HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

EDINBURGH.

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I. - GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

EDINBURGH is one of the towns in the western tier, and the second from the north. The south half is square in form, the north half triangular. It is bounded north by Day; east by Day, Corinth, and Greenfield; south by Providence; west by the counties of Fulton and Hamilton. It contains fifteen thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven acres of improved land, twenty-five thousand four hundred and sixty-five of unimproved, and of this last amount fifteen thousand and sixty-four are woodland. The population in 1875 was fourteen hundred and eighty-one.

The town of Edinburgh contains a part of the patent granted to John Glenn and others; also a part of the Northampton patent granted to John Mace and others; and the entire Livingston patent of four thousand acres granted to Philip Livingston and others, Nov. 8, 1760.

In the revised statutes of the State this town is described and its boundary lines defined as follows:

"The town of EDINBURGH shall contain all that part of said county bounded southerly by Providence, westerly by the bounds of the county, northerly by Day, and easterly by Corinth."

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II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

The Sacandaga river enters at the southwest corner of the town, and flows in an irregular northeast course across it. Along the river are flats averaging in width about one mile; back from these is an elevated plain of varying extent and gradually rising into lofty hills. The Kayadrossera ridge in the south is high, rough, and rocky. The soil is inclined to be light, but is stronger and richer than the lands of the lower valley.

There are no large bodies of water in the town. Johnny-cake lake and one or two other small ponds lie among the hills of the southeast part. The principal streams are Beecher's creek and Batcheller creek.

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III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The fertile lands of the Sacandaga valley, covered with a heavy growth of pine-trees of great size and beauty and other forest-trees, attracted early settlers to the town. It began to be settled soon after the treaty of peace with England that ended the long struggle for Independence. Of the very earliest pioneers but little can be ascertained. The distance of time obscures the memory, and the drop-curtain of death shuts down and out the view. The earliest settler of whom any definite information can be gained was Abijah Stark, a nephew of Gen. John Stark, the hero of Bennington. He came in 1787 with wagons and horses from Coleraine, Mass., via Ballston and the Fish House, and settled on the east side of the Sacandaga river, near the west line of lot 23 of the Northampton patent. At that time the country was an almost unbroken wilderness; here and there a small clearing or natural opening might be seen, but the face of the country was almost universally covered with the primitive forest. Stark was accompanied by his wife (formerly Elizabeth Newell) and two children. Here he began his labors and carved out a home for himself and his descendants. He sowed his first wheat in the spring of 1788, and it is believed to have been the first wheat raised in this town. He and his family were subjected to all the discomforts and perils of frontier life. At one time a fierce hurricane swept down the valley, laying prostrate everything that stood in its track. His cattle were in the woods, and, unfortunately, in the path of the storm. At night they did not come home, and search was begun. Soon, by the aid of the tinkling bell and subdued lowing of the cattle, they were discovered penned in among the fallen timber. Axes were brought and the timber cut away till they were reached, when it was discovered that they had entirely escaped injury, and with grateful lowings were soon wending their way homeward. He had a family of ten children, - eight sons and two daughters. Three sons and one daughter are still living. Allen N. Stark and Mrs. Olive Wait live in Watertown. Stephen lives in Warren county. Squire married Lovisa Higley, and lives on the homestead. His family consists of six children, two of them living at home. An old Indian and his squaw lived on the flats about two miles northeast of the Fish House at the time of Stark's settlement, and continued to reside there for some years.

Nathaniel Bass, Jonathan Anderson, Samuel Randall, and Sylvanus Westcot were early settlers in the Stark neighborhood.

James and Amy Partridge moved from Connecticut in 1795, and settled on lot 7 of the Northampton patent. They had nine children: Thomas, Rebecca, Ruanna, Polly, Frederick, August, Roxa, Eunice, and James. James, the youngest child, was born in 1797, and still lives at the age of eighty years, hale and hearty, on the homestead, within a stone's throw of the site of the house in which he was born. He is without doubt the oldest resident of the town, having lived in it for eighty years. His wife was a granddaughter of Philip Fraker, an early settler of considerable prominence in Day.

Doctor Gaylor, Hezekiah Ranney, Willard Trowbridge, Jordan Sprague, and William Davis were early settlers in the Partridge neighborhood. Isaac Denning settled very early in the east part of the town, near the Day line. It is said that he built the first grist-mill in town, in 1793. It is certain that it was built before 1800. It stood on the north bank of Beecher's creek, at the river-read crossing, on the present site of the brick mill. It was a small mill, built of hewed logs. Isaac Deming died in 1816, aged fifty-eight years.

John and Mehitable Sumner, with their five sons and their families, and five daughters, came into Edinburgh from Ashford, Connecticut, some time previous to 1800. They settled near the road that crosses the river below Batchellerville, on the north side of the river. John, Jr., lived a little farther down the river. Robert, still farther down the stream. Amasa lived about one-third of a mile north of Beecher's Hollow, on the State road. Benjamin lived about half-way between Beecher's Hollow and the Fish House, on the farm now occupied by William Partridge. John Sumner built the first saw-mill in the town, about 1800. It was located on Batcheller creek, near the site of Noyes & Early's measure-factory. Robert and Benjamin served in the Revolution; Benjamin was taken prisoner and conveyed to England in chains. The long confinement and galling fetters produced fever-sores from which he never fully recovered, and which eventually caused his death. He was buried on his farm, and the spot where rest the bones of this unsung hero is unmarked by stick or stone. Robert Sumner was the first supervisor of the town, and served in that capacity for four years. There were five girls in the family. Polly married Jonathan Smith, and lived to reach the age of one hundred years, dying in 1862. Betsey married George Bradford, and lived to the age of ninety-four years. Mehitabel married Willard Trowbridge. Sobrina married a Benson. Percie married James Perry, and died in 1861, aged seventy-nine years. John Sumner was a cousin of the father of America's great senator, Hon. Charles Sumner. Solomon Sumner, who lives near Beecher's Hollow, is a relative of John Sumner.

Samuel Cheadle was an early settler in the part of the town west of Beecher's Hollow. He married Rhoby Sprague about 1797. This wedding is supposed to have been the first in the town.

Samuel Downing was another settler in the western part of the town, living close to the county line. He lived to the great age of one hundred and three years, and died but a year or two since. On his one-hundredth birthday he shouldered his axe, marched to the woods, and felled a tree in honor of the occasion. A large crowd had gathered to witness the event, and the tree was quickly split up into walking-sticks and carried away for mementos.

John and Betsey Hill came from Saratoga to Edinburgh. in 1801, and settled northwest of Beecher's Hollow. They had five children, Elizabeth, William, Phbe, Asa, and Lucy. Phbe, wife of John Akley, is still living in Edinburgh, near Beecher's Hollow.

Other early settlers in this western part of the town were Abel Brown, Charles and John Rhodes, John Hamilton, George and Oliver Edmonds, John Cook, and Timothy Miller.

Ely Beecher was one of the most prominent individuals in the affairs of this town during its early existence. He was a young man, connected with John Fay in a store at the Fish House, or, more properly, Northampton. He married there Diadama, a daughter of Sylvanus Westcot, and moved to Beecher's Hollow about 1802. He bought the Isaac Denning grist-mill, and built a store a little northwest of the present store occupied by T.D. Yates. He was a very stirring, energetic, and clear headed business man, and his ventures were generally well planned and successful. He also purchased the Ellithorp distillery, which stood on the site now occupied by Cameron's tannery. In 1808 he owned the first carding-mill. This was afterwards, in 1817, replaced by a larger one, but the business declined, the machinery was disposed of, and the building is now used as a cabinet-shop. In 1827 he built the present brick grist-mill on the site of the old one. In 1825 he built the present store. He was quite prominent in town politics, and was supervisor seventeen years, and served in several other offices. His family consisted of eleven children, all of whom are numbered with the dead. He has but three living descendants bearing his name. George and Emma Beecher, his grandchildren by his son Callender, live in Saratoga Springs, and Emily Beecher, daughter of Ely T. Beecher, lives in Northville, Fulton Co. Beecher's creek and Beecher's Hollow were named after this pioneer, and perpetuate his name and fame. He died in 1865, at the age of eighty-eight, full of years, honored and respected by his fellow-townsmen.

James Goodwin was one of the first settlers at Beecher's Hollow. He lived where Leman Partridge now does, was justice of the peace for many years, kept an inn at an early day, was prominent in church and town matters, and respected by all. Israel Woodford was the first town clerk, lived a little south of Goodwin's, and moved to Onondaga county about 1812.

Anson Fowler kept an early store, lived on the river-road near Beecher's Hollow, and removed to the west.

Samuel Stinson lived near the present hotel at Beecher's Hollow, and had the first blacksmith-shop in town, about 1800. He afterwards removed to Galway, and died there in 1823, aged eighty-four. Several of his grandchildren are living in Day, and Mrs. Susan Copeland, living in this town, is a grandchild.

Daniel Washburn, Asahel Trumbull, Ezekiel Harris, Joseph Olmstead, and Guy D. Culver were early residents near Beecher's Hollow.

Benjamin Akley came from Coxsackie to Edinburgh in 1801. Settled about one mile southwest of Beecher's Hollow, on the river-road, in about the centre of the Livingston patent. Of his seven children, two sons are now living, Ananias, in Stony Creek, Warren Co., and John on the homestead. He is a well-preserved old gentleman of eighty-six years, who superintends the work of the farm, and even turns in and works, when circumstances require, with remarkable strength and vigor for one of his age. To his active mind and retentive memory we are indebted for many important facts in this history.

Azariah Ellithorp and his wife, Elizabeth, removed from Guilford, Vt., in sleighs, and arrived in Edinburgh in the month of February, 1802. They settled on lot 10 of the larger Livingston patent, on the farm now occupied by his son Solomon. Their family was made up of five boys and three girls. Two of these children are living, Azariah, aged eighty-seven, and Solomon, aged seventy-eight, both in Edinburgh. Solomon has served four times as supervisor, and was a member of Assembly in 1824. Peter Van Vleck came to Edinburgh from Schenectady in 1800 or 1801. He settled on the river-road, pretty well towards the present line of Day. While living here the first religious meetings in the neighborhood were held in his barn. In 1807 he moved to the Samuel Rogers place at Day Centre.

Jonathan Smith, Sampson Hosley, Aaron Van Patten, Hudson Benson, and Philander Hewitt were early settlers along the river-road northeast from Beecher's Hollow.

John Gordon, a native of Hesse, in Germany, was impressed into the army, and with his fellow-soldiers hired out to the British government to fight the battles of the Revolutionary war. He was placed in Colonel Baum's command and marched against Bennington. He was among the prisoners captured by the American forces, and soon after joined the American army, and fought with them through the war. At the close of the Revolution he married Susan Whitman, in Massachusetts, and removed to Henniker, N.H., where he lived till, in 1804, he came to "York State," and settled in Edinburgh on the south side of the river, on lot 4 of the larger Livingston patent. His children were named Mary, John, Elizabeth, Daniel, Zachariah, Susan, Edward W., Thomas, Andrew, Hollis, and Sally. None of these are now living in this town. Edward W. married Abigail Wight about 1816, and had nine children. Of these John, Alvah, Daniel Y., and Sally A. live in Edinburgh. Daniel Y. lives on the old homestead.

Isaac Noyes, with his wife, Sarah, and seven children, settled in Edinburgh in 1807, near Batchellerville. He was a farmer, and bought the Sumner saw-mill. Soon afterwards he sold a half-interest to Ambrose Batcheller. He also owned a grist-mill that stood a little further down the creek. He was very prominent in church matters, and the success of the Congregational or Presbyterian church was largely due to his untiring efforts and unselfish devotion. He died Sept. 6, 1826, aged sixty-one years. His wife survived him, and died in June, 1847, in her eightieth year. Their family were named respectively Levi, Isaac, Henry, Jane, Enoch, Sarah, and Percy G. Of these Levi lives in Broome county, at the advanced age of eighty-five. Isaac lives on the homestead near Batchellerville, and is a worthy successor of his esteemed father. He served as supervisor five terms. Jane Noyes lives in Batchellerville; Percy G., in Edinburgh; Joel lives in Illinois; Hon. Isaac Noyes, Jr., who served as member of Assembly in 1875-76 and 1876-77, lives at Batchellerville, and is engaged in manufacturing measures and barrel-covers, in connection with his brother-in-law, Stewart Early. He has served as supervisor.

Patrick Cain was an early settler about one mile south of Batchellerville, on the river-road.

Elias and Mary Manning settled in Milton in 1793. They removed to Edinburgh in 1808, and settled near the county line west of Beecher's Hollow. Elias Manning was a carpenter, and noted for his skill in handling the broad-axe. He helped to hew the timber for the Fish House bridge, and the smooth timbers bear testimony to his careful workmanship. He removed to Broadalbin after living here a few years. Two of his sons - Samuel and Melzor - live in Edinburgh, at Batchellerville.

One of the oldest citizens of the town is Mr. Samuel Snow, now over eighty-eight years old. He came to Edinburgh in 1815. His children are living in the town.

The Batcheller family have contributed largely to the interests of the town. They started and for many years have carried on the business that created the village which bears their name. Ambrose and Sally Batcheller came from Vermont in 1808, and settled about a mile from Batchellerville on the south side of the river. They began farming, and Ambrose purchased one-half of the mill-property of Deacon Isaac Noyes and engaged in the manufacture of wooden-ware. They had five children, - Sherman, Samuel, Lucy, Sally, and Rensselaer. Sherman and Lucy are dead. Samuel and Rensselaer live at Batchellerville, and Mrs. Sally Shiles lives in Hamilton county.

Sherman Batcheller left two children. Helen M. Conkling lives in Saratoga Springs. George S. graduated at Yale College, and began the practice of the law. In 1862 he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 115th Regiment New York Volunteers, and went with them to the front. He was afterwards appointed inspector-general of this State, and served in that position for some time. Subsequently he went to Egypt, and is now a judge in the Khedive's court.

Samuel has three children. Hiland G. is a lawyer in New York; Ada T., wife of Hon. Isaac Noyes, Jr., and Marion A., wife of Stewart Early, reside in Batchellerville.

Rensselaer has three children. John and Albert live in the town of Day. Oliver H. was a student at the United States Naval Academy, at Annapolis, Md., at the time of the breaking out of the Rebellion. He was graduated soon after with the rank of midshipman, and placed on board one of the ships of the fleet that sailed against Mobile, Ala. He participated in that action, and afterwards in the fight at Port Hudson. He was there on board the ill-fated "Mississippi," which ran aground in point-blank range of the rebel batteries, and had to be abandoned. Midshipman Batcheller was detailed to fire the vessel, and was the last man except the captain to leave its deck. He passed through the battle uninjured, and was promoted for meritorious services. He is now lieutenant-commander in the United States navy, and is stationed at the Charlestown navy-yard, near Boston, Mass.

The Batcheller family came originally from West Brookfield, Mass.

Anthon De Golia came to this section from Steuben county. He lived in Edinburgh, then in Northville, and finally settled about one and a half miles south of Batchellerville, on lot 21 of the Northampton patent, in 1837. He was a carpenter, and worked at his trade in addition to attending to his farm. There were nine children. Mrs. Samuel Batcheller, Mrs. Thomas Wren, Mrs. Tabor, and Lucien De Golia are the only ones residing in Edinburgh. Henry M. and Jane B. Torrey came from Vermont in 1827, and settled in the Gordon neighborhood. They had six children. Silas H., David A., and Emily, wife of E.D. Ellithorp, are still living in Edinburgh. Silas has served as supervisor for three years, and was chairman of the committee appointed to examine and report on the books and accounts of Mann, the defaulting county treasurer.

Among the early settlers in the Gordon neighborhood were Justus Olmstead, Abraham B. Walker, Jacob and James Armstrong, Joseph King, and Daniel Deming.

In the north and northwest part of the town Joseph Corey, David Cole, John Greenfield, Thomas Grimes, and John Kinnicut were early settlers.

Other early settlers whose residences are unknown, but all of whom resided in the town previous to 1805, and most of them as early as 1802, were Thurston Wells, Ephraim Potter, Joshua Wells, Jonathan Townsend, Elisha Mix, William Feller (all previous to 1801), James Cooper, Jacob Groat, Ebenezer Getchell (previous to 1802), Amos Cook, Dr. George Benham, Samuel Darance, Stephen Walker, Jesse Worden, Job King, Andrew Petty, Moses Crane, Jacobus Filkins, Ezra Bartlett, Jesse Barker, and a man named Parmenter, who was carried off by the Indians.

The first woolen-mill or clothiery was built by Palmer Monroe, in 1808. It was located near the foot of Beecher's Hollow. In 1821 it was sold to Isaac Brewster. Martin H. Butler afterwards purchased it. It is still standing, and is used by Chester D. Butler as a machine-shop.

The first tannery was built in Beecher's Hollow, in 1825, by Lyons & Prindle. It passed through many hands, and is now owned by George F. Cameron. Tanning, currying, and shoemaking are carried on there now.

Arad Copeland built a carriage- and blacksmith-shop at Beecher's Hollow in 1870.

The first bridge across the Sacandaga river, in Saratoga County, was built in the fall of 1801 and the winter following. It was about two miles below the Fish House, was built of hewed timber, in three spans, and was between two and three hundred feet long. Robert Sumner, Daniel Washburn, Jr., and Jordan Sprague were the building committee, and their bills were audited by James Goodwin and Willard Trowbridge. This bridge was destroyed, and in July, 1827, a floating bridge, built of logs and plank, and chained to the bank at either end, was built, at an expense of $150. It was built where the present bridge stands. Azariah Ellithorp, Samuel Noyes, and Ely Beecher were the committee in charge of the work. In 1844 the bridge was built as it at present stands.

Daniel Washburn and Ely Davis went with their teams, and carried soldiers of 1812 to Waterford, which was the place of rendezvous for this section.

The first distillery was built by Azariah Ellithorp, in 1801, on the present site of Cameron's tannery. It was sold to Ely Beecher, within a few years of its erection.

Dr. Edson was an early physician in the Washburn neighborhood.

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IV. - ORGANIZATION.

This town, the third in the county in extent of surface, was originally a part of the town of Providence. In the spring of 180l, on the 13th day of March, it was erected into a separate township, and was called "Northfield." How this name came to be conferred is not known, but it was a very appropriate name for the broad fields of the Sacandaga valley, that lay stretching away to the north from the more thickly settled part of the town of which it had been a part. In 1808, however, it was decided to change the name, because of another township having previously adopted it, and an informal meeting was called at the residence of Esquire James Goodwin to decide upon its future appellation. Two stories are told as to the derivation of its present name. One is that Mrs. Goodwin agreed to brew a mug of steaming flip for the company if she could have the privilege of naming the town; that her offer was accepted, and that she called it Edinburgh. The other is that George Bradford, a Scotchman who lived in Hadley, wished it to be called after the capital of his native land. At any rate, whichever be true, it is certain that "Edinburgh" was the name chosen, and that the new town was christened with the beverage prepared by the housewife's skillful bands.

Upon the passage of the act erecting the town, an election was called to choose officers and transact the necessary town business. It was held at the house of Esquire James Goodwin. Following is a copy of the record of the proceedings of the first meeting:

 

 

"At a meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Northfield, assembled for the purpose of choosing town officers, at the dwelling-house of Esquire James Goodwin, elected Israel Woodford town clerk for the year ensuing.

"Robert Sumner, supervisor.

"Willard Trowbridge, Jordan Sprague, Jonathan Smith, assessors.

"Thurston Wells, Sampson Hosley, Ephraim Potter, commissioners of highways.

"Daniel Washburn, Jr., John Sumner, overseers of the poor.

"Jordan Sprague, collector of the town tax.

"Jordan Sprague, Abel Brown, constables.

"Daniel Washburn, Jr., Charles Rhodes, Joshua Wells, David Cole, Jonathan Townsend, John Hamilton, Arba Perry, Samuel Rogers, James Andrus, Reuben Cornwell, Nathaniel Bass, overseers of highways.

"Esquire James Goodwin, Elisha Mix, Daniel Washburn, Jr., fence-viewers and damage-prizers.

"William Fellow, Isaac Deming, pound-keepers.

"Legally voted to raise fifty dollars for the support of the poor.

"Also voted that hogs shall run at large.

"Likewise that the next annual town-meeting is to be held at the dwelling-house of Esquire James Goodwin.

"ISRAEL WOODFORD, Clerk.

"NORTHFIELD, April 7, 1801."

 

 

The following items of interest are from the records of the town:

In 1802 it was decided that hogs might run at large, but it specified that they should wear "a good and sufficient yoak."

A bargain was also made with Jordan Sprague to keep one William Clark for one year, at the rate of $2.12 1/2 per week.

A bounty of $5 was offered for every wolf killed in Saratoga County in 1803.

The town was divided into eight school districts in 1813, by Ephraim Potter, John Younglove, and Guy Culver, commissioners appointed for that purpose. They reported June 10, 1813.

A sorrel mare strayed from her owner's premises in 1814, and was "took up" by Daniel Rhodes. In pursuance of the directions of law, as well as in accord with the customs of the people, he advertised the fact, and appended a description commencing as follows: "a sorrel mare, with a large, squire Dock, a small white spot just back of her fore-shoulders," etc.

At the town-meeting of 1817 it was voted to hold the next town-meeting "in Ely Beecher's barn." This showed the democratic principle of the people. But the growth of their aristocratic tendencies cropped out in 1822, when they repudiated the barn as a place of meeting, and adjourned to meet "in Ely Beecher's wood-house." In 1824 the Congregational church was built, and after that the elections were held there.

In 1849 a bounty of $10 was offered for every panther killed in the limits of the town.

 

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LIST OF TOWN OFFICERS.

 

 

Supervisor.

Town Clerk.

Collector.

1801.

Robert Sumner.

Israel Woodford.

Jordan Sprague.

1802.

"

"

"

1803.

"

Ely Beecher.

Thurston Wells.

1804.

"

"

John Rhodes.

1805.

Ely Beecher.

James Goodwin.

Azariah Ellithorp.

1806.

"

Israel Woodford.

"

1807.

"

"

Philander Hewitt.

1808.

"

"

"

1809.

Will'rd Trowbridge.

Robert Sumner.

"

1810.

"

"

"

1811.

Ely Beecher.

Andrew Comstock.

Anson Fowler.

1812.

"

"

"

1813.

John Hamilton.

Stephen Jackson.

Isaac G. Brewster.

1814.

"

"

John Cook, Jr.

1815.

"

"

John Brown.

1816.

"

Ely Beecher.

John Cook, Jr.

1817.

Amos Cook.

"

"

1818.

"

"

"

1819.

Ely Beecher.

Robert Sumner.

Solomon T. Scott.

1820.

"

Amos Cook.

James L. DeLong.

1821.

"

"

Elisha Oakley.

1822.

"

Martin Butler.

Nathaniel Griggs.

1823.

"

"

"

1824.

Amos Cook.

Flavel Greenleaf.

John L. Graves.

1825.

Ely Beecher.

"

James Partridge, Jr.

1826.

"

"

"

1827.

"

"

"

1828.

"

"

"

1829.

"

"

"

1830.

Amos Cook.

James Barker.

John Hudson.

1831.

Solomon Ellithorp.

"

Enoch Scribner.

1832.

Amos Cook.

William Prindle.

John W. Sprague.

1833.

Ely Beecher.

Danford Edmonds.

Amos Beecher.

1834.

Isaac Noyes.

"

"

1835.

"

Martin H. Butler.

James Partridge, Jr.

1836.

Solomon Ellithorp.

"

Samuel C. Scribner.

1837.

Isaac Noyes.

"

Samuel Snow.

1838.

Samuel Manning.

"

"

1839.

Sherman Batcheller.

William S. Butler.

Arba W. Berry.

1840.

"

Geo. B. Robertson.

"

1841.

Isaac Noyes.

Chester D. Butler.

Levi S. Kinnicut.

1842.

Joseph Covill.

"

"

1843.

"

"

"

1844.

Samuel Batcheller.

Walter G. Vaughan.

John Ellithorp.

1845.

Isaac Noyes.

Ely T. Beecher.

Elisha G. King.

1846.

Samuel Batcheller.

"

"

1847.

Henry M. Torrey.

Joseph L. Snow.

John W. Gordon.

1848.

Joseph L. Snow.

Robert Kennedy.

Zenas Whitney.

1849.

Solomon Ellithorp.

"

George H. Wheden.

1850.

"

"

Leman Partridge.

1851.

Ira Beecher.

Arad Copeland.

"

1852.

"

"

Henry Eglin.

1853.

Samuel Batcheller.

"

Squire Stark.

1854.

John K. Anderson.

"

"

1855.

Sherman Batcheller.

Levi S. Noyes.

John Y. Wheeler.

1856.

"

Arad Copeland.

Robert T. Sumner.

1857.

James Partridge.

"

"

1858.

Joseph Covill.

"

Levi S. Noyes.

1859.

Eugene Damon.

Henry Eglin.

Arba W. Perry.

1860.

Levi S. Noyes.

George F. Cameron.

J.M. Ellithorp.

1861.

"

George Wright.

William Vanavery.

1862.

William W. Hunt.

"

William E. Snow.

1863.

Winslow E. Snow.

Lehman Partridge.

James R. Steers.

1864.

Isaac Noyes, Jr.

Arad Copeland.

John W. Barker.

1865.

Leman Partridge.

Henry S. Barker.

John G. Batcheller.

1866.

Winslow E. Snow.

"

Holden Tenant.

1867.

Cyrus Sumner.

Walter D. Butts.

"

1868.

"

Albert Allen.

John Steers.

1869.

Winslow E. Snow.

John G. Pettit.

John Partridge.

1870.

Silas H. Torrey.

Amos E. Barker.

"

1871.

Winslow E. Snow.

John C. Olmstead.

David A. Torrey.

1872.

James Green.

David L. Bowman.

Foster S. Taylor.

1873.

John W. Latcher.

Edmund C. Quimby.

Falkner E. Noyes.

1874.

Lucien De Golia.

Leonard Hyer.

Calvin S. Edwards.

1875.

Silas H. Torrey.

"

"

1876.

"

"

Leonard Lyon.

1877.

Leman Partridge.

"

Levi Akley.

1878.

Ervin De Golia.

Joseph W. Allen.

M.H. Frasier.

 

A few of the earlier justices of the peace, before election by the people, were the following: James Goodwin, 1801; Jordan Sprague, 1801; Robert Sumner, 1805; Willard Trowbridge, 1807; Thomas Grimes, 1807; John Kinnicut, 1812; Solomon Slate, 1814; Azariah Ellithorp and Philander Hewitt, 1816; John Hamilton, 1818; Samuel Stimson, 1820; William Capron, 1822; Amos Cook, 1826; Solomon Ellithorp, Samuel Noyes, 1829.

 

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JUSTICES OF THE PEACE ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.

1831.

Amos Cook.

1855.

John Barker.

1832.

Jacob Wright.

1856.

Joseph Fulton, long term.

W.G. Vaughan, short term.

1833.

Samuel Manning.

1857.

William W. Hunt.

1834.

Jas Trowbridge, 4 years.

Martin H. Butler, 3 years.

1858.

Russell Smith.

1835.

Amos Cook.

1859.

 

1836.

Walton Hamilton.

1860.

Joseph Fuller.

1837.

Samuel Manning.

1861.

William W. Hunt.

1838.

Ira Beecher, 4 years.

Solomon Ellithorp, 3 years.

John Hamilton, 2 years.

Joseph Covill, 1 year.

1862.

Russell Smith, long term.

G.F. Cameron, short term.

1839.

Harvey Mattison.

1863.

Eliphaz D. Ellithorp.

1840.

Henry M. Torrey.

1864.

G.F. Cameron, long term.

H.R. Colson, short term.

1841.

Samuel Manning.

1865.

"

1842.

James Partridge.

1866.

Silas H. Torrey.

1843.

Harvey Mattison.

1867.

Henry Hamilton.

1844.

Joseph Covill.

1868.

Leman Partridge.

1845.

Henry M. Torrey.

1869.

H. Ransom Colson.

1846.

William Easterly.

1870.

Norman M. Stark.

1847.

Obadiah Wood.

1871.

John Ford.

1848.

Jno. K. Anderson, 4 years.

N.L. Barker, 3 years.

1872.

James M. Ellithorp.

1849.

Joseph Covill, 4 years.

Sol'n Ellithorp, 2 years.

1873.

H.R. Colson, long term.

James Green, short term.

1850.

Joseph L. Snow.

1874.

F.E. Noyes, long term.

", short term.

1851.

Henry Hamilton.

1875.

Holden Tenant.

1852.

Eugene Deming.

1876.

Leman Partridge.

1853.

John K. Anderson.

1877.

James B. Manning.

1854.

Russell Smith.

1878.

J.M. Ellithorp.

 

------------------------------

V. - VILLAGES AND HAMLETS.

Beecher's Hollow is an old settlement near the centre of the western half of the town, and contains about twenty dwellings, one store, two blacksmith-shops, one cabinet-shop, one carriage-shop, one grist-mill, one tannery and shoe-shop, one machine-shop, a hotel, school-house, and church, and about one hundred and fifty inhabitants. Business is conducted on a small scale. Batchellerville is a thriving village a mile and a half southeast of Beecher's Hollow. It lies on the southeast side of the river, contains about seventy dwellings, some of them of a superior quality, three woodenware manufactories, two stores, a hotel, a school-house, and a fine church. It has about five hundred inhabitants.

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VI. - SCHOOLS.

Daniel Abbott, from Connecticut, taught the first school, in 1794. A school was kept in Abijah Stark's house in 1812. It was taught by Titus Andrews.

The Liberty Hill schoolhouse was built about 1816, the Sand Hill school-house still earlier.

 

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COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT, MARCH, 1878.

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1

{joint.}

1

$52.14

$0.69

$0.72

$0.03

$1.44

" 2

38

52.14

26.14

35.38

1.27

114.93

" 3

25

52.14

17.19

15.06

.83

85.22

" 4

49

52.14

33.70

37.54

1.64

125.02

" 5

34

52.14

23.39

24.48

1.13

101.14

" 6

33

52.14

22.69

26.75

1.10

102.68

" 7

34

52.14

23.39

22.68

1.13

99.34

" 8

118

52.14

81.16

91.21

3.94

280.59

" 9

41

52.14

28.20

29.29

1.37

111.00

" 10

27

52.14

18.57

25.89

.90

97.50

" 11

18

52.14

12.38

10.87

.60

75.99

" 12.

26

52.14

17.88

11.68

.87

82.57

" 13.

62

52.14

42.64

50.94

2.07

147.79

 

506

$677.82

$348.02

$382.49

$16.88

$1425,21

 

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VII. - CHURCHES.

The first church was organized in 1798, by Rev. Mr. Munroe, from Galway. It was a Baptist church. They built a church in 1816 opposite the house now occupied by Allen Olmstead. It was a square building, two stories high, with a gallery around three sides of it. The pews were box pews, wherein one-half of the congregation were forced to sit staring into the faces of the other half, while the minister, from some hidden corner, mysteriously thundered forth his expositions of the law and the gospel, unseen by the larger part of his congregation. That our fathers were a church-going people speaks volumes in praise of their devotion and self-sacrifice. In 1852 the church was torn down. Early religious meetings were held in houses, barns, school-houses, or in the woods, as circumstances dictated or allowed. Among the early preachers were Samuel Covill, Asa Cummings, and Rev. Mr. Meeker, who held services before 1802.

------------------------------

EDINBURGH HILL METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.

This church was first organized previous to 1824, but had no house of worship till some time about 1835, when a church was built. It was a frame building, about thirty-six by forty feet in dimensions, and had no belfry or tower. This building was torn down in 1871, and a new church erected, at a cost of $1400. This new church was dedicated in 1872, Rev. J.K. Wager delivering the sermon on that occasion. It is a good wooden building, well finished and tasty in appearance.

Among the first members of the society were Peleg Tenant, David Rhodes, John Hill, David Nicholson, Mrs. D. Rhodes, Betsey Hill, Thomas Francisco, and Norman Rhodes.

The ministers who are known to have ministered to this church are Rev. Mr. Potter, Rev. Mr. Miner, Rev. Mr. Sherman, Rev. Mr. Stead, Rev. Mr. Lake, Rev. Mr. Moranti, Rev. Mr. Pomeroy, Rev. Mr. Coville, Revs. George W. Farrington, J.K. Wager, H. Slocum, S.M. Williams, J.W. Butcher, Amos Osborne, F.K. Potter, John Sumner, E.L. Arnold, and H.H. Smith. The first Sunday-school in this neighborhood was organized about 1830. Norman Rhodes was the first superintendent. It was a quite small school, and has grown a little from year to year, until it now numbers about fifty scholars. Henry Van Avery is the superintendent.

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METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF BEECHER'S HOLLOW.

The first religious meetings connected with the incipient stages of the growth of this church were held at various times and places previous to 1815. One of the most prominent places of meeting was the house of Mr. James Barker. A; the times when quarterly meetings were held there the attendance would be very large, many people coming ten, fifteen, or twenty miles to attend the services. At such times the hospitality of the brethren was freely given, and it is said that at one of these meetings Mr. Ichabod Barker housed and fed forty persons and cared for their teams.

The church was not organized till several years later, and held its meetings in the school-house until the church was built. The church is a plain, square, wooden structure, with a belfry and bell, and is valued at $2500. Its first cost was about $800, but additions, improvements, and repairs have increased its value to the above amount. Rev. Mr. Brayton and Rev. Mr. Stead were among the earlier preachers.

Rev. H.H. Smith is the present pastor. Newman L. Barker, John Steers, Lysander Edwards, and Arad Copeland are the stewards.

Except for a short time immediately after its organization, a Sunday-school has been maintained, in connection with the church. Amos Barker, superintendent, and John Steers, assistant superintendent, are the present officers.

------------------------------

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF BATCHELLERVILLE.

The second religious society formed in the town of Edinburgh was the Edinburgh Congregational society. A meeting was held on Sept. 5, 1808, at the house of James Goodwin, Esq., at which twenty-one people were present. James Goodwin, Esq., was chairman, and Israel Woodford was clerk. Rev. Mr. Haight, of Galway, instituted the church, which was composed of the following members: Daniel, Lydia, and Lucy Knight, Isaac and Sally Noyes, David and Lydia Stoddard, Phineas and Polly Warren, David C. and Eunice Jones, John and Susan Gordon, Ebenezer and Sarah Sherwin, Lydia Beecher, Sally Houghtalin, Abigail Stimson, James and Abigail Goodwin, and Israel Woodford.

Occasional meetings were held at school-houses and private houses till 1813-14, when a revival was experienced, and a large number of members added to the church. Most of these new members lived at the Fish House (Northampton), and in 1815 a church was built by the society in that village. Meetings were held alternately there and in Edinburgh. Meantime, the society had become Presbyterian in form and doctrine. In 1824, by the aid of many citizens of the town, who desired a place in which to hold town and political meetings, the society was enabled to build a church in Edinburgh. The edifice was erected on the road that crosses the river near its junction with the river-road from Huntsville to Beecher's Hollow. The foundation and grave-yard are still there to mark the spot. This church was built in the old style, - wide and low, with a steep roof. There was a gallery across the rear end. Mrs. Alexander Armstrong made a pencil sketch of the building just before it was torn down, and this sketch has been photographed, and several pictures are preserved in the neighborhood.

This church, dedicated in 1824, was occupied until 1866, when it was abandoned and torn down. In 1824 the society divided, part going to the Northampton church, and part remaining in Edinburgh. In 1831 the church received permission to change its form of government, and became a Congregational society, though still maintaining its relations to, and connection with, Albany presbytery.

This state of affairs continued until the year 1866, when the church gave up its mixed character and became a purely Presbyterian society.

At this time they abandoned the old house of worship, and, procuring a site in the village of Batchellerville, erected there a very fine church at a cost of $8000. The outside of the building presents a fine appearance. The inside is finished in black walnut, and the walls are beautifully frescoed. The bell, weighing one thousand and forty pounds, was purchased from Meneely's bell-foundry, in Troy, at a cost of upwards of $500. It is of fine tone and quality.

The list of church officers comprises the names of James Goodwin, Isaac Noyes, Sr., Abraham Beecher, Isaac Noyes, Jr., Joseph Corey, Henry Bartlett, John Ford, Henry Herrick, and Willis Noyes, who were deacons; and Isaac Noyes, Sr., Phineas Warren, Wm. W. Elliott, Harvey Goodwin, Abraham Beecher, Willard Trowbridge, Salmon Hunt, Godfrey I. Shew, and Isaac Noyes, Jr., were elders.

The first minister who is recorded as sustaining the pastoral relation to this church was Rev. N.M. Wells, who preached for them in 1814. He was followed in order by Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong, Rev. Mr. Williams, Rev. Joseph Farrar, Rev. Halsey A. Wood, Rev. Mr. Monteith, Rev. M. Donalds, Rev. Benjamin H. Pitman, Rev: Royal A. Avery, Rev. P.R. Burnham, Rev. H. Rinker, Rev. S.P. Rollo, Rev. L.H. Pease (who served several months in the army as chaplain of the Forty-fourth New York Infantry), Rev. Isaac De Voe, Rev. B.P. Johnson.. Rev. Henry Lancashire, Rev. H.C. Stanton. Rev. Mr. Bryant is the present pastor.

The total number of names appearing on the church rolls show that at different times over six hundred persons have been members. These have dropped off in various ways, and the membership is about one hundred and seventy.

The Sabbath-school has about one hundred and thirty members, and is in a very prosperous condition. Wm. S. De Golia is the superintendent, F.E. Noyes the assistant superintendent, and Wm. W. Davenport secretary and treasurer.

------------------------------

VIII. - BURIAL-PLACES.

The first burial was Alfred Perry, a child of James Perry, two or three years old. This was about 1802. There was no road for wagons, and Azariah Ellithorp carried the coffin before him on horseback to the Hewitt burying-ground. There, surrounded by a group of mourning friends and sympathizing pioneers, the little one was laid to rest, waiting the resurrection of the just.

------------------------------

IX. - PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

In the eastern part of the town, on the south side of the river, near the line of Day, traces of an Indian burying-ground are seen. Bones and skulls have frequently been brought to the surface by the plow and harrow. Arrowheads, tomahawks, and other warlike implements have frequently been found there. It is supposed that at some early day a party of Indians camped by the river, or, attempting to cross it, were attacked by another party, and a fierce battle fought.

------------------------------

X. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

The town is not favorable to agriculture, and general farming is only limited in extent. Some portions of the town afford good pasturage for stock-raising and for dairy purposes. The people are, however, largely engaged in wood business, in lumbering, mills, tanneries, and manufactories.

Bachellerville in 1833 consisted of two dwellings, a sawmill, and a grist-mill. The water-power and mills at that time passed entirely into the hands of Ambrose Batcheller. In 1837, Sherman and Samuel Batcheller came to this place and built a new shop where the present Noyes & Early shop stands. This shop has been twice burned and rebuilt, once in February, 1851, and again in 1859. In 1848 the sawmill that stood on the site of De Golia's shop was torn down and a larger shop built. In 1853, Sherman Batcheller built the present King, Snow & Co.'s shop. The one shop was sold to Lucien De Golia in 1858. The other remained in Samuel Batcheller's hands until 1865, when it was sold to Benjamin R. Jenkins. In 1876 it passed into the hands of Samuel Batcheller, and from him to Noyes & Early, the present occupants. This shop manufactures half-bushels and smaller measures, and barrel-covers. It employs from ten to twenty men.

The shop built in 1853 by Sherman Batcheller was; in 1860, sold to Henry C. Whitney. In 1864 it was sold to Cyrus Sumner. In 1868, George S. Batcheller bought it, and in 1869 sold it to King, Steers & Persons. In 1870 it was sold to the present owners, King, Snow & Co. They employ about fifteen hands, and turn out an annual product of four hundred to five hundred dozen nests of flour-buckets, five thousand lard-tubs, and five thousand tobacco-pails. They use an overshot water-wheel, about seventeen feet in diameter, with eleven-feet wide buckets.

In 1858, Lucien De Golia and Levi Porter began the manufacture of washboards in the old shop he purchased of S. & S. Batcheller. In 1863 high water carried off the dam and shop. Lucien De Golia then went to work and rebuilt the shop a little farther down than the old one, and resumed business on an enlarged scale. In 1867 he took out a patent on what is called the "Combination Washboard," one side being zinc and the other wood. In 1876, on the 26th of July, this shop was destroyed by fire, and a heavy loss fell on its proprietor. It was immediately rebuilt, however, and the business resumed with vigor. The present firm is L. De Golia & Son. They manufacture about a dozen different kinds of boards. Their power is furnished by a sixty horse-power engine, with one large boiler. The engine-house, which is built of stone and is fire-proof, is about thirty feet square. This engine drives about thirty different pieces of machinery, which take the lumber in the log and send it out in finished boards. They use about five thousand market logs each year. They are hard wood, spruce, and basswood. They also use from one hundred and twenty thousand to one hundred and forty thousand pounds of sheet zinc in a year. They employ thirty-five hands, and turn out an annual product of twenty-five thousand dozen finished boards.

Joseph L. Snow kept the first store in Batchellerville. Henry C. Whitney kept the first hotel. The latter also built and ran a small wooden-ware shop in 1855 and 1856.

There was a shoe-peg factory here at one time.

------------------------------

XI. - MILITARY.

Of the heroes of the Revolution, several came and settled in this town. Among them we find the following names: Jonathan Smith was a captain in the continental army. Azariah Ellithorp served under Washington in Pennsylvania; was at the battle of Trenton, and passed the winter at Valley Forge. Samuel Stimson was at the battle of Bunker Hill. Isaac Noyes, Sr., Sampson Hosley, John Gordon, Samuel Downing, Robert and Benjamin Sumner were all veterans of that fateful struggle.

------------------------------

The War of 1812 also called out a good many citizens of the town. The following is as perfect a list as we have been able to obtain: Orderly Sergt. Silas Washburne removed to the west and died there. John Akley lives in Edinburgh, aged eighty-six years. Ananias lives in Stony Creek, Warren county. Wm. Vanavery died in Waterford. Daniel Buckalow died in Fulton county. Myron White died in Edinburgh. Nathaniel Robinson died in Edinburgh. Ephraim Potter moved to Black river country and died. Wm. Hill died in Orleans county. Solomon Scot; moved to the west. Lieutenant John Brown died in Ballston. James Rhodes died in Edinburgh. Stephen White died in the State of New York. John Gordon was one of General Porter's aids.

------------------------------

SOLDIERS OF 1861-65.

Wm. Henry Ames, corp., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. 1863; living in western New York.

Thomas Andrews, priv., 4th H. Art.; enl. 1861; disch. with regiment; re-enl. in 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav., and served till the close of the war; mustered out with regiment; living in Albany.

Thos. Barney, priv., 4th H. Art.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; disch. with regiment, and lives in Warrensburg, Warren Co., N.Y.

David W. Berry, priv., 115th N.Y. inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; discharged.

George S. Batcheller, lieut.-col., 115th N.Y. Inf.; was afterwards made inspector-general of N.Y. State, and is now serving as a judge in Egypt.

Oliver H. Batcheller, lieut.; graduated from U.S. naval academy at Annapolis, Md.; served with Farragut at Mobile and Port Hudson; pro. to be lieut. commander, and is now at Boston in command of Charlestown navy-yard.

Preserved A. Besom, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862; disch. with the regiment; living at Batchellerville.

Wesson Benson, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862; killed in action.

George W. Bidwell, priv., 22d N.Y. Cav.; enl. April 4, 1865.

David L. Bowman, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; wounded; discharged with regiment; living at Batchellerville.

Amos O. Brown, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; disch. with regiment; living at Jackson Summit when last heard from.

Calvin Brown, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; discharged; living in Edinburgh.

Daniel W. Barney, wagoner, Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862.

Ames Burk, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862.

Carmi Betts, musician, Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; disch. with regiment; living in Batchellerville.

John Booth, priv., enl. 1861: living in Edinburgh.

Daniel Cady, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; discharged; living in Batchellerville.

Timothy Cady, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; enl. 1862; died in the service.

John G. Casey, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; removed to the west.

Lorin Cole, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct, 1, 1861; died. in hospital at Georgetown; friends live in the west.

Wm. T. Conkling, 1st lieut., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; mustered in June 1, 1861; died in hospital, of disease; is buried at Rensselaerville, N.Y.

Charles D. Cozens, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; disch. with regiment; living at Mayfield, N.Y.

Addison L. Davenport, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; died of yellow fever, at Smithville, N.C., June 22,1865; hurled at Batchellerville.

John S. Dean, priv., 14th H. Art.; enl. Sept. 1, 1864; discharged.

Asa Deming, priv., Co. B, 2d H. Art.; enl. Jan. 5, 1864; discharged; living in West Day, N.Y.

Asa Deming, priv.; substitute for Chas. H. Barker; enl. Aug. 30, 1864; discharged; living at Carthage, Jefferson Co., N.Y.

------ Deming, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; enl. 1861; died of disease while in the service.

Ezekiel Deming, priv., 2d Vet. Cav.; enl. 1861; discharged; living in Edinburgh.

Horace Deming, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; re-enl. in 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; disch. at the close of the war; died since.

John H. Doming, priv., Co. B, 2d H. Art.; enl. Jan. 5, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living at West Day.

Mansfield A. Doming, priv., Co. B; enl. Aug. 15, 1862; died in service, at Perrysville, Ky., in 1863.

Simeon Doming, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; re-enl. in 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; disch. at close of the war; living In Edinburgh.

James B. Douglas, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 25, 1861; wounded at Spottsylvania, and died of wounds in 1864, at Washington, D.C.

Anson J. Downing, priv.; enl. 1861; discharged; living in Edinburgh.

Geo. T. Downing, commissary; living.

Morris J. Dryman, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8,1862; died on the battle-field.

Wm. Dullard, sergt., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; deserted at Bull Run; re-enl. in the regular army.

Geo. M. Evans, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1862.

------ Flack, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; enl. 1861; died in service, of disease.

George Fox, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Jan. 1, 1864; discharged; living in Edinburgh.

John Freeman, priv. U.S. navy; enl. Aug. 31, 1864; disch. at expiration of term of service; living at Conklingville, N.Y.

Leman Frost, priv., Co. D, 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 30, 1864; disch. June, 1805; substitute for Leman Partridge; living in Edinburgh.

Otis Frost, priv., Co. D, 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. March 15, 1865; disch. with regiment, July 9, 1865; living in Edinburgh.

John G. Graves, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 21, 1861; killed Aug. 30, 1862, at second battle of Bun Run.

Julian W. Graves, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 28, 1862; trans. to Co. E; disch. with regiment; living at Greenfield.

Wm. Graves, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. May 7, 1861; killed Aug. 30, 1882, at second battle of Bull Run.

Wm. Greenfield, priv., 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; disch. with regiment; living at Huntsville.

Abner Hall, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 13, 1862.

Wm. B. Hall, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 13, 1862.

Emery W. Hosley, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862; died of disease while in the service.

George L. Hayden, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 1861; fell overboard from U.S. steamer "Knickerbocker" and was drowned; the body was recovered, and buried May 17, 1862.

Charles D. Herrick, corp., Co. D, 4th H. Art,; enl. Dec. 25, 1861; pro. to be 2d lieut.; disch. with the regiment; living in Michigan.

Joe. M. Herrick, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862; pro. to be 1st lieut.; disch. with the regiment, and living In Michigan.

Wm. Douglas Herrick, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. July 29, 1862; pro. to be 1st lieut.; disch. with regiment; living in Ohio.

Charles J. Houghtalin, priv., 193d Inf.; enl. April 4, 1865.

John H. Hulburt, corp., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; disch. with the regiment, Dec. 13, 1864; living near Albany.

George W. Hutchinson, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862.

Chas. W. Jenkins, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; discharged with regiment; living in Day.

Wm. H. Jenkins, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; died of disease at Saratoga Springs soon after enlistment.

Nicholas Jensser, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; died in hospital from wounds received in battle.

David W. Jones, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; was wounded and left on battlefield; taken prisoner, and has not been heard from since; supposed to have died from wounds.

Willard Jones, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. July 25, 1862; died of starvation at Andersonville prison.

George B. King, sergt,, Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with regiment; died in Edinburgh since.

John S. King, priv.; enl. Feb. 16, 1862; captured at Gettysburg and paroled; he was again taken prisoner, Aug. 19, 1864, and confined in prison at Salisbury, N.C.; exchanged Feb. 27, 1865; disch. at close of the war, and lives at Conklingville.

Samuel W. King, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Edinburgh.

Warren E. Kinney, priv., U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 31, 1864; disch. at close of war; living in Batchellerville.

Charles W. Knight, sergt., Co. M, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 26, 1863; he enlisted early in the war, served two years, and re-enl. for three years; served till he was disch. for disability; living in Edinburgh.

Jesse Lewis, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; discharged; living in Edinburgh.

Wm. H. Lewis, priv, Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; disch. Oct. 18, 1863, for disability, caused by an affection of the spine; living In Edinburgh.

James Lockwood, Musician, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 12, 1861; re-enl. Jan. 4, 1863; disch. at close of war; living in Edinburgh.

Jesse Low, priv., 1st Metropolitan Regt.; enl. Sept. 4, 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Stony Creek.

David E. Lyon, priv., 4th H. Art.; enl. Sept, 10, 1862.

Louis Mackay, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 8, 1861; was taken prisoner at the seven days' fight before Richmond; exchanged; re-enl. Dec. 21, 1862; wounded at Antietam; participated in about twenty different battles; disch. July 7, 1865; lives in Edinburgh.

Henry C. McCuen, priv., 14th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 25, 1864; disch. at close of war; lives in Edinburgh.

James McLean, musician, Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; disch. with regiment; died in the west since the war.

Jonas McLean, sergt., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; enlisted about 145 recruits, mostly for three years; disch. at close of war; lives near Northville, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Jesse Moore, priv., Co. D, 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Feb. 3, 1863; was wounded in the knee-joint, at the Wilderness, and made a cripple for life; disch. May 30, 1865; living in Batchellerville.

Franklin Morrill, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; discharged; living at Saratoga Springs.

Edward Mott, priv., 192d N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 5, 1865.

Levi Myers, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; disch. with regiment; living in Edinburgh.

John H. Noyes, priv., Co. D, 4th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Aug. 26, 1862; served with his regiment as infantry at Cold Harbor and Petersburg; disch. at close of war; living in Edinburgh.

Newton S. Noyes, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. l, 1861; served in the ambulance corps of the Army of the Potomac; disch. with regiment, Dec. 18, 1864; living in Brattleboro', Vt.

Charles A. Perkins, priv. U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 31, 1864.

Henry P. Perry, musician, Co. D, 4th Art.; enl. Dec. 14, 1861; disch. Dec. 25. 1865; living at Batchellerville.

Franklin Priest, priv, Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 5, 1862; served with regiment, participating in several battles; disch. June 10, 1865; living in Edinburgh.

George B. Priest, priv. 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 12, 1862; disch. for disability in 1863; living in Gloverville, Fulton Co.

Peter S. Putnam, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; mustered out with regiment; living in Batchellerville.

Edwin O. Resseguie, priv., 4th H. Art.; enl. Sept, 8, 1862; he lost his health while in service, and became an invalid; disch. with the regiment; died in Edinburgh of disease contracted in the service.

Henry Rhodes, priv.; enl. 1861.

Samuel Rhodes, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living near Northville, Fulton Co.

Wm. Rhodes, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. 1863.

Francis Rice, priv., Co. I, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1862; living.

Michael Rice, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; living in Schenectady.

John Ross priv., 2d H. Art.; enl. Sept. 2, 1864; living in Day.

Hayden Shew, priv.; enl. 1861.

Mahlon Robinson, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 25, 1861; living at Gloversville, N.Y.

Amasa D. Shippey, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 15, 1861; trans. to Vet. Bat. 77th Regt.

Robert P. Smith, priv, Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. July 24 1862; disch. with regiment; living at Huntsville, N.Y.

Joseph H. Snow, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862; disch. with regiment; living in Albany.

George Steele, sergt., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; at the expiration of his term of enlistment he re-enlisted in the 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; pro. to be 1st lieut.; disch. at close of the war; living at Gloversville, N.Y.

Lyman Steele, priv., 1st Metropolitan Regt.; enl. Sept, 4, 1862; died in the service.

Wm. F. Stewart, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. inf.; enl. Aug. 7,1862; died of disease in hospital at New York.

James Tabor, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Sept. 3, 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Edinburgh.

Foster Taylor, sergt., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; served till expiration of time; re-enl. in 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav. as q.-m.-sergt.; disch. at close of war; lives at Batchellerville.

Charles E. Thorn, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 9, 1862.

Smith Travis, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 13, 1864; disch. at close of war; lives in Hope, Hamilton Co., N.Y.

James Varney, priv., 4th H. Art.; enl. 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Nebraska.

Russell Varney, sergt, Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; was wounded at second battle of Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1862; disch. with regiment; lives in Batchellerville.

Thomas J. Wheaton, priv., U. S. Navy; enl. Aug. 27, 1864; disch. at close of war; living in Northampton, Fulton Co.

John H. Whitaker, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1862; was taken sick, came home on furlough, and died March 27, 1865.

Henry Wm. Whitaker, priv. U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 27, 1864; served on U.S. steamer "Mahopac;" participated in battle of Dutch Gap; disch. Nov. 16, 1864, for disability; living in the west.

Myron White, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 25, 1862; wounded at the South-Side Railroad, and died from effects of wounds, April 11, 1865, in Army Square hospital, Washington, D.C.

Wing A. White, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Ballston.

Frank Whitney, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 1, 1861; participated in the battles of Yorktown, Mechanicsville, Antietam, South Mountain, first and second battles Fredericksburg, Wilderness, and before Petersburg; disch. Dec. 27, 1864; living in Batchellerville.

Hartwell H. Whitney, priv., Co. D, 4th H. Art.; enl. Dec. 28, 1863; wounded in front of Petersburg; died in hospital.

John H. Wickus, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 31, 1862; re-enl. in 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; killed in battle.

Paul R. Williams, priv.; enl. Aug. 16, 1864; substitute for Henry Wadsworth.

John Wood, priv., Co. K, 14th H. Art.; enl. Aug. 28, 1864; disch. June 26, 1865; living in Edinburgh.

Norman B. Wood, priv., Co. E, 4th H. Art.; enl. Sept, 3, 1862; disch. with regiment; living in Northampton.

Theodore Worden, priv.; enl. Aug. 30, 1864; substitute for Chas. H. Barker; disch. at close of war; living at Carthage, Jefferson Co., N.Y.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

JAMES PARTRIDGE.

 

Residence of Jas. Partridge (with portraits)

 

James Partridge, Esq., was born May 28, A.D. 1797, in Edinburgh, Saratoga Co., N.Y. (formerly the town of Northfield), and is now in the eighty-second year of his age, having from childhood resided on the farm he now occupies. He was married March 28, 1819, to Miss Clarissa Colson. They have lived together over fifty-nine years, and have had born unto them fourteen children, two of whom have died. Her first born son, Heman, died August 27, aged two years seven months and eleven days, having been born Jan. 8, 1820. Arnold P., another son, was born Feb. 23, 1830, and died Jan. 3, 1874, leaving a wife and three children. The remaining twelve are living, and all reside in the vicinity of their parental home.

Mrs. Partridge believed the death of her first child to be the result of the bad management of the physician; she therefore dismissed him, and treated the others, sick with the same disease, herself, and their lives were all saved, and for the succeeding fifteen years no doctor was called to visit any of the family.

The father of Mrs. Partridge was Wm. Colson, of Rupert, Vt., where she was born Dec. 3, 1798. He was a farmer by occupation, and a native of that State. He subsequently removed to Edinburgh, and died Aug. 13, 1845, aged seventy-six years one month and nineteen days, leaving a wife and eleven children, his wife having outlived him about nine years. She died April 25, 1854, aged seventy-seven years nine months twenty-one days. Mrs. Partridge in now in the seventy-ninth year of her age, and in excellent health for a matron of her great age. Her mother's name was Huldah Fraker.

The father of Mr. Partridge, whose name was also James, was born in Connecticut, March 9, 1748, and subsequently removed to Greenbush, N.Y., and afterwards to Northfield, now Edinburgh, where he raised a family of nine children.

The grandfather, Thomas Partridge, was born in England, and with a brother removed to America and landed in Philadelphia, about two hundred years ago. His wife's name was Geers, who also was born in England. The mother of the subject of this sketch, whose name was Ama, was a daughter of Nathan Herrick, of Connecticut. They were married Feb. 8, 1776, and of the nine children James was the youngest.

The oldest sister of James; whose name was Rebecca, was born Jan. 4, 1778, and was married to Marcus Goodin, and became the mother of eight children.

The second, a sister, whose name was Ruama, was born Nov. 14, 1780, and married Stephen Jackson, and became the mother of six children.

The third, a son, and oldest brother of James, was born May 23, 1782; his name was Thomas, and married Miss Katie Bank, but had no children.

The fourth, a sister, whose name was Polly, was born April 8, 1784, and married Augustus McKay, and became the mother of six children.

The fifth, a son, whose name was Frederick, was born Feb. 4, 1786: and married to Hannah Burnette, by whom he had two children.

The sixth, a son, whose name was Augustus, who was born April 8, 1789, and married and had eight children born unto him.

The seventh, a sister, whose name was Roxa, was born Oct. 5, 1790, and married Samuel Walsworth, and became the mother of six children.

The eighth, a sister, whose name was Eunice, was born March 28, 1795, and was married to Solomon Demming, and became the mother of five children. James was the ninth and last.

The surviving children of Mr. James Partridge and Clarissa Colson are as follows:

Truman, born Jan. 1, 1821, and married Miss Pamelia Brundage, of the town of Hope, by whom he has had four children, two of whom have died. Truman is a farmer.

Ruama was born Jan. 24, 1822, and married John C. Olmsted, cabinet-maker and undertaker. Eleven children have been born unto them, three of whom have died.

Huldah was born July 11, 1823, and married Jacob W. Ellithorp, of Edinburgh. They have had five children, one of whom has died. Mr. Ellithorp was a farmer, and died April 22, 1866.

Leman was born Nov. 27, 1824, and married Miss Grace Ann Gorthy, by whom he had three children. She died May 25, 1863, and the three children survive her. He subsequently married Miss Isabel Gorthy, sister of his first wife, by whom he has two children.

James S. was born May 28, 1827, and married Adelina Little, of Orleans county, by whom he had three children.

Emily M. was born Nov. 21, 1828, and was married to Wm. Jenkins, a farmer, of Edinburgh, by whom she has had no children.

The wife of Arnold P. was Miss Lillie Cook, of Northampton, by whom he had three children.

William was born July 6, 1831, and married Lorancy Mason, by whom he had seven children, three of whom, with his wife, have departed this life. She died July 1, 1873. He married Susan A. Walch, of Day, Nov. 27, 1875, by whom he has had one child.

Darius Wright was born April 10, 1833, and married Anna W. Mackay, by whom he has had three children, one of whom has died. He is a farmer by occupation.

Jane was born Aug. 19, 1835, and was married to John A. Cole; they have no children.

John H. was born March 8, 1837; is not married, but resides at the parental home in care of his aged parents.

Hollis Augustus was born Sept, 2, 1838, and married Miss Martha J. Wemple. No children survive.

Polly was born Aug. 23, 1840, and married Henry Goodin; they have no children.

The mother of James Partridge, and grandmother of the above children, Ama Herrick, lived to the great age of ninety-nine years nine months and twenty-nine days, and her companion died at the age of eighty-two.

Mr. Partridge has been a prominent business man and active citizen of Edinburgh for many years. In his earlier life he was engaged in farming and purchase and sale of cattle, - often driving large herds to Stonington, Conn., and mules to New Haven, for the West India market.

He has shared largely the confidence of his fellow-citizens, having been elected to the office of constable for eighteen years, and for seventeen years of this time he served in the office of town collector.

He held the office of assessor for eight years, and was justice of the peace for four years. He has held the offices of school-commissioner and poor-master. He was supervisor for the town of Edinburgh for one term, and held the office of deputy sheriff for twelve years. For years he was appointed one of the judges of the State fair, and elected a member of the Democratic State Convention. For the last twenty years he has been afflicted with rheumatism, and compelled to use crutches, and yet most of his life be has possessed a strong constitution and enjoyed excellent health.

Mr. Partridge had the contract for building the bridge across the Sacandaga at Bachellerville, and also at Day Centre, and was mail-contractor from Ballston to Northampton in 1840, and ran the first stage over the route. He had the route also from Northampton to Luzerne, and also from Galway to Schenectady, and over these routes carried the United States mail.

He is a Royal Arch Mason, and has been connected with the order fifty-nine years. His sons are also members of the order, and seven of them are members of the Fish House lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, No. 298, and the father and six of the sons belong to the Sacandaga Chapter, No. 116.

There were no deaths in the family for fifty-five years after the death of the first, and on the mother's side there were no deaths for the same length of time among her brothers and sisters.

It has been the custom of his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren to observe the anniversary of his birth, and also of his marriage, by a gathering of all these, together with the wives of his married sons, at the parental home. For the year 1875 there were present sixty-four persons, whose united ages amounted to one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five years.

At the last anniversary of their marriage the venerable patriarch lay upon a bed of sickness, from which it was feared he would not recover. On the evening of that day he was surprised to find all his children gathering around him. The pastor of the church near by was invited, and, after an earnest conversation with the venerable man, he requested that prayer should be offered. The clergyman, after a few appropriate remarks, bowed with the children around the bed of the aged father, and offered up an earnest prayer to God for his blessing upon the aged couple and their children. The table was spread, and refreshments provided, at which the venerable matron sat at the right hand of the minister, but the father could not leave his bed. Since the above gathering he has been partially restored, and able to sit at table with his family.

Residence of Squire Stark (with portraits)

Residence of L. De Golia (with portraits)

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Transcribed from the original text and html prepared by Bill Carr, last updated 2/7/00.

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