HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

NORTHUMBERLAND.

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I.--GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

THE town lies upon the Hudson river northeast from the centre of the county. It is bounded north by Moreau, east by the county line, south by Saratoga, west by Wilton. It contains fifteen thousand and two acres of improved land, four thousand four hundred and thirty-nine of unimproved, and of this last amount two thousand nine hundred and twenty-four are woodland. The population in 1875 was sixteen hundred and twenty-two. It is wholly within the Kayadrossera patent.

For the purpose of convenient reference we include the following legal description of the town and the definition of its boundary lines, as given in the revised statutes of the State.

"The town of Northumberland shall contain all that part of said county beginning in the east bounds of the county, at an easterly continuation of the north bounds of lot number four, in the twentieth general allotment of the patent of Kayadrossera, and running thence westerly in the direction of said north bounds the distance of five miles and fifty-three rods from the west bank of Hudson's river; then southerly one degree east to the north bounds of the tenth allotment of said patent; then east along the same and continuation thereof to the bounds of the county; and then northerly along the same to place of beginning."

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II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

A line of clay and slate bluffs thirty to one hundred feet high extends along the river. Snoek Kill and its tributary, the Beaver Dam creek, are the principal streams, fed by smaller rivulets. The Beaver Dam creek forms a singular natural boundary between the clay and slate soils of the eastern portion and the light sandy loam of the west. This creek derives its name from the beaver dams found along its course in early times.

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III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

As early as the year 1765, James Brisbin, a native of Scotland, came to what is now Northumberland, then Saratoga, and settled about one and a half miles westerly of Fort Miller, towards Bacon Hill. His first wife had died in Scotland, and his two sons born there, William and Samuel, about the same time settled in what is now Wilton, in the Laing neighborhood. James Brisbin for his second wife married in Scotland Margaret Carruth, a somewhat remarkable woman. By her he had the following-named children: Margaret C., died in Scotland; Elizabeth; John, who settled in Old Saratoga in 1771; Margaret, who married Conrad Cramer; Carruth; James, who married Mary Taylor, of Argyle, Washington Co.; Robert, the ancestor of Sheriff Brisbin; and Jane.

Hugh Monro was also a pioneer before the Revolution, at what is now Gansevoort. He made, in 1765, a small opening in the forest, built a log house, and erected a sawmill. This was at the creek, near the site of the present unused woolen-factory. Whatever there was of a settlement in that section in those early times, and for many years later, was at that point, and not at the present railroad station. There is still seen the building used as a law-office by Judge Esek Cowen when associated with Gansevoort, in 1808.

Mr. Monro, adhering to the English crown in the opening of the Revolutionary war, found it convenient to remove to Canada, and never returned to this place.

On the river a Mr. Graham, of whose history or settlement we can obtain but little account, had purchased the farm now owned by Samuel Thompson before the Revolution, cleared a small portion of the farm, and erected a house. This was burned by the scouts of Burgoyne's army in the campaign of 1777. Just what year Mr. Graham settled in this town is difficult to be determined.

It is pretty certain, too, that John Mahawny was in this town before the Revolutionary war, as early as 1770. His farm was the one now known as the Stephens place. This fact is all that we have obtained concerning his settlement.

On the authority of Mrs. Metcalf, of Schuylerville, as well as of Abram Marshall and others, who are very likely to be correct on these matters, it is believed that Archibald McNeil was the first settler at the present village of Northumberland, probably as early as the Revolutionary struggle. He was a gentleman of wealth and leisure, from Boston, Mass., and lived in the style his means permitted. His house was a little below the old hotel called the Richards House, and on the other side of the road.

The pioneer family of Vandewerkers were also here before the war, perhaps for some years. This is rendered evident by the positive statements of Mrs. Metcalf, before alluded to, who, with her father, Mr. Van Tuyl, came to Northumberland in 1803. Mrs. Metcalf states that Mrs. Vandewerker had often talked over in their house the dangers she and her family had passed through during the war, when the fear of the scalping-knife and the tomahawk invaded every pioneer's home. She was often obliged to take her children across the river and hide them in the woods for safety. This Vandewerker homestead was near the river, about two miles above Northumberland village. In going across the river for safety it is probable Mrs. Vandewerker went to her father's family at the Peepin Pass, near Bald mountain.

Isaac B. Payne was also here before the war, and lived nearly opposite the mouth of Moses Kill; Stephen Payne and Nathan Payne a little farther north. There were four other brothers, Noah, Samuel, John, and Benjamin; perhaps these were all in or near this same neighborhood. Some of them on the other side of the river.

In 1772 three brothers and a brother-in-law, Wynant Vandenburg, John Vandenburg, Cornelius Vandenburg, and Peter Winney, bought sixteen hundred acres of land, with a saw- and grist-mill already built. The first was at the upper falls, opposite Fort Miller village, where Harris' saw-mill now stands, and the grist-mill was at the lower falls. It is not ascertained who erected these mills, but they must have been built about the same time as Monroe's, or perhaps earlier. The Vandenburgs paid $2000 for the sixteen hundred acres. They came with their families in the fall of 1772, and Wynant built a log cabin on what is now the farm of Widow Harris. The next year he built a frame house. The location of the other three homes is not exactly ascertained. Here they endured the perils and anxieties of the opening war, added to the hardships incident to a new home in the thick forest. In 1777, Wynant Vandenburg and family went to Albany for safety, as very likely the other families did. Even after the defeat of Burgoyne it was difficult to live here with safety until the peace of 1783.

The McCrea family, in which John and Jeanie are the ones principally remembered, settled before the Revolution, on the river, in the neighborhood of the Paynes.

The murder of Jeanie by the Indians at Fort Edward, and the service of John in the Revolutionary army, render their names noted in history.

These are about all the names that we have authenticated as residents within the present limits of Northumberland before the war. Further settlement was prevented by the seven years' struggle, and it was not till after the peace of 1783 that new settlers began to venture in.

In 1785, James McCreedy and John Terhune, of Fish-kill, came into this county, and selected a tract of two hundred acres, purchased of a Mr. Campbell, in Schenectady. To reach their farms they were obliged to cut a road a part of the way from the river. Taking an old path as a convenient line of division for their land, it left one one hundred and four acres, the other ninety-six. Mr. McCreedy settled where Abram Marshall now lives, and Mr. Terhune on the present Dodd farm. They had become informed about this section of country during the war. The McCreedy family has a war record surpassed by few or none. James McCreedy, his father, and grandfather, were all in the American army during the Revolution.

William McCreedy, son of James McCreedy, now living in Schuylerville at an advanced age, from whom we have obtained many facts in the history of Northumberland, was in the army during the War of 1812, and three brothers, - Jeremiah, Gamaliel, and Charles. The last named was a surgeon, and was drowned in Boston harbor by the capsizing of a sail-boat while in the service. The name of McCreedy appears again upon the rolls of the vast army that went to the field of battle in 1861, to preserve the free institutions established by the Revolutionary struggle, and safely rescued from danger in 1812. William McCreedy had one son in this war, making five successive generations who fought in defense of their country.

John Terhune had also been in the American service during the war. He was a brother-in-law of James McCreedy. He left three sons, - John, Albert, and Jeremiah. The last named was an adjutant in the War of 1812, and his son James was also a volunteer in the War of 1861-65.

Other early settlers followed soon after, in 1807 or 1808, Philip G. Viele and Richard Burt moved in. Mr. Burt settled somewhat below the falls at Fort Miller, and erected mills. Mr. Viele settled on what has since been known as the Albert Terhune farm, north of Bacon hill, and a mile west of the river. He came from Schaghticoke, and was a blacksmith. He was a stout, heavy-built man, six feet in height, weighing two hundred and forty. When six Tories attacked him in his own shop at Schaghticoke, he drew himself up against the side of the shop and, sledge-hammer in hand, defied them. As death was certain to one of them, they desisted from the attack. But not long after, with the courage of cowards, they dragged him from his bed at midnight, put a rope around his neck, threw it over an apple-tree, and compelled him to take the oath of allegiance to save his life. On this account he went to Canada, to avoid further "unpleasantness."

Lothrop Pope came in about the same time, and perhaps divides with Mr. Viele the honor of being the first blacksmith. He located where Mr. Cramer now lives. He is remembered by many old people as being the principal blacksmith in town for many years.

Joseph Palmer settled on the farm now owned by George Peck. He was a surveyor. Jared Palmer, for many years a town officer, was the son of Joseph.

Nicholas Vandenburg, supposed to be a brother of those already mentioned, moved to this town about the year 1790. He bought a farm next north of the sixteen-hundred-acre tract, the old pioneer homestead being where Nicholas Vandenburg, a grandson, now lives at Fort Miller. There have been three of the same name - grandfather, father, and son. The father is yet living at the age of eighty-five.

Samuel Lewis, just after the war, bought the farm, a part of which is now owned by his grandson, Samuel Thompson. As already mentioned, it was purchased of a Mr. Graham. A house upon the place had been burned by the British army. Mr. Lewis had been a lieutenant in the force under General Gansevoort at the siege of Fort Stanwix. He was the father of Professor Tayler Lewis, late of Schenectady. In the old school-house in this neighborhood the future professor commenced his education, and in his later years he delighted to return, enter the schoolhouse with spelling-book in hand, and with enthusiasm renew the precious early memories of childhood. There he learned to "parse," a vigorous grammatical exercise, which he was wont to remind his college students in after-years could never be supplanted by any modern diluted se-called analysis.

Captain Samuel Lewis, as the old pioneer was called, left three other sons, - General Samuel Lewis, late of Gansevoort; John Lewis, of Wisconsin; and Morgan Lewis, still living at Gansevoort. In the War of 1812 the old captain sent his teams with loads of soldiers to Whitehall, at his own expense, not having learned the modern art of drawing heavy bills on the government. A hired man walked out of the field one day to join the companies passing for Plattsburg. The captain took down the old Revolutionary musket, gave it to him, saying, "Take it, but don't dishonor it; your time goes on, sir, in my employ while you are gone."

About the close of the war General Peter Gansevoort bought the old Monroe property, sold by the State under the act of confiscation, and thenceforward his name and family became identified with all that section of country. General Gansevoort had been in the military service, - was in command of Fort Stanwix during the siege it suffered in the summer of 1777. The Gansevoorts resided at Albany, and the hotel built and still owned by the family was called Stanwix Hall, in memory of the old fort at Rome. The house Peter Gansevoort built upon his purchase in Northumberland is still standing, - a steep-roofed old building, recently repaired, - a little south of Gansevoort station, near the mill. The larger residence, known as the Gansevoort mansion, was built by Herman Gansevoort, son of the general, and himself having the same title in the militia. By subsequent purchases added to the original property, the estate of the Gansevoorts embraced a large tract of territory in the northwest part of the town. It has been disposed of in later years until only about sixty acres remain in connection with the mansion. There are some other separate tracts in the vicinity. On coming in here, Peter Gansevoort found the irons of the old Monroe mill hid in the woods, and they were used in building the new mills. Soon after taking possession, General Gansevoort cut out and made a road from the Hudson, near Fort Miller, to his new home in the forest. He made his new possessions in the woods his summer residence, only returning in the winter season to his residence in the city of Albany.

From 1790 to 1800 the following additional pioneers found their way into this town: James Gamble, settled on the present farm of Sidney Thompson; James Cramer, a little west of Lothrop Pope, where Hiram Cramer afterwards lived; Mr. Buel, in the same neighborhood.

Ebenezer Bacon came from Connecticut in 1794, and settled at the place which has for many years been known by his name, "Bacon Hill." He opened a tavern and also a store, and it became a large business place for many years, down to the opening of the canal. This finally diverted trade to the river at Northumberland and Schuylerville. Bacon's store was probably the first in town. Daniel Viele states that he has seen thirty teams at a time stopping at Bacon Hill, indicating a large business. The timbers taken from the old Bacon store are in the wagon-house of Mr. Fake, and the old tavern is the present dwelling-house of Mr. Pettis.

Reed Lewis settled at Bacon Hill perhaps a little later than 1800. He married a daughter of Ebenezer Bacon; was a saddler and harness-maker. A daughter of Reed Lewis became the wife of Mr. Fake.

The sons of Ebenezer Bacon settled at Ogdensburg and Prescott.

Evert Waldron was an early settler at Bacon Hill; was a blacksmith. He afterwards moved farther north, opposite Fort Miller, but back from the river a mile or more.

Mr. Bradt bought the farm now owned by Charles Bart. The old house was near two apple-trees. On this farm is an old burial-ground.

In the northeast part of the town quite a New Jersey colony settled. Sidney Berry, near the Moreau line, on the Doty farm. Nevins, on the farm still known by his name. Craig, where Isaac Woodworth now lives. To these should be added, as from New Jersey, the Paynes, already settled before the Revolution, and the McCrea family.

William Copeland settled on the Baker place, the first house being built on the site of the present one. He married a daughter of Captain Palmer.

Thomas Hartwell was the pioneer in the school district now known as Brownsville.

John Hammond was also another pioneer about the year 1790. He settled on the Mulford farm, between Northumberland village and Bacon Hill.

Sidney Berry, mentioned above, was a very prominent citizen of the town in the early years of its history. He was often called to official positions, as the civil lists of this volume will elsewhere show. His daughter Betsey married for her first husband James, the second son of General Thomas Rogers. James Rogers died in 1810, at the age of thirty-one; and for her second husband his widow married Judge Esek Cowen, then a rising young lawyer of Gansevoort.

After the Revolution John De Monts settled just above Fort Miller; kept a store there, doing a large business in lumbering. He kept a ferry, long called after him De Monts' ferry.

The first store was probably Alexander Bacon's, at Bacon Hill. The second was by Charles Carpenter, at Northumberland village. This was about 1800. His store was burned in 1811. A large number of men gathered to assist in subduing the fire, and it is related that Mr. Carpenter rolled out a barrel of rum, and directed his friends to help themselves.

In 1803, Mr. Van Tuyl, of New York, opened a store where the union store is now located, - the same building, somewhat remodeled. He brought with him a piano, the first it is believed in the county. This instrument was a source of great astonishment to some of the early settlers, who used to call at the house of the New York merchant, and listen to Yankee Doodle drawn from a box. Jonas Olmstead was also an early merchant.

At Gansevoort, Morgan Lewis opened the first store in 1831 or 32. The mills have already been alluded to in speaking of the early settlers, and it is difficult to decide whether the Monroe mill or those on the Vandenburg purchase were the first. North of Gansevoort on the Snoek Kill was a saw-mill, long since abandoned.

A son of Dr. Elisha Miller, of Ballston, settled in Northumberland in 1804. The same place is now owned by John Miller. He states that the earliest town-meetings of Northumberland were held at the house of John Palmer, on the ridge, a little west, this being a convenient point while the town of Wilton belonged to Northumberland. On the west of this ridge a cannon-ball was plowed up in early years. And there is a tradition that a solitary settler lived on this hill before the Revolution, as early or earlier than Monroe at Gansevoort.

The law firm of Cowen and Gansevoort was established at Gansevoort in 1807 or 1808. Their office was the present residence of Judith Hurd. In 1803, John Metcalf and William Metcalf, lawyers, settled at Northumberland village. Their practice extended northward to Sandy Hill, and they were long prominent lawyers there. These two law-offices, on opposite sides of the town, were on the lines of two great routes of travel north and south. That young lawyers of after-eminence in their profession settled at these points shows how comparatively unimportant at that time were Saratoga Springs and Ballston, and how great are the changes wrought in a country by the unexpected growth at one point and the consequent abandonment of another. Compare Gansevoort Mills now with the present village of Saratoga Springs, and it requires some study of history to see why Judge Cowen located at the one rather than the other.

Early physicians in town were Dr. Collins, Dr. Reynolds, and Dr. Jesse Billings. Jesse Billings, Jr., and the third of the same name in direct line, has been a successful boat-builder at Northumberland village, and is now erecting a fine building for a bank.

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IV. - ORGANIZATION.

No special reason is assigned by the citizens of this town for the adoption of this name. Who had the honor of proposing it seems to be uncertain. How the different nationalities represented by the Mac's and the Van's, with the plentiful infusion of Yankees, compromised on the ponderous but substantial English name of Northumberland, is one of the unsolved problems of history.

The town was formed from Saratoga, March 15, 1798. It included at that time the present towns of Moreau, Wilton, and a part of Hadley. The last was taken off in 1801; Moreau, in 1805; and Wilton in 1818. Colonel Sidney Berry was elected the first supervisor, and re-elected in 1799. His place was the Doty farm, in the extreme northeast corner of the town. The records of the first and second town-meetings are not in the office of the clerk, and we are unable to give their proceedings, or the place where they were held, except as to the election of supervisors, which is obtained from the county records. At the town-meeting of 1800, Jared Palmer was chosen supervisor, and he continued to hold that office for seven consecutive years. The town clerk of 1800 was Thomas Laing, and he held this office three years. In 1803, Herman Gansevoort was chosen town clerk, and held the office three years. After being retired one year from the responsibilities of this office, he was advanced to the office of supervisor, and held that four years in succession. The collector of 1800 was Eber Lewis.

A few items of interest are taken from the records in the town clerk's office: Oct, 30, 1805, Isaac B. Payne records the birth of "a male child, a slave, born in Northumberland, and called by the name of Frank, the property of the subscriber." In 1808, Thomas Laing records his mark for sheep, "a square crop off the right ear." Timothy Bishop advertises "a dark brindle steer, with no natural or artificial mark," as having come into his inclosure. Among these other stock notices, Isaac Vandewerker inserts the following: "I do hereby certify that my black woman, a slave, had a female child born Sept. 20, 1807, named Silvia."

In 1803 the bounty on wolves was $25. Afterwards it was reduced to $10, and was discontinued in 1808. After the town of Moreau was set off there is recorded a settlement between the two towns as to the support of the poor. The whole number of town-poor was found to be two, and the matter was very easily adjusted by assigning one to each town. Names of jurors entered in the records of 1808 are John Collins, physician; William Metcalf, attorney; David Killicut, Philip Mauger, Robert McGregor, Hosea Olney, John Newton, Seth Pope, Abraham Rouse, and Edmund Whitehead, farmers.

The names of several justices of the peace appear in the oaths of various town officers. Thomas Laing and Jonathan Hawley, in 1801; Epenetus White, Seth Perry, and Harvey Granger, in 1808; Herman Gansevoort, in 1804. Thomas Laing and Jared Palmer were commissioners of excise in 1801.

We select one tax-roll fifty years ago, 1827, as drawing a sharp contrast with the present wealth of the town. The amount of the taxable property assessed was $249,713, and the amount of taxes $560.28. The highest ten taxpayers were Herman Gansevoort, $61.38; Fort Miller bridge company, $19.57; Conrad Cramer, $16.80; Isaac B. Payne, $13.44; James Cramer, $10.75; John Garrison, $10.44; John Burt, $10.18; Nicholas Palmer, $7.99; Russell Burt, $7.72; John Metcalf, $7.17. In some early years, however, the taxes were much heavier. In 1819 they were $1340.74; in 1820, $914.21. Philip Schuyler was assessed for an island in the Hudson river, sixty-nine acres, $800.

 

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TOWNSHIP OFFICERS.

 

 

Supervisors.

Town Clerks.

Collectors.

1798.

Sidney Berry.

 

 

1799.

"

 

 

1800.

Jared Palmer.

Thomas Laing.

Eber Lewis.

1801.

"

"

"

1802.

"

"

John Shing.

1803.

"

Herm'n Gansevoort.

Caleb Burrows.

1804.

"

"

"

1805.

"

"

Corruth Brisbin.

1806.

"

Dudley Emerson.

Thomas Carpenter.

1807.

Herm'n Gansevoort.

James Cramer.

Richard Burt.

1808.

"

Ephraim Boswell.

Seth Pope.

1809.

"

"

Peter Angle.

1810.

"

Daniel Hicks.

Jabez Read.

1811.

Isaac B. Payne.

Reed Lewis.

John Durmont.

1812.

"

"

John Chadwick.

1813.

"

"

Jeremiah Terhune.

1814.

John Metcalf.

"

Jabez Reed.

1815.

Herm'n Gansevoort.

Daniel Hicks.

James Scidmore.

1816.

Daniel Hicks.

I. Vandewerker.

"

1817.

Jonas Olmstead.

John Metcalf.

Jabez Reed.

1818.

John Metcalf.

Henry Reynolds.

Peter Laing.

1819.

"

Jas. Vanderwerker.

Hugh Thompson.

1820.

James Cramer.

Thomas Howland.

Pardon Elms.

1821.

"

"

Samuel Chapman.

1822.

"

"

Pasley Laing.

1823.

Nathan'l McClellan.

Pasley Laing.

John Caplin.

1824.

"

"

"

1825.

Thomas Howland.

"

Peter Jordan.

1826.

"

"

John Burke.

1827.

"

"

George Guy.

1828.

Jas. Vanderwerker.

Ellery Ketchum.

"

1829.

Pasley Laing.

Lothrop Pope, Jr.

"

1830.

"

Nathan'l McClellan.

John Burke.

1831.

"

"

George Guy.

1832.

"

John Terhune, Jr.

Lemuel Eldridge.

1833.

Thomas Howland.

Charles N. Beebe.

John Burke.

1834.

Jesse Billings.

John Terhune, Jr.

Lemuel Eldridge.

1835.

Herm'n Gansevoort.

Charles N. Beebe.

Jacob G. Ball.

1836.

Conrad Cramer.

"

Solomon Hartwell.

1837.

Sidney Thompson.

Augus's H. Pearsall.

John Burke.

1838.

Conrad Cramer.

"

Solomon Hartwell.

1839.

Thomas Howland.

"

Richard Hagadorn.

1840.

Hugh Thompson.

Jonathan Howland.

Edward Raymond.

1841.

Platt C. Viele.

Thomas Wilkinson.

William Robbins.

1842.

Joseph Baucus.

Hilyard Brown.

"

1843.

"

John R. Fake.

Wynant De Garmo.

1844.

George Lansing.

"

Nathaniel White.

1845.

Augus's H. Pearsall.

I. Vandewerker.

Jonathan Brown.

1846.

Walter Doty.

George Washburne.

Nathaniel White.

1847.

John R. Fake.

"

M.M. Woodworth.

1848.

David Purinton.

J.R. Vandewerker.

Isaac P. Bemus.

1849.

John Terhune.

"

M.M. Woodworth.

1850.

David Purinton.

Isaac P. Velzy.

Martin Gifford.

1851.

"

John R. Fake.

Egbert B. Losee.

1852.

Joseph Baucus.

H. Thompson (2d).

Martin J. Gifford.

1853.

"

Stephen O. Burt.

M.M. Woodworth.

1854.

Earl H. Whitford.

"

Egbert B. Losee.

1855.

J.H. Thompson.

John Chapman.

"

1856.

R.F. Houseworth.

"

James H. Johnston.

1857.

Harlow Lawrence.

James M. Terhune.

R.P. Woodworth.

1858.

Hiram Cramer.

Derick Sutfin.

"

1859.

Joseph Baucus.

Harlow Lawrence.

Ami Palmer.

1860.

"

Marshall Rice.

Jeduthun Hurd.

1861.

"

Edwin W. Town.

Henry S. Freeman.

1862.

"

"

"

1863.

"

J. Vandewerker.

William Wood.

1864.

"

Charles R. Burt.

Edward Van Order.

1865.

Hiram Cramer.

C.M. Velsey.

John A. Palmer.

1866.

"

Moses N. Newell.

Edward Van Order.

1867.

Harlow Lawrence.

S.B. Thompson.

Hawley Ransom.

1868.

"

"

Isaac H. Wilson.

1869.

Alex. B. Baucus.

Orville D. Pettit.

Elijah Sweet.

1870.

"

Albert B. Burger.

"

1871.

"

Alpheus Dabis.

Hawley Ransom.

1872.

William Tice.

James E. Bennett.

John A. Palmer.

1873.

George Washburne.

Orville D. Pettit.

"

1874.

Alex. B. Baucus.

Sanders Lansing.

D. Vandewerker.

1875.

Edwin W. Town.

William H. Palmer.

John Grey.

1876.

Alex B. Baucus.

James H. Chapman.

"

1877.

Daniel H. Deyoe.

"

Stephen H. Morey.

1878.

J.R. Vandewerker.

Wm. H. Palmer.

Wilson Fuller.

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JUSTICES OF THE PEACE ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.

1830.

Jesse Billings.

1855.

Abram Marshall.

1831.

Reed Lewis.

Samuel Lewis.

Nathaniel McClellan.

1856.

Joseph Baucus.

1832.

Hugh Thompson.

William Velsey.

1857.

Vincent Vandewerker.

Robinson F. Houseworth.

1833.

Charles More.

1858.

Mayhew Rice.

1834.

Abram Marshall.

1859.

Abram Marshall.

1835.

Jonathan Howland.

1860.

Robinson F. Houseworth.

1836.

Hugh Thompson.

1861.

Harlow Lawrence.

1837.

Alexander Fullerton.

1862.

Mayhew Rice.

1838.

Pasley Laing.

Winants V.D. Walker.

Joseph Baucus.

1863.

George Washburn.

Egbert B. Losee.

1839.

Charles T. Fullerton.

1864.

Abram Marshall.

1840.

John R. McGregor.

Jason Livermore.

Thomas Howland.

1865.

Harlow Lawrence.

1841.

Joseph Baucus.

1866.

Philip H. Lasher.

1842.

Thomas Howland.

1867.

George Washburn.

1843.

Charles T. Fullerton.

1868.

Samuel Lewis.

1844.

John Metcalf.

Jonas Olmstead.

1869.

Harlow Lawrence.

Abram Marshall.

1845.

Mayhew Rice.

1870.

William D. Laing.

1846.

Jonas Olmstead.

1871.

George Washburn.

1847.

Charles T. Fullerton.

1872.

Samuel Lewis.

1848.

Richard English.

Abram Marshall.

1873.

James V. Snyder.

1849.

Mayhew Rice.

Joseph Baucus.

1874.

William D. Laing.

1850.

Robinson F. Houseworth.

Benjamin Durham.

1875.

George Washburn.

1851.

George Washburn.

1876.

Harlow Lawrence.

1852.

William D. Laing.

1877.

James V. Snyder.

1853.

Jeremiah Vandewerker.

1878.

Samuel Thompson.

1854.

Mayhew Rice.

 

 

 

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V. - VILLAGES.

The villages of Bacon Hill and Gansevoort are named from the well-known pioneers. Northumberland village in later years is known by the name of Fort Miller Bridge, from the fact that the river must be crossed at that point to reach Fort Miller village, three miles above. A bridge at this point was first erected by a company in 1803. The present bridge was built in 1845. The canal at this point crosses from the west to the east side of the river. Several unsuccessful attempts have been made to secure a charter for a bridge at Fort Miller.

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The village of Bacon Hill was known as Pope's Corners, and was also called "Fiddletown" in old times.

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VI. - SCHOOLS.

An early teacher remembered by the old people in the town was Frazier, who seems to have taught for several years. The school system of Northumberland, like that of others, was organized under the act of 1813, while as yet Wilton was a part of the town.

John Metcalf, Robert McGregor, an early settler mentioned in the history of the town of Wilton, and Isaac B. Payne, were school commissioners in the early years. They gave much of their time and thought, and were largely instrumental in organizing districts, harmonizing conflicting interests, laying broad and deep the foundation of that system of common schools which has furnished for the children of successive generations not only the elements of an ordinary education, but developed many men of ability and distinguished culture.

 

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COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT FOR 1878.

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1

32

$52.14

$22.01

$24.88

$1.07

$100.10

" 2

52

52.14

35.76

46.76

1.73

136.39

" 3

23

52.14

15.82

13.55

.77

82.28

" 4

50

52.14

34.39

55.75

1.67

143.95

" 5

24

52.14

16.51

15.72

.80

85.17

" 6

108

52.14

74.28

52.98

3.60

183.00

" 7

30

52.14

20.63

19.44

1.00

93.21

" 8

47

52.14

32.33

35.58

1.57

121.62

" 9

26

52.14

17.88

13.54

.87

84.43

" 10

39

52.14

26.82

48.62

1.30

128.88

" 11

37

52.14

25.45

20.63

1.23

94.45

" 12.

26

52.14

17.88

25.22

.87

96.11

 

494

$625.68

$339.76

$372.67

$16.48

$1354.59

 

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VII. - CHURCHES.

THE REFORMED CHURCH OF NORTHUMBERLAND

was a branch of the old pioneer church at Schuylerville. The citizens of Northumberland were very largely attracted to the faith and order of that church, but many of them were so far from the house of worship that they found it a matter of convenience to have meetings nearer home. Accordingly, Philip Duryea, the old pastor, used to preach at Bacon Hill at intervals. Out of these meetings grew the necessity of a house. The records of the church of Schuylerville show that the consistory, at the time the old pioneer house was falling into decay, resolved that it was advisable to build two houses. There is a little disagreement of dates, as the action of the Schuylerville church was taken Feb. 7, 1821, whereas the first preliminary gathering for organizing a church at Bacon Hill is recorded as having been held in "the meeting-house," Nov. 30, 1820. However this may be, the meeting at Bacon Hill petitioned the classis of Washington, setting forth the facts in the ease. The classis responded favorably, and convened at Bacon Hill to institute the church. The preliminary meeting was presided over by Jonas Olmstead, and John Metcalf acted as secretary. At the institution of the church John Terhune and Carruth Brisbin were ordained elders, and Andrew Johnson and Jonas Olmstead deacons. At a church-meeting soon after a call was voted to Rev. Philip Duryea to preach half of the time in connection with the church of Schuylerville. For this he was to be paid $225 cash and $25 labor and wood. The total number of members admitted before 1832 was one hundred and twenty-eight. The statistics, May 1, 1833, were fifty-four families, sixty-four members, congregation about one hundred and seventy. Jonas Olmstead remained clerk for many years. In the year 1833, John R. Vandewerker and Andrew Johnson were chosen elders, and Russell Burt and Abram Marshall deacons. The present officers of the church are Abram Marshall, J.H. Thompson, John R. Vandewerker, James H. Deyoe, elders; John Marshall, Alonzo Johnson, Stephen J. Burt, Daniel S. Deyoe, deacons. Abram Marshall is clerk and treasurer, and has served in that capacity for more than twenty-five years. The successive ministers of this church have been Philip Duryea, Hugh Mair, D.D., Cornelius Wyckoff, Hiram Slauson, Polhemus Van Wyck, George McCartney, Josiah Markle, Charles D. Kellogg, George Labagh, and the present pastor, William H. Ford. The church is collecting its annual revenue by the envelope system, and its carefully-kept books are a specimen of what may be done by any society when they are willing to work under a regular system. Hugh Mair, the second of the pastors mentioned, is the one to whom Prof. Tayler Lewis pays so high a tribute in Sprague's "Annals of the American Pulpit." It is the old story of a pious, devoted, and educated pastor leading a young man of his congregation not only into a life of piety, but of high Christian culture. Through Hugh Mair's persistent urging Tayler Lewis began to study Hebrew, and became the profound scholar, the solid defender of the Christian faith against all assaults. Without that pastor's labor he would doubtless have been content with simply that superficial education that may be obtained without the study of the classic languages of antiquity.

The house of worship is neat and comfortable, appropriate to the place and the congregation, much better than to be in debt for one of more elaborate and costly design.

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THE REFORMED CHURCH OF GANSEVOORT.

The Reformed church of Gansevoort was established in 1839, and the house was built the next year, the cornerstone having been laid in June, 1840. In the corner-stone are a hymn-book, a Bible, coins, and a copy of the Intelligencer, the newspaper organ of the denomination. It was dedicated Feb. 4, 1841, and is rather picturesquely situated west of the village, with ample grounds surrounding it. Its value was about $3000.

The committee of the classis who assisted at the organization, Sept. 13, 1839, were Rev. Wm. Wyckoff, Rev. Benjamin Van Zandt, and Elder Lewis Thompson. The first elders of the church were Elijah Merchant and James Folmsbee. The deacons, Reuben Billings and Edward Ham. The number of constituent members was seventeen. Rev. John Birkly, from England, was installed the first pastor at the time of the dedication. The successive ministers since have been Rev. John Dubois, Rev. Henry Van Wyck, Rev. George McCarthy, Rev. Mr. Markle, Rev. Alexander Proudfit, Cornelius Van Sandford, Rev. P.Q. Wilson, Rev. R.N. Rockwell, and Rev. A.G. Cochran. The present officers are Gerrit Richlin, Morton J. Vandewerker, and E.G. Losee, elders; Harvey Hinnamon and Elisha Welch, deacons. A Sabbath-school was organized early in the history of the church, and soon after a branch was formed at Brownsville. This was sustained largely by the devoted and self-sacrificing energies of the lamented Miss Augusta Melville.

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THE METHODIST CHURCH OF GANSEVOORT.

In early times Methodist meetings were held at various private houses. The house of James McCreedy, as related by his son William, was one such point. This must have been from 1810 to 1820. The society at Gansevoort village dates from a much later period. The house of worship was erected in 1839, at a cost of about $1600. At that time the men most prominent in forming a society and building the church were Solomon Hartwell, William Shurter, and Benjamin Welch. The house stands upon the main street of the village, a little north from the railroad station.

These three constituted the churches of the town. In early times a Congregationalist church within the town of Moreau received the support of the citizens in the north part of this town. The convenient location of villages in other towns not far from the limits of Northumberland secures for the churches there much aid as well as a fair attendance from this town.

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VIII. - BURIAL-PLACES.

In early times there was little or no concentration in any one public burying-ground. The dead were buried here and there as family association or convenience dictated. Daniel Viele, who has been an old sexton for forty-five years, born on this side of the river but spending his life on the other, has given special attention to this subject, and he actually enumerates seventeen places of burial in the town of Northumberland: on the Nevins farm, the Harris farm, and the Finney farm; the public cemetery at Bacon hill; the new public cemetery at Gansevoort, and the older one; burials south from Gansevoort, near Mr. Ballard's; burials near Coffinger's and in the Welch neighborhood; also on the Laing farm, the Houseworth farm, the Pope farm, the Burt farm, the Waldron farm, the Cramer farm, the farm of Isaac Vandewerker, and the farm of Thomas Williams.

But life and death are ever the same solemn realities, and the Christian pioneer committing his loved ones to their final earthly rest in these quiet and secluded places left them with confident faith in the hands of the heavenly Father, who needs no monument to show where his children sleep.

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IX. - SOCIETIES.

A Bible Society was organized in 1821. The first officers were John Craig, president; William Metcalf, secretary; Isaac B. Payne, Nathaniel McClellan, John R. Vandewerker, directors.

The society has continued its work steadily from that time to this. The third secretary was Abram Marshall, who has acted in that capacity down to the present time. Indeed, Mr. Marshall seems to be a universal secretary for churches, societies, and lodges in Northumberland. This Bible Society is not merely holding meeting for mutual enjoyment, interesting addresses, and elaborate reports. It shows actual work by remitting annually to the county society $75.

Home Lodge, -No. 398, of Free and Accepted Masons, was organized under a charter from the Grand Lodge, dated June 28, A.L. 5856. The charter members were G. Purdy, Robert Washburn, P.D. Esmond, H. Reynolds, M.D., Jeremiah Terhune, John Terhune, John Burke, Payne K. Burt, George W. Lincoln, H.D. Curtiss, David D. Garmo. The first Master of the lodge was Gilbert Purdy; the second, S.R. Lawrence.

The present year, 1877, Abram Y. Rogers is Master, and Abram Marshall, Secretary.

A lodge of Odd-Fellows also existed in the town for a few years.

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X. - PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

These are not so numerous as in the towns below, and are to some extent overshadowed and unnoticed in view of the commanding importance of those in Saratoga and Stillwater. Yet the western shore of the river in this town was the theatre of border warfare common to all this valley. If the larger armies did not make this side their principal route, yet scouting-parties in the various wars climbed these hills and threaded the valleys between them, as they watched with sleepless vigilance the movements of greater forces. Two fording-places or perhaps ferries were probably in use far back in Queen Anne's time; the one at Northumberland village, the other at the angle in the river just above Fort Miller village, situated on the east side of the river.

To guard this latter ford, Colonel Miller, in 1755, built the fort that has been known ever since by his name, the name which has been appropriated by the village on the eastern shore. The river at this point makes a sharp bend, and the fort was erected on the point in the angle. The flat was thus protected on three sides by the river and a cove at the entrance of a small creek. It was further defended by a strong parapet of timber covered with earth, and with a ditch in front. This perhaps inclosed nearly an acre. Within the inclosure store-houses were erected. From the southwestern angle of the fort an additional intrenchment was thrown up, extending diagonally to the river, a few rods below. In the southern portion of the fort there was an opening protected by this intrenchment, through which water could be brought from the river into the fort. The site of the fort is on the De Garmo farm, and some of the timber taken from it was used in the barn on that place, still standing. The supplementary intrenchment extends upon the farm of Nicholas Vandenburg. On the wooded hill overlooking the fort are still to be seen the roads cut for military purposes, - Mr. Vandenburg in his farm-work still drawing grain along the same track that army material and army supplies were hauled a hundred and fifty years ago. On the bluff north of the little rivulet was probably a block-house for still further protection.

On the farm now owned by Samuel Thompson were the remains of a large brick oven, understood to have been used by Burgoyne's army. These were visible within the memory of Morgan Lewis, of Gansevoort, whose birthplace was that farm.

The place where the army of Burgoyne reached the west shore of the river, when they crossed to attack the American position at Stillwater, is also within this town, on the farm of D.A. Bullard, Esq., marked by a deep excavation in the bank.

On one of the hills just above Northumberland village there was also a small fort or block-house, adapted to temporary use by picket-guards and scouting-parties. Mr. Hammond, grandson of an early pioneer, states that he has picked up balls in and near that place, on the Finney farm; also that his uncle once found the bones, evidently of a British soldier, in the woods near there, the bones one side of a log and a gun the other. He adds, also, that it was an early tradition that money was buried in the grave-yard near his place, that several men once stopped at his father's house under pretense of looking for farms, but before they went away frankly stated that they had been looking for buried money, but had found none.

A collection of papers and relics in possession of Mr. John Miller, at Gansevoort, has considerable historic interest. The original copy of the tax-list of 1779, given in the chapter on Ballston, is among these papers. He also has: 1. A tax-list under date of Feb. 2, 1780, signed by Jabez Patchin, John Taylor, and Beriah Palmer, as assessors, and the warrant is signed by the supervisors of Albany county: John V. Rensselaer, Isaac Vrooman, Abraham Cuyler, Peter R. Livingston, John Ten Broeck, James Gordon, Isaac Fonda, Marcus Bellinger, Isaac Goss, Volkert P. Douw, John Younglove, John L. Bronck, J. Roorback, Charles H. Toll, Philip Terrill (perhaps). 2. An indictment for treason against ------ ------, a resident of Half-Moon, under date of May 19, 1778, a valuable document, with the names of the grand jurors. 3. The will of Dr. Elisha Miller, proved in Otsego county. 4. A release of mortgage from Lewis Edson to Dr. Elisha Miller, of very early date. 5. A copy of the Albany Argus extra with the treaty of peace, 1816; also a printed copy of the act authorizing the tax of 1779, which Elisha Miller collected. 6. The will of Eliphalet Ball, witnessed by Dr. Elisha Miller, Elisha Miller, Jr., and Rhoda Calling. 7. A series of deeds and papers relating to Westchester county, some of them dating back to 1734, and one to 1702. 8. Maps relating to property in Ballston and elsewhere, about one hundred years old. The family also have several relics of the Burgoyne campaign, and a few Washington memorials.

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XI. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

Agriculture is the principal occupation of the people of Northumberland. A large part of the town is fertile, producing abundant crops. Rye, oats, and corn are the principal grains. Potatoes are also raised extensively. Fruit, abundant in former times, has failed in later years.

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XII. - MILITARY.

In the War of 1812 several citizens of this town served for considerable time; others still went to Whitehall and Plattsburg for a few days. The only names secured are the following, and these are written down from the memory of the older people, and not from any town record or muster-roll: William Coffinger, Higgins Coffinger, Joseph Stevens, Mr. Osborn, Jeremiah Terhune, an adjutant, Wm. McCurdy, Jeremiah McCreedy, Gamaliel McCreedy, and Charles McCreedy.

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It is a matter of regret that the names of those who went into the service are not on file in the town clerk's office. Much interesting material for history is lost by this neglect. Too often the work of the present time is considered of very little importance; no record of it is made, names and dates are forgotten, until after many years the historical societies of a State engage in long discussions and unsatisfactory investigations, resulting in an uncertain decision of what might have been certain, definite, conclusive. Even the names of those who represented these towns fifteen years ago in the great struggle for national life are already in many cases a matter of doubt and uncertainty. Only five towns out of twenty in this county have written the record called for by the State in 1865; and in these five there is a great lack of dates, regiments, and companies, - those incidentals that make up a finished record.

We annex to this sketch of the town a soldiers' list for the War of 1861-65, as found in the office of the town clerk, with such additions and corrections as a search among the muster-rolls of the regiments has enabled us to make. It is well for the citizens of this county to render clear and definite the great campaign of 1777, fixing by imperishable memorials the decisive points of that contest; but is it not also a patriotic duty to honor the memory of the brave men who went from these peaceful towns to the fearful scenes of modern battle and the horrors of southern prisons? Thrilling chapters of history were wrought in that struggle, - a struggle in which the issues involved equaled in magnitude those of earlier times, and far exceeded the old in the numbers of men engaged. This one county very likely sent into the last war as many men as fought at Stillwater, and that was a skirmish compared with the battle of Gettysburg as to men engaged and weight of artillery. In studying the olden campaigns, why shall citizens lose the names of the heroes who went out to the recent war from their own homes? The humblest and least-known laborer, who left home and family to die for the Union, is worthy of a place beside the conqueror of Burgoyne.

WAR OF 1861-65.

Wm. H. Austin, enl. Oct. 10, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. Aug. 28, 1862.

Joseph W. Abiel, enl. 115th Regt., Co. C.

Thomas H. Adock, enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F.

Isaac Bemus, enl. Sept. 23, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Edward Brady, enl. Sept. 26, 1861; 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

James C. Brisbin, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Lewis A. Burdick, enl. Aug. 2, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F.

John Brainerd, enl. 115th Regt.

John P. Burns, enl. Aug. 22, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. K; trans. to 3d Battery, Dec. 11, 1863.

George H. Brown, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

James Burns, enl. Aug. 22, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. K; trans. to 3d Battery, April 26, 1863.

James Baths, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; died at Acquia Creek, Oct. 20, 1862.

Fred. Bocher, enl.

John Burke.

John A. Chase, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet Bat., 77th Regt.

John Case, enl. 77th Regt.

James H. Carr, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Rhodolphus Cook, enl. 125th Regt.

John Conners, enl. 77th Regt.

John C. Coon.

Sumner S. Clark.

Joseph Carney.

William Coffinger.

Alfred Chase, enl. 77th Regt., Co. G, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va.

------ Debois, died in hospital.

John Donnelly, killed.

Henry J. Davis, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D; died.

George H. Ellison, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

William Ellett, enl. Oct. 5, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

Wm. T. Feller, enl. Aug. 13, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F.

Thomas Scott Fuller, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt. Co. G; pro. corp.; a prisoner at Andersonville; wounded at battle of Wilderness; disch. June 30, 1865.

Walter Gifford, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. 1862.

David Galusha, enl. 115th Regt., Co. C.

Charles Goodwin.

Edward Gawner.

James Galusha, enl. Nov. 6, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D; disch. April 13, 1864.

James K. Galusha, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D; disch, with regiment, Dec. 13, 1864.

George M. Galusha, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D; died of fever, June 8, 1862.

James Harrington, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

John Horrigan, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; killed at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864.

James Hays, enl. 77th Regt.

Thomas Hackett, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.; disch, with Bat., June 30, 1865; was wounded at Spottsylvania.

Joseph M. Hays, enl. 77th Regt.

Henry Hurd, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 5th Regt.

Philip Harder, enl. Nov. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

George Hanner, enl. Nov. 18, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

Frank Hall, enl. Feb. 11, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; killed in action.

Charles Juba, enl. Oct. 20, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. July 1, 1862.

Patrick Keney.

Franklin Kirkham, enl. Aug. 22, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. A ; disch. for disability Jan. 6, 1863.

George D. Lovejoy. enl. Aug. 5, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F.

Charles Leack, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; died of sickness at Philadelphia, Jan. 11, 1863. Francis Leack, enl. Oct. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. Dec. 24, 1863.

William Limber, enl. July 25, 1864.

Octavius Landon, enl. Oct. 10, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. April 22, 1863.

Amos Laduke, enl. Nov. 18, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

Leander Laduke, enl. Nov. 18, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

Michael Labare, enl. Nov. 18, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

David Laraw, enl. Nov. 18, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

Abraham Y. Lansing, enl. Feb. 18, 1864, 93d Regt., Co. F; with Grant at battle of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court-House, Thatcher's Run, and was wounded at Sailor's Run; discharged June 17, 1865.

Ambrose McOdock, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.; disch. with regiment.

Victor Matott, enl. 115th Regt.; died in the service.

James McLane, enl. 77th Regt.

Charles W. Mott, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, Co. K, 77th Regt.

Hugh McMann, enl. 77th Regt.

Peter Murphy, enl. 77th Regt.; wounded at the battle of the Wilderness.

Ambrose Matott, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; killed at Fort Stevens, July 12, 1864.

Timothy Madigan, enl. Aug. 23, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. K; trans. to Inv. Corps, Sept. 3, 1863.

Joseph Merchant.

Wm. McCarty, enl. 22d Regt.

Edward Moran.

Thomas Money.

Henry M. Moody, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died at Washington, Aug. 4, 1863.

Wm. H. McLane, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. C; disch. for disability, Oct. 16, 1862.

Samuel McGown, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Jacob Newman.

Moses Newell, enl. 5th Regt.

Thomas Newalk, enl. Sept. 25, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

Taylor I. Newell, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. Nov. 22, 1862.

George S. Orr, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; 1st lieut., Nov. 23, 1861; capt., April 25, 1862; disch. Dec. 13, 1864; lost left arm.

John L. Osborne, enl. July 30, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F.

Aaron H. Osborne, enl. July 30, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F.

Hiram A. Perkins, enl. July, 1662, 115th Regis, Co. I; taken prisoner in Florida; in Andersonville ten months; disch. June 18, 1865.

Charles E. Phillips, enl. Aug. 15, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. K; died in hospital.

George H. Pearsall, enl. Aug. 12, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F.

John W. Palmer, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D; disch. for disability, May 5, 1862.

Daniel Peck, enl. Nov. 18, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

Joseph Pepo, enl. Nov. 18, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. L.

Reuben E. Robinson, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. May 18, 1863.

Daniel Reardon, enl. 2d Vet. Cav.

Harper N. Rogers, enl. Nov. 30, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav.; 2d lieut.; 1st lieut.; mustered out, Nov. 8, 1865.

John Robinson, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died at Alexandria, April 17, 1862.

Calvin A. Rice, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; capt.; pro. major, 144th Regt., Dec. 27, 1862; pro. lieut.-col., Sept. 25, 1864; mustered out at close of the war.

James Shaw, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. C.

James G. Scott, enl. Aug. 29, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. D; disch. for wounds, Nov. 20, 1864; lost both legs in the battle of the Wilderness.

Alvin Smith, enl. 77th Regt.

Sanford Shearer, enl. 5th Cav.

Samuel A. Shaver.

Joseph Smith.

Washington Sherman, enl. Nov. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; wounded in action, May 10, 1864, at Spottsylvania, and died a prisoner about May 14, 1864.

James Shurter, 77th Regt.; died April 11, 1862; enlisted from Moreau.

Patrick Savage, enl. Feb. 14, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; wounded; disch. June 30, 1865.

James M. Terhune, enl. 77th Regt.

Loren M. Toms, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt, Co. G; died at White Oak Church, Dec. 1862.

Reuben K. Thompson, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. for disability, on June 13, 1863, at McClellan Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa.

Patrick Toumey, enl. 77th Regt.; trans. to 3d Battery.

James H. Terhune.

William Vanduzen, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. Sept. 1, 1862.

Charles Van Kleeck, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died July 26, 1864.

Taylor Vandewerker, enl. Sept. 20, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; re-enl. in 77th Battalion, and discharged with battalion.

Sidney Vandenburg, enl. Nov. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. May 16 1862.

James Van Wagner, enl. 118th Regt.; killed in action.

Lewis W. Vandenburg, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; taken prisoner at Chantilly, and died at Andersonville prison.

James P. Vandewerker; supposed to have died in the service.

James C. Vandenburg, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; killed, May 10, 1864, at Spottsylvania.

Lyman Vandenburgh, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; sergeant, Jan. 5, 1863; re-enl. 1864; trans. to Battalion, 77th; disch. with battalion.

Dennison J. Willard, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. March 23, 1863.

Isaac H. Wilson, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; lost au arm, Sept. 19, 1864.

Shallum West, enl. Oct. 30, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. Sept. 25, 1862.

William Wildy, enl. 77th Regt.

John P. Winney, enl. 115th Regt.

Henry Wilbur, enl. Aug. 30, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. June 30, 1865.

Patrick Welch.

Charles Wheeler, enl. Dec. 25, 1863, 77th Regt., Co. G; lost in action, May 10, 1864.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

E.W. TOWN.

 

Portrait of E.W. Town

E.W. Town was horn in Kingsbury, Washington Co., on June 18, 1827, and was the son of Elijah and Mary A. Town. In 1836 his father removed to Fort Edward, where he died in 1839. In 1841 young Town removed to Northumberland, and resided with Asa Clements, where he remained until he attained the age of twenty-one years.

His early education was entirely acquired by his own personal, diligent application, after the toils and labors of the day were ended.

In 1849 he removed to Washington county and worked a farm, and in the winter of that year he attended the academy at Greenwich. In 1853 he was employed as a clerk by the union store of Northumberland, and afterwards as agent, a position of trust and responsibility which he successfully filled for twenty-four years. At the end of that time he turned his attention to farming, which is his present occupation.

He married on April 26, 1864, Carrie E., daughter of Lodewick and Eliza Esmun, of Cambridge, Washington county, where she was born Dec. 20, 1835. They have three children.

Mr. Town has always been Republican in polities, and has held several town offices, being supervisor in 1875.

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ABRAHAM MARSHALL.

Abraham Marshall, Sr., was born in Rawden, Yorkshire, England, in 1730, and emigrated to America in 1773, with a family of five children, - two sons and three daughters. Two more were born in America - one son and one daughter. He settled on lands of General Schuyler, one and one-half miles south of what is now called Schuylerville, taking a life lease, to continue during the natural lives of himself and his three sons, of one hundred and twenty acres of land for the yearly rent of sixpence per acre, or 3 sterling, with four days' work with team if called for. James died on the farm; the fee-simple of the lands having been purchased of the heirs of General Schuyler prior to the death of James. He had four daughters and three sons. One of his grandsons lives on and owns the farm. Samuel, the youngest son of Abraham, removed from the old homestead in 1817, with his family of six children, to the farm owned by Samuel Bushee, - his brother-in-law, - being the farm on which the dwelling known as the "headquarters of General Burgoyne" was located; mentioned by all the historians of Burgoyne's campaign as the residence of Madame Reidesel during the negotiations prior to the final surrender. Samuel, with his oldest son, Abraham, remained on this farm until his death. His youngest son, William, came in possession, but died in early life. The farm is now owned by his widow. Abraham, who was a partner with his father in the purchase of the farm, at his marriage settled on the west end of the farm, and is now living on a farm a few miles north, known as the McCreedy farm. He is eighty years of age.

The children of Abraham Marshall, Sr., have lived to a good old age with their companions, - five children and five sons and daughters-in-law to ages between eighty and ninety-five years. The old patriarch died at eighty-two; his wife, Susannah, at eighty-five. All the above died with the companions of their youth, none having married a second time.

Two of the sons-in-law were in the Revolutionary struggle - Mr. Bushee and Mr. Jordan. Bushee wintered at Valley Forge with the small remnant of Washington's army, and was present at the battle of Monmouth. Jordan was in the bateau service at the advance of Burgoyne.

But few of the Marshall name are now living. Of the descendants of James two are living, - his son and grandson. Of the descendants of Samuel, one son, Abraham, is living, who has two sons living, and Thomas three. Of the female descendants many are living, scattered far and wide.

Samuel Marshall died on Jan. 30, 1866, aged eighty-seven.

Abraham Marshall, son of Samuel Marshall, and grandson of Abraham Marshall, was born near Schuylerville, Sept. 2, 1798. His mother's name was Phbe {Benjamin) Marshall, who was born in Egremont, Mass., Jan. 18, 1780, and died April 22, 1864, aged eighty-four years. In early life he enjoyed the advantages of the common school, which were then very inferior to those now afforded. His father, Samuel, being a tenant of Philip Schuyler, under a life lease from General Schuyler, could not afford his children any better opportunities for obtaining an education. The library of his father consisted of few books, yet through the favor of Mr. Schuyler and Richard M. Livingstone he was allowed the free use of their private libraries, a privilege which he continued to enjoy through life. "Rollin's Ancient History," the writings of Addison, Goldsmith, Pope, and other celebrated English authors, with histories and biographies written by Hume and others, were his chosen authors. Having obtained what learning could be obtained from the common schools of the day, - reading, writing, arithmetic, and English grammar, - and his services not being required during the winter season on the farm, at the age of sixteen he commenced teaching school, which was continued for twenty-one consecutive winters. At the age of nineteen he, with his father, removed from the Schuyler farm, one mile north of Schuylerville, on the farm known as the headquarters of General Burgoyne after the battle at Bemus Heights, on his retreat. Mrs. Reidesel, wife of Baron Reidesel, rendered the house famous by a residence in the cellar for several days during the negotiations between Generals Gates and Burgoyne, prior to the capitulation. This farm and other lands, containing two hundred acres, were bought of Samuel Bushee by Samuel Marshall and his son Abraham, they agreeing to support said Bushee and wife during their lives. This contract fixed the future of the life of Abraham as a farmer, keeping school during the winter season and farming during the summer. Jan. 8, 1823, he married the daughter of Job Mulford, one of his pupils, sixteen years of age, building a house on the west part of the two hundred acres, and residing there until the winter of 1837. While residing here his children - three sons and two daughters - were born. The house and farm were in the limits of the town of Northumberland. While here he was elected a justice of the peace, to which office he was elected from time to time for twenty-four years. Here also he was elected commissioner of schools, and for many years, with his associates, managed the school districts and licensed the teachers for the town. When the offices of commissioners and inspectors of schools was abolished their whole duties were merged in one person, called superintendent of schools, which office was given to Mr. Marshall, who held it for two years. While residing here, he and his wife - May 25, 1827 - connected themselves with the Reformed church at Bacon Hill, under the pastorate of Rev. Philip Duryea, D.D. In the year 1831 he was elected deacon of this church, and in 1851 was elected elder, which office he has continued to hold ever since. He has often been a delegate to classis, also to particular synod, and eight times to general synod. He is a firm believer in the doctrines and government of the church.

After the death of Samuel Bushee his father and he, coming in full possession of the two hundred acres, dissolved partnership, and Abraham sold his portion of the farm to Jonas Olmstead, and purchased the farm which was first settled by James McCreedy, near the centre of the town. In four years after the settlement here his wife died; his mother-in-law, Mrs. Mulford, taking an oversight of the family. In 1852 he married the daughter of Henry Timmerman, of Argyle, Washington Co., with whom he still lives. While here he was elected to the office of justice of the sessions, to which he was re-elected, holding the office four years. In the year 1830 he became a member of the Northumberland Bible Society, auxiliary to the Saratoga County Bible Society. He has ever been a warm friend of the Bible cause; elected by the town organization as president, and in 1838 its secretary and treasurer, which office he has held ever since. In 1845 he was elected president of the Saratoga County Bible Society. By vote of the town society he was elected a life member of the American Bible Society, and by the county society a life director of the same. He is at present president of the county society.

Retiring from the active duties of farm life, he-is residing with his youngest son, John (both of whose portraits may be seen elsewhere), occupying his advanced years in the garden in the cultivation of vegetables and flowers, in which he takes great delight. Rather than rush out in retiring wholly from the scenes of active life, while physically and mentally capable of doing something, he is agent for three fire insurance companies. Mr. Marshall's oldest son was educated as a physician in Albany, but afterwards engaged in the business of a wholesale and retail druggist at that place, where he died.

Through life he never engaged in any business of a speculative nature. He has never acquired much property, is out of debt, has a small competence for the rest of his life, and a little to leave to his children.

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DANIEL H. DEYOE

 

Residence of Hon. D.H. Deyoe (with portraits)

 

was born in the town of Saratoga Springs, Saratoga Co., N.Y., Aug. 23, 1833, being the son of Daniel and Sarah M. Deyoe, who immigrated to this county from the county of Rensselaer the same year. In 1840 he removed to the town of Westmoreland, where young Daniel was brought up on his father's farm, receiving his early education at the common schools, and afterwards attending the academies at North Hebron, Washington Co., and at Claverack, Columbia Co. Soon after this he lost his father, and purchased his father's old homestead in Saratoga Springs; but he finally disposed of it, and, after his marriage, removed to the farm he now occupies. He was married Sept. 13, 1859, to Emma T., daughter of Stephen and Mary Thorn, who were among the oldest families in the county. Their daughter was born in the town of Saratoga Springs, Jan. 1, 1841. The family of Mr. Deyoe consists of three children, four having died in infancy.

Mr. Deyoe has always belonged to the Republican party, in whose ranks he has been an earnest worker. He has been intrusted with many responsible offices, and is at present member of Assembly for his district, to which office he was elected by a majority of six hundred, and was supervisor of his town in 1877.

Both himself and wife are members of the Baptist church of Bacon Hill. In occupation he has always been a farmer.

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ISAAC VAN DE WERKER.

 

Residence of Isaac Van De Werker (with portraits)

 

Isaac Van De Werker, the subject of this sketch, is the only surviving son of Sovereign and Lucy Van De Werker, and was born Jan. 22, 1813, on the farm purchased of the original patentees by his grandfather, in 1783, in the central part of the town of Northumberland, near which he still lives. He married, in 1860, the only daughter of E.E.. Safford, Glen's Falls, Warren Co., N.Y., and by that union has two sons, - Isaac Eddie, born Oct. 16, 1863, and George Sovereign, born Nov. 23, 1867. Excepting those sons, he is the only Van De Werker living in the State of his grandfather's family.

He was left without a father at the age of eighteen, and thus early was thrown into active business life, which developed great perseverance and untiring industry, making him the chief help of his widowed mother.

In 1846 he left the farm, and entered into contract with Sewall F. Belknap to build five miles of the Vermont Central railroad. When the work was nearly completed, Belknap failed and died, and Mr. Van De Werker lost twenty thousand dollars due him. Under such loss he could not think of settling down to farming, and went south, where he remained two and a half years, engaged in successful business, and then joined in the rush and was one among the "Forty Niners" who went to California.

His courage and resolution, as well as business force, was well shown by the manner in which he surmounted all obstacles in the way of securing a passage, and when none could be obtained chartered a vessel himself and set out for California.

He spent several years there, during which time he encountered sickness and the many hardships and privations incidental upon such an adventurous life, and made many pleasing associations; but on the death of his last surviving brother he returned home to see his mother in her last days.

He is a man of culture, a thorough anatomist, a study to which he has given much time and thought, possesses firm, unyielding principle, strong determination, and warm, generous impulses.

In religion he is orthodox in faith, a Bible student of no ordinary cast, earnestly endeavoring to walk in the light of its teachings.

His ancestral line has been well preserved, and can be clearly traced far back, as is shown by the family records. His father, Sovereign Van De Werker, was born Aug. 12, 1782, married Lucy Ross Oct. 19, 1806, and died Oct. 15, 1831. Lucy Ross was born Aug. 6, 1783, and died March 13, 1860. Sovereign Van De Werker was son of Isaac Van De Werker and Elizabeth Sybrandt, his wife. Isaac Van De Werker was born Feb. 23, 1750, married Elizabeth Sybrandt Nov. 27, 1772, and died Jan. 25, 1824. Isaac Van De Werker was son of Martin Van De Werker and Margaret Owens, his Wife, who was daughter of an English physician who came from England in 1720 and settled in Albany, N.Y. She was then one year old. Martin was born 1718. They were married in 1744, and soon after their marriage they left Albany and settled on the Mohawk flats, near the village of Canajoharie, and there was born to them a family of seven children. Martin was son of Joseph Van De Werker, who emigrated from The Hague (Holland) when quite young, with two brothers, and settled in Albany about the year 1674.

Elizabeth Sybrandt, wife of Isaac Van De Werker, was daughter of Sovereign Sybrandt and Joanna Hatfield, a lady of English parentage. Sovereign Sybrandt and Isaac Van De Werker, together with their families, lived in Greenwich, Washington Co., during Burgoyne's campaign, and had much of their property stolen and destroyed by his soldiers. In 1784, Isaac Van De Werker moved into what is now Northumberland, making the third family to enter the town as permanent residents.

Sovereign Sybrandt was son of John Sybrandt and Elizabeth Van Dam, to whom he was married about the year 1730. John Sybrandt was a native of Denmark, and came to New York about the year 1724. His occupation was that of sea-captain, and about four years after his marriage, when coming through Hurl Gate in a storm, he was swept from his quarter-deck and lost his life. He left a wife and an only son, - Sovereign. Elizabeth, his wife, was daughter of Rip Van Dam and Sarah Van Der Speigle, to whom he was married Sept. 14, 1684.

Rip Van Dam was a stadtholder in Holland, and came to New York about 1685, and died June 9, 1749. He was elected governor of New York by the people, in the absence of one being sent or appointed by the government of Great Britain.

Sarah Van Der Speigle, wife of Rip Van Dam, was born Dec. 16, 1663; died Jan. 16, 1749. She was daughter of Lorens Van Der Speigle and Sarah Webber.

Sarah Webber, wife of Lorens Van Der Speigle, was born Oct. 20, 1640, married April 1, 1661, and died Jan. 26, 1685. She was daughter of Wolfort Webber and Aneke Coos, who were married in 1631. Wolfort died 1670. His wife Aneke died in 1694. They had five children, and they all emigrated to America, Wolfort's mother was sister to the father of William, Prince of Orange.

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ASA F. THOMPSON.

 

Residence of Mrs. Sarah A. Thompson (with portraits)

 

The subject of this memoir was born in the town of Moreau, Saratoga Co., on Dec. 22, 1815, and was a son of Ebenezer and Ann Thompson. The family was among the earliest settlers of that town.

Until Mr. Thompson was eighteen years of age he passed his life in assisting his father as a farmer, meantime receiving such education as the district schools of the locality afforded. Arriving at the age of eighteen, he left his home and became an itinerant, traveling over a great portion of the world. He finally settled in the south, where he engaged in business. He returned to the north in 1855, and married Sarah A, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Chapman, on Dec. 26, 1855. This lady was born in the town of Northumberland on Jan. 26, 1834. The children of Mr. Thompson consist of three, - Mary E., born Nov. 13, 1857; Anna S., born May 31, 1859; and Isabella S., born Feb. 9, 1865.

In political affiliations Mr. Thompson was always attached to the principles of the Republican party. He was a member of no particular church, but was ever ready to assist any denomination. He died June 13, 1867, greatly lamented by a wide circle of friends.

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A.B. BAUCUS.

 

Residence of A.B. Baucus

 

This gentleman was born in the town of Northumberland, Saratoga County, on April 5, 1838, and is a son of Joseph and Catharine Baucus. He is the oldest of a family of two children.

His early life was passed on the farm of his father. He received his first education at the district school of his neighborhood, afterwards enjoying the benefits of a thorough academic course.

Mr. Baucus was united in marriage on February 27, 1862, to Esther, daughter of Samuel H. and Sarah M. Deyoe, a native of the town of Northumberland. To this union were born two children, - Joseph D., born Sept. 23, 1864, and Fannie, born June 3, 1868.

In politics he was an ardent Republican until the time of the liberal reform movement in favor of Mr. Greeley, when he united with that party, and afterwards became an active worker in the Democratic ranks. He has filled the position of supervisor for a number of terms, and was the candidate of both parties for that office in 1876.

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JOHN HARRIS.

 

Residence of Mrs. John Harris

 

William Harris, the grandfather of the subject of this notice, was born at Derbyshire, England, about 1724. He came to this country about the time of the Revolutionary war, entered the American army, and served through the war. He was granted lands by the government afterwards. Soon after the war he went to Northumberland, in this county, and either then, or a few years later, settled on the farm now owned and occupied by Henry Peck. He married Elizabeth Herring, of Charlton, Mass., about 1772. She was born at Dedham, Mass., in 1749, and died June 14, 1826, in the seventy-seventh year of her age. William Harris died on November 22, 1826, in the one hundred and second year of his age.

His children consisted of two sons and three daughters. The sons were Philip Harris, who settled in Northumberland and died there; William Harris, Jr., who was born Aug. 5, 1773, and who at first settled in Northumberland, but in the later years of his life removed to Whitehall, Washington Co., where he died Sept. 12, 1856, aged eighty-three years one month and seven days. He married on April 1, 1798, Sarah Burt, who was born Feb. 14, 1777, and died May 22, 1811, in the thirty-fifth year of her age. Their children were John Harris (the subject of this sketch), Wm. B. Harris, and Lucinda Harris. Lucinda was born Oct. 28, 1805; married Jay Olney, of Oneida county, settled there, and died April 24, 1854, aged forty-eight years. Wm. B. Harris was born Nov. 30, 1803, and settled at Whitehall, where he died Aug. 13, 1849.

The other children of William Harris, Sr., were Lucy, who married Wm. Sutfin, and lived and died in Northumberland; another daughter, who married John Nevins, also lived and died in Northumberland; and Eleanor, who died April 30, 1821, in the forty-third year of her age.

John Harris, the subject of this memoir, was born on March 17, 1799. He passed his early life on his father's farm until the age of twelve years, when he started out in the world for himself. At about the age of sixteen he entered the employment of Myers & Co., of Whitehall, in the mercantile business, and subsequently, in connection with his brother, engaged in business for himself at the same place. On Aug. 7, 1831, he married Mary Clark, daughter of Joseph A. and Elizabeth Clark, of Oneida county.

In 1832 he settled in Northumberland, on the same place where his family now resides. He erected a store, and also a saw- and grist-mill, continuing the milling business in connection with farming during the greater part of his life. His family consisted of five children, four of whom lived to years of maturity, viz., Mary Eliza, John C., Wm. A., and Gertrude J. Of these only John C. and Gertrude J. are now living.

In politics Mr. Harris was formerly an old-line Whig; but at the dissolution of that party he assumed an independent position, and henceforth acted free from party control.

Mr. Harris was a man of strict integrity, systematic and regular in his business habits, and much respected by those of his acquaintance. He died on April 26, 1862, at the age of sixty-three years.

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STEPHEN O. BURT.

On another page may be seen the engraving of the residence of Stephen O. Burt, who is the only son of John Burt, and grandson of Richard Burt, Sr., who was born April 17, 1745. In the year 1770 he emigrated from Rhode Island, his native State, to Columbia Co., N.Y.

John, the eldest of eleven children, was born June 14, 1775, in the town of Chatham. He received a common-school education, and removed with the remainder of his father's family, in the year 1790, to the town of Northumberland, Saratoga Co., N.Y., where they purchased five hundred and seventy-two acres of land, bordering on the Hudson river, in the vicinity of Fort Miller Falls.

The 31st of December, 1807, John married Sarah Olney, daughter of Stephen Olney, of Saratoga. They commenced life for themselves in a log cabin. Owing to his untiring energies the small space then cleared rapidly enlarged, until the great forest became fertile fields. Two years later the cabin was replaced by a frame house that, with few alterations, still remains. In connection with farming, a portion of his time was spent in the lumber business.

In politics he was a life-long Democrat. He was a good neighbor, a kind friend, and generous alike to rich and poor. The labors of his energetic life were crowned with success, and his chief study was the comfort and happiness of those around him. His strict integrity in all business transactions commanded the respect and esteem of all who knew him.

In appearance he was of medium height, broad across the shoulders, and had brown hair and blue eyes. His habits were good, his intellect well balanced, and every lineament of his strongly-marked features proclaimed him a worker. He was the father of two children, - the eldest a daughter; the youngest a son, Stephen O., who was born Oct. 16, 1808.

In his youth, Stephen O. Burt enjoyed those advantages which the early days of this county afforded. He remained at home with his father until the spring of 1836, when he married Rebecca Salisbury, daughter of Preserved Salisbury, of Stillwater.

The following year he spent in the lumber business, at Ausable Forks, in Essex county. From thence they returned to the homestead, to make that their permanent home. His mother died Dec. 9, 1856. His father, at an advanced age, was in full possession of all his faculties, and lived to enjoy many happy reunions of children, grand and great-grandchildren, until his death, which occurred March 30, 1871, at the age of ninety-five.

After his father's death Stephen O. left the homestead, and settled at Bacon Hill, where they now reside. Of their seven children there are three living. The eldest, Lewis P., married Sarah L. Waldo, of Northwestern, Feb. 18, 1862, and resides at Woodworth Hill; the next eldest, Ella, married W.S. Deyoe, of Bacon Hill, Dec. 5, 1866; the younger daughter, Sarah J., is living at home.

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Residence of W.S. Deyoe

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