HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

CORINTH.

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I. - GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

CORINTH is one of the northern towns of the county. It is bounded on the north by Day and Hadley, east by Warren county and the town of Moreau, south by Wilton and Greenfield, west by Edinburgh.

Of the territory, twelve thousand four hundred and thirty-eight acres are improved, twenty-four thousand and twenty-one are unimproved; and of the latter only eight thousand five hundred and ninety-eight are forest, showing a large amount of waste land. The population in 1875 was 1659. The town is mostly within the twenty-second, twenty-third, and twenty-fourth allotments of the Kayadrossera patent. A narrow strip across the western part is a portion of the patent granted to John Glenn and others.

In the revised statutes of the State this town is described and its boundary lines defined as follows:

"The town of Corinth shall contain all that part of said county beginning at the southeast corner of the town of Edinburgh and running thence south along the east bounds of Providence to a point due west from the middle of a public highway south of and adjoining the late dwelling-house of George Shove, deceased, then east to the middle of the said highway, then east to the northwest corner of Wilton, then north thirty-two degrees east to a place called Flat Rock on or near the western bank of said river, then north to the bounds of the county, then westerly and northerly along the bounds of the county to a point six miles north of the south bounds of said town of Corinth, then west parallel to said south bounds to the east bounds of Edinburgh, and then south along the same to the place of beginning."

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II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

The surface of this town is rough and mountainous, abounding in wild and diversified scenery.

Its northern and western portion is occupied by the Kayadrossera range of mountains, and the Palmertown mountains occupy its southeastern part. These mountains are high, rocky ranges, mostly covered with thick forests of hemlock and hard-wood timber. Mount McGregor, a peak of the Palmertown range, is in the extreme southeast corner, and lies partially in the towns of Wilton and Moreau. It is becoming somewhat famous as a resort for summer visitors at the watering-places in the vicinity, the lovely landscape seen from its summit amply repaying the trouble incurred by a visit to the top of the mountain. A pleasant valley about four miles in width separates these two ranges of mountains. In the northwest part are several small lakes; among the largest are Efnor, Hunt, and Jenny lakes, and Black pond. The scenery around these lakes is very picturesque, and the waters abound with bass, while the brooks leading into them are all fine trout streams, furnishing a fine scene for lovers of the piscatorial art to try their wiles upon the finny tribes.

The principal streams are Early's creek, running along the base of the Kayadrossera range; Daily's creek, the outlet of the lakes above named, running northward across the west end of the town; Clothier's creek, running along the northwestern base of Mount McGregor; and the Kayadrossera creek, which rises in the southern part. The Hudson river flows along the eastern boundary in a generally south and easterly course. The great falls of the Hudson lie about the middle of the eastern boundary. They form a scene of remarkably grand and picturesque beauty. The river from Jessup's Landing runs swiftly in a series of rapids between high banks until it reaches the falls. The southern bank is a sheer, rocky precipice about one hundred and twenty feet high, fringed with pine, cedar, and hemlock at the top. The northern bank, though less abrupt, is a steep ascent, thickly wooded. The river-bed is rocky and broken, and the waters of the river, for fifty rods above the falls, rush through a narrow channel, descending some thirty feet in the distance, and hurl themselves over with irresistible force, dashing themselves to foam and spray as they descend the ragged, broken, and shelving rocks that form the face of the fall. The brink of the fall is in the shape of an are, and in very low water can be crossed on foot dry-shod. To the left of and above the fall stands a high, dark, sternly-silent pile of rocks, looking down with solemn grandeur upon the turbulent waters dashing themselves fretfully and impotently against its immovable base. Below the falls the bank takes a wide curve to the north, and in the broad basin thus formed the great river calms its agitation, smooths its ruffled surface, and resumes its onward course to the sea. For beauty, and picturesque and grand effects, the scenery of Palmer's Falls may well rank with any in the States. At one point, a few rods above the falls, the river passes through a narrow channel worn in the rocks, and a fourteen-foot plank will span from one side of it to the other. Here tradition says that several years previous to the Revolution a white trapper was pursued along the eastern bluff, and, dashing down the steep banks close to the falls, he made for this spot; and reaching it, in order to escape what was certain capture and certain death, nerved himself for the effort and vaulted over the foaming flood, alighting safely on the other side. None of his savage pursuers dared to venture the leap, and he plunged into the forest and escaped.

A half-mile above the falls a deep ravine runs down to the river. Its sides are steep and thickly wooded with pines. It is called "Indian Hollow." Many years ago it was a summer camping-ground for a tribe of northern Indians, who came there to fish and hunt.

The town is generally considered as possessing a very healthy climate, the air and water being pure and refreshing.

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III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The first settlements were made near Mount McGregor and at Jessup's Landing. There is some doubt regarding the exact date. While it is usually asserted that 1790 was the earliest date of settlement, there were evidently a few settlers prior to and during the early part of the Revolutionary struggle. Ambrose Clothier came into the town in 1775 and settled near Mount McGregor, in the southeastern part of the town. He had three sons and three daughters. The old gentleman and all his sons were noted "fiddlers" in their vicinity. It is said that when the old gentleman was over eighty years of age he heard, one evening, one of his sons playing a hornpipe. He crossed the road and, with nimble steps and unwonted vigor, danced a hornpipe and ran back home before the son got out of the house to see who was making the racket. Mrs. Alma Hikok, Morgan L. Clothier, Ebenezer Clothier, Mrs. Lincoln, Mrs. Woodward, and Miss Clothier, grandchildren of his, are still living in Corinth.

Samuel Eggleston, another early settler, came here before the Revolution. He settled near the Clothiers. He had a large family, consisting of seven sons and two or three daughters. Two of the sons are still living in Corinth. Two grandsons have became men of note in the west, where most of his descendants are living. Benjamin Eggleston, of Cincinnati, who has served several terms in Congress, and General Eggleston, a brigadier-general in the Union army and a prominent politician in Illinois, are the grandsons of Samuel Eggleston.

Benjamin Ide came from Jonesville, in what is now the town of Clifton Park, about 1777, and settled in the Clothier neighborhood. He had six children, Thomas, Benjamin, Jr., Timothy, Ebenezer, Patience, and Hannah. None of these are now living. Four grandchildren and a number of great-grandchildren are living in the town. The four grandchildren are William Ide, a son of Thomas Ide, and Mrs. Uriah Mallery, Mrs. Jno. C. Herrick, and Mrs. Simon Heath, daughters of Timothy Ide.

Jonathan Hodges, a soldier of the Revolution, came from Rhode Island into Greenfield in 1783, and soon removed into what is now Corinth. He had six sons and one daughter. One son, Claudius Hodges, is still living in Corinth. He is in his ninetieth year.

Wm. Grippen came to Corinth in 1778. Two of his sons are living, - one, Nelson W., in Corinth, the other, Alonzo J., in Ballston. One grandson, J.E. Grippen, lives at Jessup's Landing, and is now, and has been for several years, town clerk.

Lawrence Barber and Hathaway Randall were early settlers in the Clothier neighborhood.

Benjamin Cowles married Rosanna Boardman, a sister of Daniel Boardman, and in 1790-91 came from his former home in Sheffield, Massachusetts, and settled about one mile north of Jessup's Landing. From Jessup's Landing he was obliged to cut his own road through the woods. He had nine children, Nathaniel, Zina H., Chauncey, Orlando, B. Sedgwick, Henry E., Daniel H., Hannah, and Rosetta. He cleared some land and sowed and planted his crops the succeeding spring. During his life he lived on this homestead he had carved out of the wilderness, and died May 1, 1854, aged eighty-three years. In his life he was very prominent in political affairs, and was often the recipient of official honors at the hands of his constituents. In 1801 he was elected supervisor of the town of Hadley, and held that position for eighteen consecutive years. Upon the division of the town he was elected supervisor of Corinth, and served two years. In all he was supervisor twenty-four years. In 1812 he was appointed associate judge of the court of common pleas. In 1815 he was made master in chancery, and also elected to the Assembly. He also held the office of justice of the peace for many years. Two of his children, Elisha H. Cowles and Mrs. Rosetta Parmenter, are still living in Corinth.

Daniel Boardman came to Jessup's Landing with his sister and her husband. He lived in a house on the site now occupied by Mr. Brewer. He built a grist-mill and a store as early as 1793. He was an energetic business man and generally successful in his ventures. He accumulated property fast, and became the most wealthy man of the vicinity. He furnished most of the means to build the Baptist church, of which society he was an ardent and exemplary member.

Stephen Ashley was an early settler at Jessup's Landing, and kept the first inn there, about 1800.

The settlement at South Corinth was commenced about 1790, though some of the settlers in the near vicinity came a few years earlier. Among these we name a few of the most prominent ones.

Adam Comstock was born in Warwick, Rhode Island, in the year 1740, and in 1763 married Margaret McGregor. They had a family of seventeen children, the youngest of whom was born in Ballston, afterwards, by successive alterations, changed to Milton, Greenfield, Hadley, and Corinth. Entering the American army at the commencement of the Revolution, he became a colonel, and served in Washington's army. He was with the army during the winter of privation, hardship, and suffering at Valley Forge. At the battle of Red Bank, New Jersey, he distinguished himself by his valor, and at the defense of Mud fort (now Fort Mifflin) he, alternately with General Smith, of Maryland, commanded the American forces. Before the close of the war he resigned his commission, on account of the serious illness of his wife, and hastened to her bedside. Soon after his return to his native State he was elected a member of its Legislature. In 1785 he removed to this State, locating at Schenectady, where he remained one year, and in the spring of 1786 removed to this town, settling on the farm now occupied by Frank Angell, near the south boundary. In 1788 he erected the first frame building in the town. It was for many years used as a dwelling, but is now used as a corn-crib. He was appointed one of the first justices of the peace of Greenfield in 1794. Was associate judge of the court of common pleas in 1793. Elected a member of Assembly, from Milton, in 1792, he was successively reelected to that office for twelve years. He was a State senator from 1805 till 1808, and held a seat in the council of appointment during that time. In 1804 he was a presidential elector from Hadley, and had the honor of casting his vote for the immortal Jefferson. The descendants of this legislator have for three generations worn the mantle of official life. Oliver C. Comstock, a son, was a member of Assembly from Seneca county in 1810 and in 1812, and a member of Congress from that district for three terms, beginning in 1813. Oliver C. Comstock, Jr., a grandson, has served several years as a member of the Legislature of the State of Michigan; and Noah D. Comstock, a great-grandson, has served four years in the Wisconsin Legislature. Thus four generations of law-makers have sprung from this one family. Adam Comstock was a man of good education, of good ability, and of irreproachable character. He died in Corinth, April 10, 1829, and was buried in the family burial-ground. One grandson, William Comstock, and six great-grandchildren are living in this and neighboring towns. One of these, Thomas J. Comstock, now has in his possession the sword carried by his great-grandfather during his military career. His eldest surviving child, a daughter, died in 1869, aged ninety-one years. When he first came to this vicinity, he at one time got out of meat, and hearing that a man in Wilton (at that time Saratoga) had some pork, he took a bag and went after some. On his way back night overtook him, and soon the wolves, scenting the meat, began to congregate around him. Ascending a large rock, he armed himself with a heavy club, and spent the long hours of the night in a battle with his canine foes. With the dawn of day his tormentors fled, and he reached home in safety with his supply of provisions. While engaged in clearing the land, he and his sons one day heard a noise of distant chopping. Marking the direction, they took the first opportunity to search for their new neighbors, and, after cutting a path through a long stretch of unbroken forest, found a small clearing, where a man named Benjamin Carpenter had settled. Of this man, Carpenter, but little is known, save that he was an early sealer.

Nathaniel Edwards served in the French and Indian war, and was a captain in the American army during the war for independence. He enlisted from Connecticut, and served the whole seven years. His son, Isaac, enlisted at sixteen years of age, and served till the close of the war. About 1796 they came to Corinth through Greenfield Centre by a foot-path, or Indian trail, and located about one mile south of South Corinth village. Here they set to work clearing up the forest and making a home. Nathaniel built a small frame house, the first in the town, and Isaac built a log house. In the spring of 1797 they sowed wheat, planted corn, and started an orchard from seeds brought with them from their eastern home. Isaac Edwards had six sons and one daughter. Hon. Edward Edwards, a member of the Assembly in 1845, and again in 1864 and 1865, who resides at South Corinth, is the youngest of these children, and the only one living. He is a large land-owner, a prominent merchant for the past forty-six years, and a valuable citizen. He has in his possession some Indian relics in the shape of stone gouges, which the Indians used for tapping maple-trees when making sugar in the spring. They were picked up in the vicinity.

Frederick Parkman settled on the site of the present Big Tree Hotel about 1796, and kept the first inn in the town. He built a grist-mill on Kayadrossera creek, which was the first grist-mill in the county north of Ballston and south of Jessup's Landing. Frederick Parkman, a grandson, who lives at Jessup's Landing, is the only descendant living.

Jeremiah Eddy settled here, and kept the first black-smith-shop, in 1796-97. He had a large family, but one of whom, Harvey Eddy, is still living in Corinth.

John Purqua was a native of Hesse, in Germany. Going to visit a brother, who was in one of the regiments of soldiers hired to the British government, he was impressed into the service and brought to America He served three years, and then deserted the British flag, and soon after entered the American army, and served till the war closed. In 1793 he came from Rhode Island via Massachusetts and Vermont, and settled about one mile north of South Corinth. He had to cut his own road through the woods from the vicinity of Fort Edwards. He had three sons and three daughters. Peter, who lives on the homestead, and a daughter living in Illinois are the only ones living.

Jephtha Clark, Jonathan Deuel, Zebedee Mosher, Washington Chapman, James Cooper, and Timothy Brown were other early settlers near South Corinth; Stephen and William Brayton, at Jessup's Lauding; and Elial Lindsay, at Palmer's Falls.

Silas Nims came from Rockland, Mass., about 1800, and settled in the Gray neighborhood, in the north part of the town. He had a large family, of which but one, a son, Mr. John Nims, is now living in Corinth. Clark H. Nims, an adopted son of John Nims, lives at Palmer's Falls, and keeps hotel and boarding-house and a livery-stable.

The first lumber-mills in the town were built about 1800. Jonathan Deuel owned one at South Corinth in that year.

In 1810 there were between thirty and forty saw-mills in the town.

The first clothiery was built by Washington Chapman, on Kayadrossera creek, about 1805. The old building is still standing, but not in its original shape, and is now used as a bolt-factory.

The first store in South Corinth was kept by Hiram Chapman, in 1826.

Dr. Asa C. Barney, who lived in the town as early as 1805, was the first physician.

A man named Soudan was an early preacher in the south part of the town.

For the first and only time in the history of this town a murder was committed in 1819. The victim was a drinking man, well along in years, named Seth Haskins. He stopped at the house of his murderer, Benjamin Bennett, and asked for and received a drink of buttermilk. Upon leaving the house he was met by Bennett, who took a whip from a passing wagon and beat him unmercifully till the bystanders interfered and took the whip from him. Some three or four hours afterward Haskins was missed, and search being instituted, was found near by in a dying condition. A stone covered with blood and hair was found near by him. He lived but a few hours. Bennett was arrested, tried, and convicted, and was hung at Ballston, July 21, 1820.

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IV. - ORGANIZATION.

Corinth was formed from Hadley, April 20, 1818.

The first meeting held for the town was called for the purpose of deciding upon a name. This meeting was held at the residence of Washington Chapman, at South Corinth, at that time called "Chapman's Comers." Mrs. Chapman asked the privilege of naming the new town, which being accorded her, she turned to a Bible lying on the table, and opened it to look for a name. She chanced to open at the epistle to the Corinthians, and said, "There it is; it shall be called Corinth."

The first regular meeting was held in April, 1819, at John Ensign's tavern, just opposite the present Palmer's Falls hotel. It was called to order in the road, and Esquires Benjamin Cowles, Barry Fenton, Washington Chapman, and David Rogers presided, sitting on a pile of pine boards. The meeting was held out of doors. John W. Taylor, afterward a distinguished member of Congress, acted as clerk. Benjamin Cowles was elected supervisor.

The records of the town previous to 1844 have been lost or destroyed, so that any details of the early political history of the town cannot be given.

In the town books is the record of one marriage. The ceremony was performed by Esquire Thomas Brown, on the 25th day of February, 1865, at the bride's residence. The happy couple were Thomas D. Hayes, of Creek Centre, Warren county, and Mrs. Hannah Woodward, of Corinth. Thomas Watson was present as a subscribing witness, and the record was made by Olney L. Brown, town clerk.

The town had a health officer appointed once in its history. July 22, 1865, Dr. Elias Lester was appointed to take charge of a colored family suffering with the smallpox.

 

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LIST OF TOWN OFFICERS.

 

Supervisor.

Town Clerk.

Collector.

1819.

Benjamin Cowles.

Records lost

Records lost

1820.

"

"

"

1821.

Samuel McCrea.

"

"

1822.

"

"

"

1823.

"

"

"

1824.

"

"

"

1825.

David Rogers.

"

"

1826.

Benjamin Cowles.

"

"

1827.

William Jones.

"

"

1828.

"

"

"

1829.

David Rogers.

"

"

1830.

Thomas Dibble.

"

"

1831.

"

"

"

1832.

"

"

"

1833.

Benjamin Cowles.

"

"

1834.

"

"

"

1835.

Windsor Brown.

"

"

1836.

"

"

"

1837.

"

"

"

1838.

Jeduthan Lindsay.

"

"

1839.

Obadiah Wood.

"

"

1840.

"

"

"

1841.

William Ide.

"

"

1842.

Benjamin Cowles.

"

"

1843.

Benjamin F. Sims.

"

"

1844.

"

William Brown.

Ebenezer K. Clothier.

1845.

Theo. W. Sanders.

"

William Raymond.

1846.

"

David Eddy.

Joseph Barnes, Jr.

1847.

Henry S. Efner.

Jeduthan Lindsay.

Amos Clunis.

1848.

Arden Heath.

David Eddy.

Nelson W. Grippen.

1849.

Benjamin Grippen.

John R. Houghton.

John H. Card.

1850.

Amasa B. Martin.

Olney L. Brown.

"

1851.

Asahel Deuel.

N.W. Buckmaster.

Hiram Barass.

1852.

Arden Heath.

"

"

1853.

Asahel Deuel.

Nelson W. Grippen.

"

1854.

Arden Heath.

"

William E. Buttles.

1855.

A.C.T. Sherman.

N.W. Buckmaster.

Nelson W. Grippen.

1856.

Arden Heath.

Benjamin Grippen.

Spencer E. Burnham.

1857.

N.W. Buckmaster.

Jere'h E. Grippen.

James S. Brown.

1858.

A.C.T. Sherman.

"

Alfred Angell.

1859.

Nat'l M. Houghton.

"

Charles L. Allen.

1860.

Sylvanus Rugg.

"

"

1861.

Franklin Carpenter.

"

Nelson W. Grippen.

1862.

"

N.W. Buckmaster.

Charles L. Allen.

1863.

N.W. Buckmaster.

S.H. Hickok.

"

1864.

Tilly Houghton.

Salmon H. Hickok.

Peleg J. Randall.

1865.

"

Edmond Hickok.

"

1866.

"

David D. Sturdevan.

Luther Cole.

1867.

Franklin Carpenter.

Jeremiah Grippen.

"

1868.

"

"

Asel G. Hodges.

1869.

John C. Herrick.

"

Gilbert C. Ide.

1870.

John Ambler.

"

"

1871.

"

"

Olney L. Brown.

1872.

"

"

"

1873.

"

"

David T. Burnham.

1874.

"

"

"

1875.

Isaac S. Murray.

"

William H. Randall.

1876.

"

"

Emery J. White.

1877.

Gilbert C. Ide.

"

Clark H. Nims.

1878.

N.M. Houghton.

A.L. Parmenter.

"

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JUSTICES OF THE PEACE ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.

 

Benjamin Grippen.

Edward Edwards.

1861.

Enos Ambler.

1844.

David Eddy, l.t.

Gideon Comstock, l.t.

Darling P. Mallery, s.t.

1862.

Thomas Brown.

1845.

Benjamin Grippen.

1863.

David Lyon.

1846.

Benjamin F. Sims.

1864.

Daniel B. Ide.

1847.

Gideon Comstock.

1865.

Nelson W. Grippen.

1848.

David Eddy, l.t.

Elijah Trumbull.

1866.

Almerin D. Holden.

1849.

William Ide.

1867.

Asahel Deuel.

1850.

Tilley Houghton, Jr.

1868.

Daniel B. Ide.

1851.

David Lyon.

1869.

Nelson W. Grippen.

1852.

Benjamin Grippen.

1870.

Almerin D. Holden.

1853.

Amasa B. Martin.

Nathan W. Buckmaster.

1871.

Asahel Deuel.

1854.

Almerin D. Holden.

1872.

Daniel B. Ide.

1855.

Obadiah Wood.

1873.

Nelson W. Grippen.

1856.

Tilley Houghton, l.t.

David Lyon.

1874.

James E. Hickok.

1857.

John E. Comstock, l.t.

Truman Brown.

1875.

David T. Burnham.

1858.

Almerin D. Holden.

1876.

Daniel B. Ide.

1859.

Truman Brown.

1877.

Nelson W. Grippen.

1860.

Tilley Houghton.

1878.

Linus Wandell.

 

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V. - VILLAGES AND HAMLETS.

JESSUP'S LANDING is a small village in the eastern part of the town upon the Hudson. It was called Jessup's Landing because two brothers named Jessup, who were the first lumbermen in this section, and owned considerable land and some saw-mills in Warren county, used to land their rafts of lumber here, and carry the lumber by wagon across the country to a point on the river below.

It is also said that a man named Jessup kept a ferry at the point where it still is, and that the places was named after him. As early as 1800 it was quite a business point, but it never developed much until since 1851. It now contains about sixty-five dwellings, three churches, one school-house, two hotels, about a dozen stores and shops, a saw-mill, and a grist-mill. It has about five hundred inhabitants.

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PALMER'S FALLS is a hamlet at the falls, and contains about twenty dwellings, two hotels and boarding-houses, the works of the Hudson River Pulp and Paper company, and (when the mills are all in operation) about two hundred inhabitants.

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SOUTH CORINTH, in the centre of the southern part of the town, is a pleasant little village with about one hundred inhabitants. It contains twenty-five dwellings, six mills and shops, two stores, one hotel, one church (Methodist Episcopal), and a school-house.

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MOOLEYVILLE is a small hamlet in the southwest part of the town. Saw-mills, lath-mills, and the lumber business generally, have given the place whatever of importance it may have.

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VI. - SCHOOLS.

The early school-houses were built at South Corinth in 1800, and at Jessup's Landing about the same time. In 1811 the "Rock school-house" was built. It was the first frame school-house, and derived its name from being built upon a large flat reek.

Among the early teachers were Widow Church, Stephen Olney, Nehemiah Price, Mr. Spaulding, and Mr. Sabine.

Rev. Rodney D. Andrews came to Jessup's Landing in 1871 as pastor of the Baptist church. In March, 1873, with a view to afford an opportunity for those who desired to pursue a higher course of study than that afforded by the district schools, he opened a private school called "Corinth High School." The venture has been quite successful, the average attendance being about thirty scholars. The curriculum embraces all the branches of science, languages, etc., usually included in an academic course of study. Several teachers of the common schools in the vicinity have qualified themselves at this school.

 

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COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT FOR 1878.

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1

112

$52.14

$77.03

$67.08

$3.74

$199.99

" 2

33

52.14

22.70

16.35

1.10

92.29

" 3

45

52.14

30.95

33.39

1.50

117.98

" 4

20

52.14

13.76

16.12

.67

82.69

" 5

39

52.14

26.82

17.57

1.30

97.83

" 6

25

52.14

17.19

7.48

.83

77.64

" 7

145

104.28

99.73

92.25

4.84

301.10

" 8

36

52.14

24.76

17.58

1.20

95.68

" 9

28

52.14

19.26

18.98

.94

91.32

" 10

43

52.14

29.57

34.49

1.43

117.63

" 11

24

52.14

16.51

27.72

.80

97.17

" 12.

84

52.14

57.77

66.73

2.80

179.44

 

634

$677.82

$436.05

$415.74

$21.15

$1550.76

 

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VII. - CHURCHES.

THE BAPTIST CHURCH OF CORINTH.

The Third Baptist church of Greenfield was constituted Aug. 20, 1795, with seven male members. The number of female members is left in doubt. The only member named in the record was Daniel Boardman.

The church edifice was built early in the present century, probably about 1808 or 1812. Daniel Boardman was the principal person interested, and advanced a large share of the money necessary to build it. In 1833 the property was fully deeded to the society. In 1858 the church underwent extensive repairs, and a bell was put in. It now stands as it was then. Its seating capacity is about three hundred.

In 1801 the name was changed from Greenfield to Hadley, and in 1819 to Corinth.

The ministers who have served this church, named in the order in which they served, are Revs. Thomas Purrington, Samuel Savory, Joel W. Clark, Samuel M. Plumb, Benjamin St. John, Samuel Wood, Holt, H.H. Haff, Moses Randall, O. Dwyer, Palmer, Nelson Comb,, and Rodney D. Andrews, who is the present pastor, and commenced his pastorate June 1, 1871.

About three hundred and twenty different persons have connected themselves with the church at various times. The present membership is about seventy-six.

The present officers of the society are Enos Ambler and Darius Martin, deacons; John Ambler, clerk; Daniel Barrett, treasurer.

The salary paid the ministers has varied from $75 to $400. There has always been a Sunday-school connected with the church.

At one time there was an extensive revival connected with the Baptist church of Jessup's Landing, while Elder St. John was the pastor. The meetings were very interesting, and the people were wrought up to a high pitch of spiritual fervor. Meetings were held at seven o'clock every morning, and at other hours of the day and evening. As there was no bell on the church at that time, the minister used to go up and down the street every morning ringing a large dinner-bell to call the people together for the morning service.

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PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF CORINTH.

A meeting of the professed friends and followers of Christ was convened at the residence of Mr. William Scofield, about two miles south of Luzerne, on the river-road, August 29, 1814, at which meeting was organized the Congregational church of Hadley and Luzerne.

Rev. Cyrus Comstock, missionary, Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong, of Moreau, and Rev. Reuben Armstrong, of Bolton, were the committee that instituted the church. Rev. Cyrus Comstock was moderator, and Rev. Reuben Armstrong was clerk of this first meeting. Edmund and Hannah Sherman, Nezer and Thankful Scofield, Jesse and Mary Howe, Allen and Christian Stewart, Michael and Jane Kennedy, William Scofield, Charles and Catharine McEwen, Ruth Morehouse, Hannah Early, Lavinia Sherman, Lydia Sherman, Esther Holmes, Perula McQueen, Hannah Lindsey, and Jerusha Sage were the first members. Edward Sherman and Nezer Scofield were elected deacons. The society connected itself with the presbytery of Albany in December, 1814, and remained in this dual relation until 1822, when it changed to a Presbyterian society, and in 1831 assumed the name of the Presbyterian church of Corinth.

In 1832 a church edifice was erected at Jessup's Lauding, which was in use until about 1852, when the church died out, and the property was, in 1867, sold by an order of the county court, Judge McKean (since famous as a judge in Utah) presiding. It was bought by Mr. Matthew Owens for $300, and the money was applied to pay the debts of the society at Luzerne. The building is now occupied by Mr. Owens as a dwelling.

The ministers were as follows: Rev. Joseph Farrar, 1816; Rev. Wm. Williams, 1818; Rev. Mr. Manly, 1822; Rev. Mr. Cook, 1823; Rev. Mr. Beckley, 1825; Rev. Josiah Comstock, 1826; Rev. T. Redfield, 1828; Rev. Joel Wood, 1832; Rev. T. Redfield. Rev. Jeremiah Wood, a Presbyterian missionary, also preached for the church at one time.

The present Presbyterian church was organized Feb. 17, 1867, with eight members, viz., Mrs. Burnham, Eliza Burnham, Mr. and Mrs. Yack, Mrs. John Hill, Dr. John C. Herrick, Thomas and Marion Brown. Rev. John Woodbridge, of Saratoga, was the moderator of the meeting and chairman of the committee of presbytery which organized the church. Thomas Brown and John C. Herrick were elected elders. At a subsequent time R.P. Grant was also chosen to that office. The church edifice, a neat and tasty structure, situated near Palmer's Falls, was erected in the fall of 1873, and was dedicated in April, 1874. Rev. Henry Darling preached the dedicatory sermon, and Rev. Dr. Backus delivered the prayer. The church cost $2500.

The pastors have been Rev. Elihu Sandford, Rev. George Craig, Rev. William Durant, and Rev. Alexander Rankin, the present pastor, who began his connection with this church in January, 1872. The membership is now about thirty-six.

For three years past there has been a Sabbath-school connected with this church. It numbers at present about forty scholars. John Alexander is the superintendent.

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METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF CORINTH.

At some period between the years of 1825 and 1830, a Methodist Episcopal class was formed in Corinth, consisting of six members. These were James Creal, James A. Creal, John B. Rogers, Susan Carpenter, and two others. Services were held in the school-house, and in the Presbyterian church, until the Methodist Episcopal church was built. The church was built in the summer of 1858, and dedicated in September of that year. Rev. Mr. Robinson preached the dedicatory sermon. The size of the church is thirty-six by forty-eight-feet, and it has a capacity to seat about two hundred and fifty. There is a bell on the church. Rev. P.M. Hitchcock was pastor in charge when the church was dedicated. This church has always been one charge, in connection with the Methodist Episcopal church at South Corinth. The present membership is about sixty. William H. Ide, H.R. Grippen, and Matthew Owens are the class-leaders; Matthew Owens, William H. Ide, J.E. Hickok, and Edwin W. Wilcox are the stewards; and Matthew Owens, Eugene Lawrence, Truman Young, J.E. Hickok, and E.W. Wilcox are the trustees.

The Sunday-school connected with this church was started in 1850, as a union school. Subsequently, about 1871 or 72, the school was divided, and there is now a school in connection with each of the churches.

William H. Ide and Philip Rice were among the first superintendents. The present superintendent is Wm. H. Ide. Rev. Joel Martin is the present pastor of the church.

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FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF CORINTH.

For some little time previous to November, 1867, Rev. Daniel M. St. Clair, from Saratoga, had held occasional week-day evening services in the Methodist Episcopal church at Jessup's Landing, and at that time (November, 1867), organized a Free Methodist class in that place. This class was composed of J.H. and Sally M. Davis, Allen H. and Emily Woodcock, John Mallory, and James Morris. The present membership is fourteen. The hall in which their meetings are held is over Mr. J.H. Davis' store, and is a light, airy, and commodious room, neatly finished off with native wood, and capable of seating from one hundred and twenty to one hundred and fifty persons. The church has never had a regular pastor, but various ministers of the denomination from different places have preached occasionally; among others, Rev. Daniel M. St. Clair, Rev. William Gould, Rev. J.B. Freeland, Rev. Henry Matthews, and Rev. Benjamin Winger.

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VIII. - BURIAL-PLACES.

The burying-grounds in the town are as follows: first, on the south line of the town, near the place of R. Cooper; second, east of South Corinth, near the farm of T.G. Carpenter; third, in the Eggleston neighborhood, near the place of Mrs. Woodward; fourth, near the river, at the place of E. Woodworth; fifth, near the school-house, in district 6, not far from J. Earley's; sixth, south of the village of Jessup's Landing; seventh, in the northwest part of the town, near school-house No. 9.

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IX. - TOWN SOCIETIES.

In 1823 application was made to the Grand Lodge of the State of New York for a charter for a lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, to be located at Jessup's Landing, and to be known as Corinth Lodge. The charter was granted, and the lodge elected John W. Creal W.M. It flourished for a time, and had about thirty members. In 1826, William Morgan was abducted from Canandaigua, and his abduction and probable murder caused such a wave of indignation throughout the State that many lodges succumbed to the pressure and went down. Among these lodges was Corinth, which ceased to work in the fall of 1826, or in the succeeding winter. The meetings were held in the second story of the Baptist church.

For forty-one years the lodge remained in this condition, the charter, regalias, and officers' insignia having been taken to the west by J.W. Creal, W.M., when he removed there. But in 1867 a petition was presented to the Grand Master of the State for a dispensation to organize a lodge. The dispensation was granted, and the lodge organized under the name of Corinth Lodge, No. 683, F. and A.M., in September of that year, with thirteen members. June 30, 1868, their charter was granted by the Grand Lodge. The first officers were George Decker, W.M.; William Ide, Sec.; Matthew Owens, S.W.; Obadiah Wood, J.W.

The meetings are now held in a well-furnished and commodious hall over Dayton & Hough's store. The lodge now numbers about seventy members. The present officers are: W.M., Isaac S. Murray; Sec., Appleton Holden; S.W., Henry W. Mallery; J.W., Clinton Clothier; Treas., James Early.

The first and only Odd-Fellows' lodge organized in this town was chartered August 17, 1853, as "Corinth Lodge, No. 174, I.O.O.F." There was something near a dozen members at the date of its institution. The first officers were Darling P. Mallery, N.G.; Zina Mallery, V.G.; Luke C. Bartlett, R.S.; William Ide, Fin. Sec., Silas Allen, Warden; John M. Ellsworth, Cond.

The lodge has flourished from the commencement, and now has a membership of about one hundred and thirty. Among the present officers are Ezra Sayres, N.G.; Henry Allen, V.G.; Theodore Labram, R.S.; William Brown, Fin. Sec.; and Henry W. Mallery, Treas. The meetings are held in a pleasant and well-furnished hall over Daniel B. Ide's hardware-store, at Jessup's Landing.

At South Corinth is a flourishing lodge of I.O.G.T. It is known as "Excelsior Lodge, No. 228," and was first instituted in 1867. In 1875 it surrendered its charter and took a new one. It has about sixty members. The meetings are held in a fine hall over E. & G.W. Edwards' store. The present officers are George B. Lyon, L.D.; Albert Densmore, W.C.T.; Smith Allen, W. Sec.; Susan Lyon, W. Treas.

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X. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

The agriculture of this town is of a limited character.

The soil is generally a sandy and sometimes a clayey loam, and in the valley is quite productive. But little wheat is grown, and corn is the main crop.

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MANUFACTURES.

The water-power at the great falls was utilized to a limited extent in the early part of the century. The first mill was a saw-mill, built probably about 1804. It was owned by Ira Haskins as early as 1810. This mill stood until 1825, when it was torn down, and a new mill was built by Thomas, Ebenezer, and William Ide. Meantime, Thomas Harshe had built a grist-mill, and George W. and Matthew Harshe a woolen-factory, about 1820. These mills ran till about 1828 or '30, when Beriah Palmer, of New York, purchased the power and property. From that time it was idle until 1859. At that time, Mr. Thomas Brown, from Niagara Falls, came and purchased the property. He built a large race or canal to conduct the water to his works, and then built a shop to be used as an edge-tool manufactory. This commenced running in 1860. Owing to the breaking out of the Rebellion, and the rise in price of iron and labor, the shop was not kept running long. In 1865, Mr. Brown commenced building a woolen-factory, which began running in 1866. On the evening of the 7th of November, 1869, Mr. Brown left his home, and going to the factory, took an armful of cloth from the drying-racks and carried it into the building. Coming out he was met by his night-watchman, who had just wakened from sleep, and who, mistaking him for a burglar or incendiary, drew a pistol and fired. The ball entered the breast and, passing through the lungs, lodged against the spine. Mr. Brown lived but a few moments after being shot. After his death the property passed into other hands. In July, 1870, the factory was burned. It was rebuilt about twenty rods south of its former location. It was run, under the superintendence of Mr. R.P. Grant, until about 1874, when it was purchased by the Hudson River Pulp and Paper company, and is now used by them as a storehouse.

In April, 1869, the foundations for the works of the Hudson River Pulp and Paper Co. were commenced, and the work was pushed so rapidly to completion that Sept. 1, 1869, saw the wood-pulp mill in successful operation. In 1870 the old edge-tool factory was converted into a paper-mill with one eighty-inch machine, and the manufacture of printing-paper was begun. The business increased, and, in 1872, a new mill was commenced on the site of the burned woolen-factory. This was completed in 1873, and commenced running in May of that year. It contained one seventy-two-inch and one sixty-eight-inch machine, and manufactured a fine quality of printing-paper.

The patent for the manufacture of wood into pulp for the manufacture of paper was issued in 1861, but was not utilized until this mill started in 1869. The pulp is made from spruce- and poplar-logs. The logs are cut into blocks about fifteen inches long, peeled, split, and washed clean. They are then put into a machine which presses the inner face of the block against a rapidly-revolving grindstone, which reduces it to a soft white pulp. This is run through a screen, taken up on another, transferred to a felt, and run between heavy rollers, the top one gathering the pulp into a thick sheet, which is stripped from the roll and folded, tied up in bales, and is the wood-pulp of commerce. The mills of this company use about five thousand market logs, three thousand five hundred cords of fire-wood, and one thousand five hundred tons of rags every year, and produce ten tons of dry pulp and seven tons of printing-paper every twenty-four hours. They employ about two hundred hands. The power is furnished by ten iron turbine water-wheels, furnishing in all between six hundred and seven hundred horse-power. They use but thirty feet of the seventy-feet fall. They also use four large boilers for heating and drying purposes.

The office of the company is at 45 Bearce St., New York. The officers are A. Pagenstecher, Germany, president; A. Pagenstecher, New York, treasurer; W. Miller, Herkimer, secretary; Warren Curtis, Jr., Palmer's Falls, superintendent. The capital of the company is $250,000.

In April, 1877, the large mill was burned. The fire was caused by spontaneous combustion generated in the rags in the store-room. Two weeks after the fire the wall of the race gave away and washed away the southern part of the pulp-mill. The company are now at work rebuilding the mills.

At South Corinth, in 1855, Powell & Co. built a small tannery. It was located about half a mile west of the village, on Kayadrossera creek. In August, 1874, the tannery was destroyed by fire, but was immediately rebuilt by Rugg & Son, of Schenectady, who are present owners. The tannery uses about six hundred cords of bark in a year, and about five thousand "slaughter" hides and calf-skins. These are converted into sole, harness, and upper leathers, kip- and calf-skins. It furnishes employment for about six men. The power used is furnished by a water-wheel.

The woolen-factory built by Washington Chapman, in 1805, has been repaired, and additions built on from time to time, until the building presents but little trace of its former shape and size. It is now used by Morgan L. Prentiss, for the manufacture of carriage and other bolts, forged and turned nuts, and charcoal foundry facing. The works have a capacity for making a million and a half of bolts yearly, and can turn out twelve barrels of facing in a day. When running full capacity about ten hands are employed. Water furnishes the motive power used.

The most prominent of the business men of the town is Dr. Nathaniel M. Houghton, who resides at Jessup's Landing. He owns upwards of four hundred acres of farming lands, and two thousand two hundred acres of forest lands, besides having a half-interest in other lands of considerable extent. He contracts and furnishes about two thousand cords of hemlock-bark every year. He has two steam saw-mills in the southwest part of the town, that turn off an annual product of from one million to two million feet of spruce and hemlock lumber. This is shipped from South Corinth station, where large piles of lumber are kept constantly on hand ready for shipment when the market is favorable. The mills furnish employment for from ten to one hundred men, who are engaged in felling, peeling, drawing, and sawing the logs. Upwards of fifty teams are kept busy through the winter hauling logs to the mills. Dr. Houghton is a son of Tilley and Lucy Houghton, who came from Vermont and settled in the western part of the town of Corinth in 1815. None of his brothers or sisters are living here now. He has been quite prominent in public affairs, has served as supervisor, and went twice to the Legislature, in 1862 and 1863.

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XI. - PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

In the fastnesses of this wild, mountainous region there were doubtless many places where Indian battles occurred, but their history has not come down to the present time in the annals of the various tribes that roamed through this section of the State.

At Jessup's Landing, too, was one of the haunts of the Tories in the Revolutionary war, and many incidents doubtless occurred in that vicinity worthy the pen of the historian. Only in that indirect way did this portion of the county share in the great events occurring along the Hudson.

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XII. - MILITARY.

A few items with reference to Revolutionary soldiers are already mentioned in the notes upon early settlement.

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With reference to the War of 1812, the citizens of this town shared to some extent in the excitement and alarm, particularly about the time of the battle of Plattsburg. It is not easy to obtain extended lists of those who were enrolled in the militia or who served in the regular army. Among the people the names of Thomas Wheaton, Peleg Eddy, and Daniel Cole are mentioned as soldiers of the War of 1812.

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WAR OF 1861-65.

When Fort Sumter was attacked, in 1861, the citizens of this town were aroused, and immediately set on foot measures to aid and sustain the general government in the work of putting down the Rebellion. And through all the long struggle their efforts were not relaxed or their courage diminished, but they gave freely of their blood and treasure to carry on the work of maintaining the integrity of the government. As near as can now be ascertained, the following is a substantially correct list of the soldiers of the Union army who went from this town:

Frederick W. Andrews, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; died of disease at Davey's Island, N.Y.

Horace Ballou, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; enl. 1863; disch. at close of the war; lives at Saratoga.

Aaron Bratt, priv., 30th N. Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; died of disease in the service.

Timothy Brewer, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. for disability.

Archibald E. Brooks, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; captured with regiment at Harper's Ferry; paroled, and died of disease at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

Geo. Brooks, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; disch. with the regiment at close of the war; lives in Corinth.

Francis Brower, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. for disability at Comp Douglas; re-enl. 2d Vet. Cav.; disch. at close of the war; living in Corinth.

David T. Burnham, priv., 30th N. Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; pro. to 2d lieut.; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Daniel Cady, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Henry W. Cass, orderly sergt., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; pro. to a lieutenancy in a regiment of U.S. colored troops; disch. at close of the war; living in Illinois.

Chas. Chapman, priv., Co. G, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Asa J. Clothier, corp., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in Minnesota.

J.S. Clothier, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

Wm. M. Clothier, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Dwight Combs, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living at South Corinth.

Justin Combs, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; died in hospital, of disease, while in the service.

Charles Davis, priv.; captured and died at Libby prison, Richmond, Va.

R.H. Densmore, priv., Co. E, 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. for disability, caused by wounds; living at South Corinth.

S.T. Densmore, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; captured in Olustee, Fla., and starved to death in Andersonville prison, Georgia.

Peter Deuel, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; died with the measles in U.S. hospital near Washington, D.C.

Elijah Earls, Jr., priv., Co. E, 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

James Early, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; enl. 1863; disch. at close of the war; living at Jessup's Landing.

Luther Frazier, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; died in the service.

Truman Gray, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; captured at Harper's Ferry; living in Corinth.

Byron Guiles, priv.; enl. 1862; disch. honorably; living In Nebraska.

Samuel Guiles, priv.; enl. 1862; died of disease while in the service.

Harmon Hagerdorn, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; was wounded, captured, confined three hundred days In Salisbury, N.C., and disch. for disability; living at Jessup's Landing.

John Haggerty, priv.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Ambrose C. Hickok, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; trans. to Invalid Corps; disch. at close of the war; living in Corinth.

Solomon Hickok, priv., 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; pro. to sergt.; died of disease in the service.

Daniel B. Ide, corp., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; captured at Harper's Ferry, and disch. at Camp Douglas for enlargement of the heart; living at Jessup's Landing.

Gilbert. C. Ide, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; pro. to sergt.; disch. with the regiment; lives at Jessup's Landing.

Nathan M. Ide, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; pro. to sergt.; killed at Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864.

Havillah J. Loop, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; captured at Olustee, Fla.; was exchanged, but was unable to again enter upon active service; disch. with the regiment; lives in Troy.

F. La Pierre, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

George B. Lyon, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in South Corinth.

Wm. P. Lyon, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Henry W. Mallery, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; detailed for duty in hospital; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Levi Manning, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in Stillwater.

Hugh McCouchie, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; re-enl. in 2d Vet. Cav., 1863; disch. at close of the war.

Joseph McCouchie, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; died of disease while in the service.

John Merrill, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

J.I. Monroe, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861.

Wm. H. Monroe, priv., Co. D, 77th Inf.: enl. Nov. 1861.

Frederick Parkman, priv.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living at Jessup's Landing.

George Place, priv.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; living in Saratoga Springs.

Isaac Plue, priv.; enl. 1861; died in the service.

John Redmond, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; captured at Harper's Ferry; living in Corinth.

Philip Rice, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; pro. to 2d lieut.; killed at Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862.

John St. John, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1882; disch. with the regiment; living in Corinth.

Darius Schofield, M.D., priv.; enl. 1863; pro. to assist. surg.; disch. at close of the war; lives at Washington, Iowa.

Chauncey Searls, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; lives at Putnam, Ohio.

Augustus Sherman, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; disch. for disability; lives at Jessup's Landing.

Alexander Showers, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; trans. to regimental band; disch. with the regiment; living in Greenfield.

Joseph H. Showers, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; died of disease while in Army Square hospital, Washington, D.C., Dec. 21, 1862.

Thomas Smith, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; pro. to 1st lieut.; re-enl. as capt. in 2d Vet. Cav.; disch. with the regiment; died, since the war, of consumption contracted while in the service.

Joel Taylor, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in the west.

James Turner, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living at Jessup's Landing.

Reuben Varney, priv., Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; captured at Harper's Ferry; paroled.

Alexander Walker, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; pro. to color sergt., and riddled with bullets; fell on the field of Antietam, Md.

David L. Walker, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 186l; re-enl. 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; disch. at close of the war; living at Jessup's Landing.

Epaphroditas Walker, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; re-enl. 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; disch. at close of the war; living at Jessup's Landing.

Romaine Walker, priv., 30th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; re-enl. 2d N. Y. Vet. Cav.; disch. at close of the war; living at Jessup's Landing.

Lloyd Wesson, priv, Co. F, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; killed at Olustee, Fla.

Benj. Wheaton, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; died in Corinth since the war.

Emory J. White, priv., 2d N. Vet. Cav.; enl. 1863; disch. with the regiment; died since the war.

Myron W. Wilcox, priv.; enl. 1861; trans. to medical department; disch. with the regiment; living in the west.

Hamilton B. Woodcock, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. for disability on account of wounds; living in Greenfield.

Henry J. Woodcock, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; disch. with the regiment; living at Argyle, Washington county.

Hiram Woodcock, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; died at Lake City, Fla., March 3, 1864, of wounds received at Olustee.

Jesse F. Wood, priv.; enl. 1861; disch. with the regiment; died since the war.

Wm. Woodward, priv., Co. G, 115th N.Y. Inf.; killed in battle.

Uriah Young, priv., Co. G, 30th N.Y. Inf.; killed in battle.

During the war the town of Corinth assisted the needy families of several volunteers, paying them from $1.50 to $3 per week.

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