The Welsh In Oneida County, New York  |  Evans  |  The Welsh Churches | 15

Cover
Contents
About
Introduction
Article
Emigration
To Oneida
Churches
Press
Politics
Appendix
Sources
Notes
Download
Search

<< Prev  Next >>

It may seem at first strange that the pastors who fill the Welsh American pulpits at present have, almost to a man, been called to this country from Wales to the charge of either their present, or a former, pastorate. Do not their churches rear any preachers from their members?, it is asked. When that question is answered, there is laid bare that enemy against which the Welsh churches have been fighting for their lives these many years, which has conquered the most of them, and which is now only waiting for the rest of its prey. It is not that the Welsh churches have failed in their duty of rearing pastors; but that they have failed to keep their sons with them. It is not that their religion has lacked the germ to perpetuate itself;  but that the seed, planted in alien ground and reared in strange conditions, has brought forth a product which has differed from the parent stock in form. Many and many have been the pastors produced by the Welsh churches, but their field of labor has been the English and not the Welsh church. Can we ask why these young Welsh-Americans, after an education in American colleges and American theological seminaries, have not returned to the ever-narrowing field of the Welsh church?  Instead we find them filling the ranks of the English Presbyterians and Congregationalists and Baptists. The number of Welsh preachers in these denominations in New York is out of all proportion to the small number from which they have been drawn. From Oneida and Cattaraugus have come forth a great body of men to preach that same gospel, though in a different tongue, which their fathers brought from the hills of Wales to the hills of the newer country. Can one say that these little churches have failed?  It is their children that make up their body, and their sons that are the leaders, of many of the English churches which have grown up around them. Can they ask more, when their work of the transition has been done, than to be perpetuated in the life of the churches of the newer order?

<< Prev  Next >>