Cave, South Canterbury, New Zealand

St David's Memorial Church designed by Herbert H. Hall

An enduring tribute to the Pioneers of the Mackenzie County dominates the hillside.

"The rugged simplicity is intended to symbolise the faith, hope, and courage of the Mackenzie Country pioneers"  Vance.

This unusual memorial church sits on top of a knoll is named in honour of the patron saint of shepherds. The tower is forty feet high built of local uncut boulders. The roof is slate supported by wood-pegged rafters. The floor is totara. The pews and ceiling are totara and beech. No nails were used in its construction. Most of the furniture has an association with the early days.  The baptismal font, rests into a wheel hub of the Burnett family bullock wagon, is a stone mortar found on the McKay property in Sutherlandshire, Scotland. The font rests on a 400lbs greywacke boulder. On the cobblestone porch  covered with bird manure there was hanging a mast lantern from an immigrant ship but now in Nov. 2009 it is missing. St. David's Church is registered as category 1. Historic place of special or outstanding historical or cultural heritage significance or value.pdf Crean's Country photo

"This porch is erected to the Glory of God and in memory of the sheepmen, shepherds, bullock drivers, shearers, and station hands who pioneered the back country of this province between the years 1855 and 1895" etched in a greywacke slab on the porch wall. The church was erected in remembrance of Andrew (1838-1927) and Catherine Burnett (1837-1914), who took up Mount Cook run, May 1864, and in the wildness founded a home. The Burnett's came to Lyttelton on the Royal Stuart in 1861 from Scotland. Catherine reared her children in the high country, a beautiful wilderness, in surroundings where help was spiritual, certainly not material. Catherine's last statement to a son on her death bed was "I trusted in Christ."  Andrew was a Highland shepherd and he worked for John Hayhurst on Garys Hill, Simons Pass and Blue Cliffs stations before taking up the 30,000 Mount Cook Station with George McRae in 1864.

Site, design, materials and craftsmanship, are sufficiently remarkable to have earned the New Zealand Institute of Architects Gold Medal in 1934, for the architect, Herbert H. Hall, (1880-1939) Canterbury born. Hall moved to Sydney, Australia, to begin working as an architect and on his return to New Zealand settled in Timaru. Hall also designed the Fairlie Carnegie Library. Judging was by the Jury of Award of the British Institute of British Architects, London. Hall received the Gold Award (1934) from NZIA for design of the church. The church was the vision of T.D. Burnett (1877-30 Nov.1941) M.P. for Temuka (1919-1941) and he and his wife Agnes [nee Agnes Ellen Little of Annadale, Cave], were the donors. The builders were McBride and Groves (Timaru born.) The actual builders were all British born and many return servicemen. Built of materials familiar to pioneers, uncut local boulders, with adze-hewn timber framing with the nave forty feet by twenty feet with clay-coloured rough thrown plaster similar to cob homes.  The preachers chair carved out of an old log is dedicated to early Mackenzie ministers. Hall also designed the Fox Peak ski field hut.   

Norman towers prevail to suggest strength
An eloquent Pastoral in stone built without using any nails.

Visitors
Visitors are welcome. The Church will be open between 8am and 5 pm daily.
Burnett Homestead Gates are registered as category 2. Historic place of historical or cultural heritage significance or value.Note - the Trustees would prefer to leave the church open permanently but desecration & vandalism of the past makes this course inadvisable.

This beautiful stone church on Burnett's Road, Cave, was built as an interdenominational church but is now primarily used by the Presbyterian community. Has great acoustics for singing and is often used for weddings as it is very picturesque. Opened 22 November 1930 and is located over the hill in a sunny valley behind the township of Cave past the local war memorial at the pass and up Burnetts Road, a side road on the right. Turn left at the gate. The cabbage tree in the foreground is a sign of good land but in 2009 it was removed. Now days expect to find the doors locked on both the churches in Cave but St. David's behind Cave is open.


The baptismal font. 

A gathering of 200 Highlanders or their descendants assembled at Cave, in the South Island, at the invitation of Mr T. D. Burnett, MP, Mrs Burnett and the Burnett family on the occasion of the dedication of St David's Church. The occasion was memorable in the history of New Zealand. The "Timaru Herald" reports that "descendants of some of the best known and noblest clans of the Highlands were stirred to a high pitch of enthusiasm by the nature of the gathering which was arranged to create an atmosphere of the Motherland which is so dear to every Scottish heart." That the gathering was a real Highland one the names of those attending clearly prove. They include Alexander Macdonald of Orari, aged 93, with Sutherlands, Mackinnons, MacMasters, Mackintoshes, Gunns, Frasers, Rosses, Macleods, Mackays, Dunnetts, Campbells, Mackenzies, Macleans, MacNabs, etc. It is interesting to note that both the Gaelic and English languages were used in the dedication service which was of a most impressive nature. The Rev Angus MacDonald, formerly of Stornoway and senior Presbyterian Chaplain with the New Zealand troops, who officiated, said that they had met that day first to dedicate that church to the glory and worship of Almighty God, and secondly to conduct a memorial service to those men and women who settled in the back country of South Canterbury 1855-1895. Excellent photographs show that the new church has been built and furnished on artistic lines. Named St David's because David is the patron saint of all shepherds, and for this and other reasons, the church has been built in memory of the shepherds who made the Mackenzie country a name-word in the South Island of New Zealand. It is also recorded that Mr Burnett, MP, built the church "in loving remembrance of his parents Andrew and Catherine who took up the Mount Cook Sheep Run, May 1864, and in the Wilderness founded a Home." The Gaelic words follow: Daoine onarach an obair as uasaile a rinn Dia � AD 1929. It is interesting to note that relatives of Mr and Mrs Burnett live in Sutherland today.

Catherine and Andrew Burnett had eight children.
1862 Burnett Catherine McKay
1863 Burnett Donald  ?
1866 Burnett Mary Jane
1871 Burnett Andrew
1874 Burnett Jessie Agnes
1877 Burnett Thomas David
         Burnett Johanna Mackay
Later on the family moved to Perth St, Timaru so the children could obtain an education. The site was bequeathed to Timaru for a Pioneer Hall, the museum by their son, T.D. Burnett.

  Photos taken in Nov. 2009   The rough-hewn, beams; the doors fastened together with little wooden pegs, for no ordinary nails are used; the seats of birch; 

The Burnett Family Cemetery up the hill opposite the Cave War Memorial, about five minutes walk from the road. The inscription on the cross reads: 'In memory of Andrew Burnett of Mount Cook, who to found a home below the snow line freeholded the valley to the south of this cross in 1872. An honest man is the noblest work of God.' Three generation of the Burnett'a farmed at Strathnaver and the monument mainly commemorates four of the second generation's five daughters. Andrew Burnett and Catherine Burnett were from the Scottish Highlands. Strathnaver or Strath Naver is the fertile strath (valley) of the River Naver once controlled by the Clan Mackay and extending over most of northwest Sutherland. There are four flat grey granite headstones around the base of the cross:
Catherine Mackay Burnett ('Miss Kitty'), died in 1938.
Mary Jane Burnett, died in 1953.
Johanna Mackay Burnett, died in 1953.
Jessie Agnes Burnett, died in 1957.  

They're a family that lived through the history of the region, and all its changes.

Timaru Cemetery

Catherine is buried at the Timaru Cemetery, died 8th July 1914. Also buried at Timaru is their daughter Bessie, age 42, who died at Aorangi 18th September 1919 and Andrew, jun., the second son of Catherine and Andrew Burnett who died at age 13, on 2nd October 1884. Here lies also ANDREW BURNETT born at Strathnaver, Scotland Feb. 5th 1839, who with his wife, Catherine, took up the Mount Cook sheep run in May 1864. Died at Aorangi, Cave, Sept. 21st 1927, in his 90th year, Clergy Rev. Stinson. A man, who, simply and nobly served God and his adopted country according to his _ights, and heed that honour and a man's word were the main things in life.

St David's Memorial Church has seventeen stained glass windows, all attributed to Brooks, Robinson & Co. of Melbourne. On each wall is six pairs of lancet stained-glass windows, one for each Apostle with his name and symbol:  
St Phillip, St John
St Matthew and St Andrew
St Thomas, St James the Greater
St Matthias, St Jude
 St James the Less, St Peter
St Simon, St Bartholomew.
In the east gable there are three stained-glass memorial windows donated by Thomas and Agnes Burnett in memory of Thomas's parents, Andrew and Catherine. The left one depicts Ruth the gleaner, Jesus, the Good Shepherd, in the center, and to the right David, the shepherd, guardian of the sheep flocks, 'He shall feed his flock  like a shepherd.'

         

Inside, bluestone tablets set at intervals in the nave wall list the first and second wave of run holders. One of the stained-glass windows depicts Jesus, Rachel the shepherdess drawing water from the well. This window serves as a memorial to the pioneer women of the Mackenzie. The brass plagues reads: 'To the Glory of God and in honour and in memory of the pioneer women of the Mackenzie Country, who  through the Arctic winters, and in the wilderness, maintained their homes and kept the faith, these windows are reverently dedicated.' Ordered by Hall in 1929 from Brooks, Robinson and Co. Melbourne.  The other light is 'Christ in the House of St Martha and Mary of Bethany.'

St. David's Pioneer Memorial Church : Cave, South Canterbury / D.F. ; [The Trustees]
Edition : 2nd ed. [The Timaru Herald], 1967. Originally published in 1930. Contains dates and names of early runholders.  Timaru Library.
 

       
Handmade table.  Wow, you wlk into this church and you know it is special. The workmanship all donewith handtools and no nails.14 Nov. 2009  "Oh my goodness I love this church. Would get married here." Visitors book, Nov. 2009. Unusual beauty inside and out.    Many trees have been chopped down recently   1928 foundation stone for St. David's.

 

New Zealand Herald, 29 June 1935, Page 17 MEMORIAL CHAIR
LINK WITH EARLY DAYS WOOD FROM BURIED FOREST St. David's Church at Cave, South Canterbury, which is rich in historical associations with the pioneers of the Mackenzie Country, will shortly possess another link with the early days in the form of a memorial chair hewn from a piece of black pine. While other furnishings of the church recall times when the settlers had to struggle to make their homes in primitive surroundings, the chair goes back to older days, as it is believed that the timber from which it was constructed was at one time growing in a forest in the Mackenzie Country. The log from which the chair was made was found, after a flood in the Kakahu River, by Mr. Charles Groves, builder of the Cave church, having been revealed by the effect of rushing water. It comprised the greater portion of a tree trunk in a perfect state of petrification. When, the log was submitted to the Forestry Department in Wellington the opinion" was expressed that it was a remnant of prehistoric South Canterbury forest, which had been buried for thousands of years.

Evening Post 17th November 1930 page 6 IN MEMORIAM
NEW CHURCH AT CAVE     UNIQUE TRIBUTE TO PIONEERS

There is at Cave, in South Canterbury, a little church which is unique both, in its richness in historical associations, and its perfection of detail. It was built by Mr. T. D. Burnett, M.P., to be a memorial to his parents and other pioneers of the district, and its official opening will be held next Saturday. Perched on a sunny slope, against a background of protecting trees, it has such a comfortable air of being a natural part of the landscape that its newness goes unnoticed. Yet its unusual beauty of design is such that it attracts immediate attention. With no single straight line about it with old-world battlements above the, bell-tower, and steeply sloping roof of grey, slate brought from Wales, it has an English air that is particularly pleasing in a memorial to men and women who nearly all came from Great Britain. The outer walls are built of local material, with a few delicately tinted pink stones from Mount Cook worked in here and there. The stove on the inside was brought from the Mackenzie Country. The -porch, in memory of the cattle-drovers, roadmen, and other, workers of the early days, is roomy, with a cobbled floor and a hanging lantern used in one of the early lighthouses.
    Inside, the sunlight falls on the parquet floor in warm, bright patches, coming through richly-coloured stained glass windows which are a special memorial to "the women who kept the some fires burning through Arctic winters in the Mackenzie."
    The pulpit, at the eastern end of the church, with a background of windows depicting Biblical scenes in beautiful, deep colours, is bright and highly polished as mahogany. Inset, in a lighter wood, is a delicate design of Mount Cook lilies and ribbonwood. The font, which stands on the left of the pulpit, is an ancient mortar, once used in the grinding of - wheat, and brought out from Home by ancestors of Mr. Burnett. Their names appear under the pastern windows. The pedestal of the font is the hub of an old bullock waggon.
    To light the vestry there is another historic lamp, from a lifeboat that carried to safety the survivors of South Canterbury's shipwrecks. The bell above is the first that ever reminded Timaru church-goers of their duty.
    The rough-hewn, beams; the doors fastened together with little wooden pegs, for no ordinary nails are used; the seats of birch; the well-known names, prominent, together with the carrying capacities of their runs, on grey slabs of stone around the walls; the perfect harmony of everything in the building, must give Mr. Burnett the satisfaction of knowing that he has indeed built a memorial that is in every way most suitable to commemorate the lives and work of the pioneers.

Thieves Hit Church
18 February 2006 Timaru Herald

Thieves struck the Cannington district over the holiday season, breaking into the preschool and stealing property from the historic St David's Church. Senior constable Geoff Smith, from the Pleasant Point police, said the thefts were devastating for the normally quiet community over the hill from Cave. Across the road from the preschool the historic St David's Church had also been hit by thieves. An organ stool and a memorial prayer box were taken and a stained glass window was broken.

Back way to Timaru

Turn right onto Limestone Road and then along and then cut across Timaunga to Craigmore Valley Road where Maori rock art is signposted. Follow Craigmore Valley Road east back to State Highway 32 and come out at Pareora about ten minutes from Timaru.

Reference:

Mackenzie County Council Briefs: Meeting of 8th November 2005
Local history retained in road naming. Some local history is to be retained in the Cave area, thanks to a submission by local resident Morrell McFetrich. Council had proposed to rename the Cave-Pareora Road as Cannington Road from SH8 to a point near Wisely Road and as Pareora Gorge Road from that point onwards.
    However, Mr McFetrich pointed out that the short section of road from the State Highway to the foot of Cave Hill had always been known to the locals as Prohibition Road and produced historic evidence in support of his claim. The road got its name because T D Burnett originally gave the land for the road to be formed to remove temptation from wagon drivers having to pass the local hotel when leaving Cannington and heading up country towards the Mackenzie. The Council accepted his submission and the historic name will remain for that part of the road, with a sign at the State Highway saying to Cannington Road.

Mount Cook Pastoral Lease was first taken up for grazing in May 1864 when Andrew Burnett and George McRae applied for the 5000 acre Run 498. By 1865 McRae had left the partnership and Burnett, his wife Catherine (nee MacKay) and their two children settled onto the property. In 1871 they took up two more runs (603 and 614) and by 1873 started to freehold parts of the property. By 1889 Mount Cook, re-named as Run 83, covered approx. 10,000 hectares. Part of this area was eventually surrendered to form part of Mt Cook NP. In 1895, the eldest son, Donald was managing the station for his father and there was no debt recorded upon it. Following Andrew's death in 1902 Donald took over Sawdon Station and the Burnett's third son Thomas David (TD) succeeded to Mount Cook. He remained the leaseholder until his death in 1941. He is buried atop the bluff at Black Point (Rock Etam.) within a special reserve taken from the lease. In TD Burnett's time over 60,000 trees were planted on the lease, in part to provide an alternative source of timber to the beech forest at Glentanner. The station went to TD Burnett's son and daughter following his death and is the only station in South Canterbury that has been held in unbroken tenure by the same family (Pinney, 1971) Many of the peaks, steams and other landmarks were named after family members, neighbours, shepherds and farm dogs. Gorilla Stream Hutt lies outside the pastoral lease boundary. map

Press, 9 July 1914, Page 8
Timaru, July 8. The death is announced of Mrs Andrew Burnett, wife of the original lessee of Mount Cook Station, was taken up just over 50 years ago and has been in the hands of the family since.

Ashburton Guardian, 9 July 1914, Page 4
The death is announced of Mrs Andrew Burnett, of Aorangi, Cave, South Canterbury. As mistress of the homestead of Mount Cook station Mrs Burnett's name- was synonymous with hospitality. In the older days, when the route to Mount Cook inchfded the ford of the Upper Tasman and later at the Aorangi farm, the same kind welcome awaited every caller. Mrs Burnett died on Wednesday morning after only a few days' illness.

Timaru Herald Station loses runholder after 69 years
BY KATARINA FILIPE 19/07/2010 After almost 69 years of controlling Mt Cook Station, runholder Donald Burnett has died. He was 95. He died at Timaru Hospital on Thursday, after being admitted a fortnight ago. His sister, Catriona Baker, told The Timaru Herald yesterday that Mr Burnett had been working until an accident on July 4, when he slipped on ice and broke his hip. "He had lost a lot of weight ... It was too much to conquer all at once," she said. "My brother was a very private person and he worked very hard. He was 26 when he took over controlling Mt Cook Station from our father." Mrs Baker said their father, TD Burnett, took over the station in 1903, also when he was 26. "Donald was very interested in engineering and all that went with it. He put in a hydro electric plant in 1953. "He always promoted the merino sheep and also the environment. He believed in no burning." Mr Burnett never married or had children but the station would carry on because a trustee would manage it, Mrs Baker said. Duncan Mackenzie, who farmed next door to Mt Cook Station for 38 years, said Mr Burnett liked a peaceful, uninterrupted lifestyle. "He was a perfectionist in what he did in all the buildings and fencing and power plants. He hosted quite a lot of days, like Farm Forestry days." Mr Mackenzie said Mr Burnett had a lot of involvement with Merino New Zealand. In February 2000, Mr Burnett was named as the world's leading merino woolgrower in an award from a leading Italian industrialist. Mr Burnett was presented with the inaugural World Challenge Trophy by Dr Pier Luigi Loro Piana, whose Italian textile company paid $120,000 for a 100 kilogram bale of 13.1 micron diameter merino fleece. The wool set a world record for the fineness of wool in a full bale. In March 1998, Mr Burnett and Mrs Baker followed in their father's footsteps by setting up a charitable trust called the DMC and CMB Burnett Charitable Trust. Their father set up the Burnett Valley Trust with his sisters. The trust owns several farms at Cave and provides income for St Andrew's College, Christchurch. Mr Burnett was also involved with the 1967 proposal to build the Pioneer Rd sheepdog statue. He was one of three people in the Mackenzie branch of Federated Farmers who oversaw the project, leading to the statue being unveiled in March 1968. When the statue's protection came under review in May 1997, Mr Burnett said the statue represented "the soul and essence of the high country". A service for Mr Burnett will be held in St David's Memorial Church, Burnett Valley, Cave tomorrow at 1.30pm, followed by a private cremation.

Country-Wide Southern | Focus High - country character dies
Donald Burnett viewing stock at Mt Cook Station. 11-08-2010
Donald Burnett July 21, 1915 - July 15, 2010
The high-country community lost one of its characters with the death of Donald Burnett last month. He was 95. Donald was aptly christened Donald Mt Cook Burnett and Mt Cook Station was, according to friend and fellow high-country farmer Jim Morris, his home, his passion and his raison d'etre. The property has been in the Burnett family since it was first settled by Donald's grandfather in 1864. Morris, who delivered the eulogy at Donald's funeral, described how seriously Donald took his role of custodian of land and he adopted management practices such as no burning and moderate stocking rates long before they became fashionable. Throughout his life Donald was an enthusiastic breeder of Merino sheep and producer of ultra-fine, high-quality wool. In his eulogy, Morris recounted Donald's great love of animals and says he would care for his sheep, often to the detriment of his health. On one occasion Morris was travelling with Donald in the Land Rover when he spotted a packet of Malt biscuits on the dashboard. Having a penchant for Malt biscuits, Morris thought these might be for morning tea, but it transpired that they were for the pet sheep. Donald peeled an orange for himself. Similarly, a now retired South Canterbury farmer recalls how, as an 18-year-old shepherd at Guide Hill, he found a dog which belonged to Donald. This young shepherd was promised a reward for returning the dog and he eagerly anticipated what he imagined would be either cash or few beers. He was therefore surprised when Donald presented him with a bunch of grapes and a box of chocolates. From early in his farming career, Donald was sending wool to England where he regularly topped sales. The Mt Cook-branded wool soon became synonymous with style, colour and quality and in 2000 Donald was named the world's leading Merino woolgrower by Dr Pier Luigi Loro Piana, whose Italian textile company paid $120,000 for a 100kg bale of 13.1-micron fleece. This wool set a world record for the fineness of wool in a full bale. Known for his sharp mind, Donald enjoyed exploring new ideas and technologies and was a skilled photographer and engineer. His interest in photography began at school where he printed his own photographs before moving on to 16mm films upon which he recorded skiing and climbing trips to Austria and Switzerland as well as mustering on the station. In 1949 he built a power house to generate electricity for the station, primarily to make life easier for his mother, and to this day Mt Cook Station remains self-sufficient in electricity. Donald never married or had children but lived with his sister Catriona Baker, who also lived on the station all her life, initially helping her parents and for 60 years, her brother. Age was simply a number to Donald and he celebrated his 70th birthday by climbing the 2743m (9000ft) peak "Nuns Veil" with two friends. Donald's optimism was such that he recently started a new sheep breeding operation and in his nineties was still planting trees with a view to the future. Country-Wide editor Terry Brosnahan recalls phoning Donald, then in his late 80s, late one evening, only to be told he was out rabbit shooting and wouldn't be expected home for at least two hours. High-country farmers and Federated Farmers vice-president Donald Aubrey says Donald was a loyal member of Federated Farmers and was one of three members who, in 1967, instigated the building of Tekapo's famous sheepdog statue. During Aubrey's time as chair of the High Country Accord and High Country committee of Federated Farmers he always found Donald to be supportive and the pair had frequent discussions over the phone, which Aubrey says he always enjoyed. "He would always consider his words carefully and was keen to contribute. "I respected that." Aubrey says Donald was an ardent National Party supporter, particularly infuriated by the Labour Party's proposal to increase crown lease rentals based on the view. In his eulogy, Morris described Burnett as a strong-willed character. "Donald was not known to go to cabarets on a regular basis and the jazz scene in New York would be an anathema to him, but I do think that when Frank Sinatra penned the song "I Did it My Way" he may have had Donald in mind. "Donald was not a large man but you had to have a very good argument to get him to change his mind." Mt Cook Station will carry on under the Burnett name and be run by a trustee. Donald Mt Cook Burnett died on July 15. He is survived by his sister Catriona Baker. - Sandra Taylor

Suda Bay War Cemetery, Crete, Greece

Andrew MacKay Sawdon Burnett
Serial No. 11589 
photo
First Known Rank Private
Occupation before Enlistment Labourer
NOK Mr Donald Burnett (father), PO Box 2, Kurow, North Otago
Marital Status Single
Enlistment Address Kurow, North Otago
Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force (2NZEF), 2nd Echelon
Embarkation Unit 20th (Canterbury-Otago) Battalion
Nominal Roll Number WW2
Last Unit Served 23 Infantry Battalion
Place of Death Crete
Date of Death 21 May 1941
Age at Death 27
Killed in action
Son of Donald Burnett and of Barbara Ann Burnett (nee MacLeod), of Cave, Canterbury. They married in 1908.

Caitriana Mackay Beatock Burnett married (marriage 518781) Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, "Man of the Trees"
Catriona Baker - Balmoral Station her 2nd book

Richard St. Barbe Baker, 1889-1982
Born October 9, 1889 near Southhampton, England. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker was educated University of Saskatchewan; and Cambridge University where he completed forestry studies. Following service in World War II, and a brief stint with the British civil service, St. Barbe was appointed Assistant Conservator of Forests in Kenya. There in 1922, he founded the Men of the Trees, enlisting the help of 9,000 voluntary tree planters in an attempt to arrest the invading Sahara. This society, which grew into an international organization, became the central cause of St. Barbe's life. He became a renowned forestry consultant, and over the years was called upon to advise governments in many nations on forestry and conservation matters, including Palestine, New Zealand, the United States, Africa, and India. While much of his writing is autobiographical in nature, he also wrote about tree, forestry and conservation concerns, spiritual and religious topics, health matters, and horses, and also produced some material specifically for children. Throughout his life St. Barbe was constantly in demand as a public lecturer, speaking to numerous audiences in many countries, and gave talks in schools all over Britain and New Zealand. His radio talks were featured on the BBC in Britain, and he was also heard on radio in the U.S., New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and Africa. He received an honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Saskatchewan in 1972, and in 1977 the Order of the British Empire was bestowed upon him. Richard St. Barbe Baker was married twice. In 1959, his second marriage, St. Barbe married Catriona Burnett. Her home at Mount Cook Station, New Zealand remained his residence until his death, which occurred on June 9, 1982 in Saskatoon while on a visit to the University of Saskatchewan.

Famous Trees of New Zealand by Richard St. Barbe Baker. A. H. & A. W. Reed, Wellington, 1965 - 150 pages. Hardcover. DJ. 1st edition. 22cm. 53 b/w photos. Native and exotic. The author's study of NZ's unique trees was an early plea for the preservation of the native vegetation, as well as commenting on introduced species. Foreword by Sir Eruera Tirikatene. Introduction by The Earl of Bessborough.

When I was fairly young I planted trees,
Not just a few but many, many thousands,
Enough to leave the saintly St. Barbe Baker in the shade

wrote Raymond Foster

War and Peace
Photos 


All Saints Anglican Church, Cave

Photo taken April 2007 by Margaret Todd.

Worship in the early days of the Cave district was held in the local school, which stood west of the present Cave hall. For seventy years, services were held there. The school closed in 1937 the building was leased from the Education Board and furnished with altar rails, lectern and prayer desk and became known as the Cave Church School Room. By 1949 the local Guild had �400 in hand so it was decided to build a church on land purchased from the Education Board and donated for that purpose.

The 50th anniversary service was held in the church on All Saints Day, November 3 2002 followed by a luncheon in the Cave hall. Built of local stone, hand picked and carted by many people out of the Te Ngawai riverbed, the church is a living memory of the many people who have worshipped in it since 1952. Many residences still have special memories of this building project.  On November 18, 1952, before a congregation of 150 visitors and parishioners Bishop A. K. Warren unveiled the foundation stone as he was unable to be present when the stone was laid.  The church has two stained glass windows. One in the sanctuary commemorates Alfred Amyes (1851-1941), Elizabeth Amyes (1852-1928), and their son Alfred C. Amyes (killed at Passchendaele 1917) and their daughter Constance nee Baker who d. 10 Dec. 1947. Donated by Miss Amyes and Arthur Baker, husband of Constance.

Otago Witness, 7 June 1905, Page 36
The Presbyterian Church authorities at Pleasant Point are buying a section at the Cave township to build a church on by and-bye. Mr James Shepherd and Mr Robertson are the church managers for this part of the parish.
Land Sales. Mr B. McGrath has sold his farm to Mr Stonyer, of Beaconsfield.

Otago Witness, 6 May 1908, Page 39
Church Matters. The Rev. J. White, who has been the Presbyterian minister at Pleasant Point for the last 16 years, preached his farewell sermon to the adherents of the Presbyterian church at Cannington on Sunday, April 26. He reviewed the work done in the charge during his term of office, and stated what had been his ideals while he had been the pastor. His reason for leaving was that he was getting up in years.

    
31 months - another locked unused church. Nov. 2009.


Cave - St Monica, a Catholic Church that appears unused for years. The foundation stone reads May 21st 1911.



Photo credits Olwyn, August 1999 and 2009
South Canterbury, New ZealandGenWeb Project