HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

--------------------

HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

GALWAY.

-------------------------

I. - GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

GALWAY is one of the western towns of the county, a little south of the centre. It is bounded north by Providence, east by Milton, south by Charlton, and west by the county line. It contains twenty-two thousand two hundred and eighty-four acres of improved land and fifty-five hundred and twenty-one of unimproved, and of this last amount thirty-nine hundred and ninety-five are woodland.

The population in 1875 was nineteen hundred and forty-one. The town is wholly within the limits of the Kayadrossera patent, containing parts of the fourteenth and sixteenth allotments.

The following legal description of this town and the definition of its boundary lines is from the revised statutes of the State:

"The town of Galway shall contain all that part of said county bounded easterly by Milton; southerly by a line running from the southwest corner of Milton west, along the south bounds of the fourteenth allotment of the patent of Kayadrossera to the west bounds of the county; westerly by the bounds of the county; and northerly by Providence."

------------------------------

II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

The surface is gently undulating in the southern part, and in the north rises into rounded hills, of considerable elevation, forming a portion of the Kayadrossera range of mountains. Running through the town from east to west, a little north of the centre, is a strip of lowland, in which several small creeks originate and run to the east and west. Chuctenunda creek rises near the northwest corner of the town, flows southward, and is made to supply the reservoir of the Amsterdam mill-owners. This reservoir is one and a half miles west of Galway village, and when full covers about 530 acres of surface. Leaving the reservoir, the stream flows in a generally southwesterly course to Amsterdam, and empties into the Mohawk river. Feegowesee creek rises in the north centre of the town and flows easterly into the Kayadrossera creek. In the southeast a branch of the Mourning Kill rises, and flows eastwardly, emptying into the Kayadrossera, at Ballston. The soil is generally sandy, intermixed with considerable clay and some gravel, and is quite productive.

------------------------------

III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The first settlement in the town was made on Scotch street, about a mile south of Galway village. The settlement extended from the cemetery north of Galway village south through Galway and Charlton. The settlers were all Scotch emigrants, and from this fact the street became known by the name of Scotch street.

The first settlers were William Kelly, John and James Major, and John McHarg, who came in October, 1774. They were followed soon after by John and Moses McKindley, John McClelland, Joseph Newland, William McCartney, Mr. McWilliams, Mr. Bell, and others.

William and Helen Kelly settled about a mile south of Galway, and, with the industry and thrift for which the Scotch people are so famous, soon had a pleasant home started in the midst of the wilderness. This homestead, constantly improving, has passed from generation to generation, and is now owned and occupied by two of their grandchildren, William and Robert Kelly. The first white child born in the town was their daughter, Elizabeth, who was born November 1, 1774.

The Major brothers settled a little farther south. One of them, James Major, was killed by a falling tree, on Sept. 11, 1776, and was buried in the cemetery at Galway. His was the first death in town, and he was the first person buried in that cemetery.

John McClelland was born in Glaston, shire of Galloway, Scotland, Dec. 21, 1754, and came to this country and settled in Galway when he was about twenty years old. He married his wife, Jane, in the mother country. She was born at Coal Hill, England, Dec. 2, 1755. They settled on the first four corners south of Galway, and the last house occupied by them stood on the northeast corner. John McClelland was a man of unusual capacity for business, and at once became prominent among his neighbors. In 1780 he embarked in the mercantile business, and opened the first store in town. He prospered greatly, and accumulated considerable property. He was often called to official positions by the voice of his fellow-citizens, and ever acquitted himself creditably of the duties of his position. He was the first supervisor of the town, and served three years. He was then, in 1794, elected as member of Assembly from Saratoga County. He served in this capacity in 1794, 1796, 1797, 1806, and 1808. He was appointed a judge of the court of common pleas in 1806. He died April 12, 1819, aged sixty-four years. His wife died Nov. 8, 1824. They lie side by side in the Galway cemetery.

About four years after, a colony of settlers came from Centrehook, R.I., and settled near York's Corners, in the northeastern part of the town. Rev. Simeon Smith was the principal man, and he was accompanied by his parents and three brothers-in-law, Simeon Babcock, Reuben Mattison, and Joseph Brown.

At a subsequent period, probably soon after the close of the Revolutionary struggle, a settlement was begun in the southwestern part of the town by some ten or twelve families from New Jersey. Among them were John Hinman, James Hayes, Richard Paul, Peter Anderson, Mr. Harrison, Mr. Hedding, and Dudley Smith. They were nearly all from near Elizabeth, N.J., and the settlement at once received the name of Jersey Hill, which it still retains. Still nearer the southwest corner, Duncan Stewart, John McMartin, James Clizbe, and Mr. Ferguson settled about the same time.

James and Mary Hays were from Newark, N.J., and settled on the land southwest of the corners, at Jersey Hill. They came from Schenectady by an Indian trail, and brought their household treasures on pack-horses through the almost trackless forest. They had two sons and two daughters. But one, the youngest son, is now living. He, James D. Hays, resides in Galway. He was born about the time of his father's death, and was twenty years younger than his youngest sister.

Job Cornell lived near the boundary line between Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and married Sarah Wood. In 1788-90 they moved to Galway, and settled about three and a half miles north of Galway, near the town line of Providence. Job, Jr., was born in 1789, and lived on the homestead until he died, in 1837. His son, William Cornell, is the only descendant now living in Galway. He resides at Mosherville.

Pilgrim Durkee married Hannah Holmes, and at the close of the Revolution came and settled about one-half mile east of West Galway. They had a family of six sons and five daughters, of whom but one is now living in Galway. His name is Eber C. Durkee, and he resides on the old homestead. Mrs. Eunice Phelps, of Steuben county, and Mrs. Mary Wheeler, of Michigan, are two other living children. The rest are dead.

Augustus L. Stone was a son of Lewis Stone and Sally Warren, who were married in New York and came to Galway in 1794. He has been a contractor on public works for upwards of thirty years, and has now retired from active business to enjoy the fruits of his labors.

The families of the oldest settlers have nearly all become extinct, and but little is known about the early life of these hardy pioneers. That they had much to contend against, and that they by untiring industry and indomitable energy succeeded in creating homes, building up villages, establishing schools and churches, and redeemed the wild forests by transforming them into pleasant and productive farms, speaks their meed of praise. They are gone, but their works live after them, and the Present reaps the fruits of the harvest on the fields where the Past sowed the seed amid toil, privation, and hardship.

Thomas Mairs was a son of Thomas and Margaret Mairs, Argyle, Washington county, and settled in Galway in 1822. Embarked in the mercantile business in 1829, and is doing a general dry goods and grocery business at the same place in which he began forty-eight years ago.

The first church in the Scotch Street settlement was located in this town; and the first pastor, Rev. James Mairs, also resided here.

When the early settlers came through the woods from Schenectady they did not reach their destination till late at night, and said they were much annoyed by the "dogs" along the way, who kept up a continual howling and barking. On being informed that the "dogs" were wolves and foxes they were quite alarmed, and felt thankful for their preservation from harm.

Prominent among the citizens of the town was General Earl Stimson. He was a large land-owner near the centre of the town; owned fine buildings on the hill known as Stimson's Corners, where he kept a store, hotel, and boarding-house, and engaged in the meat-packing business; he also owned two other stores, one at Fonda's Bush and the other at Galway. He was a model farmer, and kept everything about his farm in perfect order, and by his example stimulated others to a careful and improved style of farming. He was member of Assembly in 1818, and, being a presidential elector in 1840, cast his vote in the electoral college for William H. Harrison. He was a liberal, progressive, public-spirited man.

Colonel Isaac Gere was another prominent citizen who held several offices conferred upon him by his fellow-citizens. He was supervisor, one of the commissioners to build the county court-house, member of Assembly, and State senator, and always deeply interested in works and matters of public interest and utility.

Among those citizens of the town who have held public office, and not mentioned above, are James Warren, member of Assembly from 1799 to 1803; Othniel Looker, member of Assembly, 1803 to 1804; Nehemiah Cande, member of Assembly, 1809; Avery Starkweather, member of Assembly, 1812 and 1814, and associate judge of the court of common pleas, 1815; Ebenezer Couch, member of Assembly, 1832 to 1833; Jesse H. Mead, member of Assembly, 1841; Azariah E. Stimson, member of Assembly, 1843; Nathan Thompson, presidential elector in 1824, who voted for Henry Clay; Ira Brockett, member of Assembly, 1863 to 1864; and Lewis Stone, who was a judge of the court of common pleas in 1843.

Among the early settlers previous to 1795 we name Lewis Rogers, Hackaliah Foster, Eli Smith, Elias Stillwell, John Munro, James De Golia, Philo and Burr Dauchy, Asa Kellogg, Philip Green, Edmund Wait, Wait Palmer, Benajah Moon, Restcome Potter, Arnold Lewis, Samuel Jones, Isaac Fay, Josiah Bartlett, and William Waggoner.

Doctor Pixley was an early physician in Galway.

------------------------------

IV. - ORGANIZATION.

This town was erected from Balls-Town, March 7, 1792. It then comprised the territory now embraced within the limits of the towns of Galway, Providence, Edinburgh, and the western part of Day. In 1796 Providence was taken from Galway, reducing it to its present dimensions. The name originally given to the place was "New Galloway," and it was so called as early as 1785. The name was given by the early settlers, who were Scotch people, and named it in honor of their former home, the shire of Galloway, in Scotland. When the act creating the town was passed, through error or oversight the name was Hibernicized, and the town called "Galway."

The first meeting of the new town was held in the April succeeding the passage of the act, and John McClelland was elected supervisor and Wait Palmer town clerk. The record of this meeting was lost, and it is not possible to give any further proceedings. The town-meeting of 1793 was held at the store of Smith & Stillwell, on the 3d of April The following town officers were elected, viz.: John McClelland, supervisor; Eli Smith, town clerk; Ebenezer Smith, John Munro, Thomas Disbrow, assessors; Lewis Rogers, Asa Kellogg, Joseph Wait, commissioners of highways; Ebenezer Smith, Philip Green, poormasters; Benajah Moon, Wilson Green, Ahira Smith, constables; Benajah Moon, Wilson Green, collectors; Ebenezer Smith, Wait Palmer, William Neal, James Freeman, Judah Chase, Joseph Garrison, fence-viewers and damage-prizers, at four shillings per day; Barnet Stillwell, poundmaster; and a list of forty-seven pathmasters. By-laws were enacted forbidding unyoked hogs to run on the commons between May 1 and November 1; forbidding rams running at large from September 1 to November 1; forbidding stallions over one year old from running at large; and authorizing the purchase of a copy of the laws of the State. The meeting was adjourned to meet in one year at the barn of David Brown. In 1795 the town-meetings began to be held at the Baptist church, then new, and after 1806 were held sometimes at the Baptist and sometimes at the Presbyterian church, and finally began to be held at the tavern at a somewhat later period.

On the 6th day of April, 1808, a black child (slave) was born at the house of Gershom Potter, in Galway. The fact was recorded the 1st day of January, 1809, by Martin Cook, who was town clerk at that time. There are several entries in the records relating to the vile curse of slavery, from which our land is now happily freed. In 1813, Abraham Fonda sold a "certain slave," known as "Lun," to John Pettit, and he entered into an agreement to free the said Lun in nine years from that date, and to "deliver to the said Lun," at that time, "two cows and ten sheep of a full middling quality." Lanton Hicks and Ebenezer Fitch witnessed the signing of the document, and Eli Smith, town clerk, placed it on record April 6, 1813. In pursuance of this article, in the year 1822, Abijah Comstock and Asa Cornell, who were then overseers of the poor, were called upon to examine Lun, and Kate, his wife, to see if they were of sufficiently ability to provide for and maintain themselves. In issuing the necessary certificate they took occasion to express their "anxiety to encourage acts of humanity," and their willingness "that all should enjoy the inalienable right of liberty."

Another one of these documents reads as follows, viz.: "Know all men by these Presents, That I, Thaddeus Jewett, purchased from Peter Yates a black woman by the name of Molly, together with her child, a boy by the name of Harry. The aforesaid child was born March the 17th, 1813."

And again, July 25, 1815, John Pettit and Abijah Smith, overseers of the poor, certified to the ability of William Reynolds, "a slave to Joseph Pinney," to take care of and maintain {original text has "iuaintain".} himself.

A special town-meeting was called, and met on the 26th of November, 1795, at the house of Hackaliah Foster, to consider the question of dividing the town. A motion to divide it by a line running parallel to and six miles north of the southern boundary was voted down, and the distance of the dividing line from the southern boundary was finally fixed at seven miles and twenty rods.

A by-law passed in 1802 reads as follows, viz.: "Be it further enacted by the said town that there shall be the sum of Twenty Dollars paid in Said Town fur the Incoridging of Killing Wolves; and thatis if any Person should Kill or Ketch a wolf in said Town they must Deliver the same or a Skelp of the said wolf within thirty-six ours to John McClelland and Adam Swan, Esqs., Who shall be Judge of the same, and Say Whether Such Person is entitled to the above Bounty or not."

The matter of estrays furnished by a perusal of the records affords considerable amusement. Among the animals advertised are the following, viz.: "A Brindle-Cullered Bull-Calf, and a pale-Red Heffier Calf;" "A black heifer, with a white face two years old, and a black heifer, with a white tail one year old;" "A Dun-Coulered Stear;' "One Yew;" "A heifer with a loin back;" "One specled pig;" "A Pail-Red cow, with a white stripe over her back, and on her belly a brown face;" and "A Read heifer, with a white face one year old, come into possession of John Gilbert about the 1st of October with a crop of the left Ear.

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LIST OF TOWN OFFICERS.

 

 

Supervisor.

Town Clerk.

Collector.

1792.

John McClelland.

Wait Palmer.

 

1793.

"

Eli Smith.

Benajah Moore,

Wilson Green.

1794.

"

"

Benajah Moon,

Restcome Potter.

1795.

John Munro.

"

",

Reuben Coggswell.

1796.

"

"

Rowland Green,

Martin Kellogg.

1797.

"

"

Rowland Green,

Pettit Smith.

1798.

"

Ebenezer Smith.

Rowland Green,

Nathaniel Keeler.

1799.

"

John Fay.

",

Joseph Brewster.

1800.

"

"

",

Rowland Green.

1801.

"

"

Perez Otis,

John Folliot.

1802.

"

"

",

Perez Otis.

1803.

Isaac Gere.

"

"

1804.

"

Martin Cook.

Joseph Brewster.

1805.

Nehemiah Cande.

"

John Folliot.

1806.

"

"

Richard Freeman.

1807.

"

"

Thompson Northrup.

1808.

"

"

Richard Freeman.

1809.

A. Starkweather.

Eli Smith.

Joseph Brewster.

1810.

"

"

"

1811.

Perez Otis.

"

John Munro.

1812.

"

"

Joseph Brewster.

1813.

Stephen Wait.

Martin Cook.

Ephraim Wheeler.

1814.

Perez Otis.

Eli Smith.

Joseph Brewster.

1815.

A. Starkweather.

"

"

1816.

Perez Otis.

"

Enoch Johnson.

1817.

Gilbert Swan.

David Clizbe.

Joseph Brewster.

1818.

Perez Otis.

Philo Dauchy.

"

1819.

Thomas Alexander.

"

"

1820.

Isaac Gere.

"

"

1821.

"

"

John J. Curtis.

1822.

Nathan Thompson.

"

"

1823.

"

"

"

1824.

"

"

John Howard.

1825.

"

"

Abel Beers.

1826.

Perez Otis.

"

"

1827.

"

"

Philip H. McOmber.

1828.

Nathan Thompson.

Burr Dauchy.

 

1829.

"

"

William Paul.

1830.

"

"

"

1831.

"

Eli Smith.

"

1832.

"

"

"

1833.

"

Philo Dauchy.

"

1834.

Dudley Smith.

"

"

1835.

"

"

"

1836.

George Davidson.

"

"

1837.

Azariah E. Stimson.

George Hanford.

"

1838.

"

Thomas Mairs.

"

1839.

"

"

Francis Williman.

1840.

Jesse H. Mead.

Charles Thompson.

"

1841.

Azariah E. Stimson.

"

Nathaniel Briggs.

1842.

Lewis Stone.

Ezekiel O. Smith.

William Cornell.

1843.

"

James Jones.

John S. Jones.

1844.

William B. Knox.

John Allen, Jr.

John E. Larkins.

1845.

John Whiteside.

George R. Knox.

 

1846.

James Fuller.

James Stillwell.

William Paul.

1847.

"

"

"

1848.

James M. Barker.

John F. Stimson.

Orrin Mosher.

1849.

Josiah Pulling.

Alanson Mead.

John Radford.

1850.

Benjamin Blair.

Patrick H. Meehan.

"

1851.

Aaron Cook.

James D. Hayes.

David Benedict.

1852.

"

William N. Beers.

William Paul.

1853.

Alex. H. Hicks.

"

Stephen Gould.

1854.

Morgan Lewis.

Nathan Briggs.

Nathaniel Briggs.

1855.

Thomas Mairs.

"

Hiram Sexton.

1856.

"

George H. French.

John Weeden.

1857.

"

William N. Beers.

U.H. Benedict.

1858.

Benjamin Blair.

S.W. Green.

William Morehouse.

1859.

Thomas Mairs.

John N. Slocum.

Abner Wilcox.

1860.

Ira Brockett.

Jared W. Bell.

David Gifford.

1861.

Harrison Allen.

Henry J. Fisher.

William Radley.

1862.

John Whiteside.

Charles Fisher.

William Buckwell.

1863.

John N. Slocum.

Hiram Saxton.

Robert Shaw.

1864.

"

Joseph E. Vines.

Matthew West.

1865.

Thomas Mairs.

A.R. Vibbard.

James D. Hayes.

1866.

Isaiah Fuller.

Marvin L. Rogers.

Edgar S. Hermance.

1867.

"

"

Montg'y Whiteside.

1868.

"

Patrick H. Meehan.

Edgar S. Hermance.

1869.

"

"

James D. Hayes.

1870.

William Buckwell.

"

Montg'y Whiteside.

1871.

"

"

Edward Shaw.

1872.

Samuel Cook.

"

John H. Seabury.

1873.

"

"

George Hanford.

1874.

Joseph D. Hayes.

"

William Alexander.

1875.

William Crouch.

"

James S. Beardsley.

1876.

"

"

Peleg Burdick.

1877.

Lauren O. Kennedy.

"

Abram F. Conde.

1878.

James D. Hayes.

Rogers J. White.

Hawley Tollett.

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JUSTICES OF THE PEACE ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.

1831.

Hugh Alexander, l.t.

Robert Spiers, s.t.

1855.

Abel S. Whitlock, l.t.

John G. Pettit, v.

1832.

Carlton Morehouse.

1856.

William Beers, l.t.

Patrick H. Meehan, v.

1833.

John H. Dingman.

1857.

", l.t.

Stephen V.R. White, v.

1834.

Hugh Alexander.

1858.

"

1835.

Ebenezer Couch.

1859.

Isaac Wilbur.

1836.

Carlton Morehouse.

1860.

William Beers.

1837.

Eli Smith.

1861.

Patrick H. Meehan.

1838.

Platt B. Smith.

1862.

Stephen V.R. White.

1839.

Hugh Alexander.

1863.

Abel S. Whitlock.

1840.

Jeremiah Whitlock, l.t.

William Beers, v.

1864.

William Beers.

1841.

Pascal P. Wheeler.

1865.

John P. Smith, l.t.

William Beers, v.

1842.

Ebenezer Couch.

1866.

Jeremiah H. Bidwell.

1843.

Ezekiel O. Smith.

1867.

Abel S. Whitlock, l.t.

Stephen V.R. White, v.

1844.

Jeremiah Whitlock.

1868.

Andrew Mead.

1845.

Truman G. Younglove.

1869.

John P. Smith.

1846.

John Vibbard.

1870.

Brightman Briggs.

1847.

Ezekiel O. Smith, l.t.

Stephen V.R. White, v.

1871.

Abel S. Whitlock.

1848.

Jeremiah Whitlock, l.t.

Aaron B. Baker, v.

1872.

William Crouch.

1849.

"

1873.

John P. Smith.

1850.

Stephen V.R. White.

1874.

Stephen V.R. White, l.t.

John P. Smith, v.

1851.

Ezekiel O. Smith.

1875.

Abel S. Whitlock.

1852.

William Beers.

1876.

Brightman Briggs.

1853.

Aaron B. Baker.

1877.

John P. Smith.

1854.

Jacob Conklin.

1878.

Stephen V.R. White.

 

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V. - VILLAGES AND HAMLETS.

GALWAY. - This village was incorporated, by act of the Legislature, April 18, 1838. The territory embraced is one-half mile square, with the four corners for a centre. Upon the passage of the act the proper persons set the march of improvement agoing, and the village improved rapidly in its general appearance. The citizens who took the greatest interest in the prosperity and improvement, and contributed most largely to that end, were Thomas Mairs, Ira Brockett, P.H. Meehan, A.L. Stone, William B. Knox, and others.

The present officers of the village are as follows, viz., President, James D. Hays; Clerk, Charles P. Saxton; Trustees, William Jackson, William Crouch, Alphonse Crota; Treasurer, J.H. Saxton; Collector, P.H. Meehan; Constable, Byron Peckham; Poundmaster, J. Fitzgerald.

Some trifling amendment to the charter was made in 1869, on the 27th of April.

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YORK'S CORNERS (East Galway post-office) is a small village containing about twenty dwellings, two churches, one steam saw-mill, a hotel, school-house, etc.

------------------------------

GREEN'S CORNERS (North Galway post-office), on the north line of the town, MOSHERVILLE, in the north part, and SOUTH GALWAY, in the east part, are hamlets.

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WHITESIDE'S CORNERS is a village of some country trade, having stores, shops, and a hotel situated in the north-west part of the town, near the line of Providence.

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WEST GALWAY touches the western boundary, but lies almost wholly in Fulton county. It is locally known as "Top-Notch," and is said to have received this name at the time the first church was built there. After the frame was up one of the workmen climbed to the peak of the rafters, and, standing upright, shouted to those below that he now stood on "the very top-notch." The name seemed so appropriate that it at once became popular, and still clings to the village.

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VI. - SCHOOLS.

Perez Otis and Thomas Alexander, commissioners of schools, in 1815 divided the town into twelve school districts. The first apportionment of money for educational purposes was made in 1795, and for the town of Galway, as then constituted, the sum of 225 6s. was apportioned.

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GALWAY ACADEMY.

On May 26, 1836, an act passed the Legislature incorporating the Galway Academy, authorizing the issuing of stock to the amount of $1500, in shares of $10 each, and naming Lewis Stone, Jesse H. Mead, Philo Dauchy, Hugh Alexander, Thomas Mairs, and Joel Root as trustees until the annual election, which was to be held on the second Tuesday of January in each year. At these elections eleven trustees were to be elected annually, and each share of stock was entitled to one vote.

In 1837 the act of incorporation was amended so as to allow an increase of the capital stock to $2500, and a privilege of increasing it to $3500 at any time within five years if thought desirable.

As soon as possible after the act of incorporation was passed the stock was issued, and work commenced on the buildings. It was the aim of the projectors to build up an institution for the higher education of the young of both sexes in one building, but in separate and distinct departments. With this end in view, the buildings were pushed forward to completion, and in the spring of 1838 the institution was opened for the reception of pupils. Rev. Gilbert Morgan was engaged to take charge of the male department, and have a general supervision over the female departments which was placed under the special charge of Mrs. Bazeley, formerly of Brooklyn Collegiate Institute.

The school at once became a success. Pupils from all parts of the State and some from other States filled the rooms, and all started off in a very successful and promising manner.

Mr. Morgan remained in the position of principal but one year, and then, having some difficulty with the trustees, started a private school, in the house now occupied by Nathaniel Briggs, which he styled "Union Academy," and which, after a year or two, he abandoned and moved away. He was succeeded in the principalship by Mr. Alexander Watson, who made a very successful teacher. The next principal was Paoli Durkee, and he was followed for a short time by Clark Beecher. The female department had meantime been under the control of Mrs. Bazeley, Miss Colton, Miss Watrous, Mrs. O'Brien, Miss Thompson, and others. In 1850 the school was converted into a female seminary solely, and D.W. Smith assumed the control of it. From time to time additions were built on and repairs made, until it had become, in a financial sense, non-paying. In 1863 the school was discontinued, and Mr. Smith moved away. The property had been heavily mortgaged to a Mr. De Groot, of New York, who had advanced money for repairs and improvements. After lying empty and unused for eight years, on the 30th of November, 1871, it took fire and burned to the ground, and the enterprise, conceived in a noble spirit of public improvement and brought to such a promising degree of efficiency at such an expense of time and treasure, vanished in smoke and fell to the ground in ashes.

Among those who were most prominent in the conception of this laudable measure, and who devoted their energies, time, and means to secure its accomplishment, we may, without appearing invidious, mention Dr. Nathan Thompson, General Earl Stimson, Colonel Isaac Gere, Thomas Mairs, John Gilchrist, Jr., Edmund Hewitt, Daniel Carmichael, Joseph Newland, and E.O. Smith.

------------------------------

 

COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT FOR 1878.

{* Joint.}

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

 

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1 *

8

 

None.

$5.50

$7.67

$0.27

$13.44

" 2 *

5

 

"

3.44

3.22

.17

6.83

" 3

99

 

$52.14

68.09

74.11

3.30

197.64

" 4

44

 

52.14

30.26

47.58

1.47

131.45

" 5

28

 

52.14

19.25

30.93

.94

103.26

" 6 *

22

 

None.

15.13

11.54

.74

27.41

" 7

24

 

52.14

16.50

25.27

.80

94.71

" 8

43

 

52.14

29.58

31.23

1.43

114.38

" 9

35

 

52.14

24.07

20.45

1.17

97.83

" 10

40

 

52.14

27.51

19.86

1.33

100.84

" 11

42

 

52.14

28.89

30.05

1.40

112.48

" 12.

37

 

52.14

25.45

28.94

1.23

107.76

" 13.

34

 

52.14

23.39

19.85

1.13

96.51

" 14.

51

 

52.14

35.08

41.63

1.70

130.55

" 15.

41

 

52.14

28.20

24.27

1.37

105.98

" 16.

53

 

52.14

36.45

42.75

1.77

133.11

" 17.

42

 

52.14

28.89

33.15

1.40

115.58

 

648

 

$729.96

$445.68

$492.50

$21.62

$1689.76

 

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VII. - CHURCHES.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH.

The records of this church now extant reach back to the year 1785, but speak of the church as an existing body for some indefinite period of time prior to this. Tradition fixes the date of its organization in the year 1778, and this date is generally received as correct, and was accepted as such by the Shaftsbury Association, of which ecclesiastical body this church was formerly a member.

It was first composed of twenty-seven members, who came in a body from Rhode Island, and settled in the north part of the present town of Galway. Feeling the need of religious meetings for consultation, instruction, and worship, they at once formed a church society, and Rev. Simeon Smith (not then ordained) assumed the pastoral charge of the church, which relation he maintained until 1790. He was ordained about 1787.

Organized in the midst of the wilderness, this church has led a varied and at times precarious existence, and yet God has carried it safely through its times of trouble and tribulation, and is able to continue his support and fostering care. The records show that the first membership was twenty-seven, in 1778; the highest was seventy-nine, 1825; the lowest was twenty-one, in 1853; and the present number of members is thirty-two.

The early meetings of the society were held at the house of the pastor, Rev. Simeon Smith. In a year or two the first meeting-house was erected. It was built of logs, but its exact location is left in doubt. In 1796 the second church was erected, on what was known as "Baptist Hill," a mile southwest of York's Corners. It was a commodious frame building, and remained in use until 1845, when it was taken down and rebuilt on its present site at York's Corners. It is a neat-looking edifice, well and substantially built, surmounted by a tower in which a fine bell is hung, and is valued at about $3000.

The pastors of the church have been Simeon Smith, 1778-90; Abel Brown, 1795-97; Joseph Craw, 1798-1801; Elisha Carpenter, 1809; John Lewis (between 1810 and 1816), one year; Jacob St. John, 1823-25; Timothy Day, John C. Holt, M.L. Fuller, 1832-37; E. Westcott, 1838-40; M.L. Fuller, 1841; O.H. Capron, 1842; E.W. Allen, 1844-46; William Bogart, 1846-49; B.H. Barber, 1849-52; T.T. St. John, 1852-53; Timothy Day, 1854-55; William Bogart, 1855-57; George Fisher, 1858-64; S.M. Hubbard, 1865; Asher Cook, 1867; R.V. Collins, 1869; G.W. Starkweather, 1870-72; Levi Wheelock, 1872.

The pulpit is now supplied by Rev. Asher Cook, who is located at Hagedorn's Mills.

The present officers are - Deacons, Seth P. Brown, John Meredith, and Henry Clute; Trustees, Seth P. Brown, Wright Tompkins, John Meredith, Edmund P. Keeler; Clerk, Joseph McMillen; Clerk of Society, Jacob St. John.

There is a Sunday-school in connection with the church that was organized about 1845, and has an average of about thirty scholars. The library is quire small. Edmund P. Keeler is the present superintendent.

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FRIENDS' MEETING-HOUSE.

Many years ago there was a society of the Friends in the north part of Galway. They had a church built of logs, but no record of the church has been preserved, and we simply know from tradition that such a society and building had an existence. It has long been numbered with the things of the past.

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SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH OF GALWAY.

In writing out the history of these early societies of Christian workers, one can but be deeply impressed with the spirit of devotion and submission to the authority of the church that marked their every action as a church organization. The comparative freedom of thought and action, and the liberty of opinion now quite generally accorded to professed followers of the Lord Jesus Christ, would have shocked our forefathers and caused them much anxiety of mind. Not only was it thought necessary that Christians should watch over themselves, but also that they should have a watchful eye over their fellow-members of the church.

Instances are common in the records of meetings where some of the brethren or sisters expressed dissatisfaction with some members because of what would now be deemed a trivial matter or not properly pertaining to church government. In such cases the matter was brought before the church and conversed upon until, almost without exception, the matter was satisfactorily and amicably adjusted.

Then, as now, the use of intoxicating liquors was a frequent source of trouble, and caused many to fall from their positions as Christians. In such cases where the man fell once he almost invariably fell again and again, until he became hardened and reckless and was excluded from the fellowship of the church.

In the records of this church many instances are related, which all tend to show the truth of these statements. One instance is chronicled where a brother going to a neighboring city undertook an errand for a neighbor, and in making the purchase had too keen an eye to his own personal advantage and reaped a pecuniary reward disproportionate to the trouble he incurred. The case was brought before the church, and after much private laboring with him by the members and committees appointed he was brought to confess the wrong and make restitution. Absence from church was frequently the cause of a committee being appointed to "cite" the absentee "to duty."

The minister of those days was satisfied with a salary of 40 per year, - equal to about $200 at the present time. Of course, considering the demands of society and custom, and the purchasing power of the money then and now, the apparent disproportion of that and the present ministerial salaries is much less than it casually appears to be. From $12 to $30 would then keep the church edifice cleaned, warmed, and lighted for a year. The church was organized at the house of James Warren, on the 27th of August, 1789. There were thirty-three members previous to 1790. They were brothers Abijah Peck, John Lamb, James Warren, Edmund Hewitt, Thomas Stilwell, Joseph Coats, Nathaniel Keeler, Wait Palmer, Elias Stilwell, James Greenfield, Abraham Waring, Isaiah Dean, Samuel Messenger, Thomas Wood, Enos Spencer, John De Golia, John Carpenter, and William Otis; and sisters Greenfield, Jemima Keeler, Beulah Lamb, Avis McMillan, Annie Waring, Lydia De Golia, Eleanor Dean, Susannah Brownell, Bethia Messenger, Mabel Messenger, Martha Stilwell, Mary Beal, Annie Davis, and Thankful Coats.

The first deacon was Abijah Peek, chosen April 29, 1790. The next was Wait Palmer, chosen May 10, 1794. In June, 1790, the church joined the Shaftsbury Association, and at a conference held at Galway (or New Galloway, as it was then called) on the 27th of February, 1790, it was received into fellowship by the churches of Stillwater and Newtown.

The first meetings of this church were held in houses, barns, and in the school-house. For some time two meetings a week, on Thursday and Sunday, were held. These meetings were addressed by ministers from other churches, or by some of the members.

The first steps towards the erection of a church edifice were taken at a meeting held Dec. 8, 1792. It was then resolved to build a church about fifty rods east of Elias Stilwell's dwelling and upon his land. The "meeting-house" was to be thirty-two feet wide and forty feet long, the "outside to be done and flour laid next summer;" i.e., 1793. Isaiah Dean, Nathaniel Keeler, and Thomas Stilwell were appointed as a building committee. The meeting-house remained in this unfinished state until the spring of 1794. Then it was decided to sell the pews (prospective) at public vendue, and apply the money thus obtained to finishing off the inside of the church. John Monroe, Wait Palmer, and Nathaniel Keeler were appointed to attend to the matter. The first board of trustees was appointed Dec. 12, 1795, and consisted of Wait Palmer, John Monroe, and Isaiah Dean.

The following action is recorded as having been taken at a meeting held Sept. 9, 1797, viz.: "A proposition was stated and conversed upon concerning brethren in Christ joining the fraternity of Freemasons, and, after mature deliberation on the subject, unanimously voted that we would withdraw the hand of fellowship from all those that have already joined and persist in frequenting the lodge, and from all those that shall hereafter join, until satisfaction shall be given by such person or persons to the church."

The names of those who have preached to this church from its organization to the present time, as nearly as can be ascertained, and in their regular order, are as follows, viz.: Simeon Smith, ------ Burris, Abijah Peck, Joseph Cornell, ------ Finch, Elias Stilwell, John Monroe, Samuel Rogers, Joseph Cornell, E. Kincaid, W.E. Waterbury, Stephen Wilkins, Jacob S. McClollom, Amasa Smith, Israel Robords, Levi S. Parmely, S. Ward, C. Randall, Robert Myers, William Garnet, H.L. Gross, George Fisher, S.M. Hubbard, A. Cook, J.W. Starkweather, J. Humpstone, Levi Wheelock, and George D. Douney, the present pastor, who began his ministrations here in 1876.

The present number of members is one hundred end thirty-seven. The present officers are Joseph Mosher, Samuel Hudson, William Crouch, Aretus M. Cox, Chauncey Cook, and Nathaniel Briggs, trustees; Aretus M. Cox, Chauncey Cook, and Richard Paul, deacons; Alonzo M. Hermance, church clerk; and Chauncey Cook, treasurer.

For about thirty years past there has been a Sunday-school connected with the church. Its present membership is one hundred and nine. Alonzo M. Hermance is superintendent; Miss Lillie Cadman, secretary and treasurer. The school has a library of some two hundred volumes.

The present church edifice was erected about thirty years ago, on the same site as the old one. It is a plain, neat-looking structure, and cost about $2000.

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FIRST ASSOCIATE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF GALWAY.

Three-quarters of a century ago, when the wild-flowers made fragrant the gentle breezes that swept over the green fields of Galway and sang praises amid the branches of the forest-trees, a few Christian people met together at the house of James Warren, Esq., and formed themselves into the "First Associate Presbyterian Society of Galway."

Hackaliah Foster offered an acre of land on which to build a church, which offer was accepted, and it was decided to build a church. This lot was the present church lot on the southeast corner of the four corners in the village of Galway. The church was not commenced until 1804, and the inside was not finished off until 1806. The society was small and its members not wealthy, and it was 1810 before the society felt able to purchase a store for the church.

When organized as a church, on the 24th of February, 1807, the .body assumed the Congregational form of church government, but was allowed to become attached to Albany presbytery. There were seventeen persons who belonged to the church at this time. Their names were Jehiel and Mrs. Dean, Hackaliah and Patty Foster, Joel and Mrs. Smith, Nehemiah and Mrs. Cande, Justus Harris, Daniel and Mrs. Dean, Mrs. Abijah St. John, Theda Osborne, Mrs. Asa Kellogg, Experience Garrison, Mary Colwell, and Abiah West. In two years the membership increased to one hundred and thirty-three. The first governing, or standing, committee of the church was appointed Feb. 6, 1808. It was composed of Joel Smith, Avery Starkweather, Justus Harris, Earl Stimson, Joseph Mather, Nehemiah Cande, Jehiel Dean, Daniel Dean, Israel Phelps, and Ezra Kellogg, and was called a "session" until, in 1832, presbytery directed that it should be so styled no longer. An effort was made at this time to change the form of government, but it failed. In 1834, however, the change was effected and the church assumed the Presbyterian form. Its first session was then chosen, consisting of Elders Perez Otis, Platt B. Smith, Benham Smith, George Davidson, Calvin Preston, William Beers, and William Cruttenden, and Deacons Enoch Johnson and Stephen C. Hays.

Isaac Hays, Stephen C. Hays, Cyrus Paul, William Jackson, Jesse H. Mead, John H. Hays, John Crain, and Abel Hoyt have been ordained as elders; and E.P. Kellogg, Alfred H. Avery, Joseph Bell, Morehouse T. Betts, Daniel Griffis, and George Davis have been ordained as deacons, at sundry times.

Eiders Platt B. Smith, William Beers, Cyrus Paul, William Jackson, John Crain, John H. Hays, and Abel Hoyt, and Deacons Morehouse T. Betts and George Davis, compose the present session of the church. John H. Hays is secretary of the board of trustees.

A debt incurred in building the first church had, in 1809, increased to nearly $1400, and it was then assessed on the members in proportion to their town-assessment, and was thus paid up.

In 1820, at a time when the church was without a pastor, a remarkable revival of religion occurred. It originated among the school-children, who, from discussing some doctrine of the Bible, fell to studying the Scriptures, and the interest grew until within the space of two months one hundred and fifty-two names were added to the church roll. Rev. Dr. Eliphalet Nott, of Union College, was at this time supplying the pulpit.

From this church fifteen ministers of the gospel have gone out into the world. Three brothers named Osborn, Platt, Sanford, Cande, Gilbert, Powell, Lacy, Green, Kelly, James Hoyt, Zera Hoyt, Alexander Hoyt, and Charles Preston, making up the number.

The pastors' names, in the order of their service, are Rev. Sylvanus Haight, Rev. Noah M. Wells, Rev. William Chester, Rev. Samuel Nott: Rev. R. Deming, Rev. James Harper, Rev. Duncan Kennedy. Rev. Henry Lyman, Rev. J.L. Willard, Rev. Saurin E. Lane, Rev. ------ McFarlane, Rev. William H. Millham, and Rev. Oliver Hemstreet, the present pastor, who commenced his ministrations here in 1872.

The present church edifice was erected in 1853, at an expense of about $6000, and was dedicated April 18, 1854. The sermon was preached by Rev. Saurin E. Lane, the pastor of the church. It is a commodious and handsome building, capable of seating five hundred people. A fine parsonage was built in 1874, and cost about $2400.

There has long been a Sunday-school connected with this church, averaging about eighty scholars. John H. Hays is the present superintendent.

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THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF GALWAY.

The first Methodist Episcopal class in Galway was formed about the years 1820 to 1825, and was a small body of determined workers in the vineyard of the world. Their meetings were held in private houses, in school-houses, and in the upper room of a building near the four comers in Galway. In 1833 it formed part of the Galway circuit, which included churches in Galway, Charlton, Glenville, Hageman's Mills, Rock City, Milton, and Providence.

In the year 1836 it was made a station, and a minister was located here. David Benedict and Mathew West were prominent among the early members of this society.

The preachers and pastors of the church have been as follows, viz.: 1833, Charles Pomeroy, Braman Ayres; 1834, Charles Pomeroy, Gilbert Lyon, Henry Williams; 1835, Seymour Coleman, Daniel Brayton; 1836, Seymour Coleman, John P. Foster; 1837, John P. Foster (died in 1849), Roswell Kelly; 1838-39, Manley Witherel, ------ Fenton; 1840-41, Joel Squires, Joseph Conner, Manley Witherel; 1841-42, John Harwood, Amos Ripley, Abel Ford; 1842-43, Alanson Richards, J.B. Rodgers; 1844-45, S. Covel, Clark Fuller, A.C. Rose; 1845-46, S. Covel, W.A. Miller; 1847, Valentine Brown, I. Fassett; 1848, R. Brown, J.F. Burrows; 1849, I. Harris; 1850-51, R.H. Robinson; 1852, G.G. Saxe; 1853, I. Phillips, L Haslam; 1854, Ira Holmes; 1855-56, O.E. Spicer, E.B. Collins; 1857-58, J.B. Wood; 1859-60, A. Shurtliff; 1861, M.B. Mosher; 1862-63, ------ Stebbins; 1864-65, Richard Meredith; 1866-67, D.N. Lewis; 1868-69, H.D. Kimball; 1870-72, W.D. Hitchcock; 1873-74, R. Fox; 1875-76, J.H. Coleman; and 1877, Rev. F.K. Potter.

The church edifice was erected in the year 1845, and at an expense of some $3500. It will comfortably seat about two hundred and fifty people.

In 1837, at a meeting held by Rev. J.P. Foster, then pastor of this church, and David Benedict, an exhorter at High Bridge (Centre Glenville), a great number of people were converted. Among them were Abel Ford, S.S. Ford, William Ford, Israel Coggeshall, and Frank Doughty; all of whom became useful ministers of the gospel, and did good work for their Saviour. Some have gone to their reward, while others are still working in the Lord's vineyard.

The present officers of the church are Matthew West, Matthew Armour, Hiram Saxton, class-leaders; J.P. Crouch, William Cole, Newton Brown, James Jones, Thomas Jansen, William H. Mead, David Benedict, stewards; J.B. Crouch, John Seabury, William Foster, John Cunning, Samuel E. Kidd, trustees.

The present membership of the church is about one hundred and fifty. A Sunday-school, in connection with the church, has an average membership of one hundred. John Seabury is its superintendent and treasurer, George West is secretary, and Charles P. Saxton is librarian.

The library contains about two hundred volumes.

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METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF EAST GALWAY.

This church was an offshoot of the church at Rock City, and the first class was formed at the school-house in East Galway, by Rev. J. B. Wood, in 1858. It was composed of some twenty or twenty-five members.

The first trustees were Philip Smith, William Cole, F. Walter, W.T. Crouch, S.V.R. White, Enos Mead, John Tubbs, Peter P. Smith, Pardon Allen; the first class-leader was Philip Smith. The church was built and dedicated in 1859; Rev. Prof. Taylor Lewis, of Troy, preaching the dedicatory sermon. The church is thirty-two feet wide by forty-four feet long, will seat two hundred and fifty persons, and is valued at $3000.

The present officers are Theodore Allen, Zalmon Pulling, William Youngs, stewards; Banker Vedder, Philip Smith, class-leaders; Jeremiah H. Bidwell, clerk of board of trustees.

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FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF GALWAY.

This society ranks among the first of the denomination in the State, and its house of worship is stated to have been the first erected in the State by this denomination. The society was formed June 11, 1814, and was composed of four members, viz.: William T. Wait, Pamelia Wait, Maxson Mosher, and Elisha Potter. The church elected Reuben Wait and Jacob Capron to the office of deacon in 1815, Arnold Chase in 1835, and Rowland Green and Amos Marihew in 1841. The most prominent among the pastors of the church was Elder Maxson Mosher. He was ordained to the work of the gospel ministry April 30, 1820, and preached to the society many years. Under his preaching in the winter and spring of 1840 seventy-five members were added to the church. The other ministers, who have officiated for longer or shorter periods, are J.S. Thompson, Jabez King, Philip Sanford, Richard Rider, Rufus D. Howes, George Burnham, Wellington Stearns, John Showers, D.M. Teller, D.P. Warner, William J. Huyck, J. W. Burghdurf, and Joel Gallup.

The first house of worship was built in 1814, on Mechanic street, about three miles north of Galway. As stated before, it was the first Christian church in the State of New York.

At the time when Second Adventism raged so wildly throughout the country, considerable trouble was caused this society by the course of some of its members, who embraced the new doctrine and went off with it. In 1855 it was thought best to reorganize the society, and it was accomplished at a meeting held on the 25th of August; Elders Richard Rider, Rufus D. Howes, and Charles I. Butler officiating. The reorganized society was composed of twenty-three members. Samuel G. Rider was elected clerk; Restcom Hall deacon; Daniel T. Hart, Reuben Wait, and Hiram Wait trustees.

In 1845 a church was formed at Barkersville by thirteen members of this church. Several churches in different parts of the country have been organized by the influence of members of this church who removed from here. The church was repaired in 1861, at a cost of some $300 or $400. William J. Huyck and Mordecai Gifford were elected deacons in from 1857 to 1859.

The present officers are Jared P. Brockett, clerk; Hamilton D. Jaynes, Samuel Mosher, and Daniel T. Hart, trustees; Rev. Joel Gallup, pastor.

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VIII. - BURIAL-PLACES.

These are numerous, and may be stated as follows: 1st. Near W. Curran's, at North Galway. 2d. Farther east, at the place of J.T. Armitage, near Mosherville. 3d. North, near the town line, at the place of B. McGovern. 4th. Northeast of Mosherville. 5th. South from York's Corners, near J.O. Brian's. 6th. At South Galway. 7th. Southwest of Galway village, near the place of J. Bell. 8th. At West Galway, beyond the county line. 9th. North of Galway village. There are probably some other places of private burial.

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IX. - PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

Near the southeastern corner of the town a branch of the Mourning Kill rises, and runs eastwardly into the town of Ballston, finally emptying into the Kayadrossera Creek, near Ballston Spa. Where this creek crosses the road a sort of embankment causes it in times of flood to overflow several acres of land, forming a small vlaie. This vlaie was once the scene of a sanguinary combat between two hostile bands of Indians. Hon. George G. Scott, in his historical address, delivered at Ballston Spa, July 4, 1876, thus alludes to it: "At a later date, hostile parties of the same Indians" (Mohawks and Algonquins, Hurons or Adirondacks) "had an encounter by the banks of a small stream near the line between Charlton and Galway, and nearly all the defeated party were slaughtered. For many years, even after the whites had begun to settle in the vicinity, the survivors and kindred of the slain were accustomed to return to the spot upon the anniversary of the battle, and indulge in lamentations over the dead, according to the Indian custom. This circumstance gave the creek the name of 'Mourning Kill,' {Kil, or Kill, is the Dutch name for creek.} which it has ever since retained."

There was an Indian camping-ground not far from the place settled by William Kelly, and one family is said to have been seriously frightened by a visit received from their dusky neighbors. The man of the house, seeing them coming, hid under the barn. The Indians noticed this evidence of his timidity, and, with the grim humor characteristic of the race, went into the house, procured a huge butcher-knife, and, coming to his hiding-place, ordered him to come forth, at the same time flourishing the dread instrument of death in the most approved and blood-thirsty style. Expecting nothing but a sudden and violent death, the trembling pioneer crept forth. His presence was the signal for a general war-whoop and a vigorous war-dance, in which he was forced unwillingly to participate, and during the continuance of which he momentarily expected to feel the stroke of knife or tomahawk. After having witnessed his trepidation and terror till their sense of humor was satisfied, they explained to the settler that their intentions were friendly, and departed, laughing in their deep, guttural tones at the success of their joke.

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X. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

The people of this town are largely engaged in farming. Little wheat is raised, but large quantities of oats, corn, barley, rye, peas, beans, and buckwheat reward the toil of the husbandman. Nearly all of the lands are under cultivation, and the appearance of the farms and buildings gives token of the industry, thrift, and prosperity of the inhabitants. But little manufacturing is done within the town, and agriculture is the principal occupation of the inhabitants.

The manufacturing interests of Galway are not very extensive. The water-power and facilities for manufacturing are quite limited. Among them we may mention a few of the most prominent.

Mosherville foundry and plow-shop is owned and run by William Cornell. It was built about 1847. Employs from two to five hands, and turns out about $3000 worth of plows each year. The manufactures consist of plows and shovel-plows.

Levi Parkis owns a grist-mill on Feegowesee creek, with two runs of stone for custom grinding and flouring.

On the same stream, a quarter of a mile lower down, Lansing & Son have a carriage-shop and grist-mill. They employ from three to five hands, and do any kind of work pertaining to these branches of business.

There is also a grist-mill at Hoesville, in the western part of the town, and a steam saw-mill at York's Corners.

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XI. - MILITARY RECORD.

In the War of 1812 the town had quite a number of soldiers, either for a longer or shorter period. No full lists were preserved. Lieut.-Col. Taylor names three from this town, - Ebenezer Olmstead, John McDonald, Wheeler Bradley.

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During the Rebellion and in the year 1864 three meetings were held to provide means for filling the quota of troops under the calls of President Lincoln. The first was held April 2, 1864, and voted, by 188 to 19, to offer a bounty for volunteers. The second meeting was held July 27, 1864, and the vote was recorded as being 106 in favor of a bounty of from $300 to $600, 45 in favor of an unspecified bounty, and 2 against any bounty whatever. The third meeting, held on the 3d of September, voted, by an overwhelming majority, to pay to volunteers a bounty of $1000 each.

SOLDIERS OF 1861-65.

Merritt B. Allen, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1862; disch. at close of the war; lives at Burnt Hills.

Samuel Allen, priv., Co. H, 153d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 13, 1862; died of disease at Now Orleans, La.

Thomas Armer, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; killed at Fredericksburg.

Gideon A. Austin, priv., Co. A, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; trans. to 77th Bat.; disch. at close of the war; lives at Cohoes N.Y.

Orville W. Austin priv., Co. A, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; trans. to 77th Bat.; disch. at close of the war; died since of disease contracted in the service.

Vernam Barber, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; died of disease in hospital at Washington, D.C., Dec. 7, 1862.

Henry Bertrand, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; died in the service.

George Bevin, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; pro. to corp.; died of disease at Petersburg, Va.

Henry Boughton, priv., 77th N. Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; died in the service.

Henry Bolton, 44th N.Y. Inf.

Miles Bowen.

Smith Briggs, priv., Co. A, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; died in hospital, of wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va.

Michael Brosnahan, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; lives in Charlton.

Hiram Broughton, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 29, 1862; disch. at close of the war; lives in Charlton.

John E. Cavert, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Galway.

Nicholas Cavert, wagoner, Co. I, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; died of disease at Beaufort, S.C., in 1863.

James Clancy, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged.

J.W. Clark, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; pro. to corp.; died of wounds received at Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 16, 1864.

John Clifford, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Milton.

John Clifford, Jr., priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Milton.

George Colony, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862; died of disease at Hilton Head, S. C.

Almonte Crater, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 1862; disch. with the regiment, July 2, 1865; living at Ashtabula, Ohio.

David B. Crittenden, musician, Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862; disch. with the regiment, July 2, 1865; living in Orleans Co., N.Y.

James Driscoll, musician, Co. A, 13th H. Art.; enl. 1862; disch. at close of the war; living at Chillicothe, Ohio.

Richard Dunberg, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Galway.

Charles S. Fisher, orderly sergt., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 2, 1862; killed at Fort Gilmer, Va., Sept. 29, 1864.

Henry Fisher, priv., 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in the west.

Thomas Fitzgerald, priv.; enl. 1862; killed in battle.

Edward Fosmire, priv.; 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Albany.

Frederick Foss, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Galway.

William Foss, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 4, 1862; disch. with the regiment, July 2, 1865; living at Galway.

Alonzo Hermance, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 2, 1862; disch. with the regiment, July 2, 1865; living at Galway.

Alfred Hickok, priv.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; discharged; living in Broadalbin.

John H. Hicks, priv.; enl. Sept. 7, 1862; disch. at close of the war; died in Providence, Aug. 1877.

John P. Hudson, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861; discharged; living in Galway.

Nathan B. Hudson, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in the west.

John Hunter, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; disch. with the regiment, July 2, 1865; living in Saratoga.

James Ireland, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862.

William Ireland, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. at close of war; lives in New York State.

Robert Kelly, priv., Co. H, 153d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 8, 1862; pro. to corp.; disch. on account of wounds; living in Galway.

Oliver Lansing, priv.; enl. Sept. 10, 1862; discharged; living in Galway.

William Leach, priv.; enl. Aug. 1862.

Everts Lingenfelter, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; living at Amsterdam.

John Lowry, musician, Co. F, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 1861; disch. for disability, May, 1862; living at Galway.

Joel McCouchie, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861; discharged; killed in Galway, Aug. 1877, by being crushed beneath a horse-power.

Terence McGovern, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; disch. at expiration of term; living in Galway.

Thomas McGovern, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept 1, 1862; disch. at expiration of term; died in Michigan since the war.

Alonzo McKee, priv.; enl. 1861; discharged; removed to Schoharie Co.

Samuel McKinney, priv.; enl. 1862; died of wounds.

Ezra McOmber, priv., Co. A, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; disch. at close of the war; living in Iowa.

George A. McOmber, priv., 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1882; disch. with the regiment; living in Galway.

Simeon D. Mirandeville, priv., 4th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; discharged; living at Galway.

Henry Morgan, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Galway; was wounded at battles of Winchester and Petersburg, Va.

Charles Mow, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Galway.

John C. Mow, priv., 32d N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living in Montgomery county.

James Norris, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Troy.

John Norris, priv., Co. I, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Galway.

Benj. C. Northrop, priv.; enl. Aug. 28, 1862; discharged; living in Galway.

Wm. Orr, sergt, Co. H, 153d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 8, 1862; disch. for disability; living in Nebraska.

Charles Ostrander, priv.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862; died in the service.

Calvin W. Preston, musician, 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Galveston, Texas.

Frederick W. Putzar, priv.; Co. H, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862; died in rebel prison at Andersonville, Ga.

Frederick Quant, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; pro. to sergt.; disch. at close of war; living in Galway.

Patrick Ready, priv.; enl. 1862; died of wounds.

James Reese, priv., 32d N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; killed in the service.

James Reese, Jr., priv., 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; discharged; died since the war.

Matthew Relyea, priv., Co. A, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; disch. with regiment; living in Ballston.

Wm. Relyea, priv., Co. A, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; lost a leg at Fredericksburg; disch. for disability; living in Milton.

John L. Root, priv., 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; died of wounds received at the battle of the Wilderness, Va., in 1864.

Seth B. Root, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; trans. to 77th Vet Bat.; disch. at close of war; living in Galway.

John Rubach, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; re-enl. in 2d Vet. Cav.; disch. at close of war; living in Galway.

Simon Ryan, priv., Co. A, 13th H. Art.; enl. 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Fairport, Monroe Co.

Daniel Shayne, priv.; enl. 1861; discharged; living in Illinois.

Thomas Shayne, priv., Co. A, 13th H. Art.; enl. 1862; disch. at close of war; removed to Ohio, and has since died of consumption.

Michael Sheehy, priv.; enl. 1861; discharged; living in Ballston.

Lucius E. Shurtleff, 2d lieut., Co. G, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861; appointed q.-m.; resigned; lost at sea.

John A. Smith, priv., Co. H, 153d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept 9, 1862; pro. to corp.; disch. with regt.; lives in Illinois.

Wm. Sullivan, priv.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Schenectady.

Henry Tanner, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1862; died in the service.

Wm. Tompkins, lieut., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 2, 1862; killed at battle of Olustee, Fla.

Wm. Turner, priv.; enl. 1861; discharged; living in Perth.

Cornelius Tymeson, enl. 1862; living in Galway.

Eldert Tymeson, died in the service.

Charles F. Wait, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; disch. with regiment, July 2, 1865; living in Galway.

George W. Welch, musician, Co. B, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

John W. Whitmarsh, priv., Co. A, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1, 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Illinois.

Walter W. Zears, enl. Sept. 1, 1862.

Charles Cornell, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

James Cowhey, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861; discharged; living in Stillwater.

Charles H. Crouch, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

Christopher Hyer, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

Lyman E. Miller, corp., Co. B, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

Wm. R. Miller, priv., Co. B, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

W.W. Milliman, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

C. Palmateer, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

Horace A. Post, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

John Shear, priv., Co. H, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

JUDGE LEWIS STONE AND HIS SON, AUGUSTUS L.

 

Residence of A.L. Stone (with portraits)

 

Judge Lewis Stone was born in Monmouth Co., N.J., Dec. 28, 1779, and removed to New York city when about five years of age. At the age of fifteen he made a visit to Galway, Saratoga Co., N.Y., to see an uncle, and was so delighted with the country that he was induced to remain. At this early age he commenced as an apprentice at the carpenter and joiner trade. He was engaged as a mechanic on the Erie canal when it was being built, and later on the Delaware and Hudson canal. During a portion of this time he was a contractor, and was successful. When about fifty years of age he returned to Galway, and ever after made it his home.

He married Miss Sally Warren, a native of Connecticut, Jan. 6, 1800. Miss Warren was born May 16, 1783. By this happy union eight children were born to them, namely, Ulysses L., Sally, Augustus L., Ann M., Augusta L., Caroline M., Eliza Jane, and Lucien L. Of this large family only Augustus L. and Ann M. are living. Judge Stone settled two miles west of Galway, and owned a farm of some two hundred acres.

In politics he affiliated with the Democratic party. He held the offices of supervisor of his town and associate justice of the county court. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church.

After a long life of usefulness, Judge Stone died May 27, 1858. Mrs. Stone died Oct. 19, 1857. Their son, Augustus L., was born in Galway, Sept. 27, 1804. He was reared on a farm until he was about eighteen years of age, when he commenced working with his father on the Delaware and Hudson canal. He continued at this or similar business for some thirty years, the greater part of the time as contractor and builder. He was superintendent of the first railroad ever built in the State. He married Miss Sally Ann Foster, May 25, 1825. She was born in Galway, May 11, 1809. By this alliance one son, Charles H., was born. Mr. Stone purchased his present home in 1855, a fine view of which, with portraits of himself and father above, may be seen in another part of this work. In politics Mr. Stone is a Republican.

Mrs. Stone was a lady greatly respected by her neighbors. She passed away Nov. 30, 1873. Mr. Stone is now about seventy-four years of age, hale and hearty, surrounded by all the comforts of a happy home.

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THOMAS MAIRS.

 

Residence of Thomas Mairs (with portrait)

 

The subject of this sketch traces his descent from a Scotch-Irish origin, a combination of national characteristics, energy, and intellectual ability that has done much for the advancement of civilization and the best interests of society. His parents were from the north of Ireland, and emigrated to this country about the year 1790, settling in Argyle, where they passed the remainder of their days.

Thomas, their youngest son, was born in Argyle, Washington Co., in April, 1804, and left home when about twenty years of age to engage in mercantile pursuits, no suitable opportunity offering in his native town. He went to Galway, Saratoga Co., where his uncle, the Rev. James Mairs, a talented and widely-known minister, resided, and through whose influence he obtained a situation as clerk with General Earl Stimson, {original text has "Stinsom".} who at that time was largely engaged in mercantile as well as agricultural pursuits. Thomas entered upon his new occupation with zeal and energy, and soon became popular with all who knew him. After clerking for three years he entered into partnership with Mr. Stimson, {original text has "Stinsom".} the only capital which he furnished being his thorough knowledge of the business. This partnership continued for a number of years, was successful, and closed satisfactorily. Subsequently, Mr. Mairs purchased the interest of Mr. Stimson, {original text has "Stinsom".}and also the store in Galway, which he replaced with a fine new building, and where he has continued business fifty years with different partners. The rules to which Mr. Mairs rigidly adhered in his business, and which have proved the foundation of his success, were never to recommend an article to be different from what it was, and to treat all alike in selling his goods, not taking advantage of a customer's ignorance.

In 1833, Mr. Mairs married Emma Thompson, eldest daughter of Dr. Nathan Thompson and granddaughter of Judge John Thompson, one of the early settlers of the county. They had six children, of whom three are living, - one son and two daughters. His wife died in 1871.

During the course of a long and active life, Mr. Mairs has been prominently identified with the educational and material development of his locality. He was one of the first subscribers to the fund which was raised to establish the Galway Academy, and was untiring in his devotion to its interests, being a trustee during the whole time of its existence.

In polities he was formerly a Whig, but united with the Republican party at its organization, and has firmly adhered to the principles of the party over since. He has frequently been solicited to accept the nomination for Assembly from his district, but declined. He represented his town for several years in the board of supervisors, where his active business habits made him a valuable member.

He has been a regular attendant upon the services of the Presbyterian church, and has contributed liberally to its support, but is not a regular member.

At the age of seventy-four years Mr. Mairs is still living, engaged in active business, bearing upon his face the evidences of a life well spent and of duty well done, and the consciousness within that he has performed his allotted task on the stage of life with honor to himself and credit to his family. His life is a fitting exemplar to the young of how many and great things can be accomplished by fidelity to duty, honesty of purpose, and stability of character.

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