At length, weary with their journey and seeing no game of value, they resolved to return home. While passing along the bank of the river, within a few miles of their home, they saw a fine fat doe, which Peter, by a well directed shot, brought to the ground. Shortly after the discharge of his gun, two savages appeared and immediately discharged their pieces at the brothers, killing Peter almost instantly. Mr. Kittle immediately shot one of the Indians and, with the butt end of his gun, felled the other to the ground, leaving both for dead. He then placed the body of his brother upon the horse and proceeded towards home. On his arrival he made known the circumstances of his disaster, ordered a horse that he might proceed immediately to the village of Schagliticoke for wagons to remove his family to some safe retreat. He had been gone but a short time when the tramping of horses feet and the yell of voices announced the arrival of Indians, who soon demanded admittance. The work of destruction was sudden and awful; a brother of Mr. Kittle's, with his wife, were murdered in the most shocking manner. Mrs. K., and her brother-in-law, Henry Kittle, were taken prisoners, but her children perished in the flames of the house, which the Indians plundered and set on fire. Mr. K. returned to find his house in ashes, the mangled bodies of one brother and sister-in-law, and the charred remains of his children, but no tidings of the others, who he supposed had perished in the flames. After suffering the usual hardships of a journey, the captives arrived in Montreal, where Mrs. K. found one of her old neighbors, Mrs. Bratt, who had previously been taken prisoner. For two years Mrs. K. received the kind attentions of the ladies of Montreal, but failed in all of her endeavors to obtain the least information respecting her husband. Her letters would sometimes be returned to her after wandering through various provinces without reaching him for whom they were designed. At length after a long and fruitless search for his long lost brother, Mr. Kittle found him in Montreal, and then for the first time heard that his wife had been made a captive and was not murdered. The meeting was as if one had risen from the dead, and the happiness of meeting can only he imagined.

Henry Miller was another of the early settlers of this town, and his descendants still reside there. He and his wife were from Germany, and came over at an early day. Having arrived in New York after a tedious voyage, he left his family and took passage with a Dutch skipper for Albany, to seek a spot upon the vacant hands of this State. From Albany he went on foot to seek a home for his family, and while traveling along the banks of the Hudson, admiring the beauty of the scenery and buoyant with hopes for the future, he suddenly met one of his old companions with whom he had served in the army in the old country. The interview was mutually agreeable. Mr. Miller went to the home of his old friend, was pleased with the country, and, with the aid of his new friends, erected a log cabin to which he removed his family in a few days, and thus became one of the early settlers of Schaghticoke.

The population of the town in 1865 was 3,054, and its area 26,900 acres.


The following information is from History of Rensselaer Co., New York by Nathaniel Bartlett Sylvester, published in 1880.

In 1668 Lewis Viele was the first person to attempt to settle in Old Schaghticoke.

In 1675 King Charles II of Great Britain (Stuart) commissioned Governor Edmund Andros to New York to attempt to make peaceful relations with the warring Indian tribes, in hopes of land being settled and developed.

In 1676 the Witenagemot council (Assemblage of the Wise) was called. It consisted of the Board of Indian Commissioners, headed by Governor Andros and his couselors, judges and divines, accompanied by the Militia of the King of England. They assembled near the confluence of the Tomhannac and Hoosic Rivers and planted the Witenagemot Oak. The famous Council Tree of Peace was planted, not only with a view of confirming the link of friendship between Kryn's "Praying Mohawks" of the Caughawag Village in Canada and Soquon's Hoosacs at Schaghticoke Village, but to strengthen the alliance of Fort Albany militia with the River Indian scouts, whose fugitive kindred were scattered throughout New England, New York and New France. It is the only "Vale of Peace" on the continent where the Witenagemot council has ever been assembled for the welfare of the Indians. This council paved the way for the eventual American success at the Battle of Saratoga, the turning point of the American Revolution.

The white oak of the Schaghticokes lived until it was uprooted by the 1949 flood of the Hoosick River.

Just a few yards from the Witenagemot meeting place was the Schaghticokes' Tawasentha (cemetery). The Mahicans believed in a renewal of life after death and held this burial place in high veneration. Even after the last Mahicans left this area in 1754, Queen Esther, a lineal descendent of Chief Soquon of the Hoosicks, made annual pilgimages with her warriors and maidens to Schaghticoke from St. Regis to their Vale of Peace. Here they danced by moonlight beneath the Witenagemot Oak and scattered sacrificial tokens in their burial ground west of the 1676 Council tree, said to be the only tree planted in North America for the welfare of the Indians.

Due to the peace negotiated at the Council of 1676 this area was able to attract settlers so that in the 100 years interim between the Council and the American Revolution, this area grew in population until it was able to furnish and supply the 14th Regiment, consisting of eight companies and scouts. The regiment was raised by Col. John Knickerbocker.

In 1698 a patent was granted to Hendick Van Rensselaer, which rights he sold to Albany in 1699.

In 1707 the city of Albany secured from the Indians a tract of land 35 square miles for two blankets, two body coats, twenty-six shirts, two guns, twelve pounds of powder, thirty-six pounds of shot, eight gallons of wine and some gin.

Early Settlers
Babcock, Joshua
Bacon, Penuel
Browning, David
Conat, Thaddeus S. W.
Danielse, Martin
Danielse, Simon
De Lamont, Martin
De Wandelaer, Johannes
De Wandelaer, John, Jr.
Doxie, Samuel
Fele (Viele), Louis
Fether (Voeder), Curset
Fort, Abram
Groesback, John W.
Groesbeek, Walter N.
Hicks, Thomas
Kip, Ignace
Kittlehuyn (Ketlyne or Kittle), Daniel (his family was slaughtered by the indians and his home destroyed)
Kittlehuyn, Daniel
Knickerbacker, Johannes
Knickerbacker, John
Livingston, Philip
Marters, Nicholas
McCleaver, William
Morehouse, Reuben
Overocker, Jacob
Pinear, Rite
Quackenbush, Sybrant
Quackenbush, Wouter
Quacumbus, Adrian
Rowland, Samuel
Van Antwerp, Lewis
Van Veghten, Derick
Van Veghten, Derrick
Vandenburgh, Cornelius
Viele, Louis
Viele, Sybrant (kept a tavern at Schaghticoke Hill)
Vischer, John Heermans
Voeder, Corset
Wenat, Garret
Wetsel, George
Wiley, Cornelius
Winne, Peter

Early Churches
St. John's Catholic Church at Hart's Falls, organized about 1835
St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, "formed amid the dark days of the Revolution"
The Lutheran Church, Bryan District, near the Hudson River, organized March 6, 1852
The Methodist Episcopal Church of Hart's Falls, organized about 1822
The Methodist Episcopal Church of Schaghticoke Hill, established at "quite an early day"
The Presbyterian Church of Schaghticoke (Hart's Falls), organized in 1803
The Protestant Episcopal Church (Trinity Church) at Hart's Falls, incorporated Sept. 1, 1846
The Reformed Church of Schaghticoke, organized in 1714

Revolutionary War Soldiers
Acker, Peter
Acker, Solomon
Knickerbocker, Col. John
Van Antwerp, John L.
Yates, Col. Peter

Officers of the 14th Regiment, Hoosick and Schaghticoke District
Bratt, Daniel, Lieut.-Col.
Kip, Ignas, Qrtm.
Knickerbocker, John, Col.
Toll, Charles H., Adj.
Van Rensselaer, John, 2d Maj.
Van Vechten, Derick, 1st Maj.

First Company
Ford, Nathaniel, 2d Lieut.
Hallenbeck, Jacob, Ens.
Ketchum, Samuel, 1st Lieut.
Vanderhoof, Hendrick, Capt.

Second Company
Davenport, Peter, 2d Lieut.
Groesbeck, Walter N., Capt.
Vandenbergh, Wynant, 1st Lieut.
Yates, Jacob, Ens.

Third Company
Bleecker, John J., Capt.
Garmo, Matthew D., 2d Lieut.
Snyder, John, 1st Lieut.
Thorn, Stephen, Ens.

Fourth Company
Boyce, Joseph, 2d Lieut.
Morrel, John, Ens.
Schouten, John, 1st Lieut.
Van Woerdt, Lewis, Capt.

Fifth Company
Davis, Jonathan, Ens.
Johnson, John, 1st Lieut.
Palmer, Fenner, Capt.
Williamson, James, 2d Lieut.

Sixth Company
Bratt, Daniel B., Capt.
Campman, Michael, 1st Lieut.
Hogal, Francis, Ens.
Lansing, Isaac, 2d Lieut.

Seventh Company
Hartwell, Peter, Ens.
Ryan, Michael, 1st Lieut.
Van Rensselaer, _____, Capt.

Minute Men
Bleecker, John, Capt.
Hicks, Thomas, 2d Lieut.
Rowland, Jonathan, Ens.
Thorne, William, 1st Lieut.

Civil War Soldiers
Acker, Philip, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Bacon, John, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Baker, Cabot E., Cavalry.
Baker, Solomon, enl. Dec. 24, 1863, 16th Art., Co. A.
Bartwell, Obed, enl. Jan. 2, 1864, 16th Art., Co. K.
Beauchamp, Emery, enl. Aug. 22, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Bliss, Henry L., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; pro. lieut. in U. S. Colored Troops.
Brownell, Charles H., enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Bryan, George A, sergt., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K; pro. to 1st lieut; killed by a sharpshooter at Petersburg; body brought home for burial.
Buffett, Levi, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Burch, Ezra, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; died in the service; body brought home for burial.
Burch, Ezra, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Butterfield, Sylvester, enl. Dec. 31, 1863, 16th Art., Co. K.
Carr, Wm., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; died at Libby prison.
Caswell, James H., enl. Aug. 12, 1861, 3d Cav., Co. D.
Conners, Michael, 169th Regt.
Crandall, C. J., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Curley, Thomas, enl. Aug. 18, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Davis, James C., 6th corp., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Dooley, John, enl. Dec. 18, 1863, 16th Art., Co. I.
Doty, A. J., enl. Aug. 13, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Doyle, James, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Fennell, Edward, enl. Dec. 19, 1863, 16th Art., Co. I.
Fields, Timothy, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Fisher, Archibald, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; prisoner; died at Andersonville.
Fisher, Douglas, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; died in the service.
Fisher, John, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Fisher, William H., enl. Oct. 18, 1861, Black Horse Cavalry.
Fisher, Wm. (one of four brothers in the service), wagoner, enl. Aug. 27, 1862.
Force, Jacob F., 1st corp., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Gallagher, Wm., enl. Aug. 7, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A.
Grant, Job A., 2d corp., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Grant, Job A., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Green, George, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Groesbeck, Wm. M., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Guest, Lorenzo, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; wounded.
Hagadorn, Wm. P., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Hoffman, Wm. H., enl. June 5, 1861, 93d Regt., Co. C.
Holden, Wm., 3d corp., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Holden, Wm., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Houck, Andrew, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Houck, Jacob, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; killed at the second battle of Bull Run.
Hoyt, Warner, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Kipp, Abraham J., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Kipp, Isaac, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; killed at Fisher's Mountain.
Mabb, James E., enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
McGowan, William, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
McGowan, Wm. M., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
McMurray, Michael, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
McWilliams, John, Cavalry.
Milk, David, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; died in the army.
Miller, Henry W., 3d sergt., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Overocker, D. C., 5th corp., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Patterson, Robert, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. A.
Pickett, Charles A., 1st lieut., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Rain, Thomas, enl. Aug. 12, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Rain, Thomas, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; wounded.
Rain, William, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Robbins, Henry, enl. 14th Heavy Artillery, colored.
Robbins, Jason, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Robbins, Jason, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Simons, James K., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; several times a prisoner; suffered severely on Sherman's march to the sea.
Slocum, Joseph, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Slocum, Josiah, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Smith, John, died in the service.
Snyder, Washington L., enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. C.
Steele, McGregor, 2d lieut., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Stratton, Charles, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; died a prisoner at Andersonville.
Thomson, E. S., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; wounded.
Thwaite, Wm., enl. July 28, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Tice, Wm. M., enl. Aug. 17, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Toomey, Michael, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Travis, Lafayette, 4th sergt., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K; killed instantly at Gettysburg.
Turner, Lewis H., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Van Antwerp, Jacob Y., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Van Schaick, Isaac, enl. Aug. 21, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Van Schaick, W. W., 2d sergt., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K; wounded at Gettysburg.
Vandenburgh, J. V. N., Capt., enl. Aug. 28, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
Vaughn, Arthur, enl. Jan. 2, 1864, 16th Art., Co. I.
Vaughn, Asthel S., enl. Jan. 2, 1864, 16th Art., Co. I.
Vaughn, Fayette, enl. Jan. 2, 1864, 16th Art., Co. I.
Ward, Amos, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Washburn, S. W., enl. July 26, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K.
White, Chauncey, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; wounded at Gettysburg and died in the hospital.
Whyland, Alexander, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K; died as a prisoner on the march to Andersonville.
Wolf, Charles H., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Wolf, George, enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Wolf, Wm. H., enl. Aug. 27, 1862, 125th Inf., Co. K.
Wood, Moran L., 4th corp., enl. Aug. 26, 1862, 125th Regt., Co. K; died in the service.


See also The Colonial Albany Social History Project, which presents a history of Schaghticoke.


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