HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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CHAPTER XVIII.

EARLY LAND GRANTS - 1684-1713.

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I. - LANDED INTERESTS.

The readers of this history, if haply any there shall be, are doubtless by this time weary of the long, long story of the old wilderness warfare that so often empurpled the soil of Saratoga County with the blood of the slain, and will turn with a sense of relief to the story of her social and industrial progress, which will form the burden of the remaining chapters.

And if Old Saratoga has become a high historic name in consequence of the heroic deeds of her warfare, she has won scarcely less of world-wide fame by reason of her material development in her time of peace. Of her it may be truly said, in Milton's immortal language,

"Peace hath her victories

No less renowned than war." SONNET XVI.

In the following pages the principal early land-grants of Saratoga County will be briefly described, and in most cases will be given a copy of the warrant issued to the patentees containing the original description of the patent. These papers have been transcribed from the original land papers on file in the office of the Secretary of State at Albany expressly for this work.

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II. - THE SARATOGA PATENT.

In the earlier years of the colonial period the old Indian hunting-grounds lying within the boundaries of the county of Saratoga were purchased one after another from their aboriginal owners, and thereafter became known in history as land-grants or patents. The most famous of these old patents still retain their old Indian names, - the patents of Saratoga and Kay-ad-ros-se-ra.

The patent of Old Saratoga, which grew out of the old hunting-ground of the river hills from which the county and the springs derive their name, was among the earliest purchases made of the Indians in Saratoga County. It was purchased of the Mohawks as early as the year 1684, but the Indian deed was not confirmed by the colonial government and the warrant for the patent issued till the year 1708, as will appear by the following copy thereof. The Saratoga patent is shown on the map facing this chapter.

"WARRANT FOR SARATOGA PATENT."

"By his Excellency, Edward, Viscount Cornbury, Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief of the Provinces of New York and New Jersey, and territories depending on them in America, and Vice-Admiral of the same, etc., in council this 25th day of October, 1708.

"To Major Berkley, Esq., Attorney-General of the Province of New York:

"You are hereby required and directed to prepare a draft of a patent of confirmation for Colonel Peter Schuyler, Robert Livingston, Esq., Dirck Wessels, Esq., Jan Jan Bleecker, Esq., Johannes Schuyler, Esq., and to Cornelius Van Dyck, the grandchild and heir-at-law of Cornelius Van Dyck, deceased, for a certain tract of land situate and being to the northward of the city of Albany, on both sides of the Hudson river, formerly granted onto some of them and others, under and from whom the rest do at present hold and enjoy by patent from Colonel Tomas Dongan, sometime Governor-in-Chief of the province of Now York, the limits and boundaries of which land are to be ascertained in the manner, that is to say: Beginning at the south side of the mouth of a certain creek on the west side of Hudson's river, commonly called by the Indians Tionoondehowa, and by the Christians Anthony's Kill, which is the uppermost bounds of the land formerly purchased by Goosie Gerritson and Philip Peterson Schuyler, and from thence descending westerly into the woods by the said creek, on the south side thereof, as it runs six English miles; and if the said creek do not stretch so far into the wood, then from the end thereof east by a straight line until it shall be six miles distant from Hudson's river, upon a measured straight line; and from thence northerly by a line parallel to the course of Hudson's river, until it come opposite to and bear east from the south side from another creek's mouth on the east side of Hudson's river, culled Tionoondehows, which upon Hudson's river is computed to be distant from the mouth of Tionoondehows aforesaid about twenty-two English miles, be it more or less, and from the left termination by a straight line to be drawn east to the north side of the mouth of the said creek, Tionoondehows; and from thence continued east six miles into the woods on the east side of Hudson's river, and from thence by a line southerly parallel to the course of the said Hudson's river, and six miles distant from the same, so far southerly until it come opposite to and bear east six miles distant from the north side of the mouth of Schardhook Kill, which is the boundary of Schardhook patent, late belonging to Henry Van Rensselaer, to hold it thence, in manner following: that is to say, for so much thereof as by the former patents had been divided for arable land to Peter Schuyler, lot No. 1, and one half the lot No. 6, to and for the use of the said Peter Schuyler, and of his heirs and assigns forever, to Robert Livingston; his lot, No. 5, and one half the lot No. 5, to and for the sole use to Dirck Wessels; his lot, No. 3, to and for the sole use to Jan Jan Bleecker; his lot, No. 2, to and for the sole use to Johannes; his lot, No. 4, to and for the sole use also to Caroline Van Dyck, the grandchild and heir-at-law of the said Caroline Van Dyck, deceased; the lot No. 7 in trust, nevertheless, to and for the use or uses for which the farm is devised by the last will and testament of his said grandfather, deceased; failing which use or uses, to the use of himself, and his heirs and assigns forever, and for so much as remains undivided according to the heir's use of, positively, that is to say: to Peter Schuyler and Robert Livingston, to each of them three-fourteenth parts; and to each of the others two fourteenth parts of the whole undivided land contained in the said patent, the farm being divided in fourteen equal parts, at and under the yearly quitrent of twenty bushels of winter wheat; and for your so doing this shall be your sufficient warrant.

CORNBURY,"

Dated as above. {Land Paper v. 4, p. 165.}

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III. - THE KAY-AD-ROS-SE-RA PATENT.

By far the largest and most important land-grant made in colonial times, any part of which lay within the bounds of Saratoga County, was the patent founded on the old Indian hunting-ground of Kay-ad-ros-se-ra. This large tract includes the greater part of Saratoga County, and runs also on the north into Warren county, and on the west into Montgomery and Fulton.

Kay-ad-ros-se-ra, "the country of the lake of the crooked stream," as has already been seen in these pages, was the favorite hunting-ground of the Mohawk branch of the Iroquois or Five Nations of central New York. The Indian deed was obtained of the Mohawk chief in the year 1703, but the patent was not granted till the year 1708, and the Indians did not ratify the purchase till the year 1768. This patent was, therefore, disputed ground for more than sixty years.

The first attempt made to obtain a grant of any part of Kay-ad-ros-se-ra was made in the year 1693. On the 1st day of April, 1693, Robert Livingston, Jr., and David Schuyler petitioned for a part of Kay-ad-ros-se-ra lying north of the Saratoga patent up as far as the Little Carrying-Place, and running as far back into the wood as the Indian property goes. In the year 1702, on the 26th of August, the Indians granted this tract to Livingston and Schuyler, described as aforesaid. This was the first Indian deed of any part of Kay-ad-ros-se-ra. When the proprietors of the whole patent acquired their title, they obtained a release from Livingston and Schuyler of their interest.

The first paper on file in the office of the Secretary of State, at Albany, in relation to the patent of Kay-ad-ros-se-ra, is the following petition:

PETITION FOR KAYADROSSERA.

"To his Excellency, Edward, Viscount Cornbury, Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over the Province of New York and Territories depending thereon in America, and Vice-Admiral of the same, etc., in council.

"The humble petition of Sampson Shelton Broughton, Esq., Attorney-General of the said Province, in behalf of himself and Comp. Most humbly sheweth:

"That your petitioner being informed of a certain tract of vacant and unappropriated land in the County of Albany, called or known by the Indian name of Kayarosses, adjoining to the north bounds of Schenectady, on the east side thereof, to the west bounds of Saratoga, on the north side thereof, and to Albany river on the west side thereof.

"Your said petitioner most humbly prays your Excellency that he may have a license to treat with the native Indians, present possessors and owners of the said tract of land, for the purchase thereof, and to purchase the same.

"And your petitioner humbly, as in duty bound, shall ever pray, etc. {Land Papers, p. 122, v. 3.}

"SA. SH. BROUGHTON."

The prayer of this petitioner was not at first granted, and Sampson Shelton Broughton, the petitioner, dying, his widow, Mary Broughton, presented the following petition:

MARY BROUGHTON'S PETITION.

"To his Excellency, Edward, Viscount Cornbury, Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over Her Majesty's Province of New York and Territories adjoining thereon in America, and Vice-Admiral of the same, etc., in council.

"The humble petition of Mary Broughton, ,widow and relict of Sampson Shelton Broughton, deceased, late Attorney-General of the said Province, in behalf of herself and company. Most humbly sheweth:

"That your Excellency's petitioner's late husband in his lifetime obtained of your Excellency in council, for the benefit of himself and company, a license to purchase of the native Indian proprietors a certain tract of vacant and unappropriated land in the county of Albany, called or known by the Indian name of Kayaderosses, adjoining to the north bounds of Schenectady patent, together with the vacancies that lie between the Ael place down along the river about one mile more or less, on the east side thereof to the west bounds of Saratoga patent, on the north side thereof to Albany river, and on the west side thereof to the native Indians and proprietors thereof, for their improvement, the north bounds running along the said river of Albany thereof; said tract of land your said petitioner's late husband in his lifetime did purchase from the native Indians, proprietors, on the 6th of October, 1704, in pursuance of your Excellency's license for that purpose, obtained on the 2d day of November, 1704, for the use and benefit of your said petitioner's late husband and company, as by the said receipted license and Indian deed of purchase now ready to be produced to your Excellency, will more at large appear; and whereas your said petitioner's late husband in his lifetime did petition your Excellency for a grant of the said land for himself and company, David Schuyler and Robert Livingston, Jr., then in this city, did oppose the granting thereof, and entered a caveat against the same; your Excellency upon a full hearing of the parties on both sides, on the 6th day of November, 1704, being the day appointed for that purpose, was pleased to declare then in council that the pretence of the said David Schuyler and Robert Livingston were groundless and frivolous, chiefly since the purchase was they provided to have made of formed parts of the said tract of land was made (if made it was) without any license from your Excellency for that purpose, and ordered therefore, that your caveat then so entered should be dismissed and also referred the said petitioner to further consideration.

"Your Excellency's petitioner therefore most humbly prays your Excellency will be pleased that the said reference which has been so long depending before your Excellency, may be determined; and your said petitioner's husband being unhappily dead since the said transaction, to the inexpressible loss of your petitioner and family, your petitioner most humbly prays that her name may be inserted in the said grant in place of that of her said late husband, for the benefit of your said petitioner's family and company.

"And your Excellency's said petitioner, as in duty bound, shall ever pray, etc., {Land Papers, p. 42.}

"MARY BROUGHTON."

On the 17th of April, 1807, Samuel Broughton, son of Sampson Shelton Broughton, filed a petition in behalf of his mother praying that she might take her husband's interest in the grant.

In the mean time Mary Broughton had gone back to England and taken the Indian deed of Kayadrossera with her among her husband's papers.

In the year 1808, the other proprietors filed a petition setting forth the fact of their not having possession of the Indian deed, and accounting for its absence as above stated.

A long controversy ensued between the Broughtons and the other patentees, which was finally compromised by making Samuel Broughton, the son of Sampson Shelton Broughton, one of the patentees.

The following is the warrant for this patent, which was finally granted to thirteen owners in common. This warrant contains a description of the patent by which all surveys were governed:

WARRANT FOR KAYADROSSERA.

"By his Excellency, Edward, Viscount Cornbury, Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief of the Provinces of New York, New Jersey, and Territories depending thereon in America, and Vice-Admiral of the same, etc., in council, this 22d day of October, 1701.

"To Major Bickley, Esq., Attorney-General of the Province of New York:

"Yon are hereby required to prepare a draft of letters-patent for Naning Harmanse, Johannes Beekman, Rip Van Dam, Ann Bridges, Major Bickley, Peter Fauconnier, Adrian Hoghland, Johannes Fisher, John Tuder, Ixris Hoghland, John Stevens, and John Gatham, for all that tract of land situate, lying, and being in the county of Albany, called Kayadarossera, alias Queen's Borough, beginning at a place on Schenectady river, about three miles distant from the southwesterly corner of the bounds of Nestigion's, the said place being the southwesterly corner of the patent lately granted to Naning Harmanse, Peter Fauconnier, and others; thence along the said Schenectady river westerly to the southeastly corner of a patent lately granted to William Apple; thence along the easterly, northerly, and westerly lines of said William Apple's patent down to the above said river; thence to the Schenectady bounds, or the southeasterly corner of said patent on said river, so along the easterly, northerly, and westerly bounds thereof down to the said river again; thence along the said river up westerly to the southeasterly bounds of a tract of land lately granted to Ebenezer Willson and John Aboot, and so along the said patent round to the southwesterly corner thereof on said Schenectady river; thence continuing to run westerly up along said Schenectady river to a place or hill called Iweetowando, being five miles distant, or thereabouts, from the said southwesterly corner of said Willson's and Aboot's patent; thence northerly to the northwestmost head of a creek called Kayaderossera, about fourteen miles, - more or less: thence eight miles more northerly; thence easterly or northeasterly to the third falls on Albany river, about twenty miles, - more or less; thence along the said river down southerly to the northeasterly bounds of Saratoga; thence along said Saratoga's northerly, westerly, and southerly bounds on said river; thence to the northeasterly corner of Anthony Van Schaick's land, on said river, so northerly and westerly along said Van Schaick's patent to the northeast corner of the above said patent granted to Naning, Fauconnier, and others; thence along the northerly and westerly bounds thereof, down to the above said river of Schenectady, being the place where it first begun. To hold to the said Naning Harmense, Johannes Beekman, Rip Van Dam, Ann Bridges, Major Bickley, Peter Fauconnier, Adrian Hoghland, Johannes Fisher, John Tuder, Joris Hoghland, John Stauen, and John Gatham, their heirs and assigns forever, at and under the yearly quitrent of four pounds . . . and for so doing this shall be your sufficient warrant. Dated as above.

"By order of his Excellency in council. {Land Papers, v. 4, p. 165.}

"CORNBURY."

After the patent of Kayadrossera was granted, in the year 1708, the patentees slumbered on their rights. It was a condition of the grant that a settlement should be made within seven years after its date and discovery. It does not appear that any attempt at settlement was made, but one petition after another was filed by the patentees, praying an extension of the time for settlement.

In 1732 the patentees filed a petition, asking that the patent might be surveyed and its boundaries determined, on account of various depredations that were being committed on it by adjoining owners who disputed the line.

But nothing was done towards a survey; and again, for more than thirty years, the owners of this magnificent domain slumbered upon their rights.

At length, in 1763, the French and Indian war being over, the patentees of Kayadrossera began to look, with longing eyes, after their lands. In the year 1764, some one of them began to issue permits to settlers to enter upon and occupy portions of the patent.

In pursuance of these permits, several families moved upon the patent in the vicinity of Saratoga lake, at the mouth of the Kayadrossera river.

In the fall of that year the Mohawks, upon their hunting excursion, fell upon these settlers and drove them away.

Learning from the settlers that they claimed it by purchase, the Mohawks became alarmed, as they said they had never heard of such purchase.

The Mohawks at once appealed to Sir William Johnson, and were surprised to learn that the whole of their favorite hunting-ground had been deeded away by their fathers more than two generations before.

"Abraham," the brother of King Hendrik, in an eloquent harangue, presented the case to Sir William, claiming that, after the most diligent inquiry among the oldest people of his tribe, it could not be ascertained that any such grant had ever been made.

In conclusion, "Abraham" demanded in the name of the tribe that the patent be relinquished.

Sir William took up the matter warmly in favor of the Mohawks, and made every effort in his power to have the patent set aside.

In the first place, Sir William wrote to Lieutenant-Governor Colden, stating the case as he understood it, and urging relief.

That very autumn, Sir William introduced a bill into the Colonial Assembly to vacate the patent on the ground of fraud.

These measures failing, in the year 1765 Sir William appealed to the council in person in behalf of his dusky brethren, but the members of the council put him off with, among other things, the plea that to vacate the patent in council would be disrespectful to the council who granted it. By this time the controversy had been taken up warmly by all the tribes of the confederacy of the Six Nations, and Sir William in their behalf petitioned to have the patent vacated on the ground of fraud by act of Parliament.

At length the proprietors themselves became alarmed for the safety of their patent, and offered to compromise with the Indians by paying them a certain sum of money to satisfy their claim. The Mohawks thought the sum offered too small, and the effort failed.

Thus the matter went on till the year 1768, when the proprietors of Kayadrossera gave to the governor, Sir Henry Moore, full power to settle with the Indians. In pursuance of this authority, Sir Henry proceeded to the Mohawk country in the early summer of 1768, and called a council of the Indians to deliberate upon the matter. But it was found that the proprietors had no copy of the Indian deed to produce in evidence on the occasion, and that, as no survey had ever been made, no proper understanding of the subject could be arrived at, and the council was dissolved. Upon his return to New York, the governor ordered a survey of the patent to be made. The outlines of this great patent were accordingly given by the surveyor-general, and, the boundaries being ascertained, a compromise was arrived at. The proprietors relinquished a large tract on the northwestern quarter of what they had claimed to be their land, and fixed the northern and western boundaries as they now run. They likewise paid the Indians the sum of five thousand dollars in full of all their claims and the Mohawks thereupon ratified the patent and forever relinquished their claims to their old favorite hunting-ground. {See Life and Times of Sir William Johnson, by Colonel Wm. L. Stone, vol. ii.}

The Indian title being thus quieted, the proprietors proceeded at once to survey their lands.

Such proceedings were had that commissioners were appointed to partition the patent among its owners. The commissioners completed their survey in the year 1771. They divided the patent into twenty-five allotments, and each allotment into thirteen equal lots, that being the number of the original proprietors.

The proprietors, or their heirs or assigns, as the case might be, cast lots as to location, each having a single lot in each allotment. It would doubtless be interesting to trace more in detail the incidents attending the granting and settlement of this important patent, but our space will not permit. Its situation is clearly shown by the map accompanying this chapter.

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IV. - THE APPLE PATENT.

On the 13th day of April, 1708, William Apple petitioned Governor Edward, Lord Viscount Cornbury, setting forth that twenty years before, he and his partner, Harmanus Hagadorn, had planted a field of corn on the north bank of the Mohawk, in the county of Albany, and when it was all ready for the harvest, the Mohawks, who were on the war-path against Canada, encamped in the field and destroyed it, to their loss of $400. That, in consideration therefor, the Mohawks thereafter gave them a deed of the land, signed by four sachems of the tribe. The land was described in the Indian deed as follows, to wit:

"A certain piece of land lying at the north side of the river Schenectady (Mohawk) nigh the bounds of the said town, beginning at a creek called Eel-Place, along the said river, under the high rocky hills, and from the said riverside northeast into the woods unto the Long lake, being in breadth alongst the said river one mile or thereabouts."

The petition further set forth that thereafter the petitioner was wounded in the attack on Schenectady, on the 8th February, 1690, and that he had a large family of small children dependent upon him for support.

Out of this petition grew the Apple patent, indicated on the map which faces this chapter.

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V. - THE VAN SCHAICK PATENT.

This patent includes the present town of Waterford and part of Half-Moon. A copy of the survey of the patent is herewith appended.

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SURVEY OF THE VAN SCHAICK PATENT.

The boundaries of a certain parcel of land in the county of Albany, confirmed unto Anthony Van Schaick, by Governor Thomas Dongan, 31st May, 1687.

A certain parcel of tract of land, and being to the north and above the town of Albany, and is commonly called and known by the name of the Half-Moon, which stretches up alongst the North river, from a certain place where are several streams of water, to a creek or kill, where there is a fall of waters, which, running into the land, hath its course into the North river; the said creek, or kill, and fall being by the Indians called Tieuwenendahow; and from thence runs up the Maquas kill westward, to a place called Dowailsoiaex, and so strikes presently eastward up along by the said stream, and then to the North river aforementioned. {Land Papers, vol. vi. p. 17.}

A true copy, taken from the original by Philip Livingston.

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VI. - THE CLIFTON PARK PATENT.

Among the earlier patents granted was the Ska-nen-da-ho-wa, or Clifton Park patent. Its situation is sufficiently indicated on the accompanying map, and it is sufficiently described in the following paper relating thereto, which is on file in the office of the Secretary of State at Albany.

"WARRANT FOR CLIFTON PARK PATENT.

"By his Excellency, Edward Viscount Cornbury, Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief of the Provinces of New York, New Jersey, etc., in council this 17th of September, 1703.

"To Major Bickley, Esq., Attorney-General of this Province:

"You are hereby required to prepare a draft of letters patent for Naning Harmansen, Peter Fauconnier, Henry Holland, Henry Swift, and Wm. Morrison, for a certain tract or piece of land in the county of Albany, called Shenondehowah, also Clifton Park, ranging in a northern line from the Mohawks, Cohoes or Schenectady river, along the western bounds of Anthony Van Schoyck's patent, about six miles northerly up into the woods, together with a small island a little to the eastward of the southwest corner of said Van Schoyck's land; then along the said river westward to the eastmost bounds of Nestigion's patent, so all along the east bounds of Nestigion's as far as the same run northward, and then all along the northern bounds of said Nestigion's patent as far as the same runneth westward; then down to the river-side along the westward bounds of said patent to the river again, and three English miles, or there-abouts, upwards to the west along the said river-side; then six miles or thereabouts from said river side up into the woods northward, and then to meet from thence on an eastern line with the line first run along the above said Anthony Van Schoyck's western bounds, said small island included, with a line parallel to the bounds of the afore-mentioned river, to hold to them the said Nanning Harmansen, Peter Fauconnier, Henry Holland, Henry Swift, and Wm. Morrison, in manner and for the following: that is to say, two-ninth part thereof to said Naning Harmansen, his heirs, and two other ninth part thereof to said Peter Fauconnier, his heirs, and two other ninth part thereof to Henry Holland, and two other ninth part thereof to Henry Swift, his heirs, and the other one last ninth part thereof to William Morris, at and under the yearly quitrent of forty shillings, on condition of settling the same within three years after a peace between Her Majesty and the French king shall be publicly declared in this province, and for so doing this shall be your warrant.

"By order,

CORNBURY."

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VII. - THE PATENT TO JOHN GLEN AND FORTY-FOUR OTHERS.

The following is a survey of this patent. It is indicated on the map accompanying this chapter.

SURVEY FOR JOHN GLEN AND FORTY-FOUR OTHERS.

"Pursuant to a warrant from his late excellency, Sir Henry Moore, Baronet, then captain-general and governor-in-chief in and over the province of New York and the territories depending thereon in America, chancellor and vice-admiral of the same, bearing date the ninth day of March, one thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine.

"Surveyed by Manning Vischer for John Glen, Junior, Simon Schermerhorn, and their associates. All that certain tract or parcel of land situate, lying, and being in the county of Albany and within the province of New York, -

''Beginning at the distance of one hundred and five chains, measured on a course south sixty-one degrees west from a black ash-tree standing near the head of one of the branches of a Brook called and known by the name of Kayaderosseras, which said black ash-tree was marked by the commissioners appointed to make division of a tract of land called and known by the name of the patent of Kayaderosseras, and runs thence south sixty-one degrees west one thousand two hundred and nineteen chains; then north fifteen degrees and thirty minutes east two hundred and sixty-eight chains; then south twenty-nine degrees and thirty minutes east eighty-one chains and three rods; then north sixty degrees and forty-five minutes oust three hundred and seventy-six chains; then north eleven degrees west one hundred and forty-one chains; then north sixty-seven degrees and forty minutes east forty-five chains; then north forty degrees and forty minutes east three hundred and seventy-seven chains; then north fifty-two and thirty minutes west five chains; then north twenty-nine degrees and thirty minutes east two hundred and sixty-two chains; then north fifty-two degrees and thirty minutes west seventy-eight chains, to the Sacandaga or west branch of Hudson's river.

"Then down the southern bank of the said branch, as it winds and turns, to a hemlock-tree marked with the letter B; then north eighty-four degrees and eight minutes west five hundred and sixty-nine chains, to a hemlock-tree marked eight miles; then south one hundred and ten chains; then west ninety chains; then south five hundred and eighty chains, to the place where this tract began, -

"Containing forty-five thousand acres of land, and the usual allowance for highways. {Land Papers, vol. xxvii. P. 64.}

"Given under my hand this second day of July, one thousand seven hundred and seventy.

"ALEX. COLDEN,

"Surveyor-General."

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VIII. - OTHER PATENTS.

PALMER'S PURCHASE. - This large patent lies partly in three counties, Saratoga, Warren, and Hamilton; the part in this county is indicated on the map.

THE NISKAYUNA PATENT was granted April 13, 1703. It is a small patent lying near the Mohawk river, in the south part of the town of Clifton Park, as indicated on the map.

THE DARTMOUTH PATENT lies partly in the eastern part of the town of Hadly, and extends northerly up the Hudson into Warren county.

THE NORTHAMPTON PATENT lies partly in this county, along both sides of the Sacondaga river, in the town of Edinburgh.

THE LIVINGSTON PATENTS lie in the valley of the Sacondaga, in the town of Edinburgh, northeasterly of the Northampton patent.

THE JOHN GLEN PATENT is a small gore of land, lying between the Hudson and the north line of the Kay-ad-ros-se-ra patent, at South Glen Falls, in the town of Moreau. The fourteen patents above named are all the whole or any part of which lies in Saratoga County. Only such documents as best show the extent and boundaries of the larger patents have been given here. The voluminous records relating to these fourteen patents can all be easily found in the archives of the State department, at Albany, by consulting the Calendar of Land Papers.

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