Troy's One Hundred Years 1789-1889:
Steam Fire Engine Companies

These are excerpts from Troy's One Hundred Years 1789-1889, compiled by Arthur James Weise, M. A., and published in 1891 by William H. Young of 7-9 First Street in Troy. They were transcribed and contributed by Bill McGrath of Clifton Park, Saratoga County, NY.

STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANIES
pages 360-362
Arba Read Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 1, informally organized in November, 1859; constitution and by-laws adopted December 19th; first officers elected January 9th, 1860. First engine received March 28th, that year. The engine-house, next north of the present [i. e., 1891] one, on the north-west corner of Third and River streets, was built in 1860; the present one was erected in 1875. The "law relating to the establishment and organization of a steam fire company of the city of Troy," passed by the Common Council, February 16th, 1860, designated the members of the Arba Read Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 1, as firemen of the city, limiting them to sixty persons. On May 24th, 1860, a span of black horses was purchased for the company. On January, 1862, the trustees transferred the apparatus and property to the city. James KNIBBS was appointed engineer of the company February, 1860, which position he filled until December 1st, 1863.

Hugh Ranken Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 2. On September 28th, 1860, a number of citizens purchased a steam fire engine for Eagle Engine Company, No. 10, the name of which the Common Council on December 20th, that year, changed to Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 2. On April 1st, 1861, the Common Council changed it to Hugh Ranken Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 2, having appropriated $2,250 to repay the sums advanced by the citizens to purchase the engine. The engine-house, at No. 14 Federal Street, having been burned on May 10th, 1862, the engine was temporarily housed at Cozzens' Northern Hotel and afterward in the house previously occupied by Niagara Engine Company, No. 7, on Second Street. The brick engine-house erected on the site of the burned building was occupied by the company on February 14th, 1863. The present one was built in 1885. The first engineer, Roswell A. MORGAN, was succeeded in 1862 by Thomas H. BAILEY, who was succeeded in 1867 by his brother William BAILEY.

Jason C. Osgood Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 3, was organized from the members of Niagara Engine Company, No. 7, which was discontinued in January 23d, 1862. The first steam engine received on January 14th, 1862, was temporarily housed in the building occupied by Niagara Engine Company, No. 7, on the north-east corner of Second and Division streets. A two-story brick house was erected for the company in 1862, on the south side of Adams Street. In 1865, a brick building was erected for its use on the south-west corner of Adams and Second streets. The new brick building, on the south-east corner of Third Street and Canal Avenue, was occupied by the company on August 21st, 1890.

The Washington Volunteer Fire Company, having obtained a steam fire engine from Button & Blake, of Waterford, on April 19th, 1864, for $2,150, sold its hand engine to the village of Trumansburgh, N. Y. for $1,000. On the transfer of the engine-house on the north side of State Street, between Second and Third streets, on August 2d, 1865, to the Capital Police, the engine was taken to the Franklin Hose Company's house at the rear of the court-house. On March 22d, 1868, the fire commissioners agreed to pay the company from May 1st, 1865, $650 annually, to meet its current expenses. On October 20th, 1867, the engineer of the company was placed under full pay by the fire department. On December 31st, 1872, the company occupied its two-story brick engine-house on the north-east corner of Third and Division streets. In December, 1874, the company was provided a team of horses by the department, the engine having been drawn until that time by hand.

Charles Eddy Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 4 was organized on November 21st, 1866, from the members of J. C. Taylor Hose Company, No. 3 and of Rough and Ready Hose Company, No. 4. The steamer purchased of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company was put in service on May 22d, 1867. The two-story brick engine-house, built in 1866, on the north-east corner of River and North Streets, was occupied by the company in May, 1867. The company was reorganized on October 6th, 1876.

Franklin W. Farnam Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 5 was organized on July 17th, 1871, from the members of Lafayette Engine Company, No 10. The first steamer of the company was built that year by L. Button & Son. The company's two-story brick engine-house, on the south side of Congress Street, Ida Hill, was built in 1876.

Edmond Stanton Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 6 was organized January 23d, 1873, from the Empire State Engine Company, No. 5. The first steam engine was received on November 30th, 1872. The company's two-story brick engine-house on the south side of Mill Street was erected in 1877.

Hope Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 7 was organized from the members of the Hope Engine Company, No 6. In May, 1882, the company received the steam engine used for a number of years by Edmond Stanton Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 6. The engine-house of the company, on the south-east corner of Pawling Avenue and the Grist Mill Road, in Albia, was built in 1886.

Esek Bussey Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 8 was organized as a hose company on January 23d, 1888. The hose-house of the company is in the north end of the Bussey & McLeod Stove Company's foundry on the east side of Oakwood Avenue, north of Hoosick Street. The company was reorganized as a part of the Troy Fire Department on June 24th, 1890. An engine-house is now building (in May 1891) for the company, on the north-east corner of Hoosick and Tenth streets.

Trojan Hook and Ladder Company, No. 3, organized February 5th, 1835, occupied its present two-story brick truck-house on the east side of Franklin Square in April, 1865. The Hayes extension ladder, truck and fire-escape, now used by the company, was purchased in 1884.

Beman Park Hose Company, No. 9, organized December 19th, 1889, officially accepted December 18th, 1890. Hose-house on south side of Eagle Street, between Fourteenth and Fifteenth streets. William GORMAN, president; T. MCDONALD, captain.



Send comments or suggestions to:
Lin Van Buren
Go Back to Troy's One Hundred Years Contents Page
Go Back to Home Page