HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

MOREAU.

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I. - GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

MOREAU is embraced in the Great Bend of the Hudson, in the northeast corner of the county. It is bounded north and east by the county line, south by Northumberland and Wilton, west by Corinth and the county line. It is mostly a part of the Kayadrossera patent, and contains 18,896 acres of improved land, 4760 acres of unimproved, and of this last amount 3083 are woodland. The population in 1875 was 2315.

To the geographical statement we add the legal description of this town and the definition of its boundaries, as found in the revised statutes of the State.

"The town of Moreau shall contain all that part of said county bounded westerly by Corinth, southerly by Northumberland and Milton, and northerly and easterly by the bounds of the county."

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II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

The west part of the town is occupied by the rocky and precipitous peaks of the Palmertown mountains. The Hudson river forms the north, the east, and part of the west boundary of the town. The central and east portions of the town are broken and undulating, with many ravines in connection with the small rivulets. The Snoek Kill and its tributaries drain the southern part of the town. Upon the Hudson river are many rapids and falls, affording valuable water-power at several points. The town is fertile in its central and southeastern parts, which are now divided into highly-cultivated and productive farms. Other portions of the town are less desirable, the soil in some sections being a coarse sand hardly worth cultivation.

The Palmertown mountains at the west are full of grand and beautiful scenery. Somewhat unnoticed in the popular rush for the Adirondacks and other more distant places in years past, they have not perhaps attracted the attention to which they are entitled. Rising suddenly from the plains of Moreau, a clear, well-defined mountain-range, their wood-crowned summits overlook an extensive country, affording views of surpassing loveliness. To the west and the north nature in its roughest, wildest forms greets the eye, while south and east cultivated fields, flourishing villages, and distant cities offer pictures of rare beauty.

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III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

To secure the names of the few families said to have been in the town of Moreau before the Revolution, with dates of settlement, has been a work of considerable difficulty. The following account is pretty well authenticated. There may be names not secured, but those who are mentioned in the following pages are believed to be correctly given.

Elijah Parks came from Salisbury, Conn., in 1766, and in connection with his sons - a part of them already married - purchased eight hundred acres of land at South Glen's Falls. Elijah built the dwelling-house, afterwards known as the "old castle," and a saw-mill about on the site of the present lower mill of the Morgan lumber company. His son Daniel settled on the flat down the river, the present Bentley place. Lewis Brown, a son-in-law, and Ephraim Parks had another house near that of Elijah, above the old castle, a double log house. These were the first houses at South Glen's Falls, and perhaps the first in town. It is said there were twelve families between Fort Miller and Fort Edward on the west side of the river when the Revolutionary war broke out, but the dates and names are very difficult to obtain; and as the date of the Parks emigration is well settled by records in the hands of Merwin Parks, Esq., 1766, as given above, this very likely constituted the first opening in the forest of Moreau. In 1775, when the news of Lexington was stirring the blood of Americans all over the land, about the same time that Colonel Ethan Allen was thundering at the gates of Ticonderoga in the name of the great Jehovah and the Continental Congress, Daniel Parks, a man of gigantic stature, "born to command," gathered a few neighbors from Fort Edward and, without any pretense of orders from Congress or anybody else, not claiming even the authority given by Colonel Allen, pushed through the woods nine miles, and demanded and received the keys of Fort George. This is the tradition in the Parks family, and it is well sustained by the fact that upon Daniel Parks' tombstone, who died in 1818, there is the following inscription: "One of the veterans of the Revolutionary war. He was the man that took the keys from the British officer at Lake George in 1775."

This fact in Daniel Parks' life must have been well authenticated then, sixty years ago. It is true the capture of the fort has passed into history as the act of Colonel Bernard Romans, and he very probably did reach that point two or three days later, and as a military officer under authority of Congress, assumed charge of the fort. Now for the dates: Ethan Allen's force seized Fort Ticonderoga May 10, 1775; Colonel Romans is reported at Fort George the 12th, and soon after left for Ticonderoga. The seizure by Parks must have been at just the same time, or perhaps earlier than the capture of Ticonderoga.

Another theory is given in Holden's "History of Queensbury": that Colonel Romans, reaching Fort Edward, secured the assistance of Daniel Parks and other volunteers; but the tradition in the family, sustained by the tombstone record of 1818, is no doubt correct, that the act was the independent move of Parks and his associates just previous to the arrival of Romans.

Early in the summer of 1777, while the Burgoyne campaign was in its earlier stages, and Tories with their Indian allies thronged this vicinity, the house of Elijah Parks was attacked by a murderous band. It is probable that on the first alarm Lewis Brown and Ephraim Parks, who lived in the double log house, hurriedly fled to the "old castle" of Elijah, and made the best defense possible. Some reports say they were not there at first. The exact particulars of the struggle at the house cannot be given. The intimation in some of the accounts of the massacre that the Tories were led by one Richardson, who desired to obtain the title-deeds or other papers belonging to Elijah Parks, may possibly be true, but it is not credited by Merwin Parks, a grandson of Daniel, now living at South Glen's Falls, who has given considerable attention to this and other legends of the family. It is his opinion that the attack was simply one of the marauding, plundering excursions common to that time, and that there was not probably any question of title-deeds. If any special reason led to the attack, it was probably something growing out of Elijah Parks' doings as a noted patriot, and out of some service he had rendered against the Tories.

Elisha and Isaac Parks resided with their father, but were away when the attack was made. They arrived to find their Father dead, and Elisha, stepping to the door, was shot in the bowels by the Tories still concealed near the house. He had a light in his hand and his wife stood beside him. The wounded man fled to the house of Daniel, below, and the women of Elijah's household also fled. Elisha, with his hands over the wound, reached the house of Daniel, who had just come home, and on the way had heard the guns, but supposed it was his brothers discharging their pieces to load them again for safety through the night. Daniel was only detained from going at once to the scene of the fight by the earnest entreaties of the wounded man that he should try to save his own family. A bed was thrown into a canoe, the wounded man placed upon it, and also the wife and children of Daniel. They were all taken safely across the Hudson, probably to the house of Albert Baker, the second settler at Sandy Hill who had come there in 1768.

A note to page 427 in Holden's "History of Queensbury" probably applies to the women of the two households at Glen's Falls, who are reported as having fled into the woods with a boy thirteen or fourteen years of age. Being met by Indians, they saved themselves from capture by stating that the boy, who was considerably bundled up, had the smallpox. The Indians left with considerable haste. It needs no elaborate description to render clear the horrors of that fearful night. The father dead in the "old castle"; the son, Elisha, with his bowels, as it were, in his hands, fleeing to his brother's house; the hasty gathering of the little children; the wife and the dying brother crossing the Hudson in the darkness for safety; the other households, with the young wife separated from her wounded husband, fleeing into the depths of the forests and reaching Fort Edward. Such are the sacrifices met by those who settled these now peaceful plains and carved out for themselves the rich inheritance, the beautiful homes of their descendants. Elisha Parks died the next morning, and his body and that of his father were buried at Sandy Hill, on the site of the Presbyterian church. The rude stones which originally marked their graves are said to be laid into the foundation walls of the church. Lewis Brown and Isaac Parks were taken prisoners that night. Brown managed to escape the next morning. Andrew Lewis, a son-in-law of Abraham Wing, lived on the island, and the Tories attempted to capture him; but for want of boats they could only do it by wading, and he made this so dangerous by the use of his trusty rifle, that they gave up the attempt. A party formed at Fort Edward the next morning started in pursuit. Daniel Parks and Lewis Brown joined them. They found the smoking ruins of the elder Parks' house and the sawmill. The double log house was not burned.

The Tories, with Ephraim Parks and some other captives, though who they were does not appear, fled up the Hudson, crossing the Sacandaga at its mouth. At Stony creek they took the bed of the stream. The pursuers, baffled and losing the trail, returned. Doubtless the lives of the prisoners were saved by this return, for Isaac Parks stated that they overheard the Tories decide to kill them if they were overtaken. Isaac Parks was carried to Canada, escaped three times, was re-taken, and kept three years.

This raid broke up the Parks settlement. They removed within the protection of Fort Edward.

Solomon Parks, son of Daniel, though a mere lad, is said to have been an orderly attached to the staff of Colonel Long, of the militia stationed at Fort Ann. About two weeks before Burgoyne's advance it was thought necessary to send all the families of this section to places of safety in Dutchess county and in Connecticut. Solomon Parks, with others, was detailed to assist in this flight. All the horses and oxen of the neighborhood were pressed into the service.

The Parks families returned when peace was declared, and with their numerous branches have ever since been prominent in the northern section of the town. Three old wood-colored houses at Baker's Falls, and one farther west, towards Glen's Falls, are old homesteads of this family. Zina Parks, thought to be the oldest living resident born in the town, still survives at the age of eighty-one.

The following note is here added from Holden's "History of Queensbury": "Some confusion has arisen by reason of the different modes of spelling this family name. The family claims affinity with the Parke family of Virginia, so nearly allied to the Custis and Washington families. The autograph of Daniel Parks shows that he spelt the name Parke. By permission, some years since, I copied from the fly-leaf of the Parks family Bible the following, which affords support to the foregoing statement with reference to early settlement:

" 'I, S. Parks, and Susannah, my wife, were married in 1789, in May. I was born in the town of Half-Moon, now Waterford. When I was two months old my father moved his family to what was then called Wing's Falls, and now Glen's Falls, and there built the first mills that was ever built there. And we suffered a great deal in the struggle for liberty. We lost our lives and property, and became poor and weak.' "

This young Solomon was the son of David, and while it confirms on the whole the record at the beginning of this narrative, it shows that Daniel Parks must have come here earlier than his father Elijah. This record shows also that Solomon was only a boy of twelve when said to have been acting as orderly. The tradition of the family is, that he was only an officer's servant, and that is consistent with the age given, though hardly consistent with the idea that he had charge of the removal of families before the advance of Burgoyne. It carries the date of Daniel Parks' settlement at Glen's Falls back to 1765.

At what is now South Glen's Falls in this town there is a tract of land, containing about two thousand acres, known as the Glen patent. It forms a gore between the north line of the Kayadrossera patent and the river. This patent was granted to John Glen, of Schenectady, in 1770. But the Parks' had made improvements there before this time, which they also sold to Glen. Glen cut a road through the woods from Schenectady, which ran through Saratoga Springs, and commenced operations on his patent about the year 1770, - some say earlier. After the Revolution, Glen occupied the place for many years. He came with his family and colored servants, and spent his summer there, living in fine style in the "old castle."

The place was first called Wing's Falls, but about the year 1788 Glen purchased the right to the name of Mr. Wing, the proprietor on the north side of the river. Tradition says Glen agreed to pay the expenses of a wine-supper for the entertainment of a party of mutual friends. To this Mr. Wing assented; the supper was had, and the name changed to Glen's Falls, which it has since borne. {See Holden's "History of Queensbury," page 359.}

JACOB BITELY. - From the account of Mr. Bitely, now a police officer in the village of Glen's Falls, we learn that his grandfather, Jacob Bitely, settled in Moreau before the Revolution. His farm was the present Hitchcock place on the river. During the most dangerous stage of the Burgoyne campaign, the family left for safety and went over to the other side of the river. They were gone but seven days. They returned to find their buildings burned, and were obliged to erect temporary shelter and get through the following winter under circumstances of great difficulty and hardship. Like all other families in this section, they recall many incidents of the great struggle. During the war a girl from a recent settler's family came to Mr. Bitely's to ask for help. He put up for her a quantity of meal, and then told the "boys" to draw the seine and catch some fish for her. While they were doing this they were surprised by some Tories and taken prisoners. John Bitely, Henry Bitely, Nathan Duryee, Lydius Duryee, and Ephraim Creehan were carried away to Canada and kept several months. The Duryees were from the other side of the river.

Jacob Bitely left four sons, the two above mentioned and two more, Jacob and Peter.

DAVID JONES. - Some years before the Revolution, just how many is uncertain, this family, destined to have a prominent place in history, in consequence of their relation. to the murder of Jeanie McCrea, came from Leamington, N.J., and settled on the river. Their place was the present Rogers farm. The family consisted of a widow and six sons. Four of the sons went farther north, and settled at Moss Street, above Sandy Hill. Two sons, David and Solomon, remained with their mother. A little earlier than this, John McCrea had settled on the same side of the river, within the present limits of the town of Northumberland, and Jennie McCrea, sister of John, came from New Jersey and lived with her brother. Here the old acquaintance between the families in New Jersey was continued, and David Jones and Jeanie McCrea were the mutual attraction to each other in the respective homes. When the Revolution broke out, the fearful line of civil war was drawn through neighborhoods formerly united in peaceful association, and through families bound by the ties of home and love, sundering the tenderest relations and shattering the brightest of human hopes. John McCrea, a patriot, entered the American service.

Before the Revolution, it is said General Thomas Rogers bargained for the Jones lot. After the war, about the year 1783, General Rogers took possession of the Jones homestead with his wife and children, and the place, now so adorned and beautiful, is still in the possession of his descendants. One of his sons married a daughter of Colonel Sidney Borey, of Northumberland. Being early left a widow, she afterwards married Judge Esek Cowen, of Saratoga Springs.

David Jones, being a loyalist, entered the British army, and in the attempt to have his betrothed wife brought to the British camp, in the summer of 1777, the fearful massacre took place which sent a thrill of horror through the land and became a powerful agent in arousing the country to resist to the bitter end the onward march of Burgoyne.

On the Olmstead farm were very early settlers undoubtedly before the Revolution. The chain of title has been from Hilton to Reynolds, Reynolds to Shepherd, Shepherd to Olmstead. The first-named Hilton was no doubt the pioneer. An unusual circumstance connected with this farm is, that a mortgage executed by Hilton had an extension of seventy-five years before it was paid. Interest was paid on it regularly through the time of Hilton, Reynolds, Shepherd, and the principal was at last paid up and the mortgage discharged after the Olmsteads came in possession.

At the mouth of the Snoek Kill there was living in the time of the Revolution one Captain Tuttle. There is a tradition, but not fully authenticated, that his house was burned by Burgoyne's army.

Some of the older people recall the name of Harrington as that of a family here in the time of the Revolution. Lent Hamlin states that there was a family also living on a part of the present Rogers property, whose house was secretly entered by the Tories and the milk poisoned for the purpose of destroying them and other patriots.

These families, with perhaps a few others, constituted the population of the present town of Moreau when the fury of the fierce conflict between England and the colonies burst upon the land. The progress of settlement was stayed. The few who were here were divided into patriots and loyalists, or, to use the names they applied to each other, rebels and Tories. Henceforward lives and homes could only be saved by unceasing vigilance, by innumerable stratagems, by flight, or by the use of trusty firearms always loaded and ready for instant use. Under such a state of society women, and even children, grew heroic, and often saved their lives and the lives of others by acts of heroism brighter than the deeds of chivalry.

When the storm had passed and the sky cleared, the sun of peace, gently rising upon a free country, shone upon many a scene of desolation, many a home of sorrow. The Hudson breaking from the mountains, drew its curved and waving boundary line as before. The dark pine-forests still covered the plains of the interior, the hills rose in grandeur at the west, but the cabins and the cottages of the settlers were in ruins. Slowly they returned to gather about them the remnants of their broken households, and build again homes for themselves and their children. It was a work full of sad memories. There were some who would return no more forever. The treaty of peace could not bring back the dead. Around the hearth-fires of the Parks family there were vacant chairs. The aged sire and the stalwart son were sleeping where neither the thunders of war nor the salutes of peace would ever again waken them to field or fireside.

The boat of David Jones no longer cleft the waters of the river, and Jennie McCrea was no longer waiting to catch the first sight of his flashing oar. She was at rest in the grave, where soldier hands had tenderly buried her mangled form, and he was a sad, lone exile, mourning over a lost love and a lost land.

But time and toil are God's angels of peace to sorrowing homes; hope rises with labor; hearts are strong when hands are busy; courage conquers sorrow within and danger without. New houses were built, no longer to be guarded by the rifle; new fields were cleared; grain again ripened in the war-swept valley; new settlers, under the glad impulse of a land redeemed from foreign rule, came from their old homes and penetrated the wilderness; and thus through toil and war and blood was reached the second pioneer period of Moreau, extending from the close of the Revolution to the organization of the town.

About the year 1790 a large number of settlers came to this section of country. Daniel Hamlin, Paulinus Potter, and Mr. Churchill, three brothers-in-law, all came from Connecticut. With them, or soon after, came Moses Lewis. Daniel Hamlin's pioneer home was on what was afterwards known as the Tearse place. He had three sons, - Daniel, Truman, and Lent.

The latter, born in 1799, is still living, and has furnished several items of early settlement for this work. Joel Potter, son of the early settler, Paulinus Potter, also resides with Hamlin, at an advanced age. The Churchill place, was in the same neighborhood. Moses Lewis' farm was the present place of John Thompson.

Just after the war, Colonel Thomas Rogers, said to be a descendant of John Rogers, the martyr, settled upon the river. It is understood that the Jones place was confiscated, and purchased by Mr. Rogers of the State. Whether this was so or not, it became the early homestead of the Rogers family. Colonel Rogers had three sons, - Thomas, James, and Halsey. Edward Washburn, of Fort Edward, when a boy. lived at Colonel Rogers'; was there when he died, in 1816. He states that there was another pioneer family, that of John Rogers, in the same neighborhood. Thomas Rogers was the first supervisor of the town. The old homestead is now owned by a descendant, John Rogers, and with its hedges, beautiful groves, and grounds finely laid out, is one of the most delightful places upon the river.

Billy J. Clark, the early physician, so well known, and spoken of at length in another place, settled in 1799 at the Corners that now bear his name. Dr. Clark and Dr. Littlefield were the earliest physicians in town.

Previously, Dr. Wicker, of Easton, was sent for in sickness, and it was under his advice that the young Dr. Clark, then a student in his office, came to Moreau.

Amos Hawley came from Connecticut in 1802, and settled on the present place of Edward Hawley. He bought the place of one Baird, who may have been a pioneer before the Revolution. Deacon Shepherd was also an early settler, below the Rogers place, on the river. He had three sons, - John, Joseph, and Amos. James Burnham and Josiah Burnham settled in the Parks neighborhood, at Baker's Falls. John Reynolds was another pioneer, about 1800. His brother, George Reynolds, came a few years later. He opened a tavern at the Corners which bear his name. The house is now occupied by his son, Hon. Austin L. Reynolds. The Thompsons were early settlers. There were six brothers, - Hugh, Sidney, Berry, Ebon, Lewis, and Asahel. In 1799, Giles Sill came from Lyme, Connecticut. He bought a farm of Mr. Hamilton, upon which mills were already built.

Mr. Hamilton's name should perhaps be added to the pioneers before the Revolution.

Giles Sill's purchase was the farm now owned by his grandson, John N. Sill. Of his sons, Enoch and Gurdon settled in this town. The former was an active member in the Congregational church, and the name of the latter appears as one of the presidents of the old temperance society. On his tombstone is recorded the following epitaph: "A temperance soldier of 1808: ever faithful to the cause."

At the "bend" there were several families very early. Dexter Whipple and Elisha Danford, brothers-in-law, came there about 1800, or 1802, from Connecticut. Oliver Hubbard, probably from the same State, was also a well-known resident there. Ichabod Hawley owned a large tract of land north from the bend, - the neighborhood where the Whipples now live, - and resided there. Mr. Andrews was an early settler with the Churchills from Connecticut.

Henry Martin, whose name appears as the first town clerk, and held that office for many years, was an early merchant.

John Albrow was an early settler near Fortsville, Irenus Hulbert at Clark's Corners, and Ezra Cooper.

Lewis Brown was an early settler; spoken of as a man of a humorous turn of mind, full of practical jokes. He once told a neighbor that he had lost sixty lambs that year. When inquired of as to the reason of so great a loss, he replied he had no sheep to raise them from.

Arrested for some petty offense and taken to Albany, he quietly informed the landlord at some stopping-place that the sheriff, who was in charge of him, was the prisoner, and must be locked up. Told the landlord the man would protest and pretend to be an officer, but he must pay no attention to it and lock him up. It was done, but by what legal or other process the sheriff escaped does not appear.

In later years, Benjamin Barrett is remembered as a peculiar genius, a noted lumber-dealer and raftsman upon the river. On one occasion, not liking the looks of an untidy, dirty-faced girl that waited upon him and his friends at a tavern, he called for a tub, for two or three pails of water, for soap and towels, all of which were duly brought according to his order.

Then suddenly seizing the unsuspecting girl, they gave her a bath and a scrubbing long to be remembered. "There," he says to the astonished landlady, "you have got a clean waiter once." The following has so often been told of so many, we may safely repeat it of Barrett: At Troy he laid a wager of five dollars with an Irishman that he could throw the said son of Erin across the Hudson river. The wager was accepted, and the money put up. Seizing the sturdy Irishman by the nape of the neck and the "northwest corner of his pants," as our informant describes it, he threw him plump into the stream. The man, puffing and blowing, clambered up the bank and demanded the money. "But," said Barrett, "I didn't promise to do it the first time; I will do it yet if it takes all day." The Irishman saw the point, and preferred to lose the money rather than have the experiment continued.

About a mile north of Fortsville, on the old stage-road from Saratoga Springs to Sandy Hill, Josiah J. Griswold kept a tavern at a very early period. This account of early settlement is already extended later probably than the year 1805, when the town was organized; but we add a few more names. James Mott came from Half-Moon in 1808, and settled on the William Haviland farm. His brother, Thomas Mott, a few years later, bought the present Alpheus place. Another brother, William, came about the same time as Thomas. His place was the present Ira Palmer farm.

The two pioneer Mott families in this country were Jesse Mott, of Saratoga, and Zebulon Mott, of Half-Moon. The Moreau settlers were sons of Zebulon. The mother of Mr. Joseph A. Sweet was a sister of the elder Motts, and the late supervisor, S. Mott Sweet, unites the family names in his signature.

Joseph A. Sweet has many manuscripts, interesting memorials of the family, unpublished poems, and other valuable material. Abraham I. Fort was a prominent settler, but not the first pioneer at the hamlet that bears his name, Fortsville.

In connection with this point: Truman Wilcox was well known by his manufactory of earthenware. He came from Hartford, Conn., first to Bald mountain, across the river, then to Gansevoort, and finally to Fortsville; at this last place he carried on the business for forty-nine years, and died June 9, 1873, aged eighty-one.

The notes from the town records, the lists of town officers, the membership of the early "Temperate Society of Moreau," and the records of the churches together show many additional names of early settlers. It is believed that, with the preceding notices of pioneers, they constitute a correct statement of the first settlement of the town.

Jabez Hamilton was a settler in the western part of the town, over the mountains, as early as 1800. His son, Jabez Hamilton, Esq., of South Glen's Falls, has been a justice of the peace for many years.

The Hayfords were also residents here, about the time of the Hamlins and Churchills.

Grist-mills were established very early, before 1800, opposite Sandy Hill, and also at Fortsville. In building the present mill at Fortsville, which stands upon the site of the first one, the old mill-stones were taken out. Lent Hamlin remembers that people went to mill over the river, walking string-pieces with bags of grain on their shoulders. Has been to mill himself, horseback, when he was so young that if a bag with a peck in it fell off, he could only get it on again by lifting it upon a stump, and then on the horse.

Tillottson's ferry, across the Hudson, was established at the "Big Bend," in 1823. The timber rafted down the upper Hudson was taken out at this point, drawn across the country to the river again near Fort Edward.

Glen's Falls was known as Wing's Falls until about 1788.

In very early times there was a tavern at the present Ensign place, kept by Conrad Ollendorf. This was on two important routes. The lumber and business travel from the "bend" across to the "roll-way," at Deadman's point, passed by this house. Also, the stage-line from Saratoga Springs, via Fortsville, to the old bridge at Sandy Hill. The old Mawney house, at Clark's Corners, the Reynolds tavern, on the route from Fort Edward to the old Saratoga line, at Fortsville, the tavern kept by Josiah Griswold, and another near the Wilton line by Betts, were all early taverns in this town. The opening of the railroad changed all the business features of the interior of the town. The railroad, drawn in a curve from Gansevoort clear around to Glen's Falls, furnishes the traveling facilities and the business connections. The small hamlets have lost the importance they once had. Most of the trade is at the villages just outside the boundary line of the town.

At South Glen's Falls the Baptist church was organised in 1794, over which Rev. Calvin Hulbert was pastor for many years. At that time members connected with this church lived at the Great bend, four miles west.

Elder John C. Holt, of Moreau, was at Glen's Falls in 1832-33, in a great revival, when eighty were added to the church.

The Congregational church of Moreau was established about 1796 (River), and from Queensbury Earnest Cheny used to cross the ferries at Sand Beach or the Block-house to attend. Also, at Reynolds' Corners, in 1800, wives on horseback behind their husbands, or sometimes walking the string-pieces that were put across the Hudson at the island at Glen's Falls.

Mr. John Folsom, soon after 1800, built the house so long known as the Rice mansion. He came from Albany; was an elder in the Presbyterian church, and was very active in organizing the church at Glen's Falls. He was a man of considerable means, at one time owning a large interest in the toll-bridge. He was active in religious work in the neighborhood, and was regularly licensed as a minister, but seems never to have borne the title of Rev. He died in 1839, Dec. 2, aged eighty-three. His mansion is still spoken of as the "old Folsom house."

Colonel Sidney Berry, of Northumberland, had one son (Sidney), who settled at Glen's Falls, and married a daughter of John Folsom.

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IV. - ORGANIZATION.

The town is named in honor of Marshal Moreau, who visited this country in 1804-5. He had participated largely in public affairs in France, and been prominent in the wars which had desolated that country. Being compromised by some real or suspected plot against the government, he was exiled, and passed the years 1805 and 1806 in the United States. Returning to France, he re-entered the army, and died of wounds received at the battle of Dresden, Sept. 2, 1813.

The town was organized March 28, 1805, its territory being taken from Northumberland. The first town-meeting was held at the dwelling-house of Samuel Scovill, Jr., on Tuesday, the 16th day of April, 1805. The following officers were elected: Thomas Rogers, supervisor; Henry Martin, town clerk; Amos Hawley, Nathaniel Sill, Caleb Burrows, assessors; Elijah Dunham, Irenus Hulbert, Samuel Crippen, highway commissioners; Amos Hawley, Abel Cadwell, overseers of the poor; Nicholas W. Angle, Paulinus Potter, constables; and the last named was also chosen collector. A pound was ordered to be built, near the dwelling-house of Henry Cole. A bounty of $10 was offered for each wolf killed in the town. "Hogs not to be run at large unless well yoked and ringed." And the meeting adjourned to be held the next year at the house of Abel Cadwell. At the general election held the same spring, May 2, 1805, Adam Comstock received fifty-seven votes for senator, John Veeder sixty-three, and Nicholas N. Quackenbush, sixty-one. For Assembly, John Cramer received seventy-eight, John McClellan seventy-seven, Jeremy Rockwell, seventy-two, and Jesse Mott seventy-two.

At the election, May 1, 1806, John Thompson, for member of Congress, received thirty-four votes, Asahel Porter twenty-five.

In 1806 the town was divided into thirteen road districts. We give the description of No. 1: "It begins at the southeast corner of the said town, at the line between Northumberland and Moreau, and runs up the river to Snoek's Kill bridge; thence west to Jesse Billings' east line; from thence south to the east line of Samuel Payne's land; from thence to the southeast corner of the town."

At the second town-meeting new names appear among the town officers: Ichabod Hawley, John King, John Reynolds, John Bitely, Jr., Abel Cadwell, Solomon Parks, John Albrow, Samuel Crippen, and Asaph Putnam. The assessors' list of jurors, made out Sept. 30, 1805, includes sixty-six names. Among them Thomas Littlefield and Billy J. Clark are entered as physicians; Peter L. Mawney, John Linnendoll, Henry Martin, Abel Cadwell, Nicholas Tillinghast, and Samuel Scovill, Jr., as merchants; Amos Baldwin, cordwainer; Abraham Weed, Parks Putnam, Thomas Williams, carpenters. At the second town-meeting it was voted that "hogs be free commoners if well yoked." The bounty on wolves was carried up to $25. And we notice as a specimen of the care they took to protect their farms, they resolved that every man "must cut the Canada thistles within his own inclosure, once by the full moon in June, and once by the full moon in August."

Dec. 28, 1810, John M. Berry certifies to the birth of a "child named Jane, born in my house of a black woman, my property or slave." The earlier records in the town-books show a large number of notices of stray cattle, and also the marks adopted by various citizens for their own sheep and cattle.

The town-meeting in 1813 was held at the meeting-house, near John Reynolds'; and that year the town was divided into six school districts by the school commissioners, Ichabod Hawley, B.J. Clark, and Nicholas W. Angle. At that town-meeting Thomas Mall was appointed a commissioner to prosecute for all offenses committed in violation of the excise law. Thus early was a struggle made to restrain the unlimited sale of liquors.

In 1835 division fences were ordered to be four and a half feet high; other fences four. The same year a bounty of 25 cents was offered for each fox killed. This must indicate either that the people cared but little for their extermination, or that they were so plenty, hunters could make money enough at that low figure.

 

------------------------------

TOWN OFFICERS.

 

Supervisors.

Town Clerks.

Collectors.

1805.

Thomas Rogers.

Henry Martin.

Paulinus Potter.

1806.

"

"

John Albrow.

1807.

"

"

Irenus Hulbert.

1808.

"

"

Ezra Cooper.

1809.

Billy J. Clark.

"

"

1810.

Henry Martin.

John Reynolds.

Solomon Parks.

1811.

"

"

Thomas Cotton.

1812.

"

Gordon G. Sill.

"

1813.

James Mott.

Henry Martin.

Barzilla Parks.

1814.

"

J.J. Griswold.

Anson Thompson.

1815.

"

Samuel Crippen.

"

1816.

"

Gordon G. Sill.

"

1817.

"

"

"

1818.

Thomas Mott.

"

Ezra Cooper.

1819.

"

Nathan Kingsley.

Henry Billings.

1820.

Paulinus Potter.

"

"

1821.

Gordon G. Sill.

Josiah J. Griswold.

Nathan Kingsley.

1822.

"

"

Timothy Andrews.

1823.

Josiah J. Griswold.

Joseph A. Sweet.

Jesse Cowles.

1824.

"

"

"

1825.

"

"

"

1826.

"

"

Timothy Andrews.

1827.

"

"

Milton Wheeler.

1828.

"

"

"

1829.

"

"

James Herald.

1830.

"

"

"

1831.

Billy J. Clark.

"

"

1832.

George Reynolds.

"

"

1833.

"

"

"

1834.

Seth Hawley.

Jonathan Austin.

William Sprott, Jr.

1835.

Josiah J. Griswold.

Nicholas W. Angle.

"

1836.

"

"

"

1837.

Joshua Fish.

"

Reuben Crandall.

1838.

George Reynolds.

Josiah J. Griswold.

Thomas Kimpland.

1839.

Lucius Cary.

George P. Reynolds.

James Kimpland.

1840.

Joseph A. Sweet.

"

"

1841.

"

"

Samuel Rheubottom.

1842.

"

"

"

1843.

"

Harvey Griswold.

David B. How.

1844.

George Payne.

A. Van Rensselaer.

"

1845.

"

R. Thompson.

Owen M. Roberts.

1846.

"

Hassan A. Hopkins.

"

1847.

Truman Hamlin.

John S. Thompson.

Geo. I. Tillottson.

1848.

"

"

John Stoddard.

1849.

Heman K. Hopkins.

"

Abram S. Cornell.

1850.

George P. Reynolds.

"

"

1851.

Heman K. Hopkins.

"

"

1852.

Joseph A. Sweet.

R. Thompson.

David Martin.

1853.

"

Peter Tearse.

"

1854.

Heman K. Hopkins.

"

John Stoddard.

1855.

Hassan A. Hopkins.

"

Alva Enos, Jr.

1856.

Joseph A. Sweet.

John Skyne.

"

1857.

Truman Hamlin.

Peter Tearse.

David Martin.

1858.

Austin L. Reynolds.

Richard Davenport.

Vincent C. Stone.

1859.

"

H.K. Hopkins.

"

1860.

"

C.V. Kenyon.

"

1861.

"

Heman K. Hopkins.

"

1862.

"

C.V. Kenyon.

"

1863.

L.B. Swartout.

"

L.B. Edmonds.

1864.

Isaac G. Stillwell.

"

"

1865.

Austin L. Reynolds.

"

George Palmer.

1866.

"

"

George P. Reynolds.

1867.

George P. Reynolds.

"

De Witt C. Sprott.

1868.

"

Thomas E. Brice.

James H. Merrill.

1869.

"

"

Joseph G. Wood.

1870.

"

James Stevens.

Thomas E. Brice.

1871.

Austin L. Reynolds.

"

Squire White.

1872.

A.T. Hitchcock.

Rufus White.

Samuel Cornell.

1873.

S. Mott Sweet.

George W. Smith.

David Martin.

1874.

"

"

"

1875.

Wm. A. Sherman.

"

George I. Jackson.

1876.

George W. Smith.

Wm. Maloney.

Ransom K. Dwyer.

1877.

S. Mott Sweet.

"

B.B. Brush.

1878.

John Campbell..

"

"

------------------------------

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE.

1830.

Benjamin Olney.

1855.

Thomas C. Howe.

1831.

Anson Thompson.

1856.

Jabez Hamilton.

1832.

Nicholas W. Angle.

1857.

Aaron M. Thompson.

1833.

John Reynolds.

1858.

Theron P. King.

1834.

Gordon J. Hill,

James Herald.

1859.

Richard Davenport,

Peter Tearse.

1835.

Leonard Husted.

1860.

Jabez Hamilton,

William Briggs.

1836.

Lucius M. Smith.

1861.

Aaron M. Thompson,

Perry C. Barker.

1837.

John Reynolds,

Anson Thompson.

1862.

Walter Fradenburgh.

1838.

Joseph A. Sweet.

1863.

James Kimpland.

1839.

Julius H. Rice.,

Russel Grant.

1864.

Jabez Hamilton.

1840.

Frederick Van Dusen.

1865.

Aaron M. Thompson.

1841.

Daniel S. Newton.

1866.

John Stoddard.

1842.

Stephen Shippey.

1867.

James Kimpland.

1843.

James Herald.

1868.

Samuel Mott Sweet.

1844.

Anson Thompson.

1869.

Aaron M. Thompson,

William Howe.

1845.

James R. Reynolds.

1870.

William Howe.

1846.

Daniel S. Newton.

1871.

Jabez Hamilton.

1847.

Thomas C. Howe,

Richard Davenport.

1872.

James Kimpland,

John N. Sill.

1848.

Anson Thompson.

1873.

John N. Sill.

1849.

Aaron M. Thompson.

1874.

William Howe.

1850.

Daniel S. Newton.

1875.

Jabez Hamilton,

S. Mott Sweet.

1851.

Thomas C. Howe.

1876.

S. Mott Sweet.

1852.

George Coney.

1877.

Warren B. Ingalsby.

1853.

Aaron M. Thompson,

Thomas C. Howe.

1878.

George P. Reynolds.

1854.

Benjamin E. Newton.

 

 

 

------------------------------

V. - VILLAGES.

SOUTH GLEN'S FALLS is comparatively a modern village. Frank L. Day, Esq., states that his father came to the place in 1828, and there was then but one saw-mill, a small affair, and not many dwelling-houses. The old Parks house, or the "old castle," as it was called, still existed as a memorial of the Revolutionary times, and the Folsom house on the present Rice place. In 1840 the grist-mill, now owned by Lapham & Co., was owned by Mr. Cronkhite. The business of the place is now very large. The Morgan lumber company operate four saw-mills, cutting sixty million feet of lumber a year. They run a planing-mill in connection with their works, and also a box-factory. William McEchron is president of the company. There is an establishment for burning lime, operating four kilns, and making about five hundred barrels a day.

The Glens Falls paper company have a capital invested of $48,000. They employ about sixty hands, and manufacture four tons a day. Augustus Sherman is president of the company. A.T. Harris, secretary and treasurer; S.A. Parks, superintendent.

The present marble and stone company of South Glen's Falls was organized in 1872. The firm-name is Reynolds, Dix & Co. They employ about twenty-five hands; and the work they are sending out consists of sawed marble, flag-stone, and limestone for building purposes. The surplus limestone goes to the kilns. The operations of the present company are not the first. In 1836, Julius H. Rice bought out the Folsom place, settled here, and established stone-works, which were continued until about 1860, and they were then sold to Cheney & Arms.

The village was laid out and surveyed under the direction of Mr. Rice in 1837, and after that buildings began to be erected. It is now a place of about five hundred inhabitants, unincorporated; and the citizens rather congratulate themselves upon their exemption from the payment of corporation taxes and interest upon bonds, such as have been so freely issued by larger and more ambitious villages. A cotton-factory was established by Mr. Folsom, and at one time quite an extensive business was done. The works were burned out in 1832, and were not renewed.

------------------------------

FEEDER DAM, in the north part of the town, contains two large saw-mills, cutting annually about fifteen million feet of lumber. Something of a village has grown up at this place, consisting of twenty-five or thirty dwellings.

------------------------------

FORTSVILLE, southeast of the centre, is a fine rural village. It has a Methodist church, a store, several mechanic shops, a grist-mill, dating back to an early period, and perhaps twenty-five dwellings.

------------------------------

CLARK'S CORNERS, in the southeast part, contains a Friends' meeting house, a cheese-factory, and a few dwellings. It derives its name from the noted physician and temperance-worker who lived there for many years.

------------------------------

MOREAU STATION no longer expresses a fact; but it was a stopping-place at one time on the Rensselaer and Saratoga railroad.

------------------------------

REYNOLDS' CORNERS takes its name from the early settlers of that name. Before the opening of the railroad system of the country, it was on important lines of travel by stage.

------------------------------

VI. - SCHOOLS.

Asahel Potter was an early teacher, also Miner, Clapp, Sherman, and Beebe. Some of these came over from Vermont. Dr. Gillett is also spoken of as an early teacher.

The town system of schools was organized under the general school act of 1812.

Services of the Episcopal church, about the year 1844, were held once a month in Moreau, at Fortsville, and also in the town of Wilton. In connection with this work a parochial school was established at South Glen's Falls, and had a successful career for a time.

Rev. Henry McVicker had charge of it. He is affectionately remembered for his pure life, his devoted piety. He died in 1852, and the school was soon after discontinued.

 

------------------------------

COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT, MARCH, 1878.

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1

349

$208.56

$240.03

$216.18

$11.64

$676.41

" 2

33

52.14

22.70

12.94

1.10

88.88

" 3.

45

52.14

30.95

22.99

1.50

107.58

" 4

46

52.14

31.64

39.21

1.53

124.52

" 5

55

52.14

37.83

32.05

1.84

123.86

" 6

33

52.14

22.70

30.70

1.10

106.64

" 7

42

52.14

28.89

16.85

1.40

99.28

" 8

38

52.14

26.13

24.80

1.27

104.34

" 9

46

52.14

31.64

33.29

1.54

118.61

" 10

48

52.14

33.01

44.53

1.64

131.32

" 11

63

52.14

43.33

52.49

2.10

150.06

" 12

18

52.14

12.38

18.62

.60

83.74

 

816

$782.10

$561.23

$544.65

$27.26

$1914.24

 

------------------------------

VII. - CHURCHES.

CONGREGATIONAL.

This was organized in 1802 by the earnest efforts of Amos Hawley, who had moved into this town from Connecticut that year. A man of devout religious principles, he was greatly troubled immediately after reaching this town at the idea of bringing up his family in a new country without the institutions of the gospel. It is related of him that he actually rode back to Connecticut to consult with his old pastor in reference to his duty in this matter. The prompt advice given was that he should return and raise the standard of the gospel in the wilderness, that this was the very place God had sent him, and that was the work he ought to do. Returning, he sought out his neighbors of similar religious views, and a church was soon after organized. The old book of records, now in the hands of John N. Sill, has all of its earlier portions taken out, little being left before 1825. The roll of members who joined this pioneer church, the date of its organization, the first officers, the purchase of a site, and the erection and dedication of the house are all left to conjecture and to the uncertainty of fading memories. There is a brief memorandum showing that Daniel Hamlin became a member in 1802, John Craig in 1804, Enoch Sill, Joseph De Wolf, Seth Hawley, and Truman Hamlin in 1808 and 1809. It is also known that Amos Hawley was one of the first deacons, that the church had a large membership during a portion of its history, some stating it as high as three hundred and fifty communicants at one time. Lebbeus Armstrong was the first pastor installed, in 1804. The church was largely composed of Northumberland families, Samuel Lewis, the Thompsons, Paynes, Berrys, Craigs, and Nevins.

Enoch Sill was a deacon of the church for many years. In 1825 his name also appears as clerk of the society, and Lemuel Leggett as moderator. Strong and radical divisions of sentiments and views seem to have characterized the society from the first. Out of a sharp discussion as to the site of the meeting-house grew two houses, one at the river, one at Reynolds' Corners, and services alternated at the two places; indeed, there was, perhaps, something of an attempt at organization at the west meeting-house. Practically, however, it seems to have been one society with two houses. With the organization of churches of the same or similar faith, Dutch Reformed and Presbyterian at Bacon Hill, Gansevoort, Glen's Falls, Sandy Hill, and Fort Edward, - in fact, a whole circle just outside of the town, - weakening the organization at every point, it finally became extinct, and no church of the kind exists in Moreau at the present time. The meeting-house at Reynolds' Corners, literally built upon the sand, and not upon the rock, became gradually undermined, was taken down, and the timbers were used in the erection of the Methodist church. The last business meeting of the church was in 1859, and Charles F. Wood and Enoch Sill the last deacons. The final dissolution was brought about by a large number of members joining in a body the Fort Edward church.

------------------------------

FRIENDS' MONTHLY MEETING OF MOREAU.

This body belongs to the denomination of Friends known as Orthodox. It is a branch or offshoot of the society in Queensbury, which has a very early history, reaching back to 1767. The Friends living in Moreau met for many years with that body, but in 1851 they began meetings near Clark's Corners under the care of a committee from the Queensbury meeting. These were continued for two years, when the present meeting-house was erected and a regular society instituted. Among the principal members active in organizing the society were James Mott and Lucius Carey. The monthly meeting is connected to the Glen's Falls quarterly meeting. The first preacher was Jonathan Duval, and he still exercises his gifts in the meetings. The wife of Mr. Duval, and also Wm. P. Angel, are acknowledged as preachers by the society. The present clerk is Anna J. Eddy.

------------------------------

THE METHODIST CHURCH OF SOUTH GLEN'S FALLS.

Methodist services have been held on this side of the river, under the care of the Glen's Falls church, for more than thirty years, and a Sunday-school was maintained in connection with them. The place was finally made a separate charge in 1876. Previous to this, in 1869, the present small but neat and convenient chapel was erected. The corner-stone was laid July 1 of that year. The first class was gathered in 1843, by James Covill. An early class-leader in those times was Heman Hopkins.

The present preacher for the society is Rev. Charles Edwards. The Stewards are G. Parks, Leonard Edmonds, James Reynolds, Clark Smith, John Trickett, William Fuller.

------------------------------

THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

was constituted in 1795, became a member of Shaftsbury Association in 1797, and the Saratoga Association in 1805. The ministers of the church in earlier times were Calvin Hulbert, Joseph H. Ellice, James Rogers, Elisha Blakeman, Charles Williams, John C. Holt, Harvey Slade, J.H. Dwyer, Joseph W. Sawyer, R.O. Dwyer, Ebenezer Hall, L.L. Still, Amos R. Wells, and George Fisher.

The house of worship is pleasantly located, and the services are well sustained.

------------------------------

THE METHODIST CHURCH OF FORTSVILLE.

This denomination were very early at work in this portion of the town with their wonted energy and perseverance. The records of early class-meetings are not easily obtained.

The society has a convenient house of worship, and is understood to be in a flourishing condition. No statistics have been received from the officers in reply to our inquiries by circular.

------------------------------

VIII. - BURIALS.

Very early burials in town occurred in many different places. Among these may be mentioned the Folsom farm, within the present village. As remembered by George Putnam, these were very old graves, going back before 1800, as they were marked by rough stones, with simply initials. The old Parks burial-ground is on a pleasant knoll near the river, opposite Sandy Hill. There are also the two cemeteries in use at South Glen's Falls, also at the bend, and at Reynolds' Corners. Further ancient private burial-places may be seen on the Olmstead Farm, the old Bitely farm, the Rogers Farm, and the Hamlin farm, near the old Mawney house, on the Richards place, and probably several others could be found.

------------------------------

IX. - SOCIETIES.

A prominent event in the history of the town of Moreau was the formation of a temperance society in 1808. As it is claimed, and no doubt justly, that this was the first temperance society in this country or in the world, its proceedings must be given at some length. Its foundation was the work of Billy J. Clark, an early physician. He is certainly entitled to the credit of beginning the first organized movement in this great struggle. Daily witnessing in his practice the fearful physical and moral ruin wrought by intemperance, he was aroused to the necessity of making an effort to resist the evil. In the winter of 1808 he endeavored to organize a county society at Ballston, but without success. Dr. Bull, then sheriff of the county, co-operated with him, but they were deemed by the entire bench and bar as visionary enthusiasts. Dr. Clark, not discouraged by this rebuff in high quarters, returned to work among his neighbors. A biographer, writing a few years since, gives the following as the starting-point of the Famous society:

"On a stormy night in March, 1808, and after a day of toil and anxiety in visits to his patients, dripping from rain and covered with mud, Dr. Clark unceremoniously entered the parsonage. The eager visitor's emphatic expression addressed to Mr. Armstrong, the pastor of the Congregational church, was: "Sir, we shall become a community of drunkards unless something is speedily done to arrest the progress of intemperance."

The pastor cordially cooperating, the step was decided upon then and there. A call was issued for a public meeting. The locality of these events was Clark's Corners, in the south part of Moreau, two miles north of the Gansevoort station, on the railroad. The house of Billy J. Clark occupied the southeast corner, standing now just as it was during all the later years of his life. The Mawney house was on the northwest corner, a little north of the actual corner. It may be said to be standing, yet so much remodeled that it does not in any respect resemble the Mawney house of olden time.

The parsonage within whose walls Billy J. Clark's idea took definite form in the shape of a call for a public meeting, was the present place of Richard Davenport, and the old school-house where the society generally met was on the site of the present house of Mr. Spicer. The Mawney house was a tavern, and strange to say, this first preliminary meeting was held in the very place of the rum traffic itself. The record of the first meeting, held April 13, 1808, is as follows: At a meeting of a number of inhabitants from the towns of Moreau and Northumberland, held at the house of Peter L. Mawney, agreeable to previous notice, for the purpose of establishing a temperance society under such laws and regulations as shall be hereafter agreed upon, Colonel Sidney Berry was chosen chairman, and Henry Martin, Esq., secretary of said meeting.

1. Resolved, In the opinion of this meeting that it is proper, practicable, and necessary to form a temperance society in this place, and that the great and leading object of this society is wholly to abstain from ardent spirits.

2. Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to draw the bylaws for said society, and that Billy J. Clark, Sidney Berry, Nicholas W. Angle, Ichabod Hawley, and Lebbeus Armstrong be the said committee; and that said committee prepare the by-laws by the 20th of April instant, and present them at the house of Peter L. Mawney at twelve o'clock.

3. Resolved, That the members of this meeting wholly abstain from all spirituous liquors.

4. Resolved, That the names registered here of persons present consider themselves members of said society. Signed Isaac B. Payne, Nicholas W. Angle, Ichabod Hawley, Dan Kellogg. David Parsons, Ephraim Ross, James Mott, John M. Berry, Alvord Hawley, John T. Sealey, Thomas Cotton, Cyrus Wood, David Tillottson, James Rogers, Billy J. Clark, Henry Martin, Charles Kellogg, Jr., Sidney Berry, Elnathan Spencer, Joseph Sill, Asaph Putnam, Solomon St. John, Hawley St. John.

5. Resolved, That this meeting be adjourned to the 20th instant at twelve o'clock, at the house of Peter L. Mawney.

April 20, 1808, the meeting again assembled at the house of Peter L. Mawney, agreeable to adjournment. The committee appointed to draft by-laws presented the following:

"Considering the prevalency of intemperance in the excessive use of spirituous liquors; considering the numerous evils and calamities to which the inhabitants of this and other countries are exposed; considering the immense sums of money expended in the purchase of ardent spirits, and heartily wishing for a general reformation by the abolition of intemperance, and a more economical and virtuous use of expenditures; we, the subscribers, inhabitants of the county of Saratoga, in the State of New York, being convened by previous notice, on the 20th of April, 1808, at the house of Peter L. Mawney, in the town of Moreau, do agree, mutually, voluntarily, collectively, and individually, to form into a society for the purpose of suppressing vicious habits and encouraging moral virtue. For the regulation of said society and the better to carry its important designs into effect, the following by-laws are unanimously adopted by said society, to the strict adherence of which every member is bound by the penalties hereinafter mentioned.

"BY-LAWS OF THE MOREAU AND NORTHUMBERLAND TEMPERATE SOCIETY.

"ARTICLE I. - This society shall he known by the appellation of the Union Temperate Society of Moreau and Northumberland.

"ART. II. - The last Monday in October, at ten o'clock A.M., shall forever hereafter be the time for holding the anniversary meeting of the society, for the election of officers, at such place as a majority of members present at their last annual meeting shall agree. And it shall be the duty of the secretary to put up written notification of the same in at least three public places in Moreau and Northumberland three weeks preceding such meeting.

"ART. III. - The officers of the society shall consist of a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, not more than seven nor less than three trustees, to be chosen annually by ballet, and a majority of the whole number of votes shall be necessary to a choice.

"ART. IV. - The members of this society shall not be allowed to drink any rum, brandy, gin, whisky, or any kind of distilled spirits, nor any kind of composition of the above liquors. except by the advice of a physician, or in case of actual disease, under such penalties as shall hereafter be mentioned.

"ART. V. - Any member of this society who shall drink any of the liquors mentioned in the preceding section, shall forfeit and pay to the treasurer, for the benefit of the society, the sum of twenty-five cents for each and every offense.

"ART. VI. - If any member of this society shall be known to be intoxicated, it shall be the duty of the trustees of this society to admonish him of it. If said member will pay to the treasurer fifty cents and promise reformation for the future, he shall be excused; if not, he shall be considered a fit subject for expulsion.

"ART. VII. - It shall be disreputable for any member of this society to offer any of the liquors mentioned in Art. IV. to any member of said society, or to advise or urge any other person to drink of said liquors, except in cases mentioned in Art. IV. And if in case any member should so offer, advise, and urge any person to drink of said liquors, he shall forfeit and pay to the treasurer twenty-five cents for each and every such offense.

"ART. VIII. - It shall be disreputable for any member of the society to speak disrespectfully of said society, or utter any words with intent to injure or bring said society into disrepute, and shall forfeit and pay to the treasurer thereof twenty-five cents for each and every such offense.

* * * * * * * * * *

"ART. XX. - That it shall not be lawful for any member of this society to drink wine, except at a public dinner (except in cases stated in Art. IV.).

"ART. XXI. - That not any of the laws of this society shall infringe on the rite and ordinance of any church or religious society whatsoever.

* * * * * * * * * *

"ART. XXIV. - That each and every individual member of this society subscribe to the above laws and regulations, and consider himself bound strictly to observe and obey them."

The articles omitted relate simply to the ordinary management and working details necessary to all similar organizations. The articles given above show the peculiar pledges and restrictions of this society, and in some respects they are decidedly curious compared with the orthodox iron-clad total abstinence pledge of modern times. A man could drink, but must pay twenty-five cents fine. He could get drunk, but it would cost him fifty cents more than it used to before he joined the society, and besides, in this case, he must promise reformation.

Amusing as these things may seem, the society was nevertheless a stout blow against intemperance.

It was the work of men in earnest, men who understood the evils they sought to remove. When the good wrought by the long line of temperance societies in subsequent years shall be properly estimated, when the victories won for sobriety and virtue shall be entered in the grand record of earth's noble deeds, history will point back to the "Temperate Society of Moreau" as the first blow in all this long struggle. In the roll of earth's benefactors, Billy J. Clark is entitled to a high place. If the leaders in other enterprises who develop a new idea and impress it on those around them are worthy of distinguished honor, so is Billy J. Clark, the thunder of temperance societies, the grand leader who in the then thick darkness existing upon this subject hung out a signal-light and called on his neighbors and countrymen to rally for temperance, - for peace, order, virtue.

At the same meeting when the by-laws were adopted the first regular officers were elected, as follows: Sidney Berry, president; Ichabod Hawley, vice-president; Billy J. Clark, secretary; Thomas Thompson, treasurer; Charles Granger, Gurdon Sill, Cyrus Wood, trustees.

The Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong was invited to deliver an address or oration at the next meeting. There were six, according to Hay's history of this society, who participated in the first meeting, but did not complete their membership by signing the constitution at the next meeting. If we leave these out, and also those whose names the same historian says are not found in the written records of the society, but only in certain printed lists, the actual pioneer members would seem to be the following: Isaac B. Payne, Ichabod Hawley, David Parsons, James Mott, Alvaro Hawley, Billy J. Clark, Charles Kellogg, Jr., Elnathan Spencer, Asaph Putnam, Nicholas W. Angle, Dean Kellogg, John T. Seeley, Cyrus Wood, Henry Martin, Sidney Berry, Joseph Sill, Solomon St. John, Thomas Thompson, James Lambert, Thomas C. Bird, Calvin Wood, Esek Cowen, Charles Granger, Asahel Warren, Stephen Payne, David B. Keeler, William H. Jacobs, Shubael Wicks, Gurdon G. Sill, Lebbeus Armstrong, Joseph Sill: Charles Kellogg, John Berry, David Pierson, Isaac Chandler, Joseph Benjamin, Oliver Bissell, Jr., Ephraim Osborn, John Dumont, Joseph DeWolf, Isaac Annable, Gardner Stow, Horace Le Barnes, Daniel Baldwin, Alexander Sutherland, Rodrick Le Barnes, John Thompson, Samuel Hinche, Jesse Billings, Jr., Simeon Berry, Jr., Russell Burrows, Jonas Murray, Jesse Woodruff, Park Freeman, John Le Barnes, I.J. Griswold, W. Angle, Jr., James Crocker, Stephen Sherman, Abraham P. Green, John Coplin, William Velsey, Jr., Cyrus Andrews, Squire Harrington, Shubael Hicks, Eli Velsey, and Robert Brisbin.

Neither Billy J. Clark's grave nor the site of the old school-house is yet marked by the monument elaborately described in a prophetic strain by his enthusiastic biographer, Judge Hay. In the old cemetery at Reynolds' Corners he sleeps in an unmarked but not an unknown grave. His best monument is the orderly, virtuous community, trained by him and his associates in the ways of temperance. Of him may emphatically be written, "He rests from his labors and his works do follow him." The old house where he lived, the office where he wrote the bylaws and resolutions, the well of pure cold water, delicious in its taste, which he loved to drink, and the Mawney house, are spots to which temperance pilgrims are even now directing their footsteps, and they may yet become classic memorials of the temperance conflict.

Rev. Lebbeus Armstrong seems to have cordially seconded the plan of organizing a society proposed by Mr. Clark, and shared largely in the work. He was the pastor of the then existing Congregational church in Moreau, - a man of energy and courage, not afraid to utter his opinions in the pulpit or out.

Among the names connected with the organization were several afterwards prominent at the bar and on the bench, - Esek Cowen, then just commencing his legal practice in the humble office at Gansevoort Mills, and Gardner Stow, a student in the same office, afterwards attorney-general of the State. The other names upon that early roll are not so well known in public affairs, but none the less have many of them adorned the walks of private life equally honorable with those of greater prominence. They represent fairly the substantial body of citizens which have rendered Moreau noted for its virtuous, orderly, temperate society.

The original society of Billy J. Clark existed for many years, holding its annual meetings, and steadily continuing its good work, but it has not been kept up to the present time. Though many temperance societies have been organized on the same ground, and many meetings held, it would not be correct to say that they were the same organization. But though the apostolic succession of temperance workers has not come down to the present in an unbroken line, yet the spirit of Billy J. Clark survives upon the plains of Moreau, and even the stronger principle of legal prohibition, first proposed by Gardner Stow, or this old society, is dominant there, - no licenses being granted for the sale of intoxicating drinks.

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X.--PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

Situated as the town of Moreau is, with the Hudson on both the north and east, old Indian-trails must have crossed its territory, as well as the routes of other armies, to some extent. Yet the well-known points of actual French, Indian, and Revolutionary warfare are just without its limits, leaving only a few places that have any special historic interest. Just outside Fort Edward, on the hills near the end of the wagon bridge, were in early times the remains of intrenchments, inclosing, perhaps, half an acre. Lent Hamlin once gathered seventy balls on that place. Doubtless the west bank of the Hudson, below the fort, furnished rallying-places for guarding the valley against the descent of enemies.

The broad level plains in the central portion of the town must have been much easier to travel over than the mountains farther west, or even the broken country near the river. No doubt these were a favorite route for Indians crossing the river at Glen's Falls, on the way to the valley of the Mohawk. At South Glen's Falls the Parks massacre occurred, in 1777, a full account of which is given elsewhere, and there was also a fortified position, held there for a short time at another stage of the Revolutionary war. It is related by L.G. Olmstead that his maternal grandfather led a company of troops on their way to join the Revolutionary army up the valley, on the west side of the river, and that they encamped for one night at the mouth of Snoek Kill. The place at Fort Miller is called in the older histories the "second carrying-place of the Hudson," and the fort was built in 1755 by Colonel Miller. Noah Payne, living opposite the "Black house," above Fort Miller, is spoken of as a prominent Whig, at whose house Moses Harris, the noted scout employed by General Schuyler, often found shelter, protection, and assistance.

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XI. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

A part of the southern and eastern portions of the town are fertile, and agriculture is pursued with success. Other portions of the town are sandy and poor. The general occupation of the people is farming, but in the northern part a large number are engaged in the various lumbering, milling, and manufacturing enterprises that are in operation along the Hudson river. Perhaps the sandy portions of Moreau may have been settled by the stratagem which Holden's "History of Queensbury" relates with reference to a Mr. Thurman, who is said to have taken beech-nuts to the south part of the county as specimens of the buckwheat that was raised here. The Moreau lands at that time were rather highly estimated, owners being unwilling, it is said, to exchange them acre for acre for the rich alluvial lands of Waterford.

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XII. - MILITARY.

The War of 1812-15 called into the field some soldiers from Moreau, but we can only give their names as recollected by citizens, there being no record in town to copy from. The following have been secured:

Tompkins, who lost his life; James Coburn, Samuel Putnam, Bloster Merrill, Solomon Parks, Elisha Danford, the latter was a captain in the service. Of one of the volunteers they relate the story that, being unaccustomed to military life, he did not for a time appreciate the strictness requisite to a proper discharge of duty. Being placed on guard before the tent of the officers, he went off just about when he saw fit to get something to drink. When arrested for the neglect of duty, he innocently replied, "He didn't suppose the officers were afraid!" He escaped punishment, but probably did better next time. Truman Wilcox was also in the army of 1812, perhaps from some other town than this.

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The activity of the town officers and the unanimity of the people in the War of 1861-65 is shown in the action of the town-meeting, where the war-measures passed without a dissenting voice, and the number of volunteers who actually went into the service. The list of those who went, appended to this history, is made as accurate as possible, considering how rapidly history is lost when trusted to memory alone, and that the record was not written up in the town clerk's office under the law of 1866. We are indebted, as are the citizens of the town, to Mr. Beecher, at the post-office, South Glen's Falls, for the valuable labor he bestowed upon the list for 1861-65.

Aug. 9, 1862, a special town-meeting was held to consider the questions of enlistment for the war. A.L. Reynolds, supervisor, presided, and C.V. Kenyon, town clerk, acted as secretary. The committee on resolutions were J.G. Stillwell, Jabez Hamilton, B. Ingalsby, A.L. McOmber, and George Payne. Patriotic addresses were made and a strong series of resolutions adopted, fully organizing the town by school districts to canvass for volunteers and for subscriptions. The entire resolutions passed without a dissenting voice and amid great enthusiasm. Twenty-four volunteers were obtained on the spot. At another meeting, Aug. 19, 1862, the town bounty was voted at $100.

June 13, 1864, at a special town-meeting, a town bounty of $300 was offered for volunteers; and at another meeting, July 23, 1864, the town bounty was increased to $500; Aug. 29, 1864, the bounty was increased to $800.

A fine military company is maintaining an active organization at the present time at South Glen's Falls. It was formed in the summer of 1876, and mustered into service in November of that year. The officers are (1877) Fred. Gleesettle, capt.; William Higgins, 1st lieut.; John H. Yattaw, 2d lieut. The company is known as the "Hughes Light Guard," 5th separate company, 10th brigade, 3d division, N.G.S.N.Y. The company musters about seventy-five men. During the great strike in July, 1877, they were called to Troy, and participated at the close of the "campaign" in the grand review at Albany. When they were about to return, Brigadier-General Alden sent ahead of them the following complimentary telegram: "Give a hearty greeting to the Hughes Light Guard. They deserve it for their soldierly conduct."

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WAR OF 1861-65.

The first call in the War of 1861-65 was for thirteen men. A bounty of $50 was offered, and the men obtained in a single afternoon; thought to be the first bounty in the United States. The following is a list of the soldiers from Moreau:

Michael Ahr, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. A; taken prisoner at Chesterfield Heights, May 7, 1864; exchanged, Dec. 10, 1864; disch. with regt. June 30, 1865.

Henry H. Barker, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. with Regt., Dec. 13, 1864.

Albert M. Burroughs, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat. 77th Regt.

Walter D. Barnes, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F; killed at the battle of Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864.

Charles Brice, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; killed at Chesterfield Heights, Va., May 7, 1864.

Thomas E. Brice, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; disch. with regt., June 30, 1865.

George Burnham, enl. 77th Regt.

Frank Breese, enl. 93d Regt., Co. H; lost an eye in the Wilderness.

James C. Brisbin, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat. 77th Regt.; wounded in leg.

Sergt. Joel Brown, enl. Oct. 10, 1863, Bat. I, 16th Heavy Art., N.Y.S.V.; disch. Aug. 28, 1865.

Wm. H. Bennett, enl. Dec. 29, 1863, 54th N.Y.S.V., Co. C; served through; disch. with regt., April 14, 1866.

Charles H. Brodie, 162d Regt.

Walter Brodie, 162d Regt.

George W. Campbell, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt, Co. G.

Luther Church, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; served through; disch. with regt., June 10, 1865.

Charles Cutler, enl. Dee. 25, 1863, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Reed Church, enl. Jan. 22, 1862, 93d Regt., Co. A; wounded in Wilderness; disch. Jan. 1865.

Patrick Callan, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 169th Regt., N.Y.S.V., Co. D; served through; disch. with regt., Aug. 6, 1865.

John Callan, enl. Jan. 22, 1862, Co. A, 93d Regt., Co. H; wounded in the Wilderness, May 10, 1864; served through; disch. with regt.

C.M. Cool, enl. Oct. 10, 1863, Battery I, 16th Heavy Art., N.Y. Vol.; disch. Aug. 28, 1865.

Patrick Conoly, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, Co. D., 169th N.Y.; served through; disch. with regt., Aug. 6, 1865.

Asa J. Clothier, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, Co. F, 115th N.Y.S.V; served through; disch. with regt., June 30, 1865.

Walter Dwyer, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D; killed in the Wilderness, May 6, 1864.

Ransom O. Dwyer, enl. Oct. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

Abram L. Davis, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; served through; disch. with regt., June 30, 1865,

Stephen Decker, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; missing at Battle of Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 1864.

Joseph Dorvee, enl. Aug. 22, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. D; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

George De Long, enl. Oct. 10, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. with regt., Dec. 13, 1864.

Henry H. Day, enl. Sept. 6, 1862, Co. E, 92d N.Y.S.V.; lost an arm and wounded in the side, and taken prisoner at the second battle of Fair Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864,; disch. July 26, 1865.

Wm. Dorvee.

John Davis.

Philip Donahee.

Alonzo Ensign.

David Elison, 2d Vet. Cav.

A. Ellison, 2d Vet. Cav.

James Ellison, 2d Vet. Cav.

Danford Edmonds, enl. Jan. 22, 1862, 93d Regt., Co. A.

Danford Edmonds (2d).

Tobias Fralenburgh, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, Bat. I, 16th H. Art., N.Y.S. Vols.; disch. Aug. 28, 1865.

Henry G. Gurney, enl. Oct. 10, 1861, 77th Regt, Co. G.

Truman Gilbert, enl. Nov. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

Enoch Gurney, enl. Oct. 2, 1862, 153d Regt., Co. G; wagoner.

Fred. Gleesettle, enl. Sept. 18, 1861, Co. G, 53d N. Y. Vols. (D.E. Zouaves), corp.; disch. April 25, 1862; re-enl. Aug. 25, 1862; Co. B, 77th N.Y.S.V.; served through; disch. June 16, 1865, with regiment.

John W. Hilton, enl. Oct. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

John Hilton, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died Jun. 27, 1862.

Timothy Hodges, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F; disch. for disability; date unknown.

George E. Hutchins, enl. Sept. 6, 1862, 153d Regt., Co. G.

Lewis Hamlin, enl. 93d Regt., Co. H.

James Brisbin.

Clark Hawley.

Wm. Higgins.

Dick Isby, enl. 22d Regt.; wounded; ball through his head; came home; went back, and was killed.

Joseph Jump, enl. Nov. 9, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

Sylvester Jacobus, enl. Sept. 16, 1864, Co. A, 51st N.Y. Vols.; taken prisoner before Petersburg; died in prison; date unknown.

Samuel E. Kidd, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Andrew J. Keys, enl. Oct. 10, 1863, Bat. I, 16th H. Art., N.Y.S.V.; served through; disch. with regiment, Aug. 28, 1865.

Franklin Kirkham, enl. 97th N.Y. Vols.

N.J. Latimore, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat, 77th Regt.; wounded at Fort Stevens in 1864; disch, with regiment, July 7, 1865.

Joseph La Rose, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, Co. A, 115th N.Y. Vols.; disch. for disability, Aug. 1863.

Samuel Malison, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died March 22, 1862.

Daniel Morse, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt, Co. G; disch. Feb. 10, 1862.

Daniel J. Morse, enl. Oct. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Michael Mehan, enl. Nov. 1, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

Newton F. McOmber, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; served through; disch. with regt., June 30, 1865.

Wm. McNeil, enl. Aug. 21, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to 1st N.Y. Battery.

Jeffrey Merrill, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to 1st N.Y. Battery.

Henry Merrill, enl. 22d Regt, N.Y.S.V.; 1st lieut.; served through; disch. with regt.

George Merrill, enl. 77th.

John McGinnis, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, Co. D, 169th N.Y.S.V.; killed at Fort Fisher, N.C., Jan 16, 1865.

Wm. McCormic, enl. Aug. 9, 1861, Co. C, 56th N.Y.S.V.; wounded at Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862; disch. Oct. 9, 1862.

Tabor Newton, enl. 77th Regt.

William T. Norris, enl. Co. E, 22d N.Y.S.V.; killed at 2d Bull Run.

Henry C. Newton, 1st lieut., enl. Aug. 3, 1861; pro. captain, July 12, 1863; wounded.

Andrew Normand, enl. March 15, 1863, Co. F, 96th N.Y.S.V.; served through; disch. with regt., Feb. 16, 1866.

William Orton, enl. Aug. 19, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. D.

Albert H. Ott, enl. Sept. 24, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D; corp.; pro. sergt.; wounded, May 4, 1864; disch.

Morgan L. Purdy, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; wounded in foot, at the battle of Olustee, Feb. 20, 1864; disch. soon after.

George Purdy, enl. Aug. 21, 1862, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to 1st. N.Y. Battery.

Solomon H. Parks, enl. Aug. 10, 1863, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. A; served through; disch. with regt., Nov. 8, 1865.

Wallace Parks

Lawrence Palmer, enl. Jan. 20, 1862, 93d Regt., Co. H; served through; disch. Jan. 25, 1865.

Geo. H. Putnam, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, Co. G, 115th N.Y.S.V.; disch. for disability, Oct. 1862.

Edward Pearson.

George Ross, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; sergt.; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Joseph R. Rey, enl. Dec. 4, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. D.

William Rising, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; disch. with the regt., but sick, and died soon after.

James Reynolds, enl. Aug. 25, 1862, Co. E, 123d N.Y.S.V.; served through; disch. with regt., April 28, 1865.

Reuben Robinson, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, Battery I, 16th Heavy Art., N.Y.S.V.; disch. Aug. 28, 1865.

Benjamin Robinson, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, Battery I, 16th Heavy Art., N.Y.S.V.; disch. Aug. 28, 1865.

Nathaniel Rice, enl. Co. G, 77th Regt., N.Y.S.V.

Charles Sill, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

Wm. Sweet, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died at Fortress Monroe.

Milton F. Sweet, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.

Rowland Sherman, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; disch. with regiment, Dec. 13, 1864.

James M. Shurter, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died at Newport, April 4, 1862.

Dudley E. Lee, enl. Sept. 29, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; died Jan. 21, 1862.

George W. Smith, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F; served through; disch. with regiment, June 30, 1865.

James Smith, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F; served through; disch. with regiment, June 30, 1865.

Reuben Sherman, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F; died of typhoid fever at Yorktown, Jan. 7, 1863.

Levi Shaffer, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; pro. to 2d lieut.; killed at the battle of Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864.

Jacob A. Sisson, enl. Aug. 1, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; served through; disch. June 30, 1865.

George H. Skym, enl. Aug. 8, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; served through; disch. with regiment, June 30, 1865.

James C. Smith, enl. July 27, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; killed at the battle of Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864.

Ira Scott, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt, Co. G; served through; disch. with regiment, June 30, 1865.

George Sumner, enl. Feb. 21, 1864, 25th Cav., Co. B.

George Scott, enl. Aug. 22, 1862, Co. G, 77th Regt.; wounded, second battle Fredericksburg, in left thigh; disch. soon after.

Martin Snyder, enl. Sept. 10, 1864, Co. G, 51st Regt. N.Y.S.V.; taken prisoner before Petersburg; died while a prisoner; date unknown.

Franklin Smith.

George Sleight, enl. 77th Regt.; lost in action; never heard from.

George Storer, enl. 77th Regt.

George C. Tucker, enl. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G.

Jesse Thompson, - died soon after returning home.

James C. Vandenberg, enl.. Sept. 26, 1861, 77th Regt., Co. G; killed in the battle of the Wilderness, May 10, 1864.

Lyman Vandenburg, enl. Oct. 26, 1861, Co. G, 77th Regt.; sergt.; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt.; served through; disch. with regt., July 7, 1865.

Elias Washburn, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. F; served through; disch. with regt., June 30, 1865.

C. Frank Winship, enl. Oct, 20, 1861, Co. G, 77th N.Y.S.V.; taken prisoner at battle of Chantilly, Va., Oct. 15, 1863; exchanged, Dec. l, 1864; disch. with regt., Dec. 20, 1864.

James White, enl. Dec. 26, 1863, Battery I, 16th Heavy Art., N.Y.S.V.; disch. Aug. 28, 1865.

Loyd Weston, enl. July 28, 1862, Co. F, 115th N.Y.S.V.; missing in a skirmish, Feb. 8, 1864, near Olustee, Fla.

Wm. H. Yattaw, enl. Aug. 11, 1862, 115th Regt., Co. G; disch. July 9, 1863.

Lieut. John J. Yattaw, enl. Sept. 6, 1862, Co. E 92d N.Y.V.; trans. to 96th N.Y.S.V., Oct. 30, 1864; served through; disch. June 18, 1865.

Christopher Yattaw, enl. June 25, 1863, Co. C, 18th Corning Light Cav., N.Y.S.V.; served through; disch. June 10, 1866, with regt.

Robert Yattaw, enl. Nov. 1863, in U.S. Navy: disch. by writ, under age.

Hiram Yattaw, enl. Aug. 9, 1862, Co. A, 118th Regt., N.Y.S.V; wounded in left leg, at Hanover Junction, Va., July 4, 1863; served through; disch. with regt., June 23, 1865.

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Residence of Stephen Vaughn

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