HISTORY OF

SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK.

by NATHANIEL BARTLETT SYLVESTER

1878

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HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNS OF SARATOGA COUNTY.

PROVIDENCE.

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I. - GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

PROVIDENCE is the central town upon the western tier. It is bounded north by Edinburgh, east by Greenfield, south by Galway, and west by the county line. It contains 8920 acres of improved land and 18,241 acres of unimproved, and of this last amount 9980 are woodland. The population in 1875 was 1132.

This town contains a part of the twenty-first allotment of the Kayadrossera patent, also a part of the patent granted to John Glen and forty-four others, under date of Aug. 24, 1770; and also a part of the Northampton patent, granted Oct. 17, 1741, to Jacob Mase and others.

In the revised statutes of the State this town is described and its boundary lines defined as follows:

"The town of Providence shall contain all that part of said county beginning at the northwest corner of Milton, and running thence a west course on a parallel line with the north bounds of the town of Charlton to the west bounds of the county; then north along the same six miles; then easterly on a straight line parallel with the south bounds to a line running north from the northwest corner of Milton; then south along said line to the place of beginning."

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II. - NATURAL FEATURES.

The town consists mostly of hilly lands and of a poor quality of sandy and stony soil. In the western part the soil is a little better, and the surface more level. The Maxon mountain, a high table-land, occupies the entire northern part of the town. Round lake lies near the centre of the town. It is a small body of water, and its outlet is denominated Hans creek. The manner in which it obtained this name is said to have been as follows: Sir William Johnson, who resided at Johnstown, Fulton county, was once, in company with one John Conyne, fishing for trout in this stream. Conyne was standing up in the canoe, and a sudden lurch caused him to involuntarily plunge into the waters. Sir William remarked that "Hans" (German for John) had "gone after some trout." Ever afterwards it was called Hans creek, from that circumstance. Lake Desolation is another small body of water. It lies on the town line, partly in Providence and partly in Greenfield. Its outlet is Kennyetto creek, now more commonly known as Hagedorn's creek. This stream rises in the eastern part of Providence, flows southwest through the town, then westerly across Broadalbin, then northerly through a portion of Mayfield, then northeasterly across Broadalbin, and empties into the Sacandaga river at Northampton through Mayfield creek. It runs a course of some twenty-two or three miles, and empties its waters less than eight miles from its source. Following the Sacandaga and Hudson to Waterford, it there joins its waters with those of the Chuctenunda creek, whose source is about one mile south of this stream, in Galway. The Chuctenunda flows westerly through Perth and Montgomery county, and empties into the Mohawk at Amsterdam. Frenchman's creek is another small stream that rises in Providence and flows west into Fulton county, emptying into the Sacandaga Vlaie.

This town may claim several excellent points from which to view the surrounding country. From Antioch hill in the Clute neighborhood, in the southeastern part, a very fine view of the country to the east, south, and west is afforded. For extent and variety it is a view seldom excelled. From other hills near the centre and from Maxon mountain fine views of the country to the west and north are obtained.

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III. - EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The first settlers after the Revolution are said to have been Nathaniel Wells and Seth Kellogg. Of these men and their families nothing is now known.

Thomas Shankland settled at Hagedorn Mills, and in 1786 built the first saw-mill in the town. This was quickly followed by a grist-mill, which was either the first or second grist-mill in town. The Schermerhorn mill, on Hans creek, is by some supposed to have been the first one. To support this theory they cite the fact that every timber, posts, sills, joists, rafters, girts, and even the braces, were of hewed timber; while those Of Shankland's mill were some of them of sawed timber. It might easily be, however, that the cost of making a road over which to draw the sawed timber induced the builders of this mill to hew their timbers. Shankland built a frame house, and kept an inn, which was the first in the town. In a few years, probably about 1792, Shankland sold this property to Peter Morey, who held it till 1806, when he in turn sold to Jonathan Hagedorn. Several of Shankland's children died previous to his removal, and were buried in a lot east of the present residence of Stephen Rockwell. These were probably the first deaths in the town, and this family burial-ground also the first in town. Some time ago quite an excitement was created by the finding of an ancient-looking grave-stone, on which the death was made to appear as having occurred in 1707. After investigating a little further, however, a part of the stone that had been broken off was unearthed, and by putting the two pieces together it made the date read 1797, which result lessened its value as an antique, but verified the truth of history.

Martin Sleezer was among the very earliest settlers, coming into the town immediately after the close of the war, and settling near the western centre of the town. There being no mills in the vicinity, he frequently went to Schenectady, hired out, and worked till he earned a bushel of wheat, took it to the mills and had it ground, and then carried it through the woods to his home, guided only by marks on the trees. Some of his descendants are still living in the town.

Jonathan Finch was one of the "Minute-men of seventy-six," and was several times called out during the troublous times that preceded the breaking out of the Revolution. At one of their musters he was accidentally wounded in one of his hands and rendered unfit for further service. He drew a pension from the government on account of his wound. At the close of the Revolution he removed with his family from Dutchess county, and settled on the land now owned by H.T. Trevett, in the western part of Providence. Here he lived, raised a family, and died, full of years and good works. Upon the organization of the Baptist church he was licensed by it to preach the gospel, and officiated as pastor for many years, being ordained to the ministry soon after his license was given. He was a chaplain in the War of 1812. His father and mother came from their southern home and spent the last years of their lives in Providence. Jonathan and Jemima Finch had a family that grew up to manhood and womanhood, and have passed from the scenes of earth. Three of his grandchildren are still living, - Lansing and Thomas S. in Providence, and Samuel R. in Broadalbin.

In the year 1796, David and Samuel S. Barker, two brothers, left their eastern home in Dartmouth, Mass., and came west to better their fortunes. David built a house on the place now occupied by Thomas Hughes, just north of Barkersville, and opened an inn for the entertainment of travelers. Samuel S. settled on the place now occupied by Jere C. Bogart. These two brothers built a saw-mill, a grist-mill, and shoe-shop and tannery, and carried on quite an extensive business. The saw-mill was built on the site of an old mill built by some unknown person, and, so far as we are able to discover, at some pre-historic time. Many descendants of these men are living in this and adjoining counties. Nathaniel Barker, of Galway, is a son of David Barker, and Mrs. Lydia Bogert, of Barkersville, is a granddaughter of Samuel S. Barker. The village of Barkersville was named after these men. Mr. J.W. Briggs has a pair of tongs in his possession that David Barker brought from Dartmouth with him eighty-one years ago.

Stephen Rockwell and his family came from Dutchess county in 1784, and settled in Milton. Their eldest son enlisted in the United States naval service during the Revolution, and was never heard from afterwards. The other son, Jonah Rockwell, settled in Providence, having married Anna Temple, and raised a family of four sons and two daughters, all of whom are dead save two, Stephen and Polly Rockwell, who live at Hagedorn's Mills. Jonah Rockwell died in 1838. Stephen Rockwell is engaged in farming. Trustram Duel was a blacksmith living in Dutchess county. Becoming dissatisfied with his location, and hoping to better his condition, he removed to Providence in the year 1797, and settled near Hagedorn's Mills. He built a house and a shop, and at once began working at his trade. This was the first blacksmith-shop in the town. He had seven children. Seneca Duel and Mrs. A. Manchester, living in Providence, are the only ones now living.

Nathaniel Sowl was a sailor engaged in whaling, and at the time of the Revolution his vessel narrowly escaped capture by a British man-of-war. He abandoned the sea, and with his family removed to Providence, in 1787, coming from Dartmouth, Mass. For several years he lived on rented lands; but finally, in 1806, he bought a small farm a mile north of Barkersville, and lived there till his death, which occurred January 7, 1837. David Sowl, of Hagedorn's Mills, and Rebecca Allen, of Amsterdam, are the only ones of his family of eight children that are now living. David Sowl has four children living in town, one daughter in Kansas, and another in Washington. One of his sons, Joseph B. Sowl, in partnership with Mosher Chase, runs the saw-mill at Hagedorn's Mills, and deals quite extensively in lumber.

Henry J. Trevett came from Newport, R.I., with a married sister, in 1804. They settled in the western part of the town, near West Providence Post-Office. He married, in 1813, Joanna Shipman, and two of their children are still living in Providence. Mr. Trevett, now eighty-nine years old, is living in the town of Florida, {original text has "Floriday".} Montgomery Co. Both of the sons living here are engaged in the manufacture of chairs. Their factories are on Frenchman's creek. The mill owned by Henry T. Trevett & Sons was built by Fox & Lyon, about 1827. It was purchased by the present owners in 1859. Though suffering from the general depression of business, they are still doing quite an extensive business.

William Clark, from Dutchess county, settled near Antioch Hill, a mile and a half north of York's Corners, in 1790. William Clark, for many years supervisor of the town, and Martha A. Fuller, of Saratoga Springs, are grandchildren of his.

Among the early settlers in the southeastern part of the town were Othniel Allen, Ichabod Ely, Zalmon Pulling, Henry R. Hagedorn, James and Jacob Conkling, David and Ephraim Root, William Beardsley, Gideon Allen, and Uriah Cornell. Jonathan Ferris, William Richardson, Peleg Hart, Shadrach Wait, Robert Ryan, ------ Jones, Stephen Wait, Samuel Mosher, Judah Chase, Edmund Wait, Joshua Boreman, Jonathan Westgate, Jabez Manchester, Wing Chase, James Haviland, and John Rosevelt were other early settlers in different parts of the town.

The first mill at Fayville was built about 1800, by a man named Van Hoesen. It stood between the present road and the river. The present mill was built by Nehemiah St. John, about 1835, and is owned by Lansing Finch. A woolen-factory was also built there about 1850. It was run but a few years, and, after passing through several hands and being used for a variety of purposes, is now used as a cider-mill.

The first woolen-factory in town was built by Isaiah Fuller, a half-mile west of Hagedorn's Mills, on the same stream, prior to 1807. This manufactory consisted of a carding-machine and a cloth-dressing machine. After passing through the hands of several parties, the mill is now running under the management of Briggs Bros. They manufacture flannels, full-cloths, and common cassimeres. It is what is known as a one-set mill, with four looms, and the annual production is about three hundred yards.

At an early day Amos Wage built a saw-mill about three-quarters of a mile farther up Kennyetto creek than Hagedorn's mill.

William Paine Mason came to Hagedorn's Mills about 1814, and built a store, tavern, and distillery. He was unsuccessful in business, and soon after sold his business and property to Calvin Wheeler, who kept the store and ran the distillery for many years. This store and the one kept by Philip Green at Green's Corners were the first stores in the town.

Stephen Ballard built a shop at Barkersville about the year 1820, and put in a trip-hammer for the manufacture of scythes. After running a short time it was converted to other uses, and is now occupied by Willard Monroe as a turning-shop for the manufacture of rolling-pins, brush, tea-kettle, and stove-lifter handles, etc. Henry M. Lewis owns a saw-mill at Barkersville and deals largely in lumber. His yearly sales amount to about $5000.

Henry Clute, one of the oldest residents of the town, is of Dutch descent. His parents lived on Aal Plaats creek, near Schenectady, and he was left an orphan at an early age. He came to Providence and lived with Henry R. Hagedorn, a distant relative, and at the age of eighty-four is still living in the vicinity of his early home. Jacob Clute and Gershom H. Clute, two of his sons, also live in Providence.

Jonathan Hagedorn was born in Watervliet, {original text has "Watervleit".} Albany Co., April 8, 1770; was married in Galway, Dec. 30, 1792, to Abigail York, a native of Stephentown, Rensselaer Co. He resided in Glenville as a farmer until 1796, when he moved to Galway and became a merchant. In 1806 he located in Providence, at Hagedorn's Mills, and engaged in farming, lumbering, and milling. Here he remained until his death, which occurred Jan. 15, 1860. He was the eldest son of Samuel Hagerdorn, and one of nine children, who all, but one, lived to quite an advanced age. The average of their ages was nearly eighty-six years, and the average of the eight who lived longest was almost ninety years. He had a family of seven children. Only one, Stephen L. Hagedorn, is living, and he, with his wife and two daughters, remains on the old homestead. Mr. Hagedorn has one of the finest grist-mills in the county. It contains three run of stones, and is noted far and wide for the excellence of its products. He is also the fortunate possessor of an unsurpassable picnic ground, in the shape of a beautiful grove of second-growth pines in the heart of the forest. This secluded glade is thickly carpeted with a profuse growth of the softest and most delicate moss, has an excellent spring of water within easy reach, and forms one of the most romantic, interesting, and picturesque scenes imaginable. A young and romantic couple celebrated their nuptials there not long since. We are largely indebted to Mr. Hagedorn for his invaluable assistance in connection with this work.

Some twenty years ago Henry Sandford built a tannery on Hans creek, on the site of the old Schermerhorn mill. It was called "Glen Wild," and was quite a pretentious establishment, employing some thirty or forty hands in connection with it. It is now quite run down, and will probably be abandoned.

The first post-office in the town was Providence P.O., located at Hagedorn's Mills, and established about 1820. Calvin Wheeler was the first postmaster. Thaddeus Scribner was the mail-carrier, and came once a week, on Fridays, from the north. His route was from Ballston north to Hadley, up the Sacandaga valley to the Fish-house, then through Providence, Galway and Milton, back to Ballston.

This township appears to be slowly returning to its primitive state. Lands that years ago were under cultivation are now growing up to pine-forests. A general odor of decay pervades nearly every portion. Business is dull. Manufactures at one time quite prominent are now at a low ebb. Farms have been abandoned, buildings gone to decay and ruin.

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IV. - ORGANIZATION.

On the 26th of November, in the year 1795, a special meeting of the citizens of the town of Galway was held to decide whether it was best to divide the town. It was decided to do so, and on 5th of the following February a bill passed the Legislature erecting a new town from the north part of Galway, and naming it Providence, after the city of Providence, R.I. This town, from which Northfield (Edinburgh) was subsequently taken, lies on the west of the county near the centre.

The first town-meeting was held at "the logg meeting-house near Jonathan Finch's" This was the old Baptist meeting-house, built in 1793. The following is the record as it appears on the town-book:

"PROVIDENCE, Sept. 9th 1796.

"At the Annual Town Meeting in and for the Town of Providence, held at the Baptist Meeting house on the first Tuesday In April, A.D., 1796, the following gentlemen Were Duly elected to the several offices annexed to each of their names, viz.: Stephen Wait, Supervisor; Peleg Hart, Town Clerk; Daniel Washburn, Jr., Edmund Wait, Ebenezer Hill, Commissioners of Highways; John Rhoads, Edmond Wait, Zebedee Potter, Assessors; Thurston Wells, Sullivant D. Hubbell, Samuel Andrews, Constables; Sullivant D. Hubbell, Thurston Wells, Collectors of Rates; James Goodwin, Benjamin St. John, Ebenezer Hill, Commissioners of Schools; Elisha Mix, John Thomas, Overseers of the Poor; Daniel Washburn, Jr., Berry Chase, Jonah Roods, Fence Viewers; Elisha Mix, William Bentley, Gideon Sly, Pound Keepers.

"Also voted the following Town Law . . . .

"The Town Shall Bee Divided Into Road Districts By the Commissioners and Town Clerk. The overseers of highways to Be chosen by the Com's.

"Voted that hogs Run at Large from the 10th day of April till the first Day of October. Being yoked all that are one year old. Shall ware a yoke of two feet Long, and yongger ones In Proportion. Boors Shall not run at Large, and if any one shall be found In the Common, the oner thereof Shall Pay a fine of ten shilling for each offence.

"Sheep Rams Shall not Run at Large after the first Day of September till the 10 Day of November; if any person's Ram Shall Be found out of his Enclosure with the a Bove Limited time, the oner thereof Shall Pay a fine of forty Shillings for each offence.

"the Next annual Town Meeting is voted to Be held at the Same Meeting house as the Present Now is.

"A true Copy from the Minutes.

"By PELEG HART, Town Clerk."

No record of the town-meetings from 1799 to 1867 are in existence, and as a consequence our list of town officers is very incomplete. Probably the inhabitants had enough to do to secure a living, and paid but little attention to the preservation of records or historical matter.

By a careful perusal of the town records that exist we find that the people are exposed to the ravages of several unknown diseases, and it is a source of some wonder how so many of them escape and live to such a good old age. Among the list of "ills that flesh is heir to" we find "dyptheria, cholera, fitts, and num palsey." And again, to show how mysterious are the ways of Providence, we find a mortgage recorded ten months before it was given, being dated "Nov. 13, 1870," and recorded "Feb. 12, 1870."

The official list of the town shows that it has been represented in the Legislature by William Carpenter, 1805; Calvin Wheeler, 1810, 1813, 1829, 1838, 1839; Jonathan Delano, Jr., 1820; Seabury Allen, 1837; and James Sumner, Jr., 1861. In 1841, Seymour St. John was appointed a judge of the court of common pleas. William Carpenter, 1806; Othniel Allen, 1813; and Samuel S. Barker, 1815, were masters in chancery. Seneca Duel was justice of sessions in 1860-61. Calvin Wheeler was superintendent of the poor from 1848 to 1852. Seabury Allen was deputy superintendent of common schools in 1843-1845.

 

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TOWNSHIP OFFICERS.

 

Supervisors.

Town Clerks.

Collectors.

1796.

Stephen Wait.

Peleg Hart.

Sullivant D. Hubbell.

Thurston Wells.

1797.

"

"

Sullivant D. Hubbell.

Thurston Wells.

1798.

"

"

William Burch.

Oliver Edmonds.

1799.

"

"

Jeremiah Wait.

Oliver Edmonds.

1800.

"

Record lost.

Record lost.

1801.

William Carpenter.

"

"

1802.

"

"

"

1803.

"

"

"

1804.

"

"

"

1805.

"

"

"

1806.

"

"

"

1807.

Jonathan Shipman.

"

"

1808.

Othniel Allen.

"

"

1809.

Calvin Wheeler.

"

"

1810.

"

"

"

1811.

"

"

"

1812.

"

Artemus Chase.

"

1813.

"

Record lost.

"

1814.

Jonathan Shipman.

"

"

1815.

Othniel Allen.

"

"

1816.

"

"

"

1817.

Calvin Wheeler.

"

"

1818.

"

"

"

1819.

"

"

"

1820.

"

"

"

1821.

"

"

"

1822.

"

"

"

1823.

"

"

"

1824.

"

"

"

1825.

"

"

"

1826.

"

"

"

1827.

"

"

"

1828.

"

"

"

1829.

Jonathan Hagedorn.

"

Stephen Rockwell.

1830.

Calvin Wheeler.

"

James Conklin.

1831.

Seabury Allen.

"

"

1832.

"

"

John Fritts.

1833.

"

"

"

1834.

David Page.

"

"

1835.

Calvin Wheeler.

"

James Conklin.

1836.

"

"

Thomas C. Closson.

1837.

"

"

Joseph Tabor.

1838.

Hiram Carpenter.

"

Stephen Rockwell.

1839.

"

"

"

1840.

"

S.L. Hagedorn.

Martin Sleezer, Jr.

1841.

"

Record lost.

Record lost.

1842.

Jeremiah St. John.

"

"

1843.

Hiram Carpenter.

"

Jeptha Mosher.

1844.

Nehemiah St. John.

"

Ebenezer K. Clothier.

1845.

Hiram Carpenter.

"

William Shaw.

1846.

Abram Manchester.

"

William A. Sleezer.

1847.

"

"

Hiram Parker.

1848.

William V. Clark.

"

Josias R. Sherman.

1849.

Stephen Rockwell.

Ezra T. Austin.

Henry Cadman.

1850.

""

Wm. A. Sleezer.

Walter W. Walker.

1851.

William V. Clark.

William S. Nash.

J.W. Briggs.

1852.

"

Abram Manchester.

Electus Dye.

1853.

William S. Nash.

"

Asa W. Duel.

1854.

William V. Clark.

Jer. Manchester.

Abram Sleezer.

1855.

"

James Marihew.

Isaac Oakley.

1856.

S.L. Hagedorn.

"

Henry Cadman.

1857.

"

"

Sylvester A. Barton.

1858.

William V. Clark.

J.W. Briggs.

Hiram Van Pelt.

1859.

James Sumner, Jr.

Joseph H. Dudley.

W.H. Mosher.

1860.

"

Wm. B. Carpenter.

Dolphus Kimball.

1861.

S.L. Hagedorn.

James L. Hagedorn.

William Clute.

1862.

Stephen Rockwell.

Wm. O. Sumner.

Martin Sleezer.

1863.

William V. Clark.

J.W. Briggs.

John Rosevelt.

1864.

"

"

Joseph B. Sowl.

1865.

"

"

"

1866.

Mosher Chase.

James Marihew.

Harlow Tabor.

1867.

William V. Clark.

J.W. Briggs.

Joseph B. Sowl.

1868.

"

"

"

1869.

"

"

James H. Rockwell.

1870.

"

James L. Hagedorn.

John Rosevelt.

1871.

"

"

John Shanley.

1872.

"

"

Edgar Sandford.

1873.

Stephen Rockwell.

"

Jacob Cromwell.

1874.

William V. Clark.

Asher Cook, Jr.

George L. Evans.

1875.

"

"

Peter C. Trevett.

1876.

Philip Mead.

Willard Monroe.

"

1877.

Stephen Rockwell.

Henry M. Lewis.

Henry Trevett.

1878.

Joseph P. Soule.

Willard Monroe.

"

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JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

1856.

Robert Cornell.

1868.

Anson B. Pease.

1857.

Lyman Gates.

1869.

Henry Sandford.

Elisha Alvord.

1858.

Seneca Duel.

1870.

Joseph B. Sowl.

Abram Manchester.

1859.

Abram Manchester.

1871.

Jere C. Bogart.

1860.

Jacob Clute.

1872.

John Rosevelt.

1861.

J.C. Robertson.

1873.

Charles E. Duel.

1862.

Wm. M. Stark.

Seneca Duel.

1874.

Joseph B. Sowl.

1863.

Henry Sandford.

1875.

Jere C. Bogart.

1864.

Jacob Clute.

1876.

Jacob Clute.

1865.

Anson B. Pease.

1877.

Charles E. Duel.

1866.

Jacob Clute.

1878.

Howland Briggs.

1867.

Henry Sandford.

 

 

 

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V. - VILLAGES.

BARKERSVILLE is a small hamlet near the centre of the southern half of the town. It has mills, and also stores, a hotel, church, and the school-house of district number two.

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GLENWILD is near the centre of the northern part of the town. North and east from the place are the wild and unsettled portions of the town, and the scenery around is surpassingly fine. Mills and a tannery, with a few dwellings, constitute what there is of the village.

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FAYVILLE is in the northwest corner of the town, grown up from the business natural to the location of factories and mills.

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WEST PROVIDENCE, on the west side, below the centre, has a hotel, shops and mills, and a post-office.

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HAGEDORN'S MILLS is a hamlet with shops and mills, and deriving its name from the Hagedorn family.

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PROVIDENCE POST-OFFICE is on the line of Galway, southeast of Hagedorn's Mills.

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VI. - SCHOOLS.

The town organized its system of schools under the law of 1812. The loss of the town records prevents giving the names of the commissioners and other school officers. The principal schools are at or in the vicinity of the villages already named.

 

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COMMISSIONERS' APPORTIONMENT FOR 1878.

District

Number of Children between five and twenty-one.

Equal Quota of the Public Money.

Public Money according to the number of Children.

Public Money according to average attendance.

Library Money.

Total Public Money.

No. 1

46

$52.14

$31.64

$31.36

$1.53

$116.67

" 2

36

52.14

24.76

26.16

1.20

104.26

" 3

{No report.}

---

none

None

None

None

none

" 4

34

52.14

22.70

21.93

1.10

97.87

" 5

33

52.14

23.38

25.56

1.13

102.21

" 6

{Joint.}

25

none

17.19

17.42

.84

35.45

" 7

29

52.14

19.95

22.70

.97

95.76

" 8

14

52.14

9.63

20.51

.47

82.75

" 9

23

52.14

15.82

11.35

.77

80.08

" 10

36

52.14

24.76

22.13

1.20

100.23

" 11

44

52.14

30.26

28.07

1.47

111.94

 

320

$469.26

$220.09

$227.19

$10.68

$927.22

 

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VII. - CHURCHES.

BAPTIST CHURCH OF PROVIDENCE.

The earliest records of this church now extant indicate that it was organized about 1790, with a possibility of its having existed as early as 1785.

The original members are not known, the earliest roll having been made in 1796. On this roll appear the following names, viz.: Elder Jonathan Finch, Samuel Halsted, William Burch, Jonathan Shipman, Gideon Bentley, Martin Sleezer, Isaac Negus, David Row, Robert Baker, Judah Chase, Jonathan Ferris, Peleg Hart, Peter Sharp, Daniel Washburn, Joseph Hewitt, John Finch, Benjamin Slater, Major Slater, Jeremiah Loveless, Zalmon Disbrow, Jonathan Finch, Sr., William Lewis, Thomas Dennis, Ebenezer Jones, Charles Jones, William Benson, Samuel Sherwood, David Marsh, Henry Roberts, Timothy Cahoon, Eli Sprague, and Benjamin Tabor. Also the names of about the same number of female members from the same families. The first house of worship was a log building, erected about 1793, near the present residence of Henry T. Trevett. It was a plain, unpretending structure, and gave place, in 1807, to a frame church built on the same site. This building was built by subscription, and many people not connected with the church gave liberally towards its erection. The first service was held in the new church Aug. 9, 1807, Elder Jonathan Finch preaching from Acts xvii. 18. This church remained in use until 1847, in the summer of which year a new church was built at Hagedorn's Mills, and the society moved there. The dedicatory sermon was preached by Elder T.T. St. John. The first pastor of the church was Jonathan Finch, who was licensed to preach in 1791, and subsequently ordained to the ministry. His pastorate closed about the year 1820, and during the next ten years the church was served by supplies, among whom we find mentioned Elders Finch, Seamans, and Corwin. Upon Jonathan Hagedorn most of the work and care devolved, and he was licensed to preach by the church. Then followed these ministers in the order in which they are named: Elders Ebenezer Hall, Adolphus F. Rockwell, Enoch P. Dye, William Groom, Henry G. Mosher, William Bogart, T.T. St. John, Myron H. Negus, William Garnett, ------ Mack, ------ Combs, A.S. Davis, ------ Corwin, E.W. Brownell, Asher Cook: At different times assistance was rendered by Elders Aaron Seamans, Stephen Wilkins, and -------- Robinson. The first protracted meeting was held during the pastorate of Elder Rockwell, in 1832. The first sermon of the series was preached by Elder Aaron Seamans, from Solomon's Song, iv. 16. As a result of these meetings, twenty-two were converted and joined the church.

The great revival of this church occurred in 1814-15, when forty-two were added to the church by baptism and even by letters. Revivals were also experienced in 1834, 1835, 1840, 1842, 1850, 1856, 1863, and 1870, bringing into the church one hundred and thirteen precious souls. The salaries paid to preachers have ranged from $100 to $400. The largest donation was that given Elder Mack in 1853-54, which netted $150. The present officers of the church are: pastor, Rev. Asher Cook; clerk, Stephen L. Hagedorn; deacons, Edward S. Trevett, Philip Mead. The Sunday-school was first organized about 1845, and the organization was completed more perfectly in 1847. The highest number of pupils was reached in 1849, when there were one hundred and fifty connected with the school. The present number is about forty, and Stephen L. Hagedorn is the superintendent.

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CHRISTIAN CHURCH AT BARKERSVILLE.

This church was an offshoot of the Galway church, and was organised May 3, 1845, with eighteen members. Their names were Asa, Ruth, Sarah, Stephen P., Ira J., Edward, and William C. Barker; Latham and Susan M. Coffin; John and Rhoda Mosher; Amos, James, and Rhoda Marihew; Hiram and Polly A. Carpenter; Delong Tabor; and Mary Ferris. The first deacons were Hiram Carpenter and Amos Marihew. The church was built in the summer and fall of 1845, finished off and dedicated in the spring of 1846. Rev. Allen Haywood preached the discourse on that occasion. The pastors, in their order, have been Latham Coffin, D.M. Fuller, Elder Daman, William J. Huyck, John Showers, J. Pratt, D.P. Warner, and Joel Gallup.

About one hundred and seventy different persons have belonged to the church, and the present number of members is seventy-eight. The church is a plain structure, capable of seating three hundred people, and valued at $1500.

The present officers are Joel Gallup, pastor; Joseph Church, clerk; Jacob Clute and Asa Duel, deacons; Orren Wait, Nathan Parker, and Samuel B. Rogers, trustees.

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FRIENDS' MEETING-HOUSE.

At an early day the Friends; several of whom had settled in Providence, built a log meeting-house near the centre of the town on lands now owned by G.A. McOmber. Joshua Boreman, Jonathan Westgate, Jabez and Alice Manchester, Wing and Abigail Chase were among the members of the society. James Haviland was the preacher for many years. In 1815 this house was abandoned, and a frame meeting-house was built, about two miles west, on the farm of Charles Haviland. This house was finally taken down and moved away. The old burying-ground is still in existence.

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METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF PROVIDENCE.

The Protestant Methodists organized a church at West Providence in 1841-42, with about thirty members. Among them were Asa, Elijah, Mary, Elisha, and Elizabeth Mosher; Carmi, Rosa, Richard, and Rebecca Hart; William and Henrietta Colony; Philip, Polly, Sally, James, and Mrs. James Tabor; James and Hannah Carpenter; Mr. and Mrs. Blake; Solomon and Jane Cole; John, Mrs. John, Isaac, and Susan Oakley; Mrs. Seth Rockwell; Mrs. Susan Burdick; Martin and Edward Sleezer. The church was built about one and a half miles northeast of Hagedorn's Mills. It is twenty-six feet wide by thirty-six feet long, and cost $500.

The first minister was Rev. Peter Esmond, and he was followed by Revs. Ransom Spear, Weaver, Walker, Carr and Burnett.

The society had an existence of thirty years, and died out in the fall of 1871, when a Methodist Episcopal society was formed, and the church property passed into their hands. The first trustees were Henry T. Trevett and John Shanley. The ministers have been Julius Stewart, Charles Armstrong, and Edwin Genge.

At one time this society numbered upwards of one hundred members, but now has but about forty.

There has always been a Sunday-school connected with the church till recently. It numbered at one time over sixty members.

The present trustee is Henry T. Trevett. There is no pastor and no preaching. Have prayer-meetings instead.

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VIII. - BURIAL-PLACES.

On the west side of the town there is a burying-ground, not far from the H. Beaman farm. There is also one north from Barkersville, in the Briggs neighborhood. One south of Barkersville, near W. Barker's. There are probably some other places of private burial.

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IX. - PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST.

There are but few places that involve historic incidents of the olden times. This town has passed along in a channel of uneventful character. Sir William Johnson used to own a fishing-house just on the borders of the town, in Fulton county, and around it sprung up a village; part of which, under the name of Fayville, lies in this town. This place was named after John Fay, a prominent business man, who owned some property and kept a store there. There were some settlements in the town previous to the Revolution, but these were abandoned, and all record of them and the settlers has become buried in the darkness of the past. When the settlers came in after the close of the Revolution, decayed and ruined buildings, and clearings grown up to underbrush, alone remained to give token of the former presence of man. Few traces of Indian inhabitants are found, and but few relics to prove their presence, and yet the finny inhabitants of the streams, and the game that roamed the forest, no doubt often called the red aborigines to the vicinity to trap, fish, and hunt. Mr. Henry Clute has a stone gouge of Indian manufacture, used for tapping maple-trees to secure the sap for sugar-making purposes.

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X. - INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS.

The surface and condition of the town are not favorable to agriculture. The soil in many parts is sandy and poor. In other parts the country is rocky and mountainous. Farming is only carried on to a limited extent. Lumbering, wood and bark business, mills, tanneries, and manufactories are the principal occupations of the people.

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XI. - MILITARY.

The War of 1861-65 called out a large number of men to serve in defense of our free institutions. If the town is not rich in fertile lands and towering manufactories, it nevertheless has a wealth of patriotic memories gathering around that eventful struggle when more than a hundred citizens periled their lives for the safety of the nation.

WAR OF 1861-65.

James Allen, priv., 69th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1863; died in hospital at Washington, D.C., Dec. 4, 1864.

Joseph Armor, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 25, 1861; re-enl, in same regiment, Dec. 2, 1863.

James F. Austin, priv., Co. K, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 23, 1861; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt., Sept. 6, 1864; pro. to be 2d lieut. in the 192d N.Y. Inf.; disch. at close of the war; living at Conklingville.

Ell Bailey, priv., Co. H, 7th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Dec. 31, 1863; disch. at close of the war; living in Providence.

John G. Baker.

James C. Barber, priv., 41st N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1863; pro. to corp. and to sergt.; disch. at close of the war; lives in Providence.

David S. Barker, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 16, 1862; disch. with the regiment; living in Gloversville.

Ira J. Barker, priv., 14th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Dec. 18, 1861; pro. to 1st Lieut.; disch. at close of the war; living in Gloversville.

William W. Barton, priv., Co. H, 7th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Dec. 31, 1863; living in Providence.

Wilson Barton, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1862; died of disease at Fredericksburg, Va., Jan. 15, 1863.

Arnold Bates, priv., 13th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Feb. 26, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Fulton Co., N.Y.

Austin Bates, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 4, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Providence.

Charles H. Bates, priv., Co. F, 13th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Jan. 26, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Fulton Co., N.Y.

Dennis Bates, priv., 13th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Aug. 20, 1864, disch. at close of the war; living in Hamilton Co., N.Y.

George Beeman, seaman in U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 25, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Herkimer, N.Y.

James H. Bell, priv., 32d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1861; re-enl., private, 9th N.Y. Heavy Art., March, 1863; disch. at close of the war; living in Broadalbin, Fulton Co., N.Y.

James C. Benson, priv., Co. F, 13th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Jan. 21, 1864; disch. at close of the war.

Asa C. Bentley, Jr., priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 11, 1861; re-enl., private, same regiment, Dec. 25, 1863; lost a leg in the Wilderness; disch. at close of the war; died in Providence in 1873.

George H. Bentley, priv, 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Dec. 1861; re-enl. same regiment, as private, Dec. 26, 1863; living in Michigan.

Gilbert Bentley, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 18, 1861; re-enl. Feb. 18, 1864, priv., 13th N.Y. H. Art.; disch. at close of the war; living at Fonda's Bush, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Hector Bentley, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1, 1861; honorably discharged; living in Fonda.

John H. Bentley, priv., Co. E, 13th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Jan. 13, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Nebraska.

Joseph J. Bentley, priv., Co. E, 13th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Jan. 13, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Ohio.

Nathaniel S. Bentley, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 5, 1861.

William A. Bentley, priv., 13th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Feb. 18, 1864; disch. at close of war; living in Broadalbin, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Charles Betts, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 30, 1864.

Francis C. Betts, priv., 4th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Dec. 25, 1861; re-enl, priv., same regiment, Feb. 17, 1863; disch. at close of the war; living at Auburn.

Wilhelm Bink, priv., enl. April 20, 1861; re-enl. sergt., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav., Aug. 1863; disch. at close of the war; living in Broadalbin, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Charles A. Briggs, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 25, 1861; died of disease, at Washington, D.C., Jan. 13, 1862, and buried there.

Noah D. Bronson, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1862; died of disease, at Washington, D.C., Jan. 13, 1862, and buried there.

Eli Brooks, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 17, 1862.

James B. Brooks, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 7, 1862; killed by the explosion of the magazine at Fort Fisher, N.C., Jan. 18, 1865.

Uriah C. Buck, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Dec. 17, 1861; re-enl., priv., same regiment, Dec. 1863; disch. at close of the war; living in the west.

Norris Burfit, priv., 2d U.S. Col. Troops; enl. April 1, 1864.

John Burns, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Jan. 1864; disch. at close of the war; living at Fayville.

Nelson W. Cadman, priv., 7th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Dec. 28, 1863; died of wounds received in battle, at Washington, D.C., July 26, 1864.

Seth Cadman, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 10, 1862; pro. to sergt.; disch. with the regiment; died of consumption, contracted in the service, in Providence, after the war.

Wm. B. Carpenter, 1st lieut., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 15, 1861; pro. to capt.; killed at battle of Spottsylvania, Va., May 19, 1864.

John W. Clark, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 19, 1862; died of sickness and wounds, in Providence, Oct. 9, 1864.

Henry Clunis, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 5, 1861; disch. with the regiment; living In Broadalbin, Fulton Co., N.Y.

John M. Clute, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 8, 1862; slightly wounded in chin; pro. to corp.; disch. at close of the war; living at Gloversville, N.Y.

Simon Cohen, priv.; enl. Jan. 24, 1865; substitute for Henry Shipman.

Arnold Cole, priv., 90th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 22, 1864; disch. with regiment, May, 1865; living in Broadalbin, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Charles Cole, priv., 151st N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 21, 1862; died of disease, at Baltimore, Md., Dec. 29, 1862.

James W. Cole, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 6, 1862; disch. for disability, Feb. 1863.

William Cole, priv., 14th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Dec. 1, 1863; died of disease, at City Point, Va., July 6, 1864.

Wm. B. Collins, priv., 91st N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 20, 1861; pro. to sergt.; disch. with the regiment, Oct. 1864; living at Northampton, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Charles Colony, priv., 34th N.Y. Inf.; enl. May 18, 1861; died of disease, at Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 21, 1862.

James S. Colony, priv., 118th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1862; pro. to sergt.; died of remittent fever, at Fortress Monroe, Va., Aug. 31, 1863.

George Colony, priv., Co. C, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 12, 1862; died of typhoid fever, at Hilton Head, S.C., July 8, 1863.

Edward J. Colony, priv., 2d N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. March 5, 1864; missing, and never heard from.

John H. Cook, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 29, 1864.

Thomas Cooper, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Sept. 14, 1864.

Wm. H. Cornell, priv., 152d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 18, 1862; died from effects of imprisonment, about a mile from Andersonville, Ga. while on his way to be exchanged.

John Costello, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 1862; disch. at close of the war; living in the west.

Michael Costello, priv., 23d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Jan. 1862; disch. at close of war; living in Minnesota.

Thomas Cunning, priv., 10th N.Y. Cav.; enl. Aug. 30, 1862; disch. for disability; living in Amsterdam, N.Y.

John L. Dalton, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 30, 1864.

Robert Dawson.

Charles E. Duel, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1861; wounded in hand while home on furlough; discharged; living in Fayville.

Thomas Donahue, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 31, 1864.

Edward Dumphry, priv., 1st Bat. Vet. Res. Corps; enl. Oct. 10, 1864.

Mason Delano, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1862; died of disease, at Hagerstown, Md.

Waldron G. Evans, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Dec. 27, 1861; disch. May, 1862; living in Providence.

William George Evans, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Jan. 5, 1862; re-enl. corp., same Regt., Dec. 1863; wounded at battle of the Wilderness; disch. for disability; living in Providence.

William W. Finch, priv., 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1861; disch. with the Regt.; re-enl., corp., 8th Bat. Vet. Res. Corps; lost one finger in the service; living in Broadalbin, Fulton Co., N.Y.

John Flanagan.

Timothy Foley, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 30, 1864.

William M. Fowler, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 5, 1865.

James French, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 30, 1864.

Henry Frey, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Sept. 14, 1864.

Levi Garwood, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 30, 1864.

Edward H. Gates, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 1862; trans. to 3d N.Y. H. Art.; pro. to sergt.; disch. at close of the war; living at East Gal way.

Elbridge Gates, priv., Co. H, 7th N.Y. H. Art.; enl. Jan. 1864: died of disease, at Alexandria, Va., Feb. 28, 1864; buried at Glen's Falls.

Hiram Gifford, priv., Co. F, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 1862; injured by falling from a tree, and died in hospital.

Russell W.H. Gifford, corp., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 21, 1861; disch. at close of the war; living at Mayfield Corners, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Irving Green, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. March 9, 1863; died of disease, at Washington, D.C., Oct. 15, 1863, and buried there.

Chauncey Hagedorn, priv., 162d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 11, 1863; disch. at close of the war; living in Gloversville.

H. Seymour Hall, 2d lieut., 27th N.Y. Inf.; enl. May, 1861; pro. to capt. and to lieut.-col. 43d U.S. colored troops; lost an arm in front of Petersburg; disch. at close of the war; living in Rochester, N.Y.

Michael Harrigan, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 1861; trans. to 11th Bat, Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 1864; wounded in the leg; living in Amsterdam, N.Y.

Benjamin E. Harrison, priv., 44th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 20, 1861; re-enl. in 22d Bat., Vet. Res. Corps; disch. at close of the war; living at Rock City, N.Y.

Edward Hayes, priv., 169th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 1862; living in the west.

Alfred Hickok, priv., Co. C, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 1862; living in Broadalbin, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Ferdinand Hoffman, priv., Co. A, 86th N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 6, 1865.

John Holland priv., 4th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Sept. 6, 1864; wounded in the face; disch. at the close of the war; living in Amsterdam.

Joseph W. Honeywell, corp., 10th N.Y. Cav.; enl. Aug. 31, 1862; killed in battle.

James H. Jeffords, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 14, 1861; died of disease, at Yorktown, Va., May 3, 1862.

Orville F. Jeffords, priv., Co. H, 7th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Dec. 12, 1863; wounded at battle of Petersburg, Va.; died of wounds, June 12, 1864.

Samuel King, priv., 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 18, 1862; wounded; disch. with regiment, May 18, 1865; living in Edinburgh.

Edward Laporte, priv., 192d N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 5, 1865.

Peter Lasher, priv., 115th N.Y., Inf. enl. Aug. 16, 1863; was taken prisoner; died at City Point, Va., of disease.

Addison Like, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861.

Stephen Marihew, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 27, 1862; died of disease, at White Oak Church, Va., Feb. 13, 1863; buried at Barkersville, N.Y.

Thomas McCormick, priv., 111th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1864; was taken prisoner and held four months.

Terence McGovern, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 2, 1862; disch. at the close of the war; living in Galway, N.Y.

Thomas McGovern, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 18, 1862; wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va.; died in Michigan since the war.

James McMahon, priv.; Co. K, 1st N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. March 22, 1864.

Michael McWilliams, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861; trans. to Vet. Bat., 77th Regt., Dec. 25, 1863; was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, while carrying the regimental colors; one ball shattered the flagstaff, and five others pierced its intrepid bearer.

Philip Mead, 1st lieut., 5th N.Y. Inf.; enl. March 17, 1863; resigned Oct. 29, 1863; living at Hagedorn's Mills.

Michael Miller, priv., 1st Bat., Vet. Res. Corps; enl. Oct. 7, 1864.

Thomas Mina, priv., 43d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 1861; re-enl. Aug. 1864; wounded.

A.N. Morgan, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861.

J. Morgan, priv., Co. D, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. 1861.

Ephraim D. Mosher, priv., 10th N.Y. Cav.; enl. Sept, 5, 1862; was injured by being thrown from his horse, and disch. for disability, March, 1863; living In Northampton, Fulton Co., N.Y.

Lewis Mundell.

John Nadew, priv., enl. Jan. 27, 1865; substitute for Samuel B. Rogers.

Elijah Olmstead, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 1862; died of disease, at White House, Va., Dec. 1863.

Jacob H. Olmstead, priv., 3d N.Y. Inf.; enl. May, 1862; pro. to corp.; disch. at expiration of time; living in Johnstown, N.Y.

Edward Orry, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. July 25, 1862; trans. to another regiment; disch. at close of the war; living in Providence.

George Packer, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 28, 1862; was a prisoner one month; discharged at close of the war; living at Avoca, Iowa.

Richard Parker, priv., 14th N. Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Oct. 11, 1864.

William W. Pease, priv., 146th Ill. Inf.; enl. May 9, 1864, died of disease, at Memphis, Tenn., Sept. 5, 1864.

Benjamin Perry, priv., 152d N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 6, 1864; died of disease, at Washington, D.C., Aug., 1864.

John A. Pettit, priv., 192d N.Y. Inf.; enl. March, 1865; disch. at close of the war; living in Iowa.

William A. Pulling, priv., 157th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug., 1862; was a prisoner two months.

William Reed, priv., enl. Aug. 27, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Albany.

Larry C. Rice, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 31, 1864.

Edmund Ricketson, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Dec. 18, 1861; missing, and never heard from.

Joseph H. Rogers, priv., Co. F, 4th Vet. Cav.; enl. March 22, 1864.

Robert Russell, priv.; enl. Sept. 3, 1864; substitute for Hiram Van Pelt.

George S. Schermerhorn, priv., 93d N.Y. Inf.; enl. Nov. 20, 1861; accidentally wounded, and died in hospital, at Philadelphia, Pa., July 17, 1862.

Daniel C. Sherman. corp., Co. I, 115th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Aug. 8, 1862; died of disease, at City Point, Va., Jan. 16, 1865.

Jethro P. Sherman, priv., 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; enl. Aug. 6, 1863; disch. at close of the war; living in Providence.

Philo D. Sherman, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 27, 1861; disch. with the regiment; died of consumption, in Providence, since the war.

Solomon Sherman, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 27, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Gloversville.

William H. Sism, priv., Co. E, 13th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Jan. 13, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Providence.

Alonzo P. Slocum, priv., Co. H, 2d N.Y. Vet. Cav.; enl. Jan. 4, 1864; disch. at close of the war; living at Batchellerville.

James A. Slocum, priv., 32d N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 26, 1861; wounded in right wrist; disch. for disability; living at Batchellerville.

Peter Smith, priv., Co. F, 4th N.Y. Heavy Art.

William W. Smith, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 31, 1864.

David Sowl, Jr., priv., 34th N.Y. Inf.; enl. April 17, 1861; re-enl. priv., 9th N.Y. Heavy Art., Aug. 1862; was held a prisoner for four months; disch. at close of the war; living in Providence.

Francis Sowl, priv., 9th N.Y. Heavy Art.; enl. Jan. 18, 1864; was four months in rebel prisons; disch. at close of the war; living in Providence.

John Sparks, priv., U.S. Regulars; enl. Jan. 18, 1865.

Henry H. Tabor, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. fall of 1861.

P.D. Thompson, priv., Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. fall of 1861.

Alonzo P. Van Epps, priv., 56th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 18, 1863.

Levi Whistler, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 29, 1864.

William J. Woolsey, priv, Co. E, 77th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Oct. 7, 1861; killed in battle of Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

Daniel Wylie, seaman, U.S. Navy; enl. Aug. 1864; disch. at close of the war; living in Montgomery Co.

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