The Welsh In Oneida County, New York  |  Evans  |  News Article |  33

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Utica Daily Press Article 1916

"Welsh Library at Harvard,"
Utica Daily Press, 5 May 1916. Transcribed by Barbara Henry from a photocopy of the original article in the possession of Jean Malot Evans.


WELSH LIBRARY AT HARVARD

REPRESENTATIVE IN THIS CITY

Paul D. Evans Seeks Copies of Welsh Publications and Other Historical Material Relating to the Welsh People in This Country--Has Written a History Of the Welsh in Oneida County.

Paul D. Evans, instructor in modern European history at Cornell University, arrived in the city last evening and will remain until Sunday at Hotel Utica, spending his time in the meanwhile looking for files, or copies of periodicals in the Welsh language, suspended or now publishing.  Mr. Evans was sent there by Harvard University, which is building up the Welsh section of its library. The Harvard library has already complete files of the Cenhadwr Americanaidd, which has published until a few years ago in the county, first in Utica in 1840, then at Remsen and later at Waterville under the editorship of the late Rev. Edward Davies.  It has partial files of other publications. Mr. Evans is particularly interested in securing copies of the Wawr, a Baptist periodical, which was published for many years in this city. "The Cymro Americanaidd," which was published in New York in 1832, he would also like to procure. "Y Beread," New York, 1842, "Haul Gomer," Utica, 1847, and other suspended publications, are missing from the Harvard library, and Mr. Evans would be pleased to communicate with any one who may have copies. In fact, he is seeking any Welsh work of historical value that is worth preserving, in addition to periodicals, and Welsh people should interest themselves in his quest. The Harvard authorities, purpose [
sic] to make the library of the university a repository of not only Welsh-American literature but of the literature of Wales, thus placing at the disposition of the historian material relating to the Welsh in this country or at home. It already has a large collection.

Many of the Welsh residents of Utica will recall Mr. Evans as the young man who was here about two years ago gathering material for a history of the Welsh in Oneida County, which he wrote as a thesis for his mater's degree. This work he has completed and it brought him the desired honor. It comprises about 40,000 words and brings the history of the Welsh in this county down to the present time. Mr. Evans spent months in its preparation and visited public and private libraries in this city and county looking for the required material. He contemplates publishing when he has the time to make some revision of the material.

Mr. Evans spent last year as a student at Harvard, and it was through this connection that the librarian of the institution discovered him and the interest he has taken in Welsh. It was natural, therefore, that he should be selected to build up the Welsh department of the Harvard Library. He has entered into the work with enthusiasm, and the university and the Welsh people generally should be grateful to him for the service which he is rendering. Mr. Evans is now working upon a thesis for his doctor's degree, and has taken as his subject The Holland Land Company, which in the olden days owned land in the vicinity of Trenton, this county, as well as a few million acres in Western New York and Pennsylvania. In the pursuit of  material for this work he expects to go to Holland next fall. The young man is a son of Rev. E. R. Evans of Ithaca, who some years ago was pastor of a Welsh church in Cattaraugus County. Until Sunday Mr. Evans will be at Hotel Utica, and after that a letter will reach him at Cornell University, Ithaca. He would be pleased to get trace of any old Welsh periodicals, or books that have historical value. Doubtless he will receive ready assistance from the Welsh people of Utica now and in the future.


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