Incomplete listing of South Canterbury fatalities, deaths, inquests from various newspapers pre1902. 


South Canterbury NZGenWeb Project

Drowning was considered the New Zealand disease!  166 people came to such grief in 1895.

Cause of deaths, 1859 -1901, in South Canterbury, N.Z. before the automobile

Drowning e.g. in rivers, wells and harbour

123

Miscellaneous e.g. walking by and tree fell

23

Suicide e.g. razor, shot, hanging...

55

Train e.g. run over by, etc.

10

Lingering illness e.g. cancer, TB

28

Murder e.g. shot

  5

Dray or cart e.g. ran over by wheel, tip-over, fell from trap, ..

39

Kicked by a horse

  6

Industrial accident e.g. dirt fell on, poisoning

33

Accident while drunk e.g. fell, drowned, binging

16

Burned i.e. children as well as adults

17

Exposure e.g. avalanche, snow

  4

Accidentally Shot e.g. climbing through fence

  9

Sunstroke

  3

Acute medical illness e.g. strangulation of bowels, pleurisy, sepsis, stroke, septicemia, typhoid

44

Childbirth

  6

Heart Disease - heart attack

31

Traction engine e.g. crushed

  3

Fall from horse

23

Natural causes - visitation of God

16

Manslaughter  4 Stillborn   3
Stroke  6  Infant mortality  10 
    11% of the deaths were by suicide Total  506

Post 1901 - 1945          Obituaries post 1945

Images online.
Lyttelton Times, 9 March 1859, Page 3
At Timaru, on the 18th February, an inquest was held by B. Woollcombe, Esq., R.M., on the body of Allen McPherson, who met his death under the following circumstances: On the evening of the 17th when Mr. Campion's dray arrived at Timaru, loaded with six bales of wool, the deceased went up and pushed inside the off bullock, though the driver warned him to keep away; as he was reaching to unhook the leading bullocks, the off bullock, a young one, kicked him under the rear bullock and as they started off the wheel of the dray went over his body. A. medical man was sent for immediately, but the case was beyond his power, the body having been crushed internally. He died two hours after the accident occurred.

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 4 June 1859, Page 4
Lyttelton Times, May 18. An inquest was held at Pariora, seven miles from Timaru, before R.H. Rhodes. Esq., J.P., on the body of a man named John Dummett, who had been employed as driver of the government dray on the works in the neighbourhood. He left Timaru on the 6th instant, and while on the road, by some accident fell off the dray and under the wheel, which passed over his head and killed him instantly. The jury empanelled, after hearing the evidence of a man who was with Dummett at the time, returned a verdict of accidental death. It appears that he had spirits with him, and was not sober at the time of the accident. — Id.
The horse Retribution, belonging to the late Mr. J. Sidebottom, was put up to auction on Saturday last and sold for £75.—

Lyttelton Times, 20 August 1859, Page 4 DIED.
August 9, at Timaru, George William Wood, son of George Rhodes, Esqs, aged 4 years

Lyttelton Times, 28 November 1860, Page 4 Died
Nov. 16, at Timaru, Ann, the wife of Mr. Samuel Williams, of the Timaru Hotel, aged 35 years.

Lyttelton Times, 28 August 1861, Page 4
A melancholy death by drowning occurred at Timaru on Friday, August 16. David Pollard, an old settler in this province, left Timaru for the purpose of going to a house at the Waimatemate; he was a little fresh. Upon coming to the Saltwater creek, about two miles from Timaru, it had broken out, the sea washing in with considerable violence. It is supposed the deceased attempted to cross it while in this dangerous condition, got carried away, and unable to resist the great power of the sea, was drowned. His horse was found dead upon the beach on the Sunday, and the body of the unfortunate man on the Wednesday, about a mile from the creek. An inquest was held by Dr. Rayner, Coroner, on Wednesday last, when a verdict of accidentally drowned was returned. The deceased was much respected.

Lyttelton Times, 28 September 1861, Page 4
Sept. 16, at Otaio Station, near Timaru, Miss Jeannie Collier, in her 70th year.

Lyttelton Times, 2 July 1862, Page 5
TREWEEK — June 25, at Timaru, of gastric fever, Thomas aged 19, fourth son of John Treweek, Esq., Christchurch. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Wellington Independent, 8 July 1862, Page 3
Death of Mr. Treweek, Junior. — We regret to notice in the obituary of the Lyttelton Times of the 2nd instant, an announcement of the death of Mr. Thomas Treweek, son of Mr. John Treweek, late of Wanganui, and very recently settled in Canterbury. Mr. Treweek died at Timaru on the 25th June of gastric fever, and this announcement will be read with considerable pain by a large circle of friends in the Wanganui district.

Otago Witness, 31 January 1863, Page 2
A melancholy and fatal accident occurred at Timaru on Wednesday the 14th inst. A party of public works people were engaged in widening and improving the Beach road at  Timaru by cutting deeper into the fence; off the cliff near Mr Beswick's store. A huge mass of cliff suddenly gave way whilst a man named Henry Gillespie was in the act of undermining it and before he could escape crushed him to the ground ; when extricated he was found by Dr Butler (the district provincial surgeon), to have sustained such injury that no hope could be entertained of his recovery all the ribs on one side being broken, besides suffering main severe contusion. The unfortunate man, who was a passenger by the Echunga lingered between two and three hours, when death put an end to his sufferings; he leaves a wife and infant unprovided for. An inquest, we understand, will be held on the body. — Lyttelton Times.

Lyttelton Times, 26 September 1863, Page 5
Popplewell—Sept. 16, at Arowhenua, the wife of Mr. Thos. Popplewell.
Hammond—Sept. 19, at Timaru, Mr. John Hammond, carpenter, aged 46 years

Lyttelton Times, 8 October 1863, Page 4
Fyfe.—October 1, at Timaru, Margaret Crigie, wife of Mr. Thomas Fyfe, painter, aged 28 years

Otago Witness, 10 October 1863, Page 5
A fatal accident occurred at Timaru on the 26th ult., terminating in the death of a little girl and the serious injury of her mother. It appears that a dray belonging to Messrs Studholme, left town that morning by the South road, carrying about two tons of wire. In addition, the dray conveyed a woman and two children as passengers. On arriving at a part of the road which had been recently formed, but not yet shingled, one of the wheels sank to the axle, capsising the dray and burying the woman and one of the children under the wire. The driver unable by himself to rescue the suffers, started to Timaru for assistance. When the unfortunate sufferers were extricated it was found that the child, a fine little girl, five years old, was quite dead. The mother sustained serious injuries about the legs, but is doing well.

Lyttelton Times, 15 October 1863, Page 4
Pilbrow — Oct. 4, at Arowhenua, the infant daughter of Edward Pilbrow, Esq.

Lyttelton Times, 21 January 1864, Page 4
STEER — Lately, at Mr. Hay's station, Mackenzie Country William Steer, aged 28 years.
James — Jan. 12, at Timaru, Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Mr. James, sergeant of police, aged 8 years.

Lyttelton Times, 12 May 1864, Page 4
Crowhurst — May 7, at Timaru Hospital, Charles Crowhurst, aged 28 years.

Timaru Herald, 2 July 1864, Page 4
Fatal Accident.— On Tuesday week last a shocking accident occurred at Geraldine. Whilst Mr. Caleb Mazlin was engaged bricking a well, the slabbing gave way, and the unfortunate man was immediately buried under a large mass of earth. The deceased had been warned by a fellow- workman that the earth was slipping, but he believed there was no danger and went down. It was three hours before the body was extricated, when life was found to be extinct. An inquest was held upon the body on the 24th inst., when a verdict of accidental death was returned.
    Funeral of Mr. Rhodes.— The funeral of the late Mr. George Rhodes took place yesterday afternoon. The procession, comprising about eighty of the principal persons of Lyttelton, with several from Christchurch, left the Court-house at half- past three, passing along London-street and Canterbury- street to the church. The pall was home by Messrs. Stoddart, Buchanan, Aynsley, Coster, Hargreaves, and Byrne.

Lyttelton Times, 30 July 1864, Page 4
Duff July 25, at Timaru, William George, only son of Mr. J. Edward Duff, aged one year and ten months.

Lyttelton Times, 30 August 1864, Page 3 Death
August 24, at Sealby Cottage, Timaru, Emily, the beloved wife of John Beswick, Esq., aged 33 years.

Timaru Herald, 22 October 1864, Page 4
Sudden Death.— As a man named Bradley (bullock-driver to Mr D. Smith) was crossing the Pareora River on Thursday last, he suddenly threw down his whip and immediately fell dead. Assistance was promptly rendered, but it was found that life was extinct. An inquest will be held on the body to-day.

Timaru Herald, 22 October 1864, Page 4
A poor old man, named Drake, who has lived here for the last twelve months, earning a livelihood by doing light work in the bush, committed suicide on Monday last, by cutting his throat. The deceased was one who had evidently seen better days, and was of a very quiet and reserved disposition. Some two or three months since his mind became affected, and his behaviour go strange, that it was deemed necessary to send him to Timaru. He could not rest there ; and as it was supposed he had become sane, he was allowed to return. Last week his manner was observed to lie altered, and his mind evidently again unsettled. He complained of being haunted by devils, who were continually telling him that he should not enter the Kingdom of Heaven. The poor fellow was living in a hut alone on the edge of the bush ; on Monday morning, instead of going to the bush, as was his custom, he remained indoors, and was seen and spoken to by several persons who passed by — by none of whom was anything particular in his manner observed. ..An inquest was held on the body, at Clarke's Hotel, Waimate, on Thursday, before the coroner, W. Woollcombe, Esq., when a verdict was returned that the deceased had committed suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity. We certainly want a medical man down here —although no aid could have saved poor Drake yet, had the wounds been of far less severity the man would have died from loss of blood if neglected for fifteen hours; that a population of between three and four hundred individuals should be dependant for medical aid, on members of the profession who resides at a distance of twenty-eight miles, is a state of things calling for immediate remedy.

Timaru Herald, 31 December 1864, Page 4
An inquest was held on Thursday last, on the body of a man named Frederick Adams, which had been found in a well near the Royal Hotel From the evidence given it appears that the deceased was in the employ of Mr. Green, and that he was sent at eleven o'clock on the night of the 27th inst. to fetch some water from the well — after which time he was not again seen alive. A man going to the well for water, discovered that something was down it, and, upon hooks being procured, the deceased was pulled out. In consequence of there being some slight wounds upon the body, a post-mortem examination was ordered; but Dr. McLean gave it as his opinion that the wounds were not sufficient to cause death, and that the deceased died by drowning. The verdict was— " Drowned, through falling down a well."

New Zealand is a well watered country. J.B. Acland, 1858

Lyttelton Times, 7 January 1865, Page 4
King .—Dec, 15, James Alexander King, Esq., of the Otipoa station, near Timaru, aged 32 years.

Timaru Herald, 11 February 1865, Page 4
An inquest was held it Waimate on Wednesday last, on the body of Mrs. Tregoing, who had died in childbirth on the Sunday previously. Some rumours having become prevalent that the death of deceased had been caused by the carelessness of the doctor, an inquiry was instituted and a post-mortem examination performed by Dr. McLean. The following was the verdict returned by the jury, after hearing the evidence of the nurse and Dr. McLean :- "That the deceased died during childbirth, death being accelerated from want or proper treatment;" and a rider was added to the effect that the conduct of Mr. Miles was reprehensible if he was a medical practitioner, but that there was no evidence to prove he was such.

Timaru Herald, 1 April 1865, Page 5
The Rangitata River has also been higher than usual in a fresh, and there a few men have been drowned — one, a man called Taylor, I see you noticed in your last week's paper. His body has been recovered. An inquest has been held on it on Wednesday last, when a verdict of " Accidentally drowned" was returned. A well known old colonial unfortunately lost his life at the lower (Ward's) ford on Monday last; he was showing some diggers over and dropped his coat, and galloped down a spit after it, and by some means got into the river, and was seen no more of. The body was recovered the next day and brought to the Orari, where an inquest has been held on it but I have not heard the result. The name of the deceased was William Smith, but better known by the name of "Billy Gooseberry;" he was a very honest, steady man, and was much respected by the residents of the district.

Timaru Herald, 20 May 1865, Page 5
Auction sale. In the matter of the Estate of William SMITH, late of Orari, Carrier, deceased: Under authority from the Registrar of the Supreme Court.

Taranaki Herald, 12 July 1862, Page 2
TREWEEK— On the 25th June, at Timaru, Middle Island, of gastric fever, Thomas, fourth son of John Treweek, Esq., Christchurch, aged 19 years. Friends will please accept this intimation.

New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, 17 June 1865, Page 3
Fatal Accident in the Rakaia. —
It seems that Mr. Walter? Wilson, son of J. Cracroft Wilson, Esq., C.B., of Cashmere, was on his way to the south to bring up stock from his father's run on the Rangitata, accompanied by Mr. McDonald, junr., manager of Mr. Wilson's station on the Selwyn ; and that, in company with several other gentlemen, he remained at the hotel on, this side of the Rakaia over Thursday night. About nine yesterday morning, Mr. Flowers sent across the river three horses belonging to the party, and as soon as they were safely across; he came back to act as pilot for the horsemen. The river had been muddy during Thursday, but yesterday it was low again and clear. Five essayed to cross, namely Mr. Flowers, pilot ;, Messrs. W. Wilson, McDonald, Caton, and J. Kett. All went well for it short distance; when Mr. Wilson's horse, a well-bred thing, commenced to rear and plunge, whereby Mr. Wilson was thrown, however, on his feet; and apparently up to his waist in the current. His horse plunged violently, and in his struggling became entangled with the horse Kett was riding, which also fell, and got away from its rider. Kett was at once in the current, when Charley Flowers (as he is generally known) swam in on horse and pulled him out by the hair of his head. A moment before this occurred young M'Donald was observed to jump off his horse, whether to render assistance to Mr Wilson, or for other reasons, it is impossible to ascertain, for at the moment he jumped; he sank and was never seen after. Mean while, Mr. Wilson, who, when thrown from his horse, must have been washed from his feet; started to swim, and most manfully he is reported to have struggled against the awful current. Mr. Flowers followed him on the well-known river horse 'Roany,' who carried him down the stream with a grand stride in close pursuit of the now struggling young man ; when almost within two lengths of him Wilson cried out to Flowers to "Come on" to which Flowers cheeringly replied, " Hold on, old boy, you are sill right." At this moment the boat was launched, and came down within a short distance of the poor drowning lad; but when within almost a boat-hook's length of him young Wilson sank to rise no more. Flowers followed the stream down for three miles, but was unable to see any trace of either of the bodies. He picked up the hats of the two youths, together with one Wellington boot. Finding further endeavours would be useless, Mr. Flowers started towards town, and met Mr. Alfred Cox, a passenger by the down Timaru mail, who returned on horseback with him, and broke the melancholy tidings to Mr. Cracroft Wilson at Cashmere, about five o'clock yesterday afternoon. At-a late hour last evening, Mr. Wilson, accompanied by his eldest son, started off to the Rakaia, to render his assistance in every possible search to discover his son's remains, and those of his companion.— Lyttelton Times.

Timaru Herald, 22 July 1865, Page 4
Inquest at Arowhenua.- An inquest was held by B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday the 12th instant, upon the body of Elizabeth Smith, wife of Mr. Smith of the Waihi crossing, Geraldine. Prom the evidence given it appeared that the deceased was taken m the pain of labour about eleven o'clock on the Sunday morning previous, and that she complained of feeling cold. She continued in that state for some hours, when her husband hearing a noise in her throat went to her, and found her very pale and dying. He then sent his man to get a horse to go for Dr. Rayner. The husband stated that no woman was present, and that his wife had seven children living, and that m several cases previously she had done without the services of a medical man. Dr. Rayner stated that he was fetched on the Suuday night about eleven o'clock ; and on arriving at the Waihi he found the woman had been dead several hours, and that the child was unborn. He had since made a post mortem examination, and found that death was caused by internal haemorrhage. The jury returned a verdict to that effect, with a severe censure upon the husband for not obtaining medical or other aid.

Timaru Herald
, 29 December 1865, Page 2
On Tuesday last about mid-day, a fatal and melancholy accident occurred near Mr. Studholme's woolshed at the Waimate to a man named Macdonald. A six-horse waggon was descending a hill from the woolshed, when the ground being very slippery with the late heavy rains, the waggon upset, and the man falling underneath was crushed in a frightful manner, having all his ribs broken on one side. Dr. McLean was immediately sent for, but the sufferer expired half an hour after the accident. He has left a wife and family in Australia.

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 6 January 1866, Page 2
The Herald of the 22nd ultimo, reports a frightful accident that happened to Mr. D. Smith, a farmer, of Deep Creek, near Waimate. It appears that he left Timaru in company with another dray-man with a bullock-dray loaded with about a ton and a-half of goods. When the two teams had passed the Otipua Creek for some distance, and were proceeding towards the Pareora river, Smith wished to jump off the dray for the purpose of driving the team down hill. He was in the act of springing from the dray to the ground, when his trousers caught in a splinter of wood which was sticking up in front of the dray, and he lost his balance and fell under the wheel, which passed over both his legs and crushed them in a frightful manner. The poor fellow was immediately taken by his companion, to a public house at the Otipua Creek, where he was attended by Dr. M'Lean. It is greatly feared that amputation of one leg will be necessary.

Timaru Herald, 12 January 1866, Page 2
Death by Drowning. — On Saturday morning last, as a traveller named Heuan was crossing the stream of the Rangitata, near Mrs. Marshall's Accomodation House, he observed the body of a child in the stream. From the evidence adduced at the inquest held before B. Woollcombe, Esq., the Coroner for the district, the body was identified as that of a child of Mrs. Marshall's. A pickle jar was also found near the body, and it is supposed that in stooping to fill it with water it must have overbalanced itself and fallen into the stream. A verdict was given in accordance with the above evidence, "Found drowned."

North Otago Times, 11 January 1866, Page 3
I regret to have to inform you of a fatal accident which occurred on Saturday morning about 9 a.m., to a daughter of Mrs Marshall at the Rangitata. The poor child which was only about three years old had been seen playing with her sister, aged about 4 years, a short time previous to the discovery of her death, which was made by one of the boatmen engaged in working the Ferry, who in wading through a shallow branch of the river, about 20 yards from the house, found the child's body in water scarcely 18 inches deep. Every available means of recovery were resorted to, but without success.

Timaru Herald,  2 February 1866, Page 2
An inquest was held on Friday last, the 27th instant, by Mr. Woollcombe, Coroner for the district, upon the body of John Gardiner, bushman, of the Waimate. A jury of fourteen persons was empanelled of which Mr. Payne was chosen foreman. It appeared that on Thursday last deceased, whilst engaged in sharpening a saw, dropped down and expired almost immediately. After a post mortem examination by Dr. Christy, a verdict was returned that the deceased died from "disease of the heart." On Wednesday last Mr. Woollcombe held another inquest, at Pleasant Valley, on the body of Alfred Major Bull, a child two years old. Twelve jurors were empanelled, of whom Mr. Paterson was elected foreman. By the evidence it appeared that the deceased was last seen playing with a dog near the banks of the river. The dog returned home wet, on which Mr. Best, of Pleasant Valley, went to search the river and there found the body of the child dead in the water. There were no marks visible and no direct evidence to show how the child got into the river. Verdict, "Found drowned."

North Otago Times, 8 February 1866, Page 2
Timaru, February 5th, 1866.
A child of the name of Bull, two years of age, has been accidentally drowned near Pleasant Valley. An inquest was held on Wednesday before Mr Woolcombe ; verdict — Found drowned.   

Daily Southern Cross, 18 April 1866, Page 4
The Timaru Herald says:— "It will be seen from the list of passengers' names in the ill-fated steamer 'London,' that a Mr. and Mrs. Wood and three children are mentioned ; also two step children named Clayson. These passengers were well in this district, having resided at the Arowhenua for a number of years, and having left there about twelve months ago to proceed to England. A singular circumstance is connected with the loss of this family. They had engaged their passages, and actually embarked on board the ship 'Victory,' which our shipping columns announce has arrived, safely in Lyttelton ; but when the Commissioners at London examined the 'Victory,' they ordered off Mr. and Mrs. Wood and family, as the cabin accommodation was found to be insufficient. But some of their luggage was left on board the Victory, and has arrived in Lyttelton. In consequence of not being able to come to Canterbury by the 'Victory,' Mr. Wood agreed with the owners, Money Wigram and Co., to proceed by their next vessel; but as that firm happened not to have one on the berth for New Zealand at the time, arrangements were made for the family to proceed by the 'London' to, Melbourne, and thence to be brought on to Canterbury. The Home News says of Mrs. Wood, that she, with other female passengers, 'read the Bible by turns in the second cabin.' Wood has a sister residing at Timaru, and also a brother at the Arowhenua.

North Otago Times, 28 June 1866, Page 3 Timaru, 25th June, 1866.
I am sorry to have to record that Mr George Green, of Geraldine, had a heavy loss here on Thursday. It appears he turned out his bullocks from a dray, and, having a young one, he left the yokes on the pair. On proceeding in the morning to find them, he came across the yolked-up pair in a small gully with their necks broken. The value of the bullocks was estimated at about L50.

Timaru Herald, 22 August 1866, Page 2
Child Drowned.— On Saturday last an inquest was held at the Waihi Bush upon the body of a child two years of age, named Mary Janet Warren. It appeared from the evidence adduced that on the Wednesday previous the mother went away for a short time, leaving the child asleep m the house, and requested a Mrs Scott, a neighbour, to see that it did not stray far away. The child was shortly afterwards seen playing outside of the house by Mrs Scott After a short time, not hearing the child about, she commenced a search for it, but being unable to discover any traces of it sent for the father, who, after searching the Waihi river found the body of the child floating. Dr Caro, of Geraldine, was immediately sent for, but on his arrival declared life to be quite extinct Every effort was used to restore life, by those present but without avail. The jury, of which Mr Campbell was foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Timaru Herald, 21 November 1866, Page 2
An inquest was held at Wadsworth's accommodation house on Monday last by B. Woollcombe Esq., coroner of the district, on the body of Anthony Hicks, who was drowned in the Rangitata last Wednesday. A jury of fourteen having been empanelled, Mr Wadsworth was chosen foreman. James Coppin, the head boatman at the Rangitata creek, was the first witness examined. He deposed, that when the mail had crossed the creek on Wednesday and while waiting for its fresh team, the horses got away and bolted up the river ; the deceased not waiting to saddle his horse rode bare backed after them, and was seen by witness for about two miles on the banks of the river. When last seen he was turning in towards the river. The next morning the horses were found by witness about three miles up the river on an island, and he observed on the bank abreast of where the horses were found, on the south side of the stream, the marks of a horse both going m and coming out of the water, and at this place the river was at first shallow but in a few feet suddenly deepened. The deceased was found on a spit a mile and a half lower down the stream to where the horses were discovered. There were bruises on the face, but such as were most likely caused by the stones when the body was washed down. Mr Bemiss, road manager to Cobb and Co, corroborated the evidence of the previous witness. The jury found a verdict of "Accidental drowning."

Timaru Herald, 13 February 1867, Page 5
Death by Drowning. — On Thursday, 24th ult., an inquest was held by J. B. Acland Esq, J.P. at the Accommodation House, Upper Ferry, on the body of John Bruce, formerly gardener for C. E. Tripp, Esq. Mr George Wright was chosen foreman of the jury. It appears that the deceased went to the river to bathe, and getting too near the rapids became confused and was carried down the stream and drowned. The body was found by Mr Rae about six miles from the spot where the deceased went to bathe. A verdict of " Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Timaru Herald, 13 February 1867, Page 2
On Monday afternoon the town was thrown into a state of excitement by the report that a man had been thrown from his horse and killed upon the spot, when near the Washdyke. On making enquiries we found the report to be true. From the particulars we have been enabled to gather it appears that Mr P. D. McRae of the Club Hotel, and Mr Garity, who keeps a public house in Timaru known as the Hibernian Hotel, left town about four o'clock on Monday afternoon, and proceeded m the direction of the Washdyke. Garity was riding a young horse, which was much given to shieing. When they had arrived within a short distance of the residence of Mr John Anderson, the horse ridden by Garity shied at a culvert which crosses the road, but the rider kept his seat The horse had only gone a few yards further when it again shied, and threw its rider upon his head on a track running parallel with the main road. Mr McRae was a few yards m advance at the time of the accident, and tried to stop the horse. Two men who were near at the time at once went to render assistance, and raised Garity from the ground. Mr McRae also left the horse to attend upon deceased, who was found insensible and quite black in the face, and was bleeding from one nostril.

Timaru Herald, 13 February 1867, Page 2
An inquest was held yesterday morning at the Hibernian Hotel before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of Elizabeth Alexander, a child aged two months. The following jury was called : — Messrs B. D. Hibbard (Foreman), J. Ord, J. D. Anderson, F. H. Eliding, T. J. Shute, W. O'Bryan, J. Hill, W. Darby, Geo. Gabites, J. E. Beckingham, T. Foden, A. J. Quelch, and R. H. Ferguson. After the jury had viewed the body, the following evidence was taken : — Ann Alexander, wife of Wm. Alexander, laborer, residing at Mount Horrible, said  I was mother of the deceased child, who was two months old. She was a weakly child from birth. About 7 o'clock on Wednesday morning she awoke, and was so ill that I sent for Mrs Tregenza, a neighbor. Mrs Tregenza arrived at my house just as the child expired. The child was not attended by a medical man, as I did not think the illness was so serious. Sarah Jane Tregenza said she was sent for by last witness on Wednesday morning to see the deceased child, but on arrival found it had died just before she reached the house. Richard Bowen Hogg, a duly qualified medical practitioner, said he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased that morning. He had found the child very small for its age and wasted. In his opinion, death resulted from natural causes. The jury, after a few minutes deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Timaru Herald, 16 February 1867, Page 2 No name
Man Drowned in the Rangitata,— "On Sunday afternoon last, a man called at Cobb & Co.'s stables, and enquired if he could get across the river. He was told that he would be taken across on horseback in a few minutes. He asked if he could not ford it, and was answered that it he attempted it he would be sure to get drowned. While the horses were being got ready, he walked down to the river, and entered at one of the most dangerous parts. He was seen about the middle of the stream, where he apparently lost his footing, stumbled, and was carried down the river. He was seen twice rolling over the outer end of spits, and every exertion was made by James Coppin, the boatman, to render him assistance, but without avail. The occurrence was reported to Serjeant Hamsay, who proceeded on Monday to endeavour to recover the body, but without success. The search was renewed on Tuesday, when it was found about three miles below the ferry, and conveyed to the Orari Hotel the same evening. An inquest was held on Thursday morning by B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, when the documents found, on the deceased by the sergeant, and the evidence as to the accident were submitted to the jury ; upon which an unanimous verdict was given of " Accidental Drowning. " The writings found had the address of "K. Sexton," without any profession, and one of them was a billhead of Borne clothing he had purchased from the firm of "Williamson and Thomas, Drapers, Launceston." He was about twenty-six years of age, 5ft 10in high, light complexion, with beard and moustache, dressed in brown tweed coat and trowsers, crimean shirt, and had on Wellington boots.

Timaru Herald, 10 April 1867, Page 2
determined case of suicide occurred at the Commercial Hotel, Timaru, on Monday last. A man named Rowley, formerly a butcher in Christchurch, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. The unfortunate man had, it seemed, been drinking for some days previous, and m a tit of delirium tremens committed the rash act.
Harriet Brassel — I am servant in the Commercial hotel Deceased came to the house on Sunday morning
Duncan McLean, deposed: I am a medical practitioner residing in Timaru.
Alfred Buckley's (the inspector of police)

Otago Witness, 29 June 1867, Page 11
Timaru Herald, 19 June 1867, Page 2
Child Smothered. —On Saturday last an inquest was held before the Coroner (B. Woollcombe, Esq.,) upon the body of a child of Mrs. C. Ellis, two or three months old, which was found dead in bed on Thursday morning. The mother of the child stated she took it from the cot about 12 o'clock at night, and at four o'clock when she awoke, she thought it was dying, and called m a neighbour and sent for Dr McLean. A post-mortem examination was made by Dr McLean who stated that the child had died from suffocation, and m his opinion by the mother overlying it. The child had bruises on the inside of the knees, which he thought might have been caused by the pressure of the knees together by an overweight. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death from suffocation."

Lyttelton Times, 26 August 1867, Page 2
A shocking accident occurred to a person named William Gregson, a carter residing at Waimate, on Wednesday last. It appears that deceased left Timaru with his dray and horses on the evening of that day but previous to reaching the Saltwater Creek, being under the influence of drink he fell under the dray upon which he was sleeping, and was killed almost instantaneously, the wheel having passed over his head.

Timaru Herald, 14 December 1867, Page 2
An inquest was held on Wednesday, last at the Otaio Inn by H. Belfield Esq., J.P., on the body of William Page, who was found underneath a capsized dray m the Otaio river on Tuesday afternoon. A jury of fourteen was empanelled, of which Mr A. Turnbull was foreman. The first witness examined was George Henderson, who, being sworn, stated he had charge of the boundary fence between Messrs Thomson's and the Pareora runs. On Tuesday afternoon he had occasion to go up the fence, and on coming to the road in the Otaio river bed leading to Blue Cliffs station, he saw lying on the line of roadway, and in the river, a dray loaded with timber capsized, with its wheels uppermost. On approaching he found the lead horse hooked on to the shafts all right, but the shaft horse was dead. On further examination he saw a man's leg sticking out from beneath the load, and he concluded the man must be dead as he not only had the load over him but he was lying in about two or three feet of water. Witness, finding he could do nothing by himself, rode on to the Blue Cliffs station, and informed Mr Hayhurst that his dray was capsized in the Otaio and he thought the driver must be dead. Mr [John] Hayhurst at once got his spring cart and went with another man and witness to the scene of the accident. On arriving they unloaded the dray and pulled the unfortunate deceased out of the river. On searching deceased's clothes they found nine £1 notes, one £5 note, and 6s 6d in silver, together with a watch, a pocket knife, and a receipt for timber. On examining the ground near to where the dray was capsized, they found that one of the wheels had been on the top of a small cutting leading directly into the river, and so fully accounted for the accident. Witness assisted to put the body into the spring cart, and one of Mr Hayhurst's servants took it to the Otaio Inn. Mr Hayhurst, being sworn, stated deceased had been in his employ for about three weeks. On Monday he had sent him to the Otaio Inn for some timber he expected to be lying there, but in the event of not finding the timber there he gave the deceased instructions to go on to the Waimate saw mills for it, a further distance of about 16 miles. Deceased not returning to Blue Cliffs on Monday gave witness no uneasiness, as he thought he had gone on to the Waimate. Mr Hayhurst then corroborated in every particular the last witness' statement about finding and searching the body. He also stated that deceased was a most sober man and had always been on good terms with his neighbours. In answer to a question of the acting coroner, witness stated that deceased only had reins to the lead horse. Abraham Blackmoore stated that deceased came to his Inn on Monday last with a pair of horses and dray to load some timber which was lying there for Mr Hayhurst. While at witness' house deceased had only a single glass of porter, and was perfectly sober when he left to return to the station in the afternoon. Deceased had reins to the lead horse but had not any to the shaft. The medical evidence proved that deceased must have met his death by first being stunned and then by drowning. The jury returned a verdict of  "Accidental death," and recorded their opinion that, deceased not having reins to the shaft horse, was most likely the cause of the accident.

North Otago Times, 17 December 1867, Page 2
A telegram was received last evening from Inspector Buckley, Timaru, that the body of a man supposed to be that of James Ryan, boarding-house keeper of this place, has been found in the Otaio River. An inquest is to be held to-day. The deceased leaves a wife and four children totally unprovided for.

Timaru Herald, 18 December 1867, Page 2 [AJHR Dec 16 1867 James Ryan, Otepua (sic) Timaru]
Yesterday an inquest was held at the Otipua Inn, Saltwater Creek, before H. Belfield, Esq., J.P., on the body of James Ryan, which was found lying in Saltwater Creek on Monday morning. ' A jury of fourteen was empanelled, of which Mr John Younghusband was foreman. The i first witness examined was Michael Kelly, who stated that he was coming out from Timaru on Monday morning and on sighting the creek he saw something lying in the water, which on nearer approach he saw was the body of a man. Others soon joined him on the bridge, and one of them went to Timaru to inform the police. Witness believed the body to be that of James Ryan, but he could not swear it was, as it was so much decomposed. He had known Ryan in Oamaru. The evidence of Abraham Blackmore went to prove that a man answering to deceased was at the Otaio Inn on Friday morning, having stayed there the previous night. The coat produced, which was found near to the creek, witness recognised as the one the man wore when he left his (witness) house. He had every reason to believe that the deceased was Ryan, but could not swear to it. The manner in which deceased's beard was cut greatly resembled that of Ryan. The clothes also were similar. Witness had known Ryan for about three years, and had always found him a decent, quiet sort of man, and a man who liked to be alone. Just before Ryan left the Otaio on Friday, witness changed for him half-a-sovereign. He only observed 2s 6d in his possession, no other money. James Burtenshaw, the police constable, proved to finding a black pilot reversible coat [produced] on Friday evening about thirty yards from the creek on the north bank. He made every enquiry but could not find an owner for it. He searched the pockets and found a small penknife, a razor, a pipe, some tobacco, and a document signed by Page and Sliddolph, stating they had let to James Ryan a house in Oamaru. Witness searched the banks of the creek and observed one footmark just above the bridge on the north bank, about two feet from the water edge. On Monday morning witness was ordered by Inspector Buckley to proceed to the creek as it was reported a man's body had been found. He did so, and found a body lying in the water. With the assistance of some men he conveyed it to the Otipua Inn, and when there he searched the clothes of deceased but found nothing on them. Witness also examined the body but found no marks of violence on it. The constable could not trace any footmarks from where he had previously found the coat to the edge of the creek, nor could he compare the footmarks on the bank to the boots deceased wore, as the heavy rain on Sunday had obliterated all marks. Sarah Ryan, the wife of the unfortunate deceased was then examined. The poor woman arrived from Oamaru by coach as the inquest was being held. She said she could not identify the body but could swear to the clothes as belonging to her husband, whom she last saw in Oamaru on Wednesday last. ...

Timaru Herald, 1 January 1868, Page 2
An inquest was held at Mr Cox's, Geraldine, on Friday last, before the Coroner (B. Woollcombe, Esq. ) on the body of George Day, a bullock driver, in the employment of Mr Cox, who was thrown from his horse on Christmas Day and killed. The evidence showed that the deceased had been partaking rather too freely of liquor, and was riding a horse given to shying, and when near Mr Cox's residence, the horse turned sharply aside, and threw deceased upon his head. He was carried to a bed at once and two hours afterwards was found to be dead, one of the witnesses stating that he heard a gurgling sound at that time. Deceased never spoke after he was thrown from his horse. The Jury returned a verdict of, "accidental death," with a rider attached that they thought a medical man ought to have been sent for, as it appeared the deceased lived for two hours after being thrown.

Timaru Herald, 4 January 1868, Page 2
Boy Drowned. — A melancholy accident happened at Temuka on Tuesday last [Dec. 30]. Three boys were bathing together in the Temuka river. One of them, named Rupert Murphy, although warned by his companions of the danger he was running, persisted on bathing near to a rapid, the consequence was he was carried down stream, and although one of the boys, named John Frazer, did what he could to save him it was of no avail. Shortly after the accident the body was recovered but life was found, to be extinct. An inquest was held on Wednesday before the coroner, B. Woollcombe, Esq., and a jury of fourteen, of which Mr K. F. Gray was foreman, when a verdict of  "Accidental drowning" was returned.

Timaru Herald, 22 January 1868, Page 2
Accident in the Rangitata. — In our last we noticed the death by drowning of Mr William Rae, Upper Ferry, Rangitata, on Wednesday evening last. The body was found next morning on a spit about two miles below where the accident took place. An inquest was immediately held by the Hon. J. B. Ackland, J.F. Mr Paterson, sheep inspector, was foreman of the jury. A verdict was returned of "Accidental drowning." The remains were removed the same day to his parents' home. On Saturday the funeral took place, which left the Upper Ferry about ten o'clock, accompanied by from thirty to forty relatives and friends on horseback, and reached Geraldine about two o'clock, where it was joined by a number more, who proceeded to the church, where the funeral service was read by the Rev. L. L. Brown. The cavalcade then wended its way towards the churchyard, where the remains were deposited, and the remainder of the service concluded. Several of the mourners lingered for some time round the grave, deploring the loss they had sustained m one so young and so generally respected meeting with such an untimely end.

Timaru Herald, 12 February 1868, Page 2
Body Found. — The body of the unfortunate man who was washed overboard from the William Miskin on Monday week last, was found on the beach on Saturday. It was taken to the Timaru Hotel, and there identified by one of the passengers. No inquest was held.

Timaru Herald, 8 February 1868, Page 2
Fatal Accident. — We regret to record a fatal accident which happened on Thursday afternoon at Woollcombe's Gully to a man named John Mills, who lived near Mr Hall's fence. He was returning homewards driving a spring cart, and when on the unmade portion of the road between Mr Lough's house and the old road the cart capsized, and fell on the unfortunate man. Two men living close to the scene of the accident at once ran to his assistance, but when they picked him up he was quite dead. The body was at once conveyed to the Timaru Hotel, where an inquest was held on it yesterday afternoon before B. Woollcombe, Esq., the coroner. Mr George Healey was the foreman of the jury, which returned a verdict of "Accidental death."

Timaru Herald, 29 February 1868, Page 7
INQUESTS ON SIX BODIES. On the 8th inst., two inquests were held by B. Woollcombe, Esq., the coroner, on the five bodies which have been recovered. In both cases a jury of fourteen was empanelled. Mr H. Forward was the foreman of the jury empanelled at the Crown Hotel, Temuka, to enquire into the cause of death of John Duff, Peter Martin, and John Kennedy. The following evidence was taken : — John Martin, being sworn, said : lam a storekeeper residing at Temuka. About half past eight o'clock last Monday night, I left our houses in company with my wife, four children, and my father-in-law, as I expected there was going to be a high flood. We all went up the road towards the Crown Hotel, my father-in-law, John Duff, carrying Robert Kennedy, [step son] my wife carrying the baby, and I with the other two children. The water was half way up to the knee when we left the house.

At the inquest held at Parr's mill, on the bodies of Mrs Salter, and two of her children, who have been found, Mr Edward Hassell was the foreman of the jury. The following witnesses wore examined : — Robert Salter, being sworn, said: I was employed at the mill by the Parr Brothers, and lived m a house close to the mill with my wife and family of four children. All last Monday it was raining very furiously, and between six and seven o'clock in the evening I observed the water was rising. I asked the Parrs if there was any danger, they said " No." We put the children to bed, and my wife and I sat up talking, fearing there might be danger. I went out again, and seeing the creek was rising to the house, called the Parrs, and got some planks and flax to cross the creek, but could not do so. The Parrs then went to bed, and said they could do no more. We then went back again into our own house, and my wife dressed the children. As the water was at that time two feet m the house, I put them all on the table, which was fixed. We were standing there for a few minutes when the house gave way. It was nearly full of water, and I held my wife and children as long as I could, but I was so knocked about that I lost thorn. The house soon broke up, and I saw no more of them. It was quite dart. I was jambed by my knee in a portion of the wood work, and could not move, and so was carried away by the water. The piece of the house I was on grounded and stuck half a mile from where it stood. I held on to it till the morning, when I got off, the water having subsided. I identify the bodies lying here as those of my wife and two children. William Parr said : lam one of the firm of Parr Brothers.

Timaru Herald, 29 February 1868, Page 7
On February 10, an inquest was held at the Makikihi  Hotel, before M. Studholme, Esq., J.P., and a jury of fourteen, on the body of Richard Bright, which was found on Wednesday last, drowned m a creek between the Makikihi and Messrs Thomson's station. The principal witness examined was Mr Nichols, who left Jones's hotel with deceased about 5 o'clock on Monday, the 3rd February. Witness lived about one and a-half miles up the Makikihi flat. Before parting with deceased, Nichols asked him to stay at his house, and not attempt the river, as it was then very high. Deceased, however, would not stop, but rode on to Messrs Thomson's station. The Makikihi was safely crossed, but m attempting a small creek about three quarters of a mile from the river, deceased must have been washed off his horse. The creek usually has about six inches of water in it, but on that Monday evening there was running through it about eight feet of water. The creek had steep banks, which would afford little hope of escape to a person struggling in the water. Deceased was found lying with his face downwards on the edge of the water by Messrs Garrow and Orbell, about fifteen chains from the spot where it is supposed ho entered the creek. The jury returned a verdict similar to those found in the cases reported above. Deceased was a fine young fellow of about 18 years of age, and was generally liked by all who knew him.

Timaru Herald, 17 June 1868, Page 2
An inquest on the body of Captain Driver, late of the brigantine Despatch, was held at the Washdyke Hotel on Monday, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., the Coroner of the district and a jury of fourteen, of which Mr Richard Turnbull was foreman. The following evidence was taken : — Herbert Boys, being sworn, said, I am a master mariner. On the day the brigantine Despatch came on shore I was on board of her. I identify the body lying here as the body of Capt. Driver, of the Despatch.
Alexander Taylor : I am a master mariner. I was mate of the Despatch on Friday night the 12th instant. I was on board of her. I have seen the body lying here. It is the body of Joshua E. Driver.
After hearing the evidence, the jury returned a verdict of " Accidental Death," and added as a rider to the verdict, that " the jury beg to record their disapprobation of the room in which the body was placed, being totally unfit by its limited space for the proper viewing of the body." We understand that the body of Captain Driver is to be forwarded by the first steamer to Dunedin for burial, it having been placed in a leaden coffin for that purpose.

Timaru Herald, 10 October 1868, Page 2  [AJHR Oct 5 1868 Margaret McCrae, Arowhenua]
Thursday, October 8. A sad accident occurred here on Friday last, which resulted in the death of an infant about two years old. The child, which belonged to Mr McRae, living at Epworth, had been playing about for some time, and when its absence was observed a search was made for it, but though it was eventually discovered, it was too late, as the child was quite dead. It appears that the infant had been playing near a post hole, into which it had fallen head first, and being unable to extricate itself had been suffocated, as it was found with it head downwards in the hole. An inquest was held on Monday, when evidence was given to the above effect, and a verdict returned in accordance therewith. It is a somewhat singular coincidence that just upon twelve months had elapsed since the father of the child to whose decease I here just alluded was drowned in a creek near his own house.

Timaru Herald, 10 February 1869, Page 5
Melancholy Death at the Point. On January 18th Mr Howell of the Point brought intelligence into Timaru of the death, under most peculiar circumstances, of a Mr Arthur Neate, a young gentleman working on Messrs Howell and Week's station as a cadet. We have been able to gather the following particulars. It seems that Mr Neate was assisting during that day in binding corn and appeared in his usual health and spirits. Some time in the afternoon he left his work but his doing so did not call for any remarks from those who were working with him, and nothing was thought of his absence. Just before dark, his lifeless body was found not far from Mr Howell's house, with a pistol shot wound somewhere near the region of the heart. A pistol was found close to the body. How the unfortunate young gentleman came by his death is still a mystery. As far as we have been informed there was nothing in Mr Neate's manner to suppose insanity and that he was likely to take his own life. At the coroner's inquest, which is to be held to-day at Mr Howell's house, it is to be hoped that evidence will be forthcoming, which will in some measure clear up the mystery which now surrounds the affair. The unfortunate deceased was barely eighteen years of age, and had only been in the colony for a short time.

Timaru Herald, 23 January 1869, Page 2 Inquest Arthur Neate
Edward James Gould, a tanner, living at Waterfalls
William Barker Howell, a farmer
William Smith, a constable, Timaru
Louisa Cook, a servant for Messrs Meek and Howell
Edward Meek, a partner with Howell in the farm

Timaru Herald, 13 February 1869, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Court-house, Timaru, yesterday, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of Jane Elizabeth Tipler, who was found dead near the residence of her father in Latter-street. Timaru, on Thursday morning. A jury of fourteen was empanelled, Mr J. Hamilton being chosen foreman. After the body had been viewed, the jury returned to the Court-house, and the following evidence was adduced : — Ada Clark, a child of about six years of age said she saw a woman dead, who was lying on her face. She was looking over the fence and saw her. The little girl was considered too young to give evidence.
Sergeant Niell, sworn, deposed : I have seen the body, and identify it as that of Elizabeth Tipler. It lies at her father's residence, Latter-street. Her father's name is Thomas William Tipler.
Thomas William Tipler, sworn, deposed : I am a currier by trade, living in Timaru. Deceased is my daughter. I last saw her alive between half-past nine and ten o'clock yesterday morning. She was then cleaning the kitchen. She was enjoying the best of health. She never had a fit in her life to my knowledge. She was in good spirits always. We had breakfast together that morning. She was 25 years old.
Edward Butler, sworn, deposed : I am a medical practitioner, living in Timaru. I have examined the body of deceased. I made a post-mortem examination to-day. The jury after a short consultation returned the following verdict : — " That Jane Elizabeth Tipler came by her death from suffocation, caused by falling on her face, but how she came into that position the jury have not sufficient evidence to show." At the conclusion of the inquest, John Muskett was brought up for not appearing m answer to the summons as a juryman. He pleaded that he thought he had been summoned for eleven o'clock instead of ten.

Timaru Herald, 8 May 1869, Page 5
An inquest was held at the Timaru Hospital on the 21st ult., before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, on the body of James Burrows, who died from the effects of injuries received on the 2nd of April. A jury of 14 were impanelled, of whom Mr Henry Hooper was chosen foreman. After the jury had viewed the body, the following evidence was taken : — Andrew Hart, sworn : I am a labourer, living in Timaru. On the 2nd of April last I was at work at Mr Bowker's shop. I was assisting to lower the building with screwjack. I was at the north-west corner. I was working one of the jacks. It was rather to far worked out. About five minutes before the accident the deceased told me to remove the cask I had us a prop to relieve the screw. I took it out and then said to Mr Harding that the screw was worked too much out and we would have to alter it. Mr Harding came to look at it. Deceased also came to look at the screw, he came between the building and the bank, at the side of the house, he told me to put the cask in again as he noticed the screw was unsafe, he then put the cask under the building ; he put it too far under according to my opinion. He told me to unscrew the jack to allow the building to rest on the cask. As I attempted to turn the lever I noticed the screw was bent, and as I tried to turn it saw the building swaying. I called to deceased and said, " for God's sake look out James it is coming over." I caught deceased by the leg and tried to make him come from under the building ; I sprang under myself but was caught in the small of the back but not much hurt. When turned round I saw deceased jammed against the bank. He cried out for some one to lever the building off him. The screws were used to try to ease it off him, and some one went inside and cut the partition on each side of him. He was then taken up and put into a bed in the room.

Timaru Herald, 8 May 1869, Page 5
James Burrows. We regret to have to record the death of James Burrows, who was so frightfully injured on the 2nd instant by a house falling and crushing him. Since his removal to the Hospital, two days after the accident, hopes were entertained of his ultimate recovery, but it seems recovery was out of the question, for the poor fellow expired on April 16th. Burrows had been in Timaru for the last four or five years, and not only had the reputation of being an excellent workman, but was a man much respected for his quiet and orderly behaviour. Burrows was a single man.
Funeral. On the 18th ult. there wended through the streets of Timaru to the southern cemetery the largest funeral procession ever I seen in Timaru. On that day James Burrows, who died in the hospital on Friday afternoon from the result of the accident on the 2nd April was buried. At about 2 o'clock in the afternoon the Odd Fellows and Foresters, numbering in all over one hundred men, with a few friends of the deceased, assembled at the hospital, and the coffin being placed on a carriage drawn by two horses, the procession was formed as follows: - In front a party of the Timaru Artillery Corps (of which deceased was a member), then the hearse, next the Odd Fellows (of which body deceased was also a member), then the Foresters, and lastly the friends of deceased. In this order the mournful cortege proceeded to St. Mary's Church. At the entrance into the church ground the proccesion halted, and the coffin was lifted off the carriage and carried by Messrs Simpson, Dixie, Chapman, Argyle, Cameron, and Morgan into the sacred building. The church was crowded to excess, and many persons were unable to obtain admittance. After the impressive burial service of the Church of England had been read by the Rev. G. Foster, the procession, in the same order as before, was formed outside, but greatly augmented by being joined by many persons at the church door. Including the Odd Fellows and Foresters there could not have been leas than 250 people following the hearse, and as they marched two and two the ground covered by the procession was very considerable. The funeral party left the Church at about 3 o'clock, and arrived at the cemetery a little before 4. Here, as far as the ground permitted, a large number of persons assembled round the grave to witness the last rites, and, when all had taken their places, the Rev. G. Foster read the portion of the burial service required by the Church. After which, by permission of Mr Foster, Mr Anderson, E.S. of the Odd Fellows, read the burial service of the Order. Before leaving the ground each Odd Fellow stepped up to the grave to take a last look at what contained the mortal remains of his comrade, and before retiring dropped on the coffin a sprig of thyme. After this the grave was closed in  and the funeral party returned to town.

Timaru Herald, 5 June 1869, Page 5 The Late Duncan Cameron.
Duncan Cameron the poor fellow who lost his life on May 24, by the capsizing of the lifeboat, was for ten years previous to his coming to Timaru now three years since— employed in the Taranaki surfboat service where he was coxswain, and for some time he held the lease of the service from the Government. As he has been in Timaru so he was in Taranaki, a man universally respected for his quiet unassuming manner, and for his constant readiness at the call of duty. Cameron leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss, and we observe, with pleasure, that a subscription has already been started and a considerable sum collected to be vested in trustees for their benefit. The Timaru Choral Society, and the Timaru Garrick Club, have each performed and devoted the proceeds of the entertainments to the same laudable purpose. Cameron, we are informed, leaves behind him no property, and so there is the more reason why the public should come forward liberally to support the widow and children of a brave man who died in the performance of his duty. Subscription lists are open at the Royal Hotel, Messrs Crawford and Green's, Turnbull's, and at the office of this paper. The body of this unfortunate man was found on Sunday last by a person named Marshall, who had been searching in the place where the body was last seen in the water. Marshall's attention was afterwards drawn to a heap of kelp and other rubbish which lay matted at the entrance of a hole or cave in the rocks in Caroline Bay, below the flag-staff. After clearing away some of the sea-weed he discovered the bare feet of a dead body. Finding he was unable to remove the body, which had been washed head foremost in a small hole about ten feet deep, and embedded in shingle, he obtained assistance. After considerable time had elapsed in trying to remove portions of the rock, a rope was attached to the legs and about twenty persons with some difficulty managed to drag the body out. The features were much bruised, and the body knocked about and covered with blood. On his person was found a pipe and an envelope containing some stamps. The funeral took place on Tuesday. A large number of the Timaru Artillery corps escorted the body on their gun carriage from the immigration barracks to St. Mary's Church. The body was then lifted off gun carriage and brought into the church by six members of the corps. A large number of people were present in the church when the impressive burial service of the Church of England was read by the Rev. G. Foster. After the portion of the service appointed to be read in the church was over, the procession was again formed, and wended its way through the streets of the town to the southern cemetery. Altogether fully two hundred people were present, sadly testifying to the very great respect deceased was held in. The procession was formed as follows: In front a firing party of twelve men of the Timaru Artillery Corps, then the gun carriage with the corpse, attended by six volunteers after which came the chief mourners, son and daughter of deceased, m a carriage with Capt. Crawford of the landing service. Following which was a body of the Temuka and Timaru volunteers -about twenty men. Then came the Odd Fellows (of which body deceased was a member) and Foresters, and lastly the friends of deceased. On arrival at the cemetery, the mourners duly assembled round the grave, and the Rev. G. Foster read the concluding portion of the burial service. After which, by permission of the clergyman, Mr Anderson, of the Odd Fellows, rend the service of the Order. Each Odd Fellow then defiled past the grave, and. taking a last look at what contained the mortal remains of their gallant comrade, threw a sprig of thyme on the coffin. The firing party then stepped forward, and the sad ceremony was brought to a close by three volleys being fired over the grave.

North Otago Times, 15 June 1869, Page 2
Timaru Herald,  3 July 1869, Page 5 Inquest
The unfortunate man, Peter Thoumine, accidentally shot at Otaio on the 31st ultimo, while pig-hunting, died on the 2nd June, from the effects of the wound. John Henry Wallace, a lad of 12 years and his brother, Frederick Wallace, was staying, living on the banks of the Makikihi with deceased. They went pig hunting.
Abraham Blackmore: I am an accommodation house-keeper.

Timaru Herald, 3 July 1869, Page 2
An inquest was held on Wednesday last at the Waihi, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., and a jury of fourteen, of whom Mr K. F. Gray was foreman, on the body of Elizabeth Honfall, who died very suddenly on Monday at her house near the Waihi Crossing. From the evidence taken at the inquest it appeared that deceased was taken ill about 12 o'clock on Sunday night, and her husband made for her as quickly as possible a drink of castor oil in warm water ; she then took some tea, and said, " I can't live, I am too short of breath," and asked for a doctor to be sent for. A messenger was at once despatched for Dr Caro, but the Doctor was not at home. The messenger was again despatched to Pleasant Valley to find Dr Caro, and Mrs Wilson, a neighbour, was also sent for. Deceased never spoke after Mrs Willson came, and she died about a quarter past three o'clock on Monday morning. Deceased had about three weeks previously complained of shortness of breath when returning after a short walk. Her husband then administered some brandy and she recovered. Deceased had taken a little castor oil and a few drops of pain-killer occasionally. Dr Caro arrived at the house about 4 o'clock. His evidence plainly proved that deceased had died from disease of the heart, he having made a post mortem examination. The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Timaru Herald, 30 October 1869, Page 3 [AJHR Oct. 20 Richard Stonyer]
Great uneasiness has been felt for the last few days on account of the disappearance of a man of the name of Stonyer, who was in the employ of Mr R. Wood, of the Temuka Mills, and who was on Wednesday entrusted with a horse and spring cart to bring home from Timaru. It appears that on that evening he arrived at the Arowhenua Hotel with the vehicle, but from some cause or other, returned towards Timaru, after which he came back to the hotel alone. Several gentlemen being about to cross the Opihi on horseback, he asked a seat behind one of the party, and, I am told, had mounted for the purpose of crossing; but upon seeing the state of the river, it was not judged prudent to take him over, and he was left behind. He then declared his intention of walking across lower down, where it would be shallow, and was actually seen to enter the water ; after which he was lost sight of, and, although a person on the opposite side, hearing cries for assistance, rode into the water to offer it, yet when he reached the spot whence the sounds proceeded, nothing was to be seen. The non arrival at home of Stonyer of course caused great alarm, and a search was at once instituted, both here and at Timaru. The horse and trap were found near Mr Nicholson's fence, but all search for the man was unavailing. Persons were engaged for some time in searching for him, but up to the present no light is thrown on his disappearance except by the finding of his hat. There is no room for any supposition but that he is drowned but the late heavy fall of snow on the hills has rendered the water so turbid that the bottom cannot be seen to ascertain the truth or otherwise of this supposition. He leaves a wife, but, I believe, no family.

Timaru Herald, 19 January 1870, Page 5
News was brought into Timaru on the 8th January that some Maoris had discovered, on the ninety mile beach, the evening previous, a body washed up by the sea at a spot a little south of the Opihi river. The police were communicated with, and Inspector Buckley, taking with him a two-horse trap, went to the locality. On examination there was no doubt that the body was that of Mr Smallwood, who was drowned in the late ill-fated boat accident. In the pockets were found three £1 notes, a £5 note, some silver, a watch, and a few small articles. On the Inspector arriving with his sad charge at the Timaru Hotel in the afternoon, two gentlemen (Messrs Tate and Watkins) were shown the watch, pipe, and a memorandum, which were all recognised by them as belonging to the deceased gentleman. The inquest was held on Sunday morning, at the Timaru Hotel, and Mr Flockton was chosen foreman. Two jurymen, Telford and Heffeman, were each fined 5s for being absent when their names were called. On the whole he thought it best to hold an inquest, on the grounds that possibly a jury of fourteen men might take a different view of the matter than the court of enquiry, presided over by only two men. The duty of the jury was simple enough — to ascertain whether death was caused by crime or otherwise. If not by crime they would have to return a verdict of accidental death. If caused by carelessness they would have to signify the same by a rider to their verdict. The cause of death could not be known by examination of the body, as it was so much decomposed. The jury could only arrive at the cause of death by the evidence of persons present at the time of the accident. If the jury thought it was necessary he would adjourn the inquest for the production of further evidence. In any case, he would point out that the body should be at once buried. The jury acted on the recommendation of the coroner as to the burying of the body, and a warrant was given accordingly by the Coroner. The first witness examined was Inspector Buckley, who deposed to finding and searching the body of deceased. He found a pocketbook in the pocket of the under coat which contained a £5 note, three £1 notes, half a sovereign, and two memorandums. There were two half crowns in the vest pocket, and in the outside pocket of the coat, a pipe with case, and a tobacco pouch. A pair of gloves and a handkerchief were also in another pocket in the coat. A watch, with a leather guard and a locket attached, was in a pocket in deceased's vest.
Edward Henry Tate, late manager of the Union Bank, deposed that deceased was a clerk in the employ of the Bank at Timaru, and that he saw him last alive on Saturday afternoon, the 18th ultimo. If the evidence of Mr G. B. Parker, who witnessed the accident, would satisfy the jury, he would adjourn the inquest, so that Mr Parker might be present. It would be best to adjourn the inquest, and get Mr Parker to give his evidence before the jury. The inquest was then adjourned until Wednesday (this day), to be held, at the Court House, Timaru. The funeral of the deceased took place on Sunday afternoon. At three o'clock a large number of his former friends assembled in front of the Timaru Hotel, when the coffin was at once carried to the hearse by some of his old companions, and the mournful procession wended its way to the cemetery. The funeral was one of the largest ever seen in Timaru, nearly a hundred persons following the remains to the grave. The Rev. G. Foster read the Church service. The coffin bore the inscription "Alfred Beaumont Smallwood, drowned off Timaru, December 18th, 1869, aged 23 years." Captain Scott was summoned. Wiriama Honere Kokoro was the first witness examined. Before his examination commenced the witness desired to know whether his expenses would be paid. The Coroner informed him he had no authority to pay him, and that witnesses in cases of inquest were required to give evidence without payment on being called upon. If witness refused his evidence he would have to commit him to prison. After some hesitation, witness gave his evidence as follows : Found a body on Friday lost at 8 p.m., about one mile south of Young's creek, 8 miles north of Timaru, on the sea beach at high water mark. Mr G. B. Parker said : Saw the deceased last alive on December 18th, about half past 5 p.m. I saw him from the deck of the Maori steamer disappear and sink. He was in a boat with me going to the steamer, and the boat was capsized by a sea when close to the steamer's side, and all in her were thrown into the water. The people on board the Maori did their best to save life. As far as my knowledge goes, there was no impropriety in the management of the boat, but perhaps it would have been more prudent if the boat had approached the steamer from the other side than the one she did. Captain Malcolm instructed the mate to go to the other side of the steamer, but the mate said the helm was hard over, and the boat would not answer. As far as I could judge I was 8 or 10 minutes in the water. I might have been less time. After I was on board Smallwood was visible several minutes. He had hold of a rope over the ship's side. By foreman : No one was guilty of culpable neglect or carelessness. Captain Scott : I was nautical assessor at the enquiry into the casualty which happened on the 18th December, whereby two lives were lost. Heard the evidence there taken, which clearly proved that the upsetting of the boat was purely accidental. The Coroner asked the jury if they desired any further evidence. The foreman, on the part of the jury, declared they were satisfied with the evidence taken. The jury then returned the following verdict with rider : — " That Alfred Beaumont Smallwood was accidentally drowned on the 18th December last, in the port of Timaru, by the capsizing of the boat in which he was in at the time." Rider — " That this jury would recommend that the Government be applied to for the expenses of the witness, Wiriama Henero Kokoro, as some recompense for the trouble taken by him in the discovery of the body, and as an encouragement for his honesty and energy."

Timaru Herald, 12 January 1870, Page 2
The funeral of the deceased took place on Sunday afternoon. At three o'clock a large number of his former friends assembled in front of the Timaru Hotel, when the coffin was at once carried to the hearse by some of his old companions, and the mournful procession wended its way to the cemetery. The funeral was one of the largest ever seen in Timaru, nearly a hundred persons following the remains to the grave. The Rev. G. Foster read the Church service. The coffin bore the inscription "Alfred Beaumont Smallwood, drowned off Timaru, December 18th, 1869, aged 23 years."

Star 22 July 1870, Page 3
The death of a man named Thomas Gregor occurred very suddenly last Saturday night at Mr Campbell's farm, Geraldine. On Monday an inquest was held before B. Woollcombe, Esq., coroner, at the Geraldine hotel, and a jury of fourteen, of which Mr Joseph Megson was chosen foreman. The principal witness examined was Alexander Patrick, who deposed as follows lam a labourer, I have seen the body of, deceased lying here. I identify it as the body of Thomas Gregor. On last Saturday night, between 10 and 11 o'clock, I was in the granary at Mr Campbell's. Deceased was there. We were playing cards. He rose off his seat to make his bed on the floor at the side of the room. He put one end of his blanket to the head of his bed, and be laid his head down. I told him to get up to make the bed, but he made no answer. I touched him but he did not stir. Another man, called Scott, lifted him up in his arms. He then threw his head back, but could not stand. I then went to look for a horse to send for the doctor. In an hour and a half or two hours Dr Fish came. When I returned from looking for a horse deceased was dead. I was about five or ten minutes absent. I have been working with deceased for about nine or ten weeks. During that time I considered be was i a healthy man. He did not complain of ill health on Saturday night." The evidence of Dr Fish, the medical gentleman examined, showed clearly that the deceased had died from disease of the heart, and the jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Timaru Herald, 15 October 1870, Page 2
An inquest was held on Wednesday by the coroner, B. Woollcombe Esq. and a jury of fourteen at Orari, on the body of William Stranks, whose sudden demise on the previous Monday it has been our sad lot to record. Mr Thomas Wadsworth was elected foreman of the jury. No further facts than those given in our last impression, were elicited by the jury, and the medical evidence was conclusive as to the cause of death — heart disease —and a verdict was returned accordingly. The funeral took place in Timaru yesterday. The hearse was followed to the grave by many of the deceased's personal friends, and by several members of the Timaru Manchester Unity of Oddfellows.

Timaru Herald, 29 October 1870, Page 2
An inquest was held, on Wednesday last, by Mr Woollcombe, coroner, on the body of Elizabeth Acroyd, who died suddenly on Monday morning. Dr Rayner gave evidence of internal disease, and a verdict of " Died from natural causes" was returned. — Yesterday an inquest was held at the Timaru Hotel on the body of James Bell, aged 60, who died on Wednesday at Pareora. A jury of fourteen was empanelled, of which Mr Cockroft was chosen foreman. After sitting a very short time a verdict was recorded, "That deceased had died from disease of the lungs. PM by Dr Fisher.

Timaru Herald, 4 March 1871, Page 2 No first name
A sad accident happened on Thursday last by which a child of Mr Campbell, farmer, near the Waihi Bush, lost its life. The child who was barely two years old, went outside the house where there was some water lying, but only one or two inches m depth. At the edge of the water the child must have slipped, and fallen face downwards, for, but a few minutes after the child was missed, the mother came to the spot and found the poor little thing dead.

Grey River Argus, 24 April 1871, Page 2
Timaru Herald, 29 April 1871, Page 2 Inquest
Timaru, April 23. Yesterday morning trooper Kennedy, whilst searching for the remains of the men supposed to have fallen overboard, when quarrelling and fighting, from the Ottawa's boat, off Timaru, on the 14th inst., picked up part of the backbone, thigh, and leg two miles north of Timaru. The boot is identified as belonging to the seaman George Webb. The bones were perfectly fleshless.

Colonist, 1 September 1871, Page 2
The Timaru Herald of August 5th has the following :—Our readers will learn with extreme regret that Mr. Paterson of Temuka, died on Thursday night last. The deceased gentlemen was a very old colonist, having come out to Nelson between thirty and forty years ago, and there for some time followed farming pursuits. About the year 1860 he settled at Temuka, and about the same time he took up a run in the Mackenzie country. Some two or three years after establishing himself at Temuka, Mr. Paterson received the appointment of Sheep Inspector for the southern district of Canterbury—an appointment for which few men were better fitted. As a public servant his loss will be much felt ; as a private gentleman he will be universally regretted.

Timaru Herald, 9 August 1871, Page 2
Tub Late Mr Andrew Paterson. — This gentleman, whose decease occurred on Friday last, was born m 1812 at Maxwellton, Galloway. He left Scotland in November, 1841, in the Martha Ridgeway, and formed one of the band of the earliest settlers in Nelson, arriving there in 1842. Mr Patterson's early training was that of a mechanical engineer, but we are not aware that he followed his profession m the colony. On his arrival in Nelson he took to farming, but, like many others in that line, was but moderately successful. He was in Nelson at the time of the Wairau massacres. In 1854 he left Nelson, for the Wairau, and in 1860 removed with his family to Canterbury, and bought land near to the Temuka township, on which he has since resided, except for in few months after his arrival, when he lived in Timaru. Two years previously he purchased a small run in the Mackenzie Country. From his great knowledge of stock — especially sheep — he was offered in the year 1863, the appointment of Sheep Inspector for the southern district, which he accepted. The deceased gentleman had through life been a man of very active habits, and the task of sheep inspection in a large district suited him exactly, and right well did he perform the work. His strict unbending sense of duty, and thorough knowledge of his work, has eradicated that pest of flock masters — scab. No matter, however important, or no amount of personal inconvenience, was ever allowed to stand for a moment, in the way of duty. Early and late, winter and summer, Mr Paterson was in the saddle, moving from station to station, and we should say that, until illness struck him down, in May last, a full week at home was somewhat a rare occurrence with him. The funeral took place yesterday, and was one of the largest attended that has ever taken place in South Canterbury. From far and near from Geraldine, from Kakahu, from Timaru, and from other districts the friends and acquaintances of the deceased came to pay the last tribute, of respect possible to offer. We cannot wonder that this respect was wide-spread as a public servant. Mr Paterson did deserved merit respect, and as a private gentleman he won affection and regard for the same sterling qualities which fitted him so pre-eminently to fulfil a public duly. A little before noon the friends of the family assembled at the late Mr Paterson's residence, and about 20 minutes after 12 o'clock the Rev. Geo. Barclay read the first part of the funeral service. The service over, the coffin was taken from the house and carried to the hearse waiting outside. The procession started at 12.45. Following the hearse was a carriage with Mr Paterson (son of deceased) and a few personal friends, then came marshalled in order from 15 to 20 carriages, followed by upwards of 60 horsemen. A few pedestrians brought up the rear, and in all there could not have been less than 140 people in the mournful cortege. At the junction of the bye with the main road, the procession was augmented by a few additional horsemen, &c, and then proceeded at foot's pace through Temuka (where the shops, &c, were closed) and on to the cemetery, situate more than a mile to the east of the township. The cemetery was reached about 2 o'clock. All then clustered round the newly dug grave, and the Rev Mr Barclay, after reading the 90th Psalm, gave a short and most impressive address. That over, the coffin was lowered into its resting place, and before the earth was shovelled in, the friends of the deceased came to have a last look on that which hid from view the remains of one much liked m life, and honored even in death. Mr Paterson leaves a widow and numerous family to mourn his loss, consisting of six daughters and two sons.

Timaru Herald, 16 September 1871, Page 2
Inquest.— An inquest was held at Waimate on Monday last, before the district coroner, Mr Woollcombe, on the body of, Sarah Miller Brown, wife of Mr James Brown, of Waimate, who died suddenly on the 9th instant: Mr S. W. Goldsmith was chosen foreman of the jury. From the evidence of Mr Drury, who made a post mortem examination of the body, it appeared the deceased had been suffering for a long time from an enlarged liver, and. that her death had been accelerated by having given birth to twin children. After hearing the evidence, the jury returned a verdict of "Died from natural causes."

Timaru Herald, 25 October 1871, Page 2
On Friday last the Rangitata, an inquest was held on the body of Mr Bethune, before B. Moorhouse, Esq., J.P., and a jury, of which Mr Taylor was chosen foremen. A verdict of "Accidentally drowned" was returned.

Timaru Herald, 21 October 1871, Page 2
With regret we learn that Mr John Bethune, manager of Mr J. C. Wilson's station, Upper Rangitata, was drowned on Wednesday last.

Daily Southern Cross, 25 November 1871, Page 3
Timaru — November 20 : A man named Patrick Mooney, from Dunedin, was killed this afternoon, on the railway works, by a fall of earth.

Timaru Herald, 31 January 1872, Page 2
Death at the Hospital. — : A young man named Robert Hay, who has been an inmate of the Timaru hospital for some months, died yesterday morning of consumption. He caught cold last harvest tying up wet sheaves, and probably neglected at the time to change his clothes.

Otago Witness, 13 April 1872, Page 14
A recent Timaru telegram mentioned the accidental Death of a man named Reilly, by falling under one of the surf boats while it was being launched. The Timaru Herald of Monday writes regarding the deceased as follows :— We have every reason to believe that the poor fellow Reilly, who was crushed to Death on Thursday last by the surf-boat, was the same individual who some years since, along with another man named Hartley, discovered gold in Otago. The deceased, in name, character, physical build, and by common report, was identified with the gold discoverer. For some little time after the discovery the two men kept it quiet, and amassed very considerable sums of money but through dissipation and recklessness, Reilly, at all events, parted with his money as soon as he made it. He then went to the West Coast diggings, where he was knocking about for some time, but not doing any good for himself or others. Reilly had only been a few weeks in Timaru when he met with his sudden and frightful Death.

Evening Post, 30 April 1872, Page 2
Timaru. 29th April Heavy floods have occurred in all the southern rivers, and road communication has been stopped for the last three days. The Opihi protective works have been washed away, and the farms on the South River flooded; stacks, &c. being washed away. The water was around Woodsworth's Accommodation House, and the River was half a mile wide on the Geraldine Road. The south approach to the Opihi Bridge and two pieces of the bridge itself, have been washed away. The suspension bridge across the Temuka has been destroyed by the gale. A butcher was washed out of his trap, on Saturday, when crossing, the Temuka. The horse was drowned and the trap smashed. A man, named George Bradford, was drowned on Sunday while attempting to cross the Temuka by the suspension bridge. A large part of the Temuka township was under water. A land slip has occurred in the railway cutting, undermining the Masonic Hall.

Daily Southern Cross, 1 May 1872, Page 3
Timaru. 2 p.m.
Heavy rains, followed by destructive floods, have been experienced since Saturday. The suspension bridge at Temuka, and the protective works and bridge at Opihi, have been destroyed. A man named George Bradford, while attempting to cross the suspension bridge, was drowned.

Timaru Herald, 8 May 1872, Page 5
An inquest was held at the Crown Hotel on Wednesday, May 1, on the body of George Bradford, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., coroner, and a jury of fourteen. Mr Rutland was chosen foreman, and the following evidence was taken : — James Bradford, sworn, deposed : I am a laborer at the Waitohi Flat. I have seen deceased, my son, George Bradford. James Mason, sworn : I am a messenger in the Telegraph-office. I was down on the banks of the Temuka river on Sunday last and saw deceased riding a horse into the river; it was about noon; the river was very high. I saw both man and horse swept down the river to a flax bush, end then lost sight of him. I then ran up to the town and gave information. James M'Rae, sworn: I am a carrier, living at Temuka. I went in company with Sergeant Quinn down to the Temuka river in search of the body of deceased. Suspected that the body was in the gravel pit. Loft the gravel pit and went across the river. On my return to the gravel pit the water was considerably lower. I went in, and found the body of deceased. I called out to the people on the bank, and with Sergeant Quinn's assistance, dragged the body out from under some gravel. Michael Quinn, sworn : I am a sergeant of police stationed at Arowhenua ; on Monday 29th April in company with last witness and others I was searching the Temuka river for the body of deceased; after being some hours searching the river, the last witness sang out "I have got him ;" I then went over to the gravel pit where the last witness was, and with his assistance took the body out of the pit ; I afterwards searched the deceased, and found 13s 6d, a pocket-book, two pocket handkerchiefs, a boot lace, and a tie, now produced ; I afterwards had the body removed to the Crown Hotel, where it now lies; the body was lying on its face with about 6 or 8 inches of sand over it ; the water washing partly over it ; After hearing the above evidence, the Jury returned the following verdict : — " That George Bradford was accidentally drowned while attempting to cross the Temuka river while in a fresh on the 2Sth April."

Evening Post, 21 November 1872, Page 2
Timaru. 21st November.
The poll for the election of a member to represent- the district of Geraldine in the Provincial Council was taken yesterday :—
Hayhurst, 88 ; Bullock, 47.
The body of the missing man Murdoch McLean, was found this morning, in the Washdyke Creek with a piece of flax (attached to which was a lump of iron) tied round his throat. An inquest will be held on the body today.

Daily Southern Cross, 22 November 1872, Page 3
Timaru. Thursday. Murdoch McLean was found this morning drowned in Washdyke Creek, having a piece of iron round his neck and a lot in his pocket. All his money, some £60, was gone. Inquest to be held to-day. The party searching for McLean this morning found at a creek near Mount Horrible, 16 miles south of Timaru, the body of another man, which had apparently been lying there three or four days.

Otago Witness, 30 November 1872, Page 14
Timaru, November 21st.  The body of Murdoch M'Lean, who had been missing for several days, was found this morning in the Washdyke Creek, with a heavy piece of iron round the neck. The deceased's hat was in his pocket, and all his money, amounting to some £60, was gone. An inquest will be held on the body to-morrow. A party engaged in searching for the body of McLean, this morning found in a creek near Mount Horrible, 16 miles from Timaru, the body of another man, which had apparently been lying there for four or five days. It has not yet been identified. November 23rd. An inquest held yesterday on the body of Murdoch M'Lean, who was found drowned in the Washdyke Creek. The jury returned an open verdict. There is little doubt that McLean met his death by his own act. It would appear that he attached a piece of pig iron, weighing 721bs, to his neck with flax, and waded with the iron upon his shoulder into the deep water where his body was found. An inquest was commenced to-day upon the body of the man found in a creek near Mount Horrible, and who was named George Blackall. The inquest was adjourned until Monday for further evidence. The evidence already taken tends to show that he was accidentally drowned. He had been in the water for a month. November 26th. At the instance of the jury, the body of George Blackall was exhumed, and a furthermost mortem examination made by Drs Hammond and McIntyre. It is rumoured that suspicious circumstances will be disclosed at the adjourned inquest tomorrow

MCLEAN, MURDOCK
Age at Death 25
Date of Interment 24/Nov/1872
Cemetery Timaru Cemetery
Section: GENERAL, Block B Plot 38
Clergy Name CHATAIGNER
No headstone.

Daily Southern Cross, 29 November 1872, page 3
Timaru. Thursday. At the inquest on the body of Blackall, the jury insisted on a fresh medical examination being held. This was accordingly made, and a bruise was disclosed on the skull sufficient to stun, which had been given before Death. The jury, after being locked up for some hours, returned a verdict of Willful murder against some person or persons unknown. The Coroner at first objected to receive the verdict, but ultimately recorded it.

Record Details Reference 26792
BLACKALL, GEORGE
Age at Death 0 (Unknown )
Date of Interment 24/Nov/1872
Cemetery Timaru Cemetery
Section FREE GROUND
Block C Plot 17

Timaru Herald, 30 December 1872, Page 2
Death by Drowning. — On Friday morning when the coach arrived at Temuka from Timaru, the driver announced that there was the body of a man lying in the river Opihi, about the site over which the bridge has lately been removed. Sergeant Eares, and Messrs Marshall, Rutland and Brewer started for the spot, (the river here is from ten to twelve feet deep), and after some time they succeeded in recovering the body, which proved to be that of Peter McNair— an old resident in the district — who had evidently walked into the water by the tracks on the sand. The body was conveyed to the Crown Hotel Temuka, where an inquest was held, on Saturday, before B Woollcombe; Esq., coroner, and a jury of fourteen, of which Mr A Wilson was chosen foreman the following evidence being adduced: — Martin Connelly sworn, deposed : I am a carrier living at Georgetown Arowhenua. I have seen the body, and recognise it as that of Peter McNair. At about half-past- seven on Friday morning I was going across the Opihi river ; as I passed by I noticed a dark object m the water where the bridge was removed from ; I went close to the edge of the water and satisfied myself as to what it was — viz, the body of a man — and went and reported to Mr Glasson, of the Arowhenua hotel. I went back again with F Leitchen and saw a hat floating in the water, and as the coach was passing at the time I told the driver. By a juryman :. I know the Main South road. The body was where the road formerly ran, the traffic is not that way now. The road leading to the hole in the river is partly fenced off. There is no fence across the road — there is one rail partly across the road, but there is room for a vehicle to pass. The road leaving Temuka and going south crossing the Opihi is carried over one branch by a bridge, then there is an embankment to the site of the bridge that has been removed. The embankment is made of shingle, at the end of this embankment there is a drop of four or five feet where the bridge - formerly stood, and within a few yards of it there is a hole with about eight feet of water and forty feet long in a line with the road and about twenty feet across. I found the body about ten feet from this side and about the middle of the water way. The water is not running in the hole, but there is a small stream running out. — W. Eares Sergeant of Police stationed at Temuka, deposed : I was informed by the driver of the mail coach on Friday morning, that there was the body of a man seen in the Opihi river. I proceeded to the place and saw the body of a man lying partly on his side in about ten or twelve feet of water and about ten feet from the edge. I got a drag and tied a fork to the handle of it and booked it into his clothes and pulled the body out of the water .with the assistance of Messrs Marshall and Brewer, and I brought it here. I searched the body and in the left hand coat pocket I found a pocket book, with a cheque in it for £2 10s and sundry papers, also 10s 6d in silver, and in vest pocket 6s were found. I saw the deceased the previous evening at about a quarter to nine o'clock — saw no more of him until I saw the body in the water. Have examined the body, saw no marks about it.— By juror: I saw foot track leading to the water.— J. M. Marten sworn, deposed : I am a storekeeper living at Temuka. I saw P McNair on Thursday evening at my store at about half past eight or a quarter to nine o'clock. He sold me a horse. I gave him a cheque for £2 10s and 17s in silver He told me he was going straight home, and that his son would call for the saddle and bridle in the morning. I did not see which way he went : he did not live across the Opihi. It was about nine o'clock when he left and was not very dark. After a few remarks from the Coroner, the following verdict was returned:— "Accidentally drowned in the Opihi river on the night of the 26th December." The following rider was appended to the verdict. — "That the jury are unanimously of opinion that a fence should be erected to protect the traffic now carried on across the Opihi river bed.— Signed. A. Wilson, foreman of jury."

Timaru Herald, 13 January 1873, Page 4
On December 27, when the coach arrived at Temuka from Timaru, the driver announced that there was the body of a man lying in the river Opihi, about the site over which the bridge has lately been removed. Sergeant Eares, and Messrs Marshall, Rutland and _rewer started for the spot, the river here is from ten to twelve feet deep), and after some time they succeeded  in recovering the body, which proved to be that of Peter McNair —an old resident m the district—who had evidently walked into the water by the tracks on the sand. The body was conveyed to the Crown Hotel Temuka, where an inquest was held, on the following day before B. Woollcombe, Esq. coroner, and a jury of fourteen, of which Mr A Wilson was chosen foreman the following evidence being adduced: — Martin Connelly sworn, deposed : I am a carrier living at Georgetown, Arowhenua. I have seen the body, and recognise it as that of Peter McNair. At about half-past seven on Friday morning I was going across the Opihi river ; as I passed by I noticed a dark object in the water where the bridge was removed from I went close to the edge of the water and satisfied myself as to what it was — viz, the body of a man — and went and reported to Mr Glasson, of the Arowhenua hotel...J. M. Marten sworn, deposed : I am a storekeeper living at Temuka. I saw P McNair on Thursday evening at my store at about half past eight or a quarter to nine o'clock. He sold me a horse. I gave him a cheque for £2 10s and 17s in silver He told me he was going straight home, and that his son would call for the saddle and bridle in the morning. ... After a few remarks from the Coroner, the following verdict was returned: — "Accidentally drowned in the Opihi river on the night of the 26th December." The following rider was appended to the verdict. — "That the jury are unanimously of opinion that a fence should be erected to protect the traffic now carried on across the Opihi river bed. — Signed, A. Wilson, foreman of jury."

Timaru Herald, 7 February 1873, Page 3
An inquest was held at Royal Hotel, Temuka yesterday on the body of John Keeling, before W. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of fourteen, Mr A. Wilson being elected foreman. Fred. Stanley, sworn. deposed as follows : I am a labourer, residing at Kakahu. Deceased was working for Mr Evans, and with me. He slept in the same room with me at Mr Evans', and was at work with me up to eight o'clock on Tuesday evening last. He came home with me and had tea. He had a very bad cough previous to the night he died. I went to see him in bed, and he was asleep. On the following morning, at about four, I awoke and called to deceased, but received no answer. I then told John Evans that John Keeling was dead. The room was then closed up until such time as Sergeant Kennedy took charge of the body. A few days before his death he said that he had been under Dr Fish's hands. The night before his death he took a pill which he said was prescribed for him by Dr Fish. James Kennedy, police, constable stationed at Temuka. There appeared no marks of violence on the body. I searched his clothing and found nothing; but in a bag hanging over his head I found a small bag (produced) which contained five one-pound notes, 2s in silver, and a Post Office Savings' Bank deposit receipt for £17, at the Timaru Post-office ; a depositor's book ; a licence to occupy twenty- three acres of land, and other documents ; also a letter from his sister, from Burton-on-Trent, and a lot of clothing. I had the body removed to the Crown Hotel, Temuka. Thos. Ottery Rayner, sworn : I a medical practitioner residing at Temuka. The liver appeared to be quite healthy. I therefore came to the conclusion that the man died from pulmonary apoplexy. He had evidently been dead for some time, and had had dropsy of the chest. I believe that he was suffering from disease of the lungs, or pulmonary consumption. Verdict: Died from the visitation of God.  

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 22 March 1873, Page 3
An inquest was held in the Timaru district last November on the body of a man named George Blackall, which had been found in a ditch, and the verdict was that of " Murder" against Borne person or persons unknown. The recent finding of a pocketbook and papers which belonged to the deceased, shows that his death was most probably caused by suicide.

Otago Witness, 19 July 1873, Page 13
Timaru, July 10th. At the criminal sittings of the District Court, Robert Waugh, charged with stealing coins from the foundation stone of the Masonic Hall, was discharged.

Timaru Herald, 30 July 1873, Page 2
An inquest was held on Saturday last, before H. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, at the Resident Magistrates Court, Timaru, on the body of Edward James Gould, a boy nearly nine years of age, when met with his death by falling from a horse and being dragged. The following persons composed the jury : — Messrs Webster, .Sutherland, Pountly, Derby, Kennedy, F. Healey, V. Healey, Coker, Sullivan, Graham, Martin, Denoon, Hatfield and S. Smith. Mr Webster was chosen foreman. Edward James Gould, sworn, said : I am a farmer living at the Waterfalls, Opihi. On the 23rd of July, I, my son and Mrs Gould had a horse a piece, dragging logs out of a bush, situated about a mile from my house. The horse the boy was working was an entire, which he was riding. The horse was attached to a stretcher by chains, and the centre of the stretcher was fastened to a log. I was close behind the boy, and told him to stop the horse and give him a drink at a creek. Close to the creek the log caught against a rock and the stretcher broke in the middle.... The Coroner having summed up, the jury proceeded to consider their verdict, and after a short deliberation returned one of " Accidental Death," with a rider to the effect that the father should not have allowed such a young child to ride an entire horse at such dangerous work. George Green, Moses White and Thomas Chapman, who were summoned as jurors, and who failed to put in an appearance, were each lined 10s.

Timaru Herald, 27 August 1873, Page 8
An inquest was held at the Resident Magistrate's Court, Waimate, on the 9th of August, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., District Coroner, touching the death of Ellen McIlwraith, a widow. Mr S. Goldsmith was chosen foreman of the jury.
Margaret Vergers, sworn, deposed : I am a married woman living at Waimate.
George Dixon Drury, deposed : I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, living at Waimate. Strychnine would produce the symptoms I have described. About a quarter of a grain would destroy a human being. I should say a grain would cover a sixpence. Spasms generally commence about half an hour after taking strychnine, but it is very variable.
Robert Smith, deposed : I am a laborer at Waimate. I
The jury returned the following verdict : — " That the deceased, Mrs Ellen McIlwraith, to the jurors known, came by her death by poison administered by her own hand during a fit of temporary insanity."

Timaru Herald, 3 September 1873, Page 3
An inquest was held on Saturday last at the Tekapo Ferry accommodation house, by Melville Gray, Esq., J.P., and an ordinary jury, on the body of James Crawford, which was found m the Tasman river-bed on the 23rd ult. The first witness examined was — John Rainbow Stansell, publican, Burkes Pass, who deposed : I identify the body as that of James Crawford, first saw the dead body on the 23rd inst ; he was lying within a few yards of the Tasman river, flat on his back on the shingle, with the head m the natural position, with three shirts on, no other clothing, and covered with a blanket. His legs appeared clean as if he had walked through water before. He left there on Saturday 9th ult. He had been there between a fortnight and three weeks. He was in apparent good health then. He had been drinking, but was never incapable. He showed no signs then of suffering from the effects of drink. His possessions were a bay horse, lately belonging to James Sims, shepherd, saddle and bridle, and a swag. John Keay, shepherd, Glentanner station, Mackenzie Country, being sworn, said : I identify the body as that of James Crawford. I first saw him on Wednesday August 13, he had come to Glentanner station on the 12th, engaged by Mr Dark as bullock driver. He appeared m good sense on that day and evening, but at night before going to bed and afterwards he talked in a wild, excited manner. He remained walking about on the 14th, and did not work ; he seemed nervous, shaky, and unfit for work. After a good deal of persuasion we got him back to the hut and put to bed ; but when he was there a few minutes he jumped up again and said he would go and sleep m the woolshed, as he feared having the horrors, and did not wish to disturb us. We did not follow him, and that was the last I saw of him alive. We went out to look for him next morning. There was no snow on the ground, we continued searching and found him on the 23rd dead in Tasman riverbed, about seven miles from the station. He was lying straight on his back,- with two shirts and one flannel on;  He owned a bay gelding, saddle and bridle when he came, which are there still. James Walker, sworn, said: I am a shepherd on Glentanner station. I first saw him when he came to the Glentanner station on the 12th August, when he appeared sensible. William Edgar Billens, carpenter at the Burkes Pass, said: I last saw him on Saturday the 9th inst. leaving Burkes Pass. I knew him there about three weeks, he was staying m the same house all the time, and sleeping in the same room until last week. John McGilivray, sworn, said: I am a shepherd on Castle Hall station. I saw him last alive on Tuesday the 12th inst. I came to the Burkes Pass accommodation house on Friday the 8th inst., left with deceased on the 9th, and went to the Tekapo Station ; on the 10th from Tekapo station to Tekapo ferry ; on the 11th from Tekapo ferry to Braemar, and on the morning of the 12th I saw him across Tasman river, on his way to Glentanner station. When we travelled he seemed to be in his proper senses, and did not seem to have any effects of drink about him. I slept in the same room on two nights at Tekapo station and Braemar, and he did not disturb me at all at night. The jury returned the following verdict :— I "That the said James Crawford on a certain day unknown, between the fourteenth and twenty-third days of August, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three, by and in consequence of excessive drinking, (and not from hurt, injury, or violence, done or committed, to the said James Crawford, to the knowledge of the said jurors) died.

Star, 4 September 1873, Page 2
An inquest was held on Saturday last at the Tekapo Ferry Accommodation House, by Melville Gray, Esq., J.P., and an ordinary jury, on the body of James Crawford, which was found in the Tasman river-bed on the 23rd ult. The following is the evidence of the principal, witness : — John Rainbow Stansell, publican, Burke's Pass, who deposed: I identify the body as that of James Crawford; first saw dead body on the 23rd inst. he was lying within a few yards of the Tasman river, flat on his back on the shingle, with head in the natural position, with three shirts on, no other clothing, and covered with a blanket. There was no evidence of water having been over him. His legs appeared clean as if he had waded through water before. He was staying at my house before his death. He left there on Saturday, 9th ult. He had been there between a fortnight and three weeks. He was in apparent good health then. He had been drinking, but never incapable. His possessions were a bay horse lately belonging James Sims, shepherd — saddle and bridle, and a swag. After hearing the evidence, of John Keay, and James Walker, shepherds at Glentanner Station, William Edgar Billens, carpenter, Burkes Pass, and James M'Gilivray, shepherd, Castle Hill Station, the jury returned the following verdict— "That the said James Crawford, on a certain day unknown, between the 14th and 23rd days of August 1873, by and in consequence of excessive drinking (and not from hurt, injury, or violence, done or committed to the said James Crawford, to the knowledge of the said jurors), died,"

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 9 September 1873, Page 3
Sad Death. — Some few weeks since, says the Timaru Herald of September 1, Mr. Dark, of Messrs. Dark Bros., Station holders, Mackenzie country, engaged a man named James Crawford as a bullock driver. The man was picked up in Burkes Pass, and told to go to the station. It appears he had been drinking heavily at the Burkes Pass Accommodation-house, and after "knocking down" a considerable amount of money, left in a state bordering upon delirium tremens. The unfortunate man, on his way to Messrs. Dark's station, called in at a hut on Mr. Cox's run, and while there, it is said, he indulged in drinking kerosene. However, he reached Messrs. Dark's, and was supposed to have got hold of some more of this pleasant liquor. The man was missed, and after a four days' search instituted by the hands at Messrs. Dark's neighbouring stations, his body was found in the river-bed. 

Timaru Herald, 22 September 1873, Page 3
An inquest was held before B. Woollcombe Esq., District Coroner, on the 18th met., at the Geraldine hotel on the body of Annie McKenzie, a child of Mr James McKenzie, aged seven years. Mr W. H. Grimmer was elected foreman of a jury of fourteen. The following are the depositions : — . ' Jessie McKenzie : I am a married woman living with my husband James McKenzie at the Waihi bush. I identify the body of Annie McKenzie as my daughter. She was seven years old. At 9 o'clock on Monday morning the 15th inst, I last saw her alive, she was then going from home to school. That evening Mr Flatman and others brought the body of my daughter into the house, she was then quite dead. ...
Duncan McKenzie said : I am the son of James McKenzie. I am eight years old. I live with my father at the Waihi bush. On Monday last, the 15th of September, I went to school with my sister, Annie. I left school that evening and met my sister at Stephen Taylor's. We then went towards home together, and had to cross the Waihi river at Mr Stonehouse's house, on a tree laid across with one hand rail of sawn batten nailed to spine uprights. I crossed the river first, my sister followed, and came up to me ; that was the last I saw of her alive. I was then about a yard from the river. She did not speak to me. James Guilford said : I am a sawyer, living at Geraldine. On Wednesday last I went to the Waihi bush. I was at Stephen Taylor's house between four and five o clock, in the afternoon. Joseph Drain, the younger, came there and said that a little girl, daughter of McKenzie, was supposed to have gone down the river. The following verdict was arrived at after a short deliberation. " That Annie McKenzie was found drowned on Monday, September 15, in the Waihi river. The jury find no marks of violence, only what would be caused by the body being washed down the river."

Timaru Herald, 1 October 1873, Page 4
An inquest was held at the Geraldine Hotel, Geraldine. The following verdict was returned — "That Owen Williams came by his death from mortal injuries received from falling off the terrace into the Waihi river bed where he was found dead. The first witness examined was — William Palmer, who being sworn, said : I am a farmer living near Geraldine.
Michael Keavey, sworn, said: I am a laborer living at Waihi Bush. I recollect Thursday last. I was on the racecourse till close on dark. From there I went to Raukupuka with Owen Williams. The men would not let me in, and beat me, I was then insensible. When I came to myself I found myself close to the creek near the station. This was at break of day. Owen Williams was not there with me. I never had any words with deceased.
Michael Keavey, sworn, said: I am a laborer living at Waihi Bush.
James Kennedy, sworn, said : I am constable of police stationed at Arowhenua.
James Patrick Kalagher, sworn, said : I am a labourer living at Geraldine. I identify the body lying here as the body of Owen Williams. I was walking down the Waihi river bed, close to Geraldine yesterday morning, looking for turkey's eggs, when I saw deceased lying with his legs up the terrace, face downwards, the face was in the sand, the right hand was doubled, out in the sand, the left hand was under his belly. I walked up to him, and satisfied myself that he was dead.

Timaru Herald, 29 December 1873, Page 3
Sudden Death. — A man named William Nelson, aged fifty-one, a wool sorter, was taken suddenly ill on Thursday evening last at, six o'clock at Young's Clarendon hotel, Waihi Crossing, and immediately afterwards expired. An inquest was held on the body before B Woollcombe, Esq., district coroner, on Saturday last, by a jury of fourteen, of whom Mr Alexander Wilson was chosen foreman. After hearing the evidence of Dr Rayner, who made a post mortem examination, the jury returned a verdict of died from disease of the heart.

Timaru Herald, 13 February 1874, Page 1
An inquest was held at the Makikihi hotel on February 4th, on the body of George Bowstead, before B. Woolcombe, Esq. coroner, and a jury of fourteen, consisting of — Samuel Derrick, Matthew Smith, John Macnamara, Michael Quirk, Edmund Hussey, Alexander Bennett, William Hall, Henry Loder, Thomas Neal, Nicholas Quinn, William McNott, Patrick Gallagher, Charles Clarke, and James Dickson, of whom Charles Clarke was chosen foreman. The following is the evidence : — Ambrose Jackson, being sworn, said : I am a bushman living at the head of the Makikihi river. I have seen the body of deceased lying here. I identify it as the body of George Bowstead. He was working for me, and had done so for twenty months. At about midnight on Monday night last I was called from Marshall's, at the Otaio. I went direct home. I reached home at about three o'clock on Tuesday morning. I then saw deceased lying dead on the ground in my garden. He was lying on his back, with a gun by his side. The deceased was in the same state as now, with a hole in the temple. His hat was about a yard beyond the head, with a hole through the hat. The hat produced is the one. I know it to be the hat of deceased. The gun produced is the one I found lying by deceased. There was part of a cap in the hammer when I found it, and the boot lace was on the trigger as at present. Deceased had been away from Sunday week last, till last Thursday at about a quarter to eight. Deceased left Martin's on Sunday week last to go home, at about noon. I saw him next last Thursday at dinner time, at Hunter's Hill, about four miles from my house. I never saw him after that till I saw him dead. Deceased appeared shaky from the effects of drink. On Thursday he said he had spent all his money. I told him to go home and be quiet. By jury : The gun was about two feet from the body, with the muzzle towards the head.
Luer Krenzel, said : I am a farmer living with Quinn at the Makikihi. At five minutes to seven o'clock last Monday evening, I was carting timber out of the bush at the head of the Makikihi river. I heard the wife of last witness call to her boy George to come up, and said, " I shall go up to Quinn's cutting." I went up Quinn's cutting with the dray and horses. As I got there, I saw deceased standing with a gun in his hand. I sung out to him, " George, George." He gave no answer. He waved one of his hands, and I saw him lower his head forward and lift one of his feet ; and then I heard the report of a gun, and he fell right down, and did not move after. I went up to him ; he was lying a little on one side, and the gun was lying about a yard on the right side of the body I put two bags over the body, then I rode one of the horses I had in the dray to the Makikihi, got another horse there, and rode to the Waimate and reported it to the police. Cross-examined : The gun belongs to French Charlie. Last Thursday deceased told me he had spent £21 10s ; he said he had been at the Makikihi hotel. By foreman : Deceased told me that he had been to Waimate in a trap with Mr Murphy, the landlord here, to change the cheque. By a juror : Deceased said he had spent his money from Sunday to Thursday. The boy George Jackson came to me on Monday evening, and said George (the deceased) wanted to see me. Charles Foble, sworn, said : I am a bushman, living at Low Quarry bush, at the head of the Makikihi. I was at Mr Quinn's on Monday last. On Wednesday last deceased said to me that he was going to leave to go up the country. I advised him to stay where he was. He said it was too close to a public house. He said he had spent £22 at the Makikihi public house, and that he was in debt to the landlord 10s besides. He said he had been at the Makikihi hotel from Sunday evening till Wednesday morning, and that he went to Waimate one day to draw some money from Manchester. The gun produced belongs to me. I used the gun about a week before, and kept it over the fireplace in my house. It was there when I last saw it. It was not loaded, By a juror : Deceased used the gun twice before to shoot kakas. The Coroner, addressing the jury, said that they must find a verdict in accordance with the evidence which they had heard ; there was nothing m that to lead to the belief that deceased was in an unsound state of mind when he came by his death ; he (the Coroner) would not say that he was not m an unsound state of mind, but the jury had only the evidence to go upon, and that gave them no information on the subject. The jury, after some consideration, returned the following verdict : — " George Bowstead shot himself, in a sound state of mind, on the 2nd day of February, 1874."

Timaru Herald, 13 February 1874, Page 1
Diphtheria. — This disease is very prevalent just now in Timaru. Several children are down with the complaint, and in five cases cases has already proved fatal. It would be well if Mr Greathead's remedy for the disease were tried, which is said to be a certain cure. The following is the recipe:— Let the common strong sulphuric acid, or oil of vitriol be used. ; One drop let fall from an ordinary small medicine phial, into one ; tablespoonful of water, and sweetened with, a few grains of sugar, may be taken by an infant. Let an additional dose of the same, both acid and water, be added for each year of age up to four; then for every three years afterwards till a maximum dose of nine or ten drops an equal number of tablespoonfuls of water is reached. This may be repeated every four hours.

Timaru Herald, 1 June 1874, Page 4 INQUEST.
At the Timaru Hospital on Saturday last, at 10 a.m., before H. Belfield, Esq., J.P., Acting- Coronor, an inquest was held on the body of Laurenze Peterson, who was accidentally killed on Thursday last. The following were the jury : — Peter W. Hutton (foreman), Richard Thompson, William Redfern, Thomas Price, Joseph Spruce, George Williams, Robert Stansell, Andrew Bower, John Duff, Joseph Bennett, William Healey, Thomas Machin, William Wilson, and William Ward. After the jury had viewed the body the following evidence was taken : — Edmund Cotter : I am keeper of the gaol, Timaru. Last Thursday afternoon, between 3 and 4 o'clock, I was on my way from the gaol to North-street. At the corner of one of the streets, I saw a team of horses attached to a cart bolt. The deceased was with the horses and trying to stop then. After the horses had gone about twenty-five yards the man fell. I cannot say whether deceased was struck by the shafts, or whether he slipped. The team still went forward, and I ran up to the man. Deceased was lying on his face, and with the assistance of a young man I turned him on his back. I took him to a cottage near. He was insensible, and was groaning, I went for a doctor, but could not find one. I met a constable, and he got a conveyance and took the deceased to the hospital. Alexander Spence : I am a laborer living in Timaru. On Thursday I was going up to Mr Robert's house. By foreman : The blinkers were off the shaft horse. By juror : I did not observe whether there was a brake on the dray. Timothy Quinn : I am a laborer living in Timaru. I was standing by a team of horses alongside Martin's fence in the town on Thursday last. On the dray at the time was a chaffcutter and a bag of flour. By foreman : The blinkers were off the horses, deceased being in the act of feeding them. The dray was a two wheeled dray. I have known the same horses to bolt before. They belong to my master, Hugh Sutherland. To the best of my belief deceased was only engaged to drive the dray on the day of the accident. It is usual always to take the horses out of the dray at feeding time. I presume that the reason it was not done on Thursday was that deceased did not know the rule. By juror : Deceased was quite sober. There was a brake on the dray. Patrick McIntyre : I am a medical practitioner residing at Timaru. On Thursday afternoon last I was sent for to attend a man at the hospital. I found him in bed prostrate, and evidently suffering great pain from injuries in the back and bowels. The left shoulder blade was fractured. Deceased lived about five hours after being brought in. The injuries were from a loaded dray or by some great weight passing over the body. The man died from internal injury. He was sensible. The jury arrived at the following verdict: — " That the deceased Laurenze Peterson came to his death through a loaded dray passing over his body while he was in charge of the same, through the horses taking fright and bolting." Charles Thompson, Thomas Webster Fyfe, and Samuel Hadfield, who were summoned as jurymen were not in attendance when called upon, and were each fined 5s.

The Pall Mall Gazette (London, England), Friday, June 12, 1874; Birth
Campbell, wife of the Rev. W.R., at Timaru, Canterbury, New Zealand, April 3 (stillborn)

Timaru Herald, 24 June 1874, Page 3
Robert Quick, alias Patrick Quinn, was charged with the manslaughter of Christina Ellis. Mr Orrasby appeared for the prisoner. Alfred Dorn : I am a constable of police stationed at Timaru. From instructions received I went to Temuka yesterday. Samuel Williams accompanied me, and pointed out prisoner to me. From information received from Williams and other sources, I arrested prisoner. He told me his name was Robert Quick, but on searching him I found papers directed Patrick Quinn, and he then said that he went by the name of Quinn. It was after I had charged prisoner that he said he had been in the house on Tuesday. He said he had been staying at Driscoll's, he believed, eight days while in Timaru, and afterwards said that he arrived in Timaru on the Monday previous to the 15th. I knew the deceased went by the name of Christie Gordon, as well as Christina Ellis.
The examination of Anthony Dorn, constable of police, was continued. He said that when he arrested prisoner he had with him two cases of jewellery, and at his boarding house he found two other cases and a diary, the last entry m the latter being dated the 13th of Juno. The articles he referred to were thence now produced in Court. Prisoner had owned that the articles were his property. After the evidence of Samuel Green had been taken, who said that deceased also told him that the man who had beaten her was a hawker of jewellery, the man she had pointed out to Williams, Mrs Fisher was examined, and repeated the evidence given by her at the inquest, Thomas Driscoll, landlord of the Hibernian Hotel, said that prisoner, who employed himself with watch repairing and travelling with jewellery, came to his house on or about the Ist of May, and stayed for about three weeks, when he went away. He believed he returned to the house on a Monday, three weeks ago, and left on the next day week—Tuesday before last. Ho was at the hotel on the Monday before he went away. His Worship committed him to take his trial at the next sitting of the Supreme Court at Christchurch.

Timaru Herald, 26 June 1874, Page 3
The Missing Man Treanor. — Yesterday morning, a little boy of Mr John Irwins was going down to the creek, bounding his father's land near Temuka, same distance from the house, he saw something floating on the water, and immediately informed his mother, who perceived that it was a human body. The police were at once communicated with, and Sergeant Scott proceeded to the spot, and with great difficulty succeeded m getting the body out of the water. The body proved to be that of the missing man, John Treanor, who was missed ten days since. The body was conveyed to the Crown Hotel, were an inquest will be held at 11 o'clock, this morning, before B. Woolcombe, Esq., Coroner. Resident Magistrate's Court, Temuka.

Timaru Herald, 29 June 1874, Page 4 Missing man
At the Crown Hotel, Temuka, on Friday last an inquest was held on the body of John Treanor before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coronor, and the following jury : — A. Dyson, A. Rayner, S. Edwards, J. Wareing, J. Burrows, J. Chapman, J. Velvin; J. Paterson, J. W. Fyfe, R. Lloyd, W. Coulman, J. Mendelson, F. Arenas, and G.H. Thompson. Mr J. Mendelson was chosen foreman. R. Orton, farmer at the Point, said : I have seen the body lying here, and recognise it as that of John Treanor, of Kakahu flat. On Tuesday, June 9th, was the last time I saw him alive. He had met with an accident with his waggon. One of the shaft horses was under the waggon injured. Some parties were with him, and called to me to stop my waggon. I did so, and went to see what was the matter. I then took two of my leaders off and helped to extricate the horse from the waggon. As soon as the horse was extricated I called to Treanor to come and take his horse. I left him holding his horse. After I got on to my waggon seat, I saw that deceased had let go of the horse again. It was a very dark, night. The horses that had been loosed from the waggon I heard crossing the Opihi river, going north. The injured horse was standing in between my waggon and Treanor's by itself. I have not seen Treanor alive since. I consider he had had drink, and was he not quite sober. Cross-examined by foreman : The accident happened just at the turn after going off the Opihi bridge. When deceased let the horse go, he went away towards the river. I supposed he went after the loose horses. Deceased was going north.
W. Frew, a farmer living at Arowhenua,
Hurry Erskine, a groom at Glasson's hotel
Mary Jane Irwin : I am a married woman residing at Temuka.
Sergeant Scott, sergeant of police at Temuka
There were no bruises or cuts on his head, nor marks on the body. I found in one of his trousers pockets a pocket book containing 2s and 10 waybills, and 2s in the other pocket. I had the body removed to the Crown hotel, where it now lies. By the Foreman : The spot where the body was found is about three or four chains from Irwin's house. I have no idea how Treanor got there. Deceased might have been trying to cross the creek towards Irwin's house. I doubt if anyone, even a good swimmer, could make his way out of the creek at night, the banks being steep and a great deal of cress and weeds in it. The jury returned the following verdict : — "That John Treanor was found drowned on the 25th day of June, 1874, in John Irwin' creek, near Temuka, and that no marks of violence appear on his body."

Timaru Herald, 13 July 1874, Page 3
CHILD BURNT TO DEATH. At the Hibernian Hotel, on Saturday last, an inquest was held on the body of Elizabeth Lawry (about 5 years). before B. Woollcombe, Esq., coroner, and the following jury: — Messrs Richard Turnbull (foreman), W. G. Allen, Joseph Sinder, W. Sutherland, Joseph Dockerill, Samuel Hunter, Frank Davenport, Daniel Lannigan, John Hamilton, J. R. Stansell, Frank Allan, James McKay, Samuel Harding, and Thomas Maloney. P. McIntyre: I am a duly qualified medical practitioner at Timaru.
Peter Pender: I am Inspector of Police.
Sarah Telford : I am a married woman living in Sandie Town; I live on the next section to Lawry's. Verdict, and after about half-an-hour's deliberation, returned the following : — That deceased, Elizabeth Lawry, came to her death by injuries caused by accidental burning." Rider—" From evidence adduced the jury are of opinion that the children of William Lawry have been much neglected, and recommend the removal of the remaining children to the Orphan Asylum." Donald Murray, who was summoned as a Juror and who was not in attendance when his name was called, was fined 10s.

Timaru Herald, 10 July 1874, Page 4
At the Royal Hotel on Wednesday last, an inquest was held on the body of Eliza Catterick alias Eliza Shipley, before B Woollcombe, Esq. Coroner, and the following jury: B. Hibbard, (foreman), Richard Langdown, A. G. Stone, W. McKenzie, John Reilly, Patrick Clancy, Walter Townsend, T. G. Rowley, H. Durand, G.C. Williams, Francis Hobbs, Charles Green, A. J. H. Bowers, and Robert Morgan. James William Catterick said : I am not quite fourteen yean old. I identify it as the body of my mother. Her proper name is Eliza Catterick, she has been known by the name of Shipley. On Monday last deceased and myself and my brother went on board the Beautiful Star, steamer, to go as passengers to Dunedin. The same evening we left Lyttelton. At about twenty minutes past ten o'clock on Tuesday evening she was in bed, and asked the second steward of the steamer for a drink, as it would save her life. The second steward gave her some brandy and water. She drank it, and asked for a little more put on by her side. I then went to bed in the bed above where deceased was lying! I went to sleep, and when I got up at a quarter-past seven o'clock this morning, the second mate came in and said deceased was dead. Apparently, deceased had been drinking sufficiently to bring on these fits. The jury returned the following verdict: — "Eliza Catterick alias Eliza Shipley, died an epileptic fit, brought on by excessive drinking."

Timaru Herald, 26 August 1874, Page 3
"We have received from a resident at Pleasant Point parts of a human skull, which were found on Saturday last by some workmen engaged on the embankment approach to the Te Nga Wai bridge. They at first supposed the bones to be those of a sheep's head, and threw them into a dray with the gravel which they were removing. On emptying the dray however, our correspondent, who was present, recognised the fragments of decaying humanity, and forwarded them to us for examination. Not having the advantage of being able to consult any Ph.D.,F.R.S.,M.R.I.B.X.Y.Z., or other infallible authority, we have looked carefully at the relics ourselves, and have arrived at the following conclusions, in stating which, however, we are quite prepared to receive the correction, assistance or advice of individual savants, or scientific bodies, whether in the colonies or the older European seats of learning. We find that the bones before us consist of the Frontal, Parietal, Malar, Sphenoid, and Superior Maxillary bones of a senile female adult, whose death occurred at a very distant date, probably more than a century ago. The cranium is elliptical, and indicates by its shape, and the paucity of the capacity of the cranial cavity m relation to the extent of facial development, an inferior type of the human family. We are therefore justified m supposing that this skull is that of a native of New Zealand, or of one of the yet lower race which inhabited these islands at an anterior period of their history. The fact that all the incisor, canine and premolar teeth are missing from the maxillary, which still, however, retains two well-preserved, posteriorly situated, multicuspid molars, would seem to point to a prehistoric origin, and to suggest as a cause of the imperfect dentition, the life-long practice of picking the bones of Dinornis Gigantea...

Timaru Herald, 16 September 1874, Page 4
At Geraldine, on Monday last, an inquest was held before B.Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, on the body of Charles Smith. The inquest was hold at the late residence of the deceased. The following were the jury: Samuel Mills (foreman), Edmund Perry, Thomas Moore, John Woodman, William Booker, Joseph Barrett, John Collins, William Colbert, George Slapleton, Charles Sconiss, Valentine Kenyon, Thomas Jenkinson, Martin McDermott, and William Earl. George Epworth, sworn, said : I am a carpenter, living at, Geraldine. I have seen the body of deceased. I identify it as the body of Charles Smith. On Friday evening last, at about 6 o'clock, I saw deceased mount a horse at Mr Brown's, in Geraldine. I supposed he was going home to his house. When I saw him he was in good health. Edward Prouting, sworn, said : I am a carpenter, living at Geraldine. I have seen the body of deceased lying here. I identify it as the body of Smith. On Friday evening last, at about half-past 6 o'clock, I saw deceased riding a horse along the road this side of Geraldine. I observed the stirrup leather on off side give way, and he fell off the horse on to the road. I ran to pick him up. He fell with his head downwards. I then observed a wound on the bank of his head. I saw blood on his head. When I lifted him up he appeared dead for several seconds ; shortly after he breathed. Another person came up and I left, picked up the stirrup leather, and came here to deceased's wife. The stirrup leather was not broken, but had slipped off the iron on the saddle. I went for the doctor. By Foreman: I saw deceased coming before he fell off, but did not speak to him. I am sure the stirrup leather did not break, or the girths, or spring-bar. I looked at the saddle. Deceased never spoke. Henry Palm, sworn, said : I am a waggon driver for Mr Palmer. I was coming up the road about half-past six o'clock on Friday evening last. I saw two men at tho side of the road with a man lying on the ground. The men asked me to take the man lying down to Mr Pern's. I did so, and I was asked to take him home. I was told it was Mr Smith, and I brought him here. The man did not speak. He was cut at the back of the head. There was blood about his head. The person I brought down here is the same lying dead here. George Palmer sworn said : I am a shoemaker living at Geraldine. I saw a dray coming down the road on Friday evening, and I was called to assist to carry deceased from the dray m which ho was brought hero into the house. I remained with deceased the greater part of Friday night and Saturday morning, until he died, which was at about noon on Saturday last. Deceased was not sensible any part of the time. He never spoke. I did not see any wounds on deceased's body. The Doctor said he had a wound on the back of his head. The jury returned the following verdict — "Accidental death, caused by a fall from a horse."

Timaru Herald, 21 October 1874, Page 1
Inquest. At Waimate on October 2nd an inquest was hold before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, on the body of a child fourteen days old named William Wheeler. The evidence showed that the child was m good health until a few hours before death, though difficult breathing was observable. When the child was seen to be very ill a doctor was sent for, but death ensued before he arrived. The jury returned a verdict of death from inflammation of the lungs.

Timaru Herald, 30 December 1874, Page 3
Death by Drowning at Milford. — On Sunday evening last, a man named Miles reported at the police station, Temuka, that a child was drowned in the creek at Milford, near to Kippingale's farm. Upon enquiries being made, the body was found to be that of one of Mr Robert Lavery's children, a boy of seven years old. It is supposed that the lad, while crossing the stream, got off the ford into deep water. There were two other younger children with him at the time of the accident. An inquest will be held on the body to-day.

Timaru Herald, 8 February 1875, Page 4
An inquest was held on the body of William Mitchell, at the Hibernian hotel, Timaru, on Saturday, before B. Woolcombe, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury: A. J. H. Bower (foreman), W. Nelson, J. Smith, J.A. Gedye, E. Goldsmith, J. Stansell, W,. Fulton, J. Craigie, W. Redfern, S. Graham, A. Wheeler, P. Stock, D. Clark, D. "McLennan.
Ralph Simpson, who was summoned, as a juror, but was not present when his name was called, was fined 10.
The following evidence was taken : Robert Mitchell :I a farm laborer. I have seen the body lying here, and identify it as that of my brother William Mitchell. He is twenty-five years of age. On Friday morning last at about three o'clock I last saw him alive. He was lying beside me in bed. I heard him making a choking noise. I spoke to-him, but he made no reply. I saw he was bad, and went out outside for some of the men. We were sleeping in a tent on Mr Macintosh's farm, near Mount Horrible. I
went back into the tent, and Robert Tank came in soon afterwards. We lifted up the upper part of deceased's body a little and he vomited slightly. He died about a quarter of an hour after this. He complained about a week ago that his breath was short at times. Dr Hammond : I made a post mortem examination of the body of William Mitchell. There were no external marks of violence. I opened the chest and found the heart much enlarged and the right cavities full of blood. Upon opening the stomach I found the liver very much enlarged. There was sufficient disease of the heart to cause death. The disease was of long standing. The jury returned the following verdict : — " That William Mitchell died on the 5th of February, 1875, from disease of the heart."

Timaru Herald, 8 February 1875, Page 4
FATAL ACCIDENT AT TEMUKA. At the Crown Hotel, Temuka, on Thursday last, an inquest was held on the body of Rosa Brogden, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury : — Messrs J. Mutch (foreman), W. T. M. Dugdale, W. G. Rutland, A. L. Wilson, G. M. Gentlemun, L. Collins, T. Sheen, M. Quinn, J. Bevan, H. Pratt, E. C. Foster, D. Murray, J. Cockroft, F. Tavender.
Thomas Graham Fyfe, a cabinetmaker, said : About 3 or 4, o'clock on Tuesday last I saw deceased in a buggy, coming down towards Temuka by herself. I went to my shop door to take a chair out of her way, as she appeared to have no control over the horse she was driving. She was holding on by one hand to the back of the seat, and had the reins in the other hand. The reins were quite slack. The horse was galloping as hard as it could. The buggy was on the footpath, and when it came to my shop the front wheel struck against the corner of the building. The buggy was capsized, and the girl was thrown on the ground about eighteen feet away. I picked up deceased and gave her to Mr McDougal. She was bruised about the forehead. I fetched Dr Cumming.
David Farquarson
Dr Cumming said : On Tuesday afternoon at a quarter-past four I arrived home, having been out since eleven in a buggy. On reaching the house, my servant girl came out and asked me if she might take the buggy to the stable. I said are you quite sure you can do it. She said " yes," a very confidential manner. The horse was then heading from Temuka. I turned the buggy round and put it straight for the stable. She then got in, and I gave her the reins telling her to be sure and not let the horse go out of a walk. She replied" "very well, sir." I saw her start walking the horse, and then I went into the house. I left the door open, and while hanging up my hat, I heard a crack, and looking out of the house, saw the horse going at a trot. The horse kept along the side of the road, and broke into a gallop about opposite to Mr Gray's. I saw the buggy strike the corner of a shop, and went immediately down the town. I met first witness, who told me that the girl was dead. I found the girl in Mr Wareing's store, and that she was suffering from concussion of the brain and injury to the arm. I had her removed to my house where she died Tuesday morning. The jury returned tho following verdict — " That Rosa Brogden died on the 4th of Feb. from concussion of the brain, caused by being accidentally thrown from a buggy on Tuesday, Feb. 2."

Otago Witness, 6 March 1875, Page 17
A very large skeleton was found on Tuesday (says the Timaru Herald), about seven feet below the surface of the sand on the Saltwater Creek Spit Mr Bullock, the carter, in removing some sand for building purposes, dropped across this relic of a past age, and brought the fragments to town. We have had an opportunity of inspecting them, and were struck by their symmetry no less than their great size. They appear to have belonged to a man of gigantic stature; but are so far incomplete as to render it difficult to ascertain the dimensions of his frame. The bones are much decayed, a fact which taken in connection with the dryness of the situation where they were found, probably indicate for them a great antiquity. We shall have some more to say about this interesting discovery in our next issue.

Timaru Herald, 2 April 1875, Page 4
VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER. At Waimate, on Wednesday, an inquest was held before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, touching the death of Sarah Hardy. Sergeant O'Connor said that on Monday, the 29th instant, he saw Mrs Hardy lying dead in her husband's house. He saw that there was a lump on her right jaw which was discolored, and that the inside of the right ear and the back of her neck was black. In reply to a statement from him, Mr Hardy said that he struck the deceased on the 2lst or 22nd because she would not go to bed.
Henry Preston, a fellmonger at Palmerston, and father of the deceased, said he visited the deceased on the 23rd instant, and remained with her till she died. He said that she was never was strong, that she had been suffering from consumption, and that the doctors had been attending her for the last four years. He knew that Mr Hardy had tried to get everything he possibly could for her in the shape of delicacies, and purchased a buggy to drive her out in. Dr Drury said he considered Mrs Hardy m the last stage of pulmonary consumption. A blow in the state deceased was in would accelerate death. Dr. Macintyre said the left lung was very extensively diseased. She was not pregnant. The jury returned, the following verdict "That the deceased Sarah Hardy died from consumption, accelerated by blow or blows inflicted by her husband, Thomas Ayratt Hardy ; and that the jury fined a verdict of manslaughter against the said Thomas Ayratt Hardy. Mr Hardy then entered into security appear at the next sitting of the Supreme Court, Timaru, for trial, himself in £300 and two others in £150 each.

Timaru Herald, 9 April 1875, Page 3
Death from Scalding. — On the 30th March an accident which terminated fatally happened to Adelaide Emma Bailey, aged two years find eleven months, the daughter of Mr Bailey, bootmaker, residing on the Great South road, Timaru. The child, it seems, put her mouth to the spout of a kettle that was in the fire-place and poured some of the hot water which the vessel contained down her throat. Dr Hammond attended the little sufferer, but all efforts to save life were unavailing, death ensuing in about eight hours after the injury was received.

Timaru Herald, 10 May 1875, Page 3
On Saturday last, at the Otaio, an inquest was held before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, touching the death, of Thomas Bruce, who was found dead on Thursday on the Main-road between the Otaio and Pareora. A. verdict of death from natural causes, resulting from the rupture of one of the main blood vessels was returned. The post mortem examination was made by Dr McIntyre.

Timaru Herald, 9 June 1875, Page 3
An inquest was held at Mr McKerrow's house, Claremont, near Mount Horrible, on Monday last, on the body of Robert Ward, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., R.M., Coroner, and the following jury:— John King (foreman), Samuel Briggs, Thomas Tuite; William Clarke, James Guscott, Thomas Chamberlain, Mathew Brown, Thomas Jeffcoate, Edward Tregenza, William Shafe, James Rapsey, John Ward, Maurice Stack, and William Gosling.
William Ward, a laborer, said that he was a nephew of the deceased; On Friday evening last he and deceased were in company, each driving a team to Mount Horrible from Timaru. Between seven and eight o'clock they arrived at a gate on the public road near Claremont. Witness, whose dray was leading, opened the gate and proceeded on his journey. After going a little distance he heard deceased call to his horses. He stopped his team, ran back, and found that deceased's dray was upside down, and, that deceased was lying under it.
James Park, a workman on the farm of Mr McKerrow.
Richard Bainbridge corroborated last statement.
Verdict: The deceased Robert Ward met his death by suffocation, caused by his dray having capsized on to him, that the accident was caused by the gate placed across the public road.

Marlborough Express, 12 June 1875, Page 4
Gascoyne. — At Timaru, on the 28th instant, Arthur Gascoyne, of Waimate, aged 35, son of John Gascoyne, Esq., of Clifton, Somersetshire, England. Home papers please copy.

Timaru Herald, 7 July 1875, Page 3
Burned to Death. — A most painful accident happened at Temuka on Monday by which the daughter of Stephen Bradley, aged about four years, was burned to death. The child's parents, who are new arrivals, live in a sod hut at the portion of Temuka where the other immigrants are located. It appears that Mrs Bradley left her three children in a room together while she went to a neighbor's. She says that she was away for only a few minutes, and that when she returned she found her daughter Mary Ann, whom she had left sitting on a chair about seven or eight feet away from the fire, lying on the ground with all her clothes burnt off her, the child being fearfully scorched and dead. The two children who were in the room with deceased were younger than she was, and not old enough to assist their sister or give an alarm. An inquest touching the death of the child will be hold to-day.

Evening Post, 9 July 1875, Page 2
A child named Pratty, four years old, was burned to death at Temuka. Her mother left her sitting on the hob while she went out. In ten minutes she came back and found the child dead on the floor, and the room full of smoke. A verdict of accidentally burned to Death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 28 July 1875, Page 3
An inquest was held at Pleasant Point on July 14, before B. Woollconibe, Esq., coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr John Campbell was foreman, on the body of William Fenwick. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was a laborer, came to the Point from the Mackenzie Country, and stayed at Mr Edward's hotel. On Tuesday dinner was supplied to him, and when Mr Edwards went into the room half an hour afterwards he found him lying on the floor quite dead. Dr MacIntyre, who was sent for soon afterwards, made a post mortem examination of the body, and found a piece of meat in deceased's wind pipe, half an ounce in weight, which had caused death by suffocation. The jury returned the following verdict That William Fenwick accidentally came to his death by suffocation, while partaking of his dinner, on Tuesday, the 13th of July.
    Found Dead. A woman named Frew who resided at Waimate, was found dead in her bed about the hour of 10 o'clock p.m. on July 6. Some of her children on finding their mother dead raised an alarm, when Mrs Elizabeth Drummond, the nearest neighbor, went to the house and found Mrs Sophia Frew quite dead in the bed, her husband being m the house under the influence of liquor. Sergeant O'Connor and Dr C.W. Dunkley were m immediate attendance, but the woman was supposed by the doctor to have been dead two hours. No marks of violence or accident were discernible. An inquest (see 12 July 1875, pg 3) was held on the body on July 9 at 11 o'clock by B. Woollcombe, Esq., and a coroner's jury. Husband Alexander Frew was drunk. Death was heart disease.

Timaru Herald, 28 July 1875, Page 4
An inquest was held near Timaru on Monday, July 26, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., coroner, on the body of Carl Kippenberger, who was killed on Saturday last. The following evidence was taken. Maurice Kippenberger said that he was the brother of the deceased. On Saturday last, the deceased and witness left Mr Macintosh's place at Mount Horrible, with a dray drawn by two horses. There was a winnowing machine in the dray, and a reaping machine attached to the back of it. The horses were stopped at Mr Kelland's gate, where the winnowing machine was to be left. Deceased was unfastening the reaper, and witness was helping him, when the horses started. Witness caught hold of the reins of the shaft horse to endeavor to stop them but could not. Witness believed deceased jumped off the dray while the horses were galloping, and went to the place where he saw him jump off, but t could not find him. When the horses stopped, witness found deceased lying on the ground with a tooth of the machine stuck into the lower part of the buck of his head. Witness called for help, and Dennis Sullivan came to his assistance. They pulled deceased from under the machine, and found that he was then dead. Dennis Sullivan, a laborer working on the road, said that on hearing last witness call for assistance, he ran across the paddock to where he was with the dray and horses. He saw deceased lying on the ground under the reaping machine, and with the help of last witness got him nut. The Jury returned the following verdict : — "That Carl Kippenberger was accidentally killed by a wound in the back of the head, caused by a reaping machine.

Timaru Herald, 9 August 1875, Page 4
An inquest was held at the Hibernian Hotel, Timaru. On the 6th instant, before B. Woollcombe, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Patrick Sweeney, who died suddenly on the previous day, near Mount Horrible. The following evidence was taken : — Thomas O'Driscoll identified the body a that of Sweeney. He said that Sweeney had been staying at his hotel a fortnight, and left on Wednesday last. He appeared to be in good health. George Dan, a laborer from Mount Horrible, said that he knew the body lying there as that of Patrick Sweeney. On the evening of the previous day he, with others and deceased, left the threshing machine near Mount Horrible to go to the camp, about a mile distant. After going a few chains deceased came up to witness and said "don't leave me." He seemed as if he had over-exerted himself. After getting to the next field deceased complained of being bad, and went away from the party. Witness asked him to come home, and took his arm and walked with him for some distance, when deceased, began to shake very much, and could go no further. Another of the party came to assist, but deceased fell down and died. He came to the machine late, with the intention of working. He was quite sober. George William Cole deposed that he was a duly qualified medical practitioner, residing at Timaru. He made a post mortem examination of the body, and found no external marks of violence on it. On the chest there were old and strong pleuritic adhesions. There was a large abscess occupying the greater portion of the right lung, the left being highly congested. The heart was flabby, its muscular structure being degenerated, the right and left ventricle containing blood clot, and the large vessels atheromatoma. The liver was much larger than (natural, extending over the left side. The kidneys were enlarged and congested. He considered deceased died from Asphyxia, caused by pleuro-pneumonia or inflammation of the lungs and surrounding tissues, and that the disease must have been of long standing. The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Timaru Herald, 11 October 1875, Page 3
Death.— An, inquest was held before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, on Monday last, at the Rangitata ferry house, on the body of Lanritz Gronngaard, a laborer, who was found dead near the railway works at the river. A post mortem examination disclosing that deceased died from heart disease, a verdict to that effect was returned.

Timaru Herald, 11 October 1875, Page 3
Found Dead.— An inquest was held at Winchester on Saturday last before the Coroner, on the body of Alexander Gordon Campbell, a laborer, who has been working on the Waihi bridge. From the evidence it appears that deceased and James Anderson, a blacksmith at Winchester, returned from the Geraldine races to the Waihi bridge works on Thursday evening, the former not being sober at the time. Deceased left Anderson at the works and went m the direction of his tent, which was about seventy yards away. Nothing more was seen of him till the following morning, when he was found by Mr Pye, one of the contractors of the bridge, lying on the ground at some distance from his tent with his face downwards dead. Dr Cumming made a post mortem examination and found the lungs enormously congested, the heart full of black blood, and a little fluid m the stomach which smelt of spirits. The congestion of the lungs, he considered, was the cause of death, and the congestion might have been brought on either by suffocation or through lying out in the cold under the influence, of drink. The following verdict was returned: "That Alexander Gordon Campbell met his death on October 8th by suffocation when under the influence of drink."

Timaru Herald, 6 December 1875, Page 3
On Monday last, and inquest was held before D. Sutherland, Esq. J.P., of Omarama, and the jury returned verdict to the effect that Hugh Hannah was found dead, but there was no evidence to show how he came by his death. The deceased was afterwards buried. It is highly probable that a medical man will be sent from Oamaru to make a post mortem examination of the body of Hannah, but as the Lake is about 150 miles away, we cannot expect to hear the result before the beginning of the week. Mounted Constable Green, of the police force here, was despatched by Sergeant Smith up to Lake Ohou to enquire into the matter.

Press, 29 December 1875, Page 2
The South Canterbury Times gives the following particulars of a fatal accident which happened on Christmas Day in the Mackenzie Country :—A sad and fatal accident occurred on Christmas Day last, whereby the infant daughter of Mr A. Ormsby, solicitor, of this town, met her death. It appears that Mr Ormsby, accompanied by Mrs Ormsby, child, and nurse, were driving along the old track to Mr Kimbell's station, Mackenzie Country, and when about thirty-five miles from Timaru went through a mud pool, that apparently had a sound bottom, but after going a short distance the near side wheel went into a hole, and through the plunging of the horses forward caused the nurse and child to be thrown out. Seeing that the child was badly hurt, Mr Ormsby, after getting her and the nurse into the trap again, drove at all haste to the residence of Dr Kimbell, who, on examining the child, stated that it had been dead about half-an-hour, or an hour and a half after the accident had occurred. The body of the deceased was afterwards brought to Mr Ormsby's residence. An inquest was held on the body on Monday, December 27th, at the residence of Mr Ormsby, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., coroner, and a jury, when a verdict of Accidental death was returned.

Evening Post, 11 January 1876, Page 2
Timaru Herald, 14 January 1876, Page 3
Referring to a case of suspected murder, the Timaru Herald has the following: — An inquest was held at Temuka on Wednesday morning on the body of Robert Hannah, found in the Temuka River on Monday last, which inquest was adjourned until Thursday the 13th instant. Through an error we stated in a previous issue that a verdict had been returned by the jury. We are requested not to publish any particulars until after further inquiry, very suspicious doubts having been entertained as to the cause of the Death. Although refraining from publishing the evidence as given, we may state that a man named Carr and his wife were arrested on Thursday afternoon by Sergeant Ross at Temuka, charged with at least implication in the crime of murder. On the 7th inst. Owen Carr, Mary Carr, and James Spratley, brought up under suspicion of murdering Robert Hannah at Temuka, on the 3rd of January, were remanded for eight days, to enable them to be brought up at the adjourned inquest on the body of Hannah on the 13th instant. The female prisoner, who had a baby in her arms, pleaded hard to be released, but the Magistrate said he had no power to do so.
Stuart M. Camming, a medical practitioner at Temuka
Dennis Barrett, a laborer living near Temuka.
Thomas Boss, a constable of police, stationed at Temuka
Robert Matson, a laborer, at Temuka
Mary Carr said she was the wife of Owen Carr
Edwin Carr Said he was in his father's house at Temuka,
John Smith said he was a blacksmith living in Temuka. He heard a row outside, of Carr's house. He had lived near Carr's house about nine months and he heard rows and quarelling before at their place.
Edwin Evans, a wheelwright at Temuka
The Coroner having briefly reviewed the evidence, the jury had a long- discussion ultimately arriving at ; the following verdict— "Found drowned in the river Temuka, but not sufficient evidence has been adduced to show cause how deceased came in the river, but the jury are of opinion that the circumstances surrounding the case are very suspicious."

Timaru Herald, 14 January 1876, Page 5
Sad Accident. — With considerable regret we have to record a sad and fatal accident which befell on Christmas day. Mr and Mrs Ormsby, with their infant child, were driving on the Burke's Pass road, when some accident happened (particulars of which are not to hand) and the child was thrown out of the trap. The effects of the fall were such that the poor little girl lived only a very short time. An inquest will be hold to-day, at 11 o'clock, at Melville House. Inquest. — An inquest was held at the residence of Mr Arthur Ormsby, on Monday last by Mr Belfield, J.P., acting for the Coroner, on the body of Isabella Louisa Ormsby, an infant, who met her death through being thrown from a trap on the in Burkes Pass road. Arthur Ormsby, father of the deceased, deposed that he was driving a trap with a pair of horses along the Burkes Pass road on Saturday last. About 35 miles from Timaru, one of the wheels went down into a deep rut, giving a violent jerk to the carriage, and the horses pulling forward at the same time, the nurse and child sitting at the back were thrown out. He stopped the trap at once, and found the child to be most severely injured. He pushed on to Mr Kimbell, but the child died about an hour and a-half after the accident. Dr McIntyre deposed to having examined the body of the deceased, and finding marks of injury sufficient, in his opinion, to cause death. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 14 January 1876, Page 5
Inquest at Waimate. — On Thursday, the 23rd inst., an inquest touching the death of Peter Nolan, a boy about twelve years of ago, was held at the Waimate Hotel, before M. Studholme, Esq., J.P., acting as Coroner, and the following gentlemen sworn in as jury : — .Frank Sloe (foreman), Thomas Richmond, George Pratt, Charles Murphy, Robert Smith, Albert Maclin, Joe Reece, Thomas McDonald, James Crawford, Jonathan Cameron, Jonathan. Hunter, William Patterson, and Alexander Price. Joe Nolan, on being sworn, said he was the father of the deceased boy. He identified the body as being that of his son. He saw deceased alive the last time about half -past eight the previous forenoon ; he was then in his usual health, and went to school. He received information about out one o'clock that he was drowned. He was eleven years and six months old. J. M. Gilchrist, a mounted constable, said that on hearing a report of the boy being drowned he proceeded at once to the spot on horseback. Mr Freeman was there before him ; he was searching for the body. A boy named Hogan took him out ; he dived to the bottom and brought him up. The water-hole was about twelve yards by eight ; the water was eight feet or so deep. The body then found is the name as that now identified by Nolan as that of his son. There were no marks on the body. William O'Connor, Sergeant of Police, said that in consequence of there being rats in the house where the body was first brought, he had it-removed to the hotel. Richard Newman said he was the son of Mr Frederick Newman and about twelve years of age. He saw deceased at school the previous day; he left school with Willie Stevenson, Willie Lillie, Jonathan Horgan, Joe Watts, and Peter Nolan (deceased) all went to the pond to bathe ; we all went in to bathe. Nolan ran away from us we told him not to go to the deep hole, but he would not take heed. In a few minutes he was struggling in the water ; we tried to get him out, but could not. I then ran to the police and told them ; when we ran he had gone down ; we reached sticks to him, but he did not try to catch at them. William Lillie said he was the son of Mr Alexander Lillie and about twelve yean of age. The two water-holes wore about fifty yards apart. G. B. Freeman said that, on first hearing of the accident ho rode over to the water-hole, taking the boy Lillie with him. Lillie showed him where Nolan was. I found the hole very dangerous and muddy. I went up to my knees, and suddenly stopped into water up to my head ; the bottom was still deeper. Dan Hogan was searching too he felt the body, and dived and brought it up. I assisted him to take it out of the water. Constable Gilchrist, who arrived just after him, also assisted to take the body out of the water. After a short deliberation the Foreman handed in the following verdict : — " That the deceased, Peter Nolan, was accidentally drowned whilst bathing in a hole in the Waimate creek, on Wednesday, December 22nd, 1875." The jury recommended lads when bathing m the creeks to always have long strong stick in readiness m case of accident.

Timaru Herald, 11 February 1876, Page 4 No First Name
An inquest was held before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, at the Crown Hotel, Temuka, on Wednesday, on the body of a man supposed to be J. M. Condell, found in the Opihi river on Sunday last. The following jury were sworn: — Messrs Gray (foreman), Parker, Radford, Storey, B. Thompson, Mendelson, Monke, Henry, Green, Cardell, Lemon, J. Brown, Esery, and Wilson. Thomas Ross deposed : I am a constable of police at Temuka. On Sunday last, owing to information received, I went to the Opihi river and found the body in question. The head was under water. I had the body conveyed to the place where it is now lying. I searched the pockets, and found £2 16s 9d in money, a pawn ticket for £3 on a watch given to deceased by Stewart, together with several letters referring to his good character and also recommending him as a waiter. The ticket given bore the name of Condell, but no description was endorsed on the same. I produce a swag. It was given to me by a publican named Spillane, who has the Arowhenua Hotel.
William Clark deposed: I am a ploughman. He had a blue swag with him. I spoke to him when he was sitting on his swag. I met him again on Saturday, between the two rivers. He had no swag with him. I afterwards met him going towards Spillane's about ten o'clock the same day. The deceased appeared to be sober. The reason I took notice of him was that a man called "Charley the Swede" or " German Charley " said he was a very eccentric character. He did not seem to be deranged.
Samuel McBratney deposed : I found him drowned in the Opihi. I also found a hat in a stream about a hundred yards from the river.
John Green deposed : I saw the deceased on Friday last under Wilson and Son's verandah. He appeared to me a deranged state.
Alexander McBratney deposed: I am a farmer living I also saw the body. It was some distance down the river, about five chains from the bridge.
T.O. Rayner deposed ; I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, residing at Temuka. I found no mark of violence. The liver was healthy, and bore no appearance of any drunkenness. Case to be one of suffocation from drowning.
Michael Spillane deposed ; I am landlord of the Arowhenua Hotel. I gave the swag produced to the police on Saturday last, it was left at my house by some one. I saw the swag about a hundred yards from my house on the Point road. Verdict was returned. " We, the jury, are of the unanimous opinion that, the deceased, whose name we believe to be Condell, was found drowned on Sunday morning, the 6th February, in the Opihi River, situated in the Province of Canterbury in the colony of New Zealand and that the said Condell as aforesaid had no marks of violence appearing on his body, but how or by what means the said man became drowned, no evidence did appear to the jury." The following rider was appended : — "The jury are of the opinion that the police are guilty of great negligence in not furnishing more complete evidence respecting the identification of the deceased. " Signed K. F. Gray, " Foreman."

Timaru Herald, 14 January 1876, Page 5
An inquest was held at the residence of Mr Arthur Ormsby, on Monday last by Mr Belfield, J.P., acting for the Coroner, on the body of Isabella. Louisa Ormsby, an infant, who met her death through being thrown from a trap on the Burkes Pass road. Arthur Ormsby, father of the deceased, deposed that ho was driving a trap with a pair of horses along the Burkes Pass road on Saturday last. About 35 miles from Timaru, one of the wheels went down into a deep rut, giving a violent jerk to the carriage, and the horses pulling forward at the same time, the nurse and child sitting at the back were thrown out. He stopped the trap at once, and found the child to be most severely injured. He pushed on to Mr Kimbell, but the child died about an hour and a-half after the accident. Dr McIntyre deposed to having examined the body of the deceased, and finding marks of injury sufficient, in his opinion, to cause death. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 15 February 1876, Page 4
An inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Timaru Hospital on the body of Isaac Lyons before B. Woollcombe, Esq., R.M. and the following jury: Messrs R. Turnbull (foreman) J. R. Stansell, B. Bailey, W. Walker, S. Griffin, F. Healey, A. Eaton, W. Redfern. E. Duff, E. J Holdgate, B. Wallis, J. Spence, T. Winter, T.E. Price, George Clapton, a laborer working near Pighunting Creek said that he identified the body of deceased as that of Isaac Lyons. At about 2 o'clock on Sunday afternoon deceased, witness, and two others named George Talbot, and Vincent Turner, went to the mouth of Pighunting Creek to bathe. Talbot and deceased were the first to undress and go into the water. They swam for about ten minutes...George Talbot a farmer at Pighunting Creek, gave corroborative evidence.
James Lyon, a farmer, said that he identified the body lying there as that of his brother. He then explained how, after he was informed that his brother was drowned he went out out on the creek in a boat and recovered the body by means of an oar. He also said that he had heard his brother say that at one time when bathing he took the cramp. His brother he said was a blacksmith by trade, unmarried, about 25 or 26 years of age, the son of John and Catherine Lyon, and had been in the colony about three months. The jury returned the following verdict," That Isaac Lyon, on the 13th of February, was accidentally drowned while bathing in Pighunting Creek."

Evening Post, 28 February 1876, Page 2
Timaru. 26th February.
Another accident occurred here this afternoon. William Necklin, a laborer, was buried; by a fall of earth while doing excavating work on Cains-terrace, and sustained among other injuries a fracture of the right leg. Two smart shocks of earthquake were felt here to-day; one at 3.20 a.m., and the other at 8.47 a.m.

Timaru Herald, 4 April 1876, Page 8
The adjourned inquest on the death of James Bain, whose body was found in Caroline Bay, Timaru, on Monday, March 27th, was held at the Resident Magistrate's Courthouse on March 31, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner. The following jury has been previously empanelled, and with the exception of W. C. Hill, answered to their names: - Messrs J. Messrs J. Hamilton, (foreman); W.C, Hill, R. Stansell, J. S. Gibson, J, A. Webb, T. Roberts, J. Hope, J. Cockroft, J. Jackson, F. George, T.D. Ross, S. Grifiin, J. Newton, and J. S. Cowan. Inspector Pender stated that since the former sitting, another portion of a man's body had been found, viz., a foot in a boot. Francis McKenzie, a seaman living in Timaru.
Murdoch McLeod said that he was a carpenter living in Timaru.
Moses White, a clerk residing in Timaru.
Donald McLennae, a publican in Timaru.
William Lennan
Mr Ralph, the clerk of their Company
William Henry Collis, a boatman. Said he was coxswain of the Timaru Landing and Shipping Company.
Jacob Hill
George Todd, a draper.
Thomas Chapman, manager at the Timaru Landing and Shipping Co.
George Collis

Verdict: That the deceased, James Bain, was drowned accidentally in the Timaru Roadstead on the morning of the 26th February, 1876, caused by the swamping of the surf boat.
Rider: The jury are of the opinion that lawful control of the Landing Services should at once be vested in the Harbor master or other competent office, and that the Coroner be respectfully requested to represent this opinion too the Government."

Evening Post, 21 April 1876, Page 2
Timaru. 20th April. At the inquest on the body of Lizzie Duncan the jury returned the following verdict:— " That deceased was burned to Death, but that there was no evidence to show how the fire originated." A rider was added severely blaming Jones, Butler, and Orr for not endeavoring to rescue the woman.

Timaru Herald, 24 April 1876, Page 4
An inquest was held on the body, of Edward Channan, at the Crown Hotel, Temuka, on Friday last, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of thirteen, Messrs Massey, (foreman), J. Blythe, Richard Clarke, E. Pilbrow, Hubbins, W. Bryant, J. McBratney, W. Wills, James Bashford, J.B. Wareing, W. Robert Uprichard, J. Wilson, and C. Nicholas.
William Hayes : I am a laborer living at Green Hayes. On, Wednesday last deceased came with me and two others to get a cheque, from Mr Barker for labor, that he had done for fencing in some swamp for Mr Rolleston. After having settled accounts outstanding, and divided the balance, I went about my own business and came to Arenas' corner to meet my mates, but as they were not there I went home. About eight o'clock the deceased and two others come to my house. Deceased had some tea. There was a bottle of brandy which was drunk. I put deceased to bed, and the other man left. This was about nine o'clock. I got up next morning a little before ... , daylight to get my, wife some water, had to pass the bed on which deceased was lying. I did not hear him breathe. I found he was dead. Sergeant Scott was informed of the circumstance. The body was removed to the Crown Hotel, where it now lies..
Thomas Small: I am a laborer.
Dr Cumming I am a duly qualified medical practitioner residing at Temuka.
Verdict. "Died from suffocation whilst under the influence of drink on Thursday morning last."

Timaru Herald, 24 August 1876, Page 6
An inquest was held at Fairlie Creek, on August 15, before W. B. Howell Esq., J.P and a jury, on the body of John Mackenzie. The evidence showed that deceased had a few drinks at Wedderill's, Fairlie Creek Accommodation House on the 12th inst., in company with Waddell, Smith and Davis, ploughing contractors, and Wearing of the Levels Plains. Davis purchased a bottle of brandy and a bottle of whisky before starting, which he took away with him. The deceased being drunk, either fell or was thrown off his horse, his feet entangled in the stirrup irons, and the horse kicked him, causing a wound that killed him. There was a cut on the head and the skull was fractured.

Timaru Herald, 4 May 1876, Page 5
An inquest was held on April 26 at; George Town, Temuka, on the body of Daniel Fergusson, a young child, before JB. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and Jury
William. Hopkinson, a  carrier re-siding at-George Town, near- Temuka.; On Tuesday the 15th, about noon, I. was coming home with an empty timber carriage, drawn by two horses in two pair of shafts. When approaching my house a number of children ran up to meet me. "I was sitting on the waggon and took my boy, on my knee. Two or three other boys got on the back on the, waggon. After proceeding at a slow pace for some little distance, the children shouted to me. On looking back I saw the hind wheel pass over a child's head. Daniel Fergusson : I am a clerk at the Temuka  Road Board. Deceased is my grandson, and was four years old at the time of his death. He was a very healthy boy. The following rider was attached :— " That the jury would caution waggoners from allowing children of tender years to; climb on to waggons, when there is no bottom or sides to the same,"

Evening Post, 9 May 1876, Page 2
Timaru. 8th May.
James Stewart, Inspector of Levels to Road Board, was found in a creek hung up by the growing flax leaf. At the inquest on the body, the jury brought in a verdict of suicide, during temporary insanity.
    There was a fire at Washdyke last night. A horse and man are reported to be burnt.
    On Monday, Ilma De Murska gives two concerts.
    The Southern Railway is finished as far as Otaito, but cannot be opened, owing to want of room at the Timaru station. This inflicts a heavy loss on the farmers.

The Timaru Herald Thursday May 25, 1876
SUDDEN DEATH - Yesterday the wife of a newly-arrived immigrant, named Eliza King, died suddenly soon after giving birth to a child. As no medical certificate was forthcoming as to the cause of death, the police reported the circumstance to Mr Belfield, J.P., who in the absence of the District Coroner, will hold an inquest on the body today.

The inquest was reported on the following day in the Timaru Herald:
“An inquest was held yesterday before H. Belfield Esq., J.P. and a jury of fourteen of whom Mr James Match was foreman at the residence of Mr Daniel King on the body of his wife Eliza King who died suddenly the day previous. The following evidence was given:
    Ann Barrett: I am a married woman wife of John Barrett living at Temuka. I was called in to attend to the deceased at about half past one o’clock on the morning of 24th May. The deceased gave birth to a girl at ten minutes past four o’clock the same morning. The deceased, Eliza King, then appeared all right and spoke to me cheerfully and told me that she felt very comfortable. I left her at about six the same morning. A Mrs Murphy called me between seven and eight o’clock and I came over and she requested me to change her clothes. I also gave her some brandy and water. I did not like the look of the deceased and I asked her whether I should not send for a doctor. Deceased said “No” and that she would be better again in a little while. About five minutes afterwards the deceased said she felt very comfortable and I told her I was going away but would come back again in a little while. In about twenty minutes or half an hour after that, her husband called me and told me he thought his wife was dying. I came immediately and found deceased in Mrs Murphy’s care and I think deceased drew one breath after I came in.
    Johanna Murphy: I am a married woman living at Temuka. At about half past one o’clock yesterday morning Mr King, the husband of the deceased came to me and asked me to come to his wife. After I came to the home the deceased appeared lively and in good spirits. She told me to tell her husband to fetch Mrs Barrett. Deceased was confined of a girl at ten minutes past four o’clock that same morning. About two hours after the birth deceased appeared very bad and I told Mrs Barrett to go for a doctor. Deceased said she did not want a doctor but that she would be alright in the evening. I left the house five minutes after Mrs Barrett left. About half past seven o’clock I was called again to go for Mrs Barrett and she and I came back to the King’s house together. Mrs Barrett gave deceased a small quantity of brandy and water (about two teaspoonsfuls of brandy). Deceased got very bad again but on my mentioning to send for a doctor she again refused. About two hours afterwards the deceased died.
    Stewart Macdonald Cumming:
I am a legally qualified medical practitioner living at Temuka. I was called to see deceased Eliza King by her husband at half past nine o’clock yesterday morning. He asked me to come as quick as I could as he thought his wife was dying. He told me his wife had been confined of a child in the early part of the same morning. I came immediately but found her dead. There was a good deal of blood in the bed but not more than is usual in some cases. I have since made a post mortem examination of the body and find all the internal organs in a healthy state with the exception of the heart which was dilated on the right side. The womb had also not contracted sufficiently which was the cause of internal hemorrhage which brought on fainting, from which deceased never rallied.
    By Foreman. If I had been in attendance on deceased three hours before I was called I could probably have saved her life.
    Daniel King, laborer living at Temuka: I am the husband of the deceased Eliza King. About one o’clock on the morning of the 24th of May she was taken ill and she told me to call Mrs Murphy. I did so and came with Mrs. Murphy. I then went for Mrs Barrett, who came immediately. After the two women left, about six o’clock, I went into deceased’s room asked her how she was and also if I could get anything for her. I made her a little cornflour, she saying that she felt faint. She took four teaspoonfuls of the cornflour and said she had quite sufficient for the present. She told me not to leave the room and about five minutes afterwards she asked me to turn her over on her left side. I then gave her two teaspoonsful of brandy at her request. I wished to send for a doctor but she refused. After that I gave her a drink of tea. She kept getting fainter and fainter and asked me to send for Mrs Barrett.
    By the Foreman: Deceased has had nine children and at every confinement except one she has never been attended by a doctor. Deceased repeatedly told me she would not have a doctor. She had perfect faith in Mrs Barrett and so had I. My wife told me so.
    After very brief deliberation the jury returned the following verdict – That the deceased, Eliza King died of natural causes – adding as a rider – The jury are of the opinion that had medical attendance been called in time, life probably might have been saved.”

North Otago Times, 23 June 1876, Page 2
Timaru Herald, 22 June 1876, Page 3
POISONING AND SUICIDE AT Timaru. ("Herald," June 21.)
The inhabitants of Timaru were startled yesterday by the report that John Macgregor had committed suicide by taking poison, and that he had killed his wife Celia, by administering some of the stuff. The circumstances of the case as follows : — A milkman named Harris went to the house in which Macgregor and his wife lived (a two-roomed cottage close to the Hibernian Hotel) at about 9 a.m., but found the door fastened, the place appearing as though the inmates were not up. In reply to his knocking and calling, he heard Mrs Macgregor answer him from within in such a manner as to inspire the belief that something was wrong. He went to an adjacent house for a Mrs Emma Eliza Jones (wife of John Alfred Jones), who, with him, managed to effect an entrance into the house of Macgregor. They found Macgregor in bed in a dying state, with his hands raised, and Mrs Macgregor, who was in bed with him, told them that he had taken some bitters, which he had obtained on the previous night at the Ship Hotel She then began to complain of pains of a twitching nature in her inside, which, she kept increasing in intensity. Mr Charles Harris, dairyman, and Mrs Jones at once sent for Mr O'Driscoll, proprietor of the Hibernian Hotel, and Mrs Macgregor said upon his arrival that she had taken some of the bitters, which her husband had given her. In a very short time after Mr O'Driscoll's arrival Mrs Macgregor died. Dr Patrick Macintyre was sent for as soon as possible after it was seen that the woman was dangerously ill, but before he arrived life was extinct. Enquiries having been set on foot to account for the Deaths, it transpired that on the previous day Macgregor had purchased from. Mr Watkins, chemist, 5s worth of strychnine, and it was then surmised that he must have put this into the bitters that he had obtained for the purpose of destroying his life ; but whether he intended to poison his wife, or whether her partaking of the liquor was an accident, is not known for a certainty. It is generally believed, however, that he originally only meant to destroy himself. This belief is entertained principally from the tenor of a letter to his wife which was found in one of his pockets, dated Friday last, and running to the effect that owing to troubles which he had got into on account of money matters in land transactions, he was going to put himself out of the world, in order to prevent his wife suffering as well as himself. It seems that Macgregor intended to destroy himself in a different way to that by which he effected his purpose. On Monday he went to Mr E. Reece's to buy a pistol, giving as his reason for requiring one that he was going into the Mackenzie Country, and that in consequence of the tramps on the road he did not like being without a weapon to defend himself with in case of an attack. For some reason, however, the shopkeeper did not supply the pistol. We are informed that Macgregor came out to Canterbury in 1864, that he was manager of the "Canterbury Standard" for some time, and held an office in connection with the Supreme Court, Christchurch, afterwards. He was at one time a publican in the Mackenzie Country, but during the greater part of the time he has resided in this district he has followed the occupation of a clerk and accountant at Timaru. An inquest will be held on the bodies at the Resident Magistrate's Court Office at ten o'clock this morning.

Timaru Herald, 29 June 1876, Page 3
This concluded the evidence, and the jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict to the following effect — " That John McGregor died on the 20th day of June, 1876, from the effects of strychnine, administered by his own hand whilst laboring under temporary insanity ; and that Celia McGregor, also died from the effects of strychnine, but by whom administered there is not sufficient evidence to show.

Date of Interment 26 June 1876
Cemetery Timaru Cemetery
CELIA & JOHN MCGREGOR
Section G BLOCK A, Plot 1, Beam A

Timaru Herald, 24 August 1876, Page 6
An inquest was held at Fairlie Creek, on August 15, before W. B. Howell Esq., and a jury, on the body of John Mackenzie. The evidence showed that deceased had a few drinks at Wedderill's, Fairlie Creek Accommodation House on the 12th inst., in company with Waddell, Smith and Davis, ploughing contractors, and Wearing of the Levels Plains. Davis purchased a bottle of brandy and a bottle of whisky before starting, which he took away with him. The men went in the direction of Waddell's camp, about three miles away. They all arrived there together and at about 3 p.m. of the same day deceased and Wearing started for the accommodation house, the former being the worse for liquor. After going a little distance, deceased turned to go back to the camp. Wearing went on s to the accommodation house, where he remained all night. Deceased reached the - camp, and he and Waddell, Smith and Davis drank the two bottles of spirits. At 7 p.m. in deceased left for his own home on horse back. About 5 p.m. Smith and Davis left the hut to go to their tent, which was close at hand, and before reaching it saw a dark object lying in the snow, which proved to be the body of Mackenzie. The felt his pulse and found that it had censed to beat. They put the body in the hut, and give information of the matter on the following morning. On the same morning deceased's horse was found with the saddle under his belly, and without any bridle or stirrup irons. Constable Ross, deposed that there was a cut on the head from two to three inches long, and one and a-half deep, the skull being fractured; also, that there was a large quantity of blood at the spot where the body was found. The following verdict was returned: — "That deceased being drunk, either fell or was thrown off his horse, his feet getting entangled in the stirrup irons, and that the horse kicked him, causing the wound already described, which killed him ; it appeared that the whole party were drunk, and did not know what they were doing."

Timaru Herald, 4 October 1876, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday by B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, at Messrs Greenaway's farm, Orari, on the body of Thomas George Ewings, aged about two years. After the jury had viewed the body, the following evidence was taken :— John Ewings : I am a laborer living at Greenaway's farm. The body lying here is Thomas George Ewings'. He was about two years old. The child was born at sea. I last saw him alive about 12 o'clock on Wednesday last as I was leaving to go to my work. He was in the house then. A short time after I heard an alarm, and ran to the creek where his mother was. I found the hat of the deceased near to the edge. Next morning about 11 o'clock I saw the body of the child in the Orari river. Greenaway brought it to the house. Mary Ann Ewings : I am mother of the deceased. On Wednesday last I was outside Greenaway's and saw the children playing near the creek. I missed the deceased and made a search, and not finding him near the creek concluded he had fallen in. Isaac Greenaway : I am a farmer living in the Orari. On Thursday morning last I found the body of the deceased partly in the water and partly on the shingle in the Orari river. A verdict of " Accidentally drowned " was returned.

The Medical Times and Gazette. 1877 - Page 491
Jones, Edward Percy, son of Edward Jones, M.D., 48, Sydenham-park, London, at Pleasant Point, on February 17, aged 20.

Timaru Herald, 15 November 1876, Page 3
An inquest will be held at the Resident Magistrate's Court to-day, on the infant child of Mrs P. Hurt, who died shortly after its birth.
Timaru Herald, 16 November 1876, Page 3 inquest
— "That the newly-born child died from natural causes ; and the jury are of opinion that Dr Cole acted unwisely in removing the body previous to the registration of death.

Timaru Herald, 9 January 1877, Page 6
An inquest on the body of Arthur Wearer was held at the Hibernian Hotel on Jan. 3, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury. Charles Routledge, Sergeant of Police, said that at about 7 o'clock on Tuesday, from information he received he went to Dr Cole's late residence in Church street. He saw the body of deceased lying in the gateway. Thomas Arslott, a laborer, said he identified the body us that of Arthur Weaver. Henry Guilbert, a tailor, said that at about 20 minutes to 6 on Tuesday morning he met deceased in Church-street, near the Church. Dr Hammond said ho had made a post mortem examination of the body of Arthur Weaver. He was suffering from inflammation of the right lung and liver. The cause of death was disease of the heart, weakened by the affection of the liver and lungs. The following verdict was returned: "That Arthur Weaver died on the 2nd of January, 1877, of disease of the heart, in the natural way.

Evening Post, 20 February 1877, Page 2
Timaru. 19th February. E. P. [Edward Percy] Jones, a schoolmaster at Pleasant Point, was drowned on Saturday while bathing. He came out in the Duke of Edinburgh last year, and was said to be well connected. The weather is intensely hot, and the crops are not nearly so much damaged as was at first supposed.

Timaru Herald, 6 March 1877, Page 5
An inquest was held at the South Rangitata Railway Station on Feb. 7 before B. Woollcombe, Esq , Coroner, and a jury, on the body of Samuel John Fulton.
James Hughes : I am a farmer on Rangitata Island. I have seen the body lying here, it is the body of a man I found in the south branch of the Rangitata on the 8th of February last.
James Smith : I am a laborer. I identify the body lying here as the body of John Fulton. I was employed by him m farm work.
William Freeman : I am a laborer, living about seven or eight chains from the river From information received on Tuesday last about dinner time, I went to the river and saw two men in the stream of the South Rangitata river. The last witness was about three or four chains below the other ; they were both cooeeing. I sent my brother, who hi with me, for more help. Deceased called to me to get on his horse. He was then on a spit between two streams m a kneeling position. There was too much water between us for me to go to him on the hone. I told him there was a spit close below him which was dry. He tried to make for that and I then left him and went to the other man and called out to him to make for the spit, which he did, and got out. As soon as last witness got out of the water, I looked round for deceased but he was gone.
The jury returned the following verdict : — That Samuel John Fulton was accidentally drowsed m the south branch of the Rangitata river, on Tuesday, the 6th of February, 1877.

North Otago Times, 18 April 1877, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Club Hotel, Waimate, by B. Woolcombe, Esq., (Coroner for Timaru District), on the body of Ben Bailey, who came to his death by a dray wheel passing over his body on Thursday, the 12th inst.. The following jury was empanelled : — John Manchester (foreman), John Cameron, Mathew Thornton, F. and G. Smith, Alexander Little, Fred Gascoyne, Fred. Gaitt, Frank Slee, James Gaitson, Joseph Reece, James Burk, William Black, William McDonald, and James Dixon. After the jury had viewed the body, John Lonargan, police constable, stationed at Waimate, deposed : From information received on Thursday, the 12th inst., I proceeded to Butchers' Lane, in Waimate and saw deceased lying on his back in the road, quite dead. I searched him, and found a knife and a watch. I then removed the body to the Club Hotel. By the Foreman: I saw no blood on the road, nor on the body. I did not examine the body. Henry Butcher, sworn, deposed : I am a carter, living in Waimate. I have seen the body. I identify it to be the body of Ben Bailey. On Thursday last he was in my employment, carting straw. I was driving a team of bullocks ; deceased was walking with me. When we turned into Butcher's Lane, deceased rushed in front of me close to the bullocks, when the near side pole bullock kicked him on the legs and threw him down. I caught hold of him and tried to lift him out of the way of the wheel, but did not succeed. ... William Henry Butcher:  I am the son of the last witness. I was with my father..
Ann James (sworn) deposed : I am the wife of Henry James, a laborer, of Waimate. I have known the deceased for two years. He was twenty-three years of ago. His father's name was George Bailey, I don't know his mother's. Deceased was a native of West Wickham, Buckinghamshire, England. He has been three years in Now Zealand. He was married on the 30th Dec, 1876, at Waimate. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

Timaru Herald, 18 May 1877, Page 3
    Late Drowning Case at Waimate. The body of Richard Uren, who was drowned in the Waimate creek on Monday last, has not yet been found. Search was made by Mounted Constable Connell on Tuesday and Wednesday, but without success. The creek was dragged from where the accident occurred to its mouth in Waimate lagoon. The constable is of opinion that the body must have floated into the lagoon, which is a very natural surmise, considering the force of the current at the time the accident occurred.
    Accident.— We are very sorry to have to report a painful accident which happened to Mr E. H. Martelli yesterday afternoon, while following the hounds at the hunt near the Washdyke. As far as we can learn the horse he was riding straddled one of the fences and threw Mr Martelli over his head, eventually rolling on top of him. On being picked up he was almost insensible state, and it was feared his back and thigh were broken. He was conveyed to a house near at hand, and Dr McIntyre and Hammond sent for. On their arrival he was examined, and we are sorry say that the pelvis was found to be broken, and other severe injuries sustained. Later on he was brought into town in a buggy and safely deposited in his own house. He is at present lying in a very critical state.
    Death of Mr W. J. Fulton.— Another of our old and most respected residents has passed away in the person of Mr W. J. Fulton, of the Sportsman's Arms, Saltwater Creek, who died at his residence yesterday evening. Mr Fulton has been living in this district for about 13 years, and during that time succeeded in earning the goodwill and hearty friendship of all with whom he came in contact. He was taken ill on Tuesday night about 11 o'clock with inflammation of the kidneys ; and though he rallied slightly yesterday morning, he took a turn for the worse later in the day, and expired about 3 p.m.

Press, 19 May 1877, Page 5
Timaru, May 18. A man named Mitchell had both feet and his legs badly crushed by railway trucks running over them near the Waimate station last evening. He was conveyed to the Oamaru hospital, where the whole of one foot and part of the other were amputated. A woman dropped dead in a hotel at Waimate last evening. It is reported that poison has been found on her. Mr Martelli, who was hurt at the hunt yesterday, is not expected to live. An operation was performed upon him to-day.

Timaru Herald, 29 May 1877, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Melville Hotel, before E. Wakefield, Esq., J.P., noting as coroner, touching the death of A. F. Nixon, who met his death by the accidental discharge of a gun which he was at the time carrying. The following were sworn as jurymen : — Messrs W. Priest, T. Desmond, J. Davidson, E. Smith, S. Williams, M. Whitridge, a. Walters, H. Franklin, A. Bell, J. Hill, A. Laing, P. Dillon, F. Hobbs, and F. Risdon. Mr. W. Priest was elected foreman.
Inspector Pender deposed : This morning at a quarter to seven o'clock, a man named Petrie came to the Police-office and reported a death in Woollcombe's Gully, but could not say for certain whether the man was dead. I at once got a conveyance and accompanied him, and called for Dr Macintyre on the way and he went with us. Constable Macdonald also came with us. On arrival at the gate, in a fence on the North road, near Petrie's house, and not far from Judge Ward's residence, we found the body of the deceased. Petrie's son and a man named Donald McArthur were there. The body was lying close to the gateway, quite dead but warm. Part of the brain was scattered about the place about, twenty feet around. His bat was on the other side of the gate, in the paddock, and a portion of the brain was in the hat. His pipe was also inside the gate, but there was no tobacco in it. The body was lying with the head north-east, and the feet to the west at the foot of the gate. One of the legs was entangled in the rails of the gate, and had apparently got there from the fall. Under the body I found this gun now produced. The barrel and muzzle of the gun were covered by the body. It had this string tied on just as it is now, and I think the string was used for the purpose of carrying the gun, though I do not think the deceased had it across his shoulder when he fell. Dr Macintyre and I made a careful investigation of everything connected with the circumstances. The deceased was evidently going from the road side of the gate into the paddock. After examining the body we removed it into the cart and searched it, and the property now produced was found upon it ; consisting of £4 m notes ; 7s m silver, and three half-pence in copper ; also a silver pencil case; a silver watch with a gold chain attached ; a small quantity of powder and shot and one cap ; a bunch of keys ; a card ; and some letters addressed to A. F. Nixon. From the letters it would appear he had recently been in Dunedin, and that he has a daughter and some friends there. I have seen him here for about the last six weeks or so. He was in the habit of going to the Mechanics' Institute. He was a tall gentlemanly looking man, and from the papers and documents which I have since seen in his house, he had beep in good circumstances, and was a man of good education. He had a Maori kit strapped on his shoulder. The gun had been recently discharged. I feel convinced from the circumstances that he came by his death accidentally, and was apparently going out shooting towards the beach. The gun is quite new, and has been little used. The string could not have been tied on for suicidal purposes, as there was no mark indicating the impression of a foot upon it.
John Petrie deposed : I am a carpenter, living at Woollcombe's Gully. I knew deceased by sight. I heard a shot this morning about 4 a.m. About 6 o'clock, Donald McArthur came to my house and said a man was lying on the ground. I took a lantern and went with him and found deceased lying by the gate in the fence.
D. M'Arthur deposed : I am a laborer. The jury, after considering or a few minutes, returned a verdict of accidental death.

Star 17 July 1877, Page 2
A correspondent writes to us from Burkes Pass, July 10, as follows:— I got word last night that a man named William Free was drowned at the Pukaki ferry on July 6. He had been drinking for two or three days ; the ferryman at the Pukaki, however, says that Free was quite sober when he came to the ferry at 5 p.m. After he had got on the punt Free lost his hat; Tait followed down the river to recover his hat for 400 or 600 yards, and after obtaining it he returned to the punt, and found Free had disappeared, leaving his horse on the punt. He also took off his coat, gloves, and comforter, leaving them on the punt. Mr Ostler, Sergeant Gilchrist, and a number of men are searching for the body. Free was employed by David, Bros., as bullock driver. His father, William Free, a pensioner, used to live in Christchurch, near Ward and Co.'s Brewery. If the body is found an inquest will be held by Mr Ostler.

Timaru Herald, 21 August 1877, Page 8
On Friday, Aug. 10, four swaggers arrived at the Saltwater Creek from Waimate. They pitched their tent amongst the flax on the south side of the creek, a little distance below the bridge. One of them, whose name we have been unable to learn, then came to town, mid getting employment. On Saturday the other three Thomas Jackson, Charles Shepherd, and Thomas Mellor also came into Timaru, and stayed till about 8 p.m. When they left they were the worst for liquor, and on arrival at the Sportsman's Arms had some more. They then returned to their tent. On entering it Mellor tripped over one of the lines and knocked it down. This, it seems, disgusted the other two, for they rolled up the tent and started off; Mellor remaining on the spot and going to sleep. It is supposed that they saw the light from the Sportsman's Arms when they struck their tent on i the previous night, and mistaking the depth of water, attempted to cross the Creek, as their footsteps were easily traced to the edge. The water where they were found is some eight or ten feet m depth, and deepens suddenly about 12 feet from the shore. The two men were both hardworking, industrious fellows. Jackson, who was about 30years of age, is a native of Christchurch ; while Shepherd has not been long m the colony, and is supposed to have arrived at Nelson from London in the ship Fernglen about 18 months ago. He was not more than 22 or 23 years of ago. An inquest on the bodies was held on August 11 at the Commercial Hotel, before B. Woollcombe, Esquire, Coroner, when a verdict of " Accidental Death" was returned.

Evening Post, 24 September 1877, Page 2
Timaru. 23rd September. A fatal accident occurred about noon today. A girl fifteen months old, the daughter of Mr. Richard Shaw, fell into a pool of water in a brickyard. The father lived at the back of the section, and the dividing fence had been taken away yesterday. The mother on missing the child searched and found it in the pool. Medical aid was obtained as soon as possible, but was of no avail.

Press, 10 October 1877, Page 2
Sudden Death at Temuka — William Thompson, a son of Mr Boyd Thompson, of Temuka, was found dead in his bed on Monday morning. The deceased had complained of pains in his head on the previous night, but no serious consequences were anticipated.

Evening Post, 10 November 1877, Page 2
Timaru. 10th November.
A fatal accident occurred yesterday at Fairlie Creek. A son of Mr. Young of the firm of Elder and Young, fell from his horse. He was insensible when picked up by the driver of the mail coach. He only spoke a few words and then expired.

Timaru Herald, 17 November 1877, Page 3
Inquest. — An inquest was held yesterday at Sod Town, Temuka, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, on the body of a child 16 months old, the son of George Edgeley. It appeared that on last Thursday the child strayed away from the house to an adjacent creek, into which lie fell, resulting m his being drowned. A verdict of accidental death by drowning was returned.

Evening Post, 14 December 1877, Page 2
A man named Henry Eagle was killed to-day through the upsetting of a dray with a load of shingles at Ruamahunga Bridge. It is said that he leaves a wife and a large family at Temuka or Timaru.

Evening Post, 17 December 1877, Page 2
Timaru Herald, 1 January 1878, Page 7
Yesterday afternoon, a man named Joseph Carey was drowned in the Saltwater Creek, Timaru. While under the influence of drink, he went into the creek to bathe, and after swimming a short distance he sank. Mr. Thomas Eagan went to his assistance, but was nearly drowned himself through the struggles of the drowning man. Dr. Lovegrove was soon on the spot, and tried every means in his power to bring Carey round, but without avail. He is said to have a wife and family in Tasmania. Carey was a man of 35, a native of Ireland.

Tuapeka Times, 16 January 1878, Page 6
On the 8th inst. there died in the Timaru hospital, of heart disease, Mr Charles Lane, who was for some time before his arrival, in this Colony (about eighteen months ago) connected with the Canadian and London Press. He did very little journalistic work in this Province, and for some time past was in Oamaru in very indifferent health.- . Deceased, who was very well connected; for some years held a commission in H.M.s 54th Foot.

Evening Post, 23 January 1878, Page 2
Timaru. 22nd January. A fatal accident occurred last night at Opawa [Albury] on the railway. A man named Hutt, a bullock-driver, belonging to Level's station, while attempting to pass into another carriage fell. The guard hearing a woman scream put the break hard down, and backed the train, when the body of the man Hutt was found outside the rails. His head was severed into two pieces, and the back-half of the skull was hanging to the other portion by a piece of skin. Brains were found about six yards from the line. The flange of the wheel struck the man's head. The body was uninjured. Had he fallen three or four inches further off he would probably have been saved. Hutt was about 25 years old and it is believed his parents live at Moeraki Downs.

Timaru Herald, 23 January 1878, Page 4
Fatal Accident. Mr Henry Hutt, a brother of the unfortuate man who was killed on the Opawa railway on Monday evening, write to us us follows: "Would you kindly correct & slight misstatement in your report of the fatal accident which happened to the young Mr Hutt on Monday. You stated that his father lives at Moeraki Downs, south of Oamaru it should be, Moeraki Downs, near Rangiora."

Grey River Argus, 25 January 1878, Page 2
A man named Hull was killed on the Opawa railway on the 21st inst. He got into the down train at Cave station, and shortly afterwards attempted to pass from one carriage to another. He slipped and fell underneath, his head being cut into two pieces by the flange of the wheel The body was brought into town and an inquest was to be held. Hull was a bullock driver on the Levels station, and about 30 years of age.

Timaru Herald, 29 January 1878, Page 5
FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE OPAWA RAILWAY.
We regret to have to record a fatal and most painful accident which occurred on the Opawa railway on Monday, 21st inst. On the down train arriving at the Cave station, a young man named Hutt, a bullock driver on the Levels station, got into it. Shortly after starting, he attempted to pass from one carriage to another, but slipped and fell. Guard Wadlow heard a woman scream out, and at once put the break hard down. .. Inspector Pender being at once communicated with Mr Jones, the Station Master, having provided a stretcher, the body was conveyed to the Club Hotel. Hutt was between 25 and 30 years of age, and it is stated that his parents live at Moeraki Downs, near Rangiora. No blame is attached to the guard for the accident occurring.'

Timaru Herald, 7 February 1878, Page 3 WILFUL MURDER
An inquest was held at the Hibernian Hotel, Timaru, yesterday, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of a female child, which occurred at the old Hospital on Saturday, the 2nd inst. The following jury were sworn in : George Cullen, W. Mein, Henry Law, Henry Hadfield, W. Edminston, F. A. Sims, John Herman, L. Scott, C. Green, Thomas Price, A: Levy, P. W. Hutton, and A. G. Stone. Mr Hutton was elected foreman, and the body was viewed. The Coroner said that he had been informed by the police that they had arrested the mother of the child, Margaret Wilson on suspicion, and be would express it as his opinion that the medical evidence only should be taken then, so as to allow of the body being buried. Dr Macintyre was then called, and deposed as follows : I know Margaret Wilson. She was confined on Saturday morning last of a female child, and I attended her very shortly afterwards. The body just viewed by the jury is that of her child. I have held a post mortem examination on it. When I first saw the child it was strong and healthy. In making the post mortem examination I discovered no marks of injury on the skin, but on removing that I found the large veins on the neck, chest, and head were filled with dark fluid blood, and those of the membrane covering the brain were in, a similar state. On dissecting the skin of the skull, I found an extensive bruise in the tissues underlying it. The bruise was above and behind the right ear, and extended round the back of the head. I also found a smaller bruise on the right side of the windpipe, leading into the gullet. The lungs were gorged with dark fluid blood, and the heart contained dark clotted blood. There was also blood in the nostrils and mouth. From these symptoms it is my opinion that the child died of suffocation by its windpipe having been pressed with violence. I saw the child alive twice, last time being on Monday.

Timaru Herald, 8 April 1878, Page 4
Death of the Lad Musker. — James Musker, the lad who a few days ago met with an accident, by being crushed between two trucks on the siding near the National Mortgage and Agency Company's store, George street, died from its effects at half-past 1 o'clock yesterday morning. An inquest will probably be held to-day. [no inquest was held, but if he was an adult one would have been held - see Timaru Herald, 11 April 1878, Page 3

Timaru Herald, 9 April 1878, Page 4
An inquest touching the death of Alice Theodora, daughter of William Husband, on Saturday evening, was held at the father's residence in North-street yesterday afternoon, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury:- W. A Ford (foreman), J. Sinter, Charles Jones, C. F. Hullam, T. Amos, Henry Gardner, J. Allpress, G. Kimbor, G. Purdie, W. J. Nelson, J. Murphy, W. Price, H. Packer, A. McGlashan. Henry Green and T. T. Brownell were fined 10s each for not being m attendance as jurymen.
    Alice Husband : I am the wife of William Husband, and mother of the deceased. Her name was Alice Theodora, and she was 3 years and 2 months old. On Saturday evening last about 6 o'clock I had occasion to go to the well for water. When I came away I forgot to put the lid on again. I returned to the house, and my brother then went out, and I thought the deceased followed him. When he returned he said he had not seen her. He then had his dinner, after which I went to look for the child. I went down the section, and on returning saw a wineglass about two feet from the well. I then looked into the well, and saw the deceased floating face downwards in the water in it. I called out to Mr Husband, who came out at once and got a ladder to put down the well. While he was getting it, Mr Raine went down the well by means of a rope, and put the deceased a bucket, by which she was brought up. She was quite dead then.
    William Husband : I am the father of the deceased. ...
    W. S. Raine : I live next door to Mr Husband. About half-past 6 o'clock on Saturday I went outside, and saw two persons standing by the well behind Husband's house. One was Mrs Husband. I think they were holding a candle over the well. I heard Mrs Husband call out, "She's down there," and I got over the fence and went to them. The man went and got a ladder, but could not get it into the well. I then went down by means of the bucket rope, and found a child floating on its face in the water. I put it in a bucket and it was drawn up. It was to all appearances quite dead. The jury without hesitation returned a verdict of " Accidental Death by Drowning," adding a rider recommending that a safer lid be attached to the well in future.

North Otago Times, 19 April 1878, Page 2
Timaru Herald, 22 April 1878, Page 4 Inquest
A man named William Somers, a baker in the employ of Mr Mendelson Morris, Pleasant Point, was burnt to Death last night. He set a batch of bread at eight o'clock, and went to bed at nine. The bakery, which was a detached building, was afterwards found to be on fire, and was burnt to the ground. On examination the remains of Somers were found. No clue has been obtained as to the cause of the fire. The poor fellow remains were taken to the Point Hotel, where an inquest will be held.

Timaru Herald, 22 April 1878, Page 4 INQUEST.
An inquest touching the death of William Somers, who was burned to death in Messrs Mendelson and Morris's bakehouse at Pleasant Point, on Wednesday last, was held before B, Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, at the Point Hotel last Saturday. Mr William Eames was chosen foreman of the jury, and the following evidence was taken : — Charles Wedge : I am a baker, living at the Point. On Wednesday evening last, at about half-past 7 o'clock, I was in a bakehouse near Mendelson's store. William Somers was also in the bakehouse. I had done the baking work for the next day, and I left William Somers undressed and in his bed, which was about two feet off the floor, with a chaff matrass. There were colored curtains suspended from the ceiling hanging down below the bed. I left a candle in a candlestick standing on a box, with matches, and a pipe. 1 blew the candle out before I left him. There was no fire in the house, and had not been all day. I went to the Point Hotel and stayed till I heard the alarm of fire. I went over and found that the house in which I had left William Somers was on fire. The building consisted of a bakehouse which the front door opened into. The Oven was at the back of the bakehouse. The bedroom was on one side of the bakehouse communicating with the bakehouse and with a door to the back. There was a bed alone the front side of the bedroom in which William Somers was sleeping. I had a bed alongside the partition between the bedroom and bakehouse. I have been residing in the house burnt down about a fortnight. William Somers had been there previously.
    Griffith Roberts : I am storeman to Mendelson and Morris.
    William Exell : I am a brickmaker living at the Point. I knew the bakehouse that has been burnt down. I was about fifty yards from it on Wednesday night. When I first saw smoke issuing from it a little before nine o'clock William McClellan was with me. We both went to the house, calling out fire. There was a well there, and people were pumping, but the fire was too strong.
    Joseph Stanley : I am a constable of police stationed at the Point. William Somers came from England with me in 1875. He was about 44 years old. I know nobody belonging to him. I do not know whether he was married ; he had no family with him.
    Isaac Lewis Morris : I am one of the partners in the firm of Mendelson and Morris. The late fire was on my premises, in a bakehouse. William Jones rented the bakehouse. It was not insured. Wedge and Roberts are both in my employ. Somers was only about two months there. The place was on fire about 12 months ago accidentally that fire was put out. I have no suspicion that the last time it was set on fire. The jury after a short deliberation returned the following verdict : — " That William Somers died through having been burned on Wednesday, April 17. 1878, but in what manner the fire originated there is no evidence to show."

Timaru Herald, 23 April 1878, Page 4
An inquest touching the death of William Taylor, who was found dead m Messrs Allan and Stumbles' blacksmith shop, Timaru, on Sunday morning, was hold yesterday afternoon and evening, in the Ship Hotel, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury: — G. W. Wade (Foreman), F. Parsons, J. A. Davidson, G. Todd, C. Green, W. Huggings, J. Barrett, Samuel Barclay, W. H. Smith, G. Bryant, T. F. Dillon, J. J. Daily, and W. J. Allen. The following evidence was taken : — John Hamilton : I am manager for Mr J. Bruce, in Timaru. Yesterday, about a quarter-one o'clock, I, i company with Peter Sinclair and Leask, went to the spot where the deceased was found, viz., at Messrs Allan and Stumbles' blacksmith's shop. Sinclair called my attention to the body. It was lying under a roof attached to the shop. Leask went for a policeman. The deceased was lying on his back on the ground, with the strap produced fastened tight round his neck. His knees were drawn up and his feet turned at an angle to his body, and close to the edge of a small bank.
Albert Clarke : I am barman at the Old Bank Hotel, Timaru. I have seen the body lying in this hotel, and recognise it as that of a man named " Bill the Baker." I saw him last between 8 and 9 o'clock on Saturday night. He was m the billiard-room of the hotel, lying asleep on the sofa. I had seen him in the bar earlier m the evening. He appeared sober then, but had been drinking hard for several days previously.
James Knight : I am a laborer, living in Timaru. I have seen the body of the deceased, and recognise it as that of William Taylor, a baker.
Harry Wilson : I am a waiter at the Old Bank Hotel.
Verdict: — "That the accused committed suicide while laboring under temporary insanity." The Coroner staled he should take this verdict, and the proceedings terminated.

Timaru Herald, 23 May 1878, Page 4
—An inquest touching the death of James Campbell who was killed last Monday at the Cave by a team of horses while he was driving having trampled on him, was held yesterday at the Cave Hotel, before B. Woollcombe, Esq , and a jury. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

Evening Post, 28 May 1878, Page 2
Timaru. 27th May. A man named John Keating, who was injured on Saturday by the kick of a horse at Jonas Hart and Wilde's saleyards, died to-day.

Timaru Herald, 29 May 1878
An inquest touching the death of John Caton who died, in the hospital from the effects of injuries received by him in being kicked by a horse in Mr Jonas's horse repository last Saturday, was held yesterday afternoon in the hospital, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury :Henry Cain (foreman), J. Crawford, W.F. Newbury, R. Barton, W. Evans, J.S. Derby, C. Bowker, J.B. Witt, G. Gee, S. Shappere, W. Upton, T. Green, J. Levein and J. Jones.
Peter Pender: I am an Inspector of Police, stationed at Timaru. On Saturday last, about noon I was standing on the Main South Road, in from of Jonas, hart and Wildie's sale yard, when an alarm was raised that a man was hurt, and I went in. I saw the deceased, lying on the ground supported by some men. Some brandy was given to him, and he was taken to Mr Jonna's office. He said he had been kicked by a horse in the stomach.
Maurice John Hart : I am one of the firm of Jonas, hart and Wilie, There was a sale of horse on Saturday in our yard. As a mare, was being led round for sale, I saw her kick the deceased.
The horse was broken in.
Patrick Macintyre: I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, in charge of the hospital. Found he was suffering from great pain in the bowels. I made a post mortem examination of his body. A part, of his, bowels, was torn right across, and the bowels generally membranes were inflammed.
George Brown Fairburn : I am the Steward of the hospital. His name was John Caton. He was a road contractor. knew his father. The deceased has been five years in New Zealand. I believe his father's name was Daniel Caton. He was married. He belonged to the County of Kerry, in Ireland. I saw the deceased on Sunday, and he told me the horse was coming too near him and he struck it with a rod and it kicked him.
Frederick Turgood : I was leading the hone when some one called out "he is kicked." I looked back and saw the man on the ground. I believe someone struck the horse. The jury, after a short deliberation, returned the following verdict :— " That the deceased came by his death by a rupture of the bowels, caused by an accidental kick from a horse."

Otago Witness 19 October 1878, Page 13
On the 2nd October, at London, Margaret Hunt, wife of H. J. LeCren, late of Timaru. (By telegram.)

Timaru Herald, 29 May 1879, Page 2
Inquest at Waimate. — An was opened on Monday evening, at the Club Hotel, Waimate, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, upon the body of an infant who had died under very peculiar circumstances. The evidence of Frederick Harris, the father of the child, was to the effect that the child was born about 5 o'clock on Sunday morning. He was asleep at the time, and afterwards got up and left the house, knowing nothing of what had occurred. His wife had not informed him of the birth of the child, as she was ashamed to do so, and she declared that she had been ignorant of her condition. The mother went, and about noon Dr Deane was called in. He found that the child was born alive, but for want of attention had presently died. It was not until Dr Deane had arrived that the father learned what had happened. The evidence of the mother being necessary, and Dr Deane stating that she would be unable to attend for at least ten days, the inquest was adjourned till Wednesday, June 4th, the jury being bound over to attend again.

Timaru Herald, 13 July 1878, Page 3
An inquest, touching the death of Maria Meades, was held yesterday m the Courthouse, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., coroner, and a jury, of which Mr R. B. Sibly was chosen foreman. Several jurors who did not answer to their names when called upon, were fined 10s each for not attending the inquest. The following evidence was taken : — William Meades : I am a laborer. The body lying at my house is that of my wife Maria Meades. Her maiden name was Maria Starr. She was born at Kilrush, in Ireland, and has been in New Zealand for the last 17 or 18 years. She was 38 years of age, and has been married nearly 11 years. On Wednesday evening, the 10th inst., I found her a little the worse for liquor, and I put her into bed. ...
Edward Thornton: I am a constable of police.
James Francis Lovegrove : I am a duly qualified medical practitioner living in Timaru.
The jury, without retiring, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, "that the deceased died from dropsy of the heart."

Otago Daily Times 29 July 1878, Page 3
On the 25th June, at Waimate, Canterbury, New Zealand Thomas M'Kinlay, aged 44 years, late of Nether Ross Farm, Dunbartonshire, Scotland.

Timaru Herald, 31 July 1878, Page 2
An inquest touching the death of Frederick E. Fynmore, whose body was found last Monday m the Saltwater Creek, was held yesterday morning m the Court, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Robert Webster was foreman. The following evidence was taken : — Henry Martin : I am a laborer, working at the tannery near Cabot's. Yesterday morning I observed a man's head floating in the Saltwater Creek, near the bridge, on the Otipua road.
John Eric Davidson : I have known the deceased for some years. He lately came from Nelson to Timaru. His wife Fanny Fynmore is here.
I know the deceased's handwriting. The letter addressed to his wife in his handwriting. I have seen the deceived a good deal lately. Ho expected £1750 from England. I saw the letter stating his father was dead, and the money was coming out. I saw the death of his father cut out of a paper. Deceased was a commissioned officer in the Royal Marine Artillery. I say deceased last alive on the evening that the San Francisco mail arrived. He had made arrangements to go Home. I know he took stimulants to make him sleep. He bought a bottle of chlorel from Mr Watkins like the bottle produced. Deceased was sometimes in high spirits, and sometimes despondent.
Thomas Hall: I am a commission agent, and know deceased. We have been trying to get some money out from Home for him. He has had money remitted to him from Home previously. He was in hopes of getting money by last mail, but we did not think there was time. He had incurred liabilities in town. The mail arrived in Timaru on the evening of the 9th of this month, but; the money did not come.
Patrick Macintyre : I am a duly qualified medical practitioner.
This completed the evidence, And the jury, after some deliberation, returned the following verdict: — "That the deceased drowned himself on the 10th day of July, 1878, m the Saltwater Creek, while suffering under temporary insanity."

Timaru Herald, 9 August 1878, Page 2
An inquest was held at Mr Thomas Lee's house, Waimate Bush, on August 7th, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, on the body of a male child, the infant of James Wilson. From the evidence of Jane Wilson and Mrs Drummond (the nurse), it appears that the child was born dead on the 6th inst., at 10 a.m. The doctors refused to give a certificate for burial. Dr Hoadley, after making a post mortem examination, deposed that the child had never breathed. A verdict was returned that the child was stillborn.

Timaru Herald, 19 August 1879, Page 2
An inquest touching the death of Peter Pezet was held at Stone's Hotel yesterday afternoon, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury : — Messrs E. G. Stericker (Foreman), F. W. Hales, H. Green, C. Bowker, T. B. Jones, C. Palliser, G. Cliff, R, Spurwin, A. J. H. Bower, W. Rutherfurd, J. Allpress, and D. Maclean. The jury having proceeded to the Hospital and viewed the body, the following evidence was taken : — Henry Evans : I am an architect living in Timaru, and the High School in being constructed under my supervision. I drew up the plans for it. The contractor is James Gore, of Dunedin, and the Clerk of Works, — Ogilvie. I was at the building on Saturday last. Part of the brickwork at the west side was doing worked at. Two men were plastering about four foot from the ground, a boy was at work on the ground, and others were higher up, engaged on the scaffolding. Shortly after 2 p.m. the brick pediment broke off some twenty feet from the ground, fell on the scaffolding, and the whole came down. I noticed some of the men among the debris. The pediment was rather lighter than usual.
John Hamilton : I am a Clerk of Works, residing in Timaru. I had nothing to do with the High School, but was there when the accident occurred.
James Gore : I am contractor for the High School. My son looks after the work for me. I am acquainted with the plans.
Peter John Pezet : I am a son of the deceased. We lived at Dunedin, and came up last Tuesday week. I was at work on Saturday with him, at the High School. I was on the ground and he was above me. I was knocked down by the fall of bricks. When I got up I saw my father almost buried. One large stone was on his head.
George Hutcheson : I am a bricklayer, and have been employed at the High School. I knew the deceased. He was a plasterer. On Saturday I was on the top scaffolding at the west end of the building. A laborer named Moore was with me. The deceased was on another scaffolding ten feet below me. After a short absence they returned with a verdict of " Accidental Death," at the same time drawing attention to the inadvisability of carrying out their cornices in their present form.

Timaru Herald, 24 August 1878, Page 2
Mysterious Death. — Information was brought to the police station about 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon that the body was found in the neighborhood of Mr Perry's house. The Inspector, Sergeant, and Constable Thornton proceeded immediately to the place indicated, and found there in a gorse bush the body of a man named Thomas Brookes, a resident of Church street. The body was first discovered by a man named Procter, who was engaged with Mr G. H. Bridge in surveying the place. There was no mark of violence on the body, and apparently the deceased died without a struggle It is conjectured that as he was drinking hard for some time, he must have crept into the bush while under the influence of drink and died there. The body was removed by the police to the Melville Hotel, whore an inquest will be hold at 10 o'clock this morning.

Evening Post, 2 September 1878, Page 2
Information from Albury says that Edwards and wife went out to burn tussocks on their farm. The flames spread rapidly, and Edwards told his wife to make for home. She did so, while he started to extinguish the flames. He was fearfully burnt, and on his way home found his wife lying insensible, face downward, on the burnt ground. She was burnt from head to foot. He carried her home and sent word to town. She died this morning before medical assistance arrived, and he is now in the Hospital, not expected to live. They were only just married
    Timaru, 31st August. An inquest was held at Winchester touching the Death of Mrs. Lucy Edwards, who died from injuries received from her clothes catching fire while burning tussocks on her husband's land on the Opuha River. A verdict of accidental Death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 4 September 1878, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Melville Hotel, Timaru before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, touching the death, on Sunday last, of a sailor of the late barque Melrose, named Arthur Connolly, alias Arthur Waters. The following jury were sworn . — John Campbell, F. Scott, J. Allpress, M. Mullin, J. Macpherson, Thos. F. Dillon. J. Craigie, J. Cotton, J. Whitttker, C. Dodson, F. Buchanan, A. Bennett, J. Herman, R.S. Cook. Mr Allpress chosen foreman. The articles of the vessel having been produced, the deceased's name appeared therein, as Arthur Waters, a native of Liverpool.
James Howie : I was chief mate of the barque Melrose.
Peter Pender : I am an Inspector of Police, stationed at Timaru.

Timaru Herald, 20 September 1878, Page 2
The Late Fire at Raincliff. — We regret to learn that Mr Edwards, who was burnt so severely by a grass fire, near Raincliff, about three weeks ago, died at his father's residence, Christchurch on Wednesday last.

Evening Post, 21 September 1878, Page 2
The Star to-night tells the following touting story : — " In our obituary notices to-day, appears the melancholy record of the death of young couple within two months of their wedding day. The circumstances are these : A fire has occurred near Timaru, by which Mr. Edwards was badly burnt, and his young; wife (late Miss Lucy Eyre) was burnt to death. Mrs. Edwards was the youngest daughter of Mr. Eyre, of Te Arai Point, and had been married but a few weeks. Mr. Edwards was quite a young man. The sudden and terrible death of one so well known, who but lately left her home in full enjoyment of health, and with a happy future in prospect, has cast quite a gloom upon Te Arai district, Mr. Edwards lingered for nearly three weeks after the untimely end of his young wife, and then expired from the injuries he had sustained and the severe nervous shock to his system."

Timaru Herald, 4 October 1878, Page 2
Drowning of Mr James Mitchell. — Additional particulars regarding the death by drowning on Tuesday last, of Mr James Mitchell, came to hand yesterday. It appears he was trying to cross one of the overflows of the Waitaki, when the buggy which he was driving was overturned, and being unable to swim he was swept away and drowned. Another person was crossing on horseback at the time but was unable to render any assistance. Mr Mitchell's body has not yet been recovered. Inquest Timaru Herald, 10 October 1878, Page 3

Timaru Herald, 10 October 1878, Page 3
The following are the full particulars of the inquest on Mrs Stirling. A Coroner's inquest touching the death of Mary Emily Stirling, was held at the Club Hotel, Waimate, on Monday, before Richmond Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury. The jury went to the bush to view the body, after which they returned to the Club Hotel, when the following evidence was taken.
William Brett: I am working m the bush at Waimate and am a mate of Stirling's, the husband of the deceased. I lived in the same house with him. I remember the day Mrs Stirling died.
John Barnes : I am a laborer, living at Waimate
Joseph Culvert : I am a laborer, and live close to Stirling's house.
Eliza Culvert : I am the wife of Joseph Culvert, and live near Stirling's.
Marian Hamilton : I am a widow, and live at Waimate Bush, about three minutes' walk from Stirling's.
George Steadman : I am a laborer. I lire near Hunt and Jeffery's mill, about 100 yards from Stirling's. I can see the house from my hut.
William Burgess : I am a laborer at Waimate. I know the Stirling's. I heard them quarrelling five or six weeks ago.
John Waddell : I am a laborer at Waimate Bush and live near Stirling's house.
Sergeant Routledge: I went to Stirling's house on the evening of the 4th, with Dr Hoadley.
Robert Hoadley : I am a duly qualified medical practitioner at Waimate. The opinion I have formed is that the deceased died from hemorrhage, from the wound on the stomach If the wound was inflicted by an instrument it would be by something blunt.
Mary Stirling, a child of tender years, was too much overcome to give evidence. The Jury found Charles Stirling guilty of "manslaughter," and he was removed to the gaol at Timaru.

Otago Witness, 19 October 1878, Page 13
On the 2nd October, at London, Margaret Hunt, wife of H. J. LeCren, late of Timaru.  (By telegram.)

Evening Post, 16 November 1878, Page 2
Timaru, l5th November. A frightful fatal accident occurred at half past 11 this morning. The roof blew off a house near Ormsby's flour mill, taking a chimney with it. Through its fall the latter caused instantaneous death to an infant seven months old, and Mrs. Drew died about ten minutes after. Drew is a most respectable man, and is head miller at the mill in question. Great sympathy is felt at his sudden bereavement.

Grey River Argus, 18 November 1878, Page 2
Timaru, Nov. 16. At the inquest on the bodies of Mrs Drew and her infant, a verdict of accidental death was recorded, the jury adding a rider strongly animadverting on the construction of buildings similar to the one where the accident occurred, and requesting the Coroner to forward to the proper quarter a recommendation that the erection of buildings be properly supervised in future. It came out in evidence that the roof was not connected in any way with the walls of the building.

Grey River Argus, 25 November 1878, Page 2
About 11.30 o'clock, and when the gale was at its worst, Mr Drew (in the employ of Mr Ormsby at the Belford Flour Mill) left the mill to go home. His house is one of two three-roomed concrete lean-to's situated in North-street, just behind the mill. As he entered the wicket-gate, he noticed the roof of the house lifting. He immediately hastened inside, and as he entered the door he saw his wife rush towards the fire place, where the youngest child — a baby only seven months old — was asleep in a chair. Just as she caught the little creature up in her arms the roof blew off, and the chimney fell inwards with a crash, and, striking Mrs Draw on the back, buried her and the baby in its ruins. Mr Drew frantically exerted himself in removing the debris, amongst which was a huge solid block, from off his wife, and by dint of great labor, and the assistance of others who hastened to the house, soon released her. The infant was to all appearances quite dead, while Mrs Drew was evidently seriously injured. Medical help was at once sent for, Dr Williams arriving in a few minutes, and Dr Macintyre immediately afterwards. Life was pronounced to be quite extinct in the baby, while the mother was so terribly crushed about the back and lungs that she only lived ten. minutes after being extricated. Subsequently the bodies were removed to the Commercial Hotel, where an inquest will be held at 11.30 a.m. to-day. Mrs [Elizabeth] Drew was 37 years of age, and, we believe, with her husband had only lately arrived from Christchurch. Mr Drew, as may be imagined, is completely prostrated by the dreadful blow, and one and all will join with us in tendering our sincerest sympathy to him in his sad bereavement. It seems that the roof of the lean-to was simply nailed to plates which rested on the walls without in any way being fastened. The portion of the chimney above the roof was carried off with it, while that beneath down to the mantelpiece, fell inwards and crushed Mrs Drew and her infant. The whole building must have been very badly constructed.

Timaru Herald, 6 December 1878, Page 2
An accident attended with loss of life and other serious consequences, occurred last Wednesday at Kakahu. In the forenoon of that day four men in the employment of a contractor named Andrew Reid, were engaged in filling a load of gravel in a gravel pit, when the bank fell in burying one of them completely, and covering two others up to the shoulders. Assistance was rendered as soon as possible by Mr Skinuer's men, and a number of shearers who happened to be near the place at the time, and the men were dug out of the gravel with all possible speed, when it was found that the poor fellow, who had been completely covered, was dead, and that the other two men had escaped with comparatively slight injuries. Dr Fish was soon afterwards in attendance, and discovered that the deceased had his two legs broken, and his body and head fearfully bruised. Sergeant O'Malley who arrived shortly after, had his body removed to the Hilton Hotel, Kakahu, the same evening. The name of the deceased is unknown, but it is probable that it would be ascertained at the inquest which was to be held yesterday. The names of the men who were with him were Daniel Leary, Edward Sheenan and Hugh Guining, all of whom escaped unhurt. The dray that the men were filling was smashed to pieces, the shaft, horse killed on the spot, and the leading horse's legs were broken.

Timaru Herald, 19 December 1878, Page 2
Inquest. — An inquest was held at Waimate on Monday last, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr Price was chosen foreman, touching the death of a man named William Budge. The evidence of the principal witness, Robert Ruddock, was as follows : — "I am a laborer. On last Saturday night I slept in the Waimate Hotel. Two other men slept in the same room with me. I saw the body of deceased. It is the body of one of the men who slept in the room. David Budge deposed : "I saw the body of deceased last night. I identify it as that of my brother William Budge. He has been managing for Messrs Lees and Moore lately. His ago was 42. Deceased was born in Caithness Shire, Scotland. He has been in the colony 16 years. He is not married. He never complained to me of illness. He resided sometimes at Oamaru and sometimes at Redcliffe." After other evidence had been taken, a verdict of " Death from natural causes " was returned.

Timaru Herald, 24 December 1878, Page 2
Death from Drunkenness. News was brought to town yesterday afternoon by Sergeant Burtonshaw, of the Opawa Station, that a man named Albert Slocum was found dead yesterday morning by a Michael O'Brien on the Allandale road, about five miles from Fairlie Creek. The deceased was found stretched flat on his back, with his face uncovered, and fearfully scorched from the sun. He held a bottle of gin very firmly m his hand, and it is supposed that while under the influence of drink he went to sleep m the position above described, and was killed by sunstroke. He could not have been more than about 40 hours dead before he was discovered, as O'Brien had seen him on the previous Saturday afternoon near the place. He was then under the influence of drink, and invited O'Brien to partake of some of the contents of the bottle. O'Brien reported the matter at the Fairlie Creek Hotel, to which place the body was subsequently conveyed, and it still remains there awaiting an inquest.

Timaru Herald, 26 December 1878, Page 2
An inquest touching the death of Albert Slocum who was found dead on the Allandale road on the previous day, was held last Tuesday at the Fairlie Creek Hotel, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., J.P., Acting Coroner, and a jury. The evidence of Dr. Macintyre, who had made a post mortem examination of the body, was to the effect that the deceased had been a man of feeble constitution, who had been subject to chest and heart disease, and that he died from inflammation of the intestines. The verdict of the jury was in accordance with the medical testimony.

Timaru Herald, 26 December 1878, Page 2
Suicide. — Frederick Tully, who shot himself through the head at Station Peak on Monday last, died in three-quarters of an hour after the committal of the rash act. An inquest was held last Tuesday, but the result has not yet reached us.

Timaru Herald, 26 December 1878, Page 2
The following scale of fees are to be charged in future by the Geraldine Cemetery Board Digging grave, attendance and dressing ground, warrant of burial, and registering, without distinction of age, 17s 6d cost of grave plots, each, £1 10s; re-opening vault or grave, £1.

Timaru Herald, 27 January 1879, Page 2
The Timaru Hospital. — An inquest was held in the Hospital on Saturday on the body of John Cassidy, a labourer, who at the time of his death was a patient in that institution. We trust that the Hospital Commission will institute the strictest possible inquiry into the circumstances connected with this matter and that for the satisfaction of the public they will take such measures ns may be deemed necessary to prevent a recurrence of such cases. No doubt some one is in fault for the gross carelessness, to say the least of it, which was exhibited in regard to the attendant on Cassidy. If an inquiry is decided upon it is to be hoped that it will not be of a private diameter.
Harry Woodfield said: I am a laborer, living at Temuka
John Joseph Daily deposed : I am steward at the Timaru Hospital.
Rawlenson deposed : I am at present a patient m this Hospital
Charles Dear deposed : I am a porter at the Timaru Hospital.
Patrick O'Connor, a patient at the hospital.
Dr. MacIntyre, visiting surgeon to the Timaru Hospital
The Coroner summed up, and the Jury, after about fifteen minutes consideration, brought, in a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from typhoid fever that the use of the straight jacket was unnecessary, and that the deceased should have been visited during the interval between one and seven o'clock on Saturday morning.

North Otago Times,10 February 1879, Page 2
Timaru. February 8.
February The body of Capt. Evans, of the ketch Palmerston, who was drowned at the time of the shipping casualties on the 1st September last, was found to-day buried in the shingle in Caroline Bay. It was hardly recognisable.

Otago Witness, 18 January 1879, Page 18
Star, 16 January 1879, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday, touching the Death of Mary Connor, who hanged herself at Waitohi Flat on Monday. A verdict of "Suicide while labouring under temporary insanity" was returned. The deceased had only been in the Colony about a year. 
Timaru Herald
, 16 January 1879, Page 3 inquest. Peter Friel : Mary Connor, the deceased, was in my service us housemaid and dairymaid.

Timaru Herald, 16 January 1879, Page 3
An inquest was hold on Tuesday last at Mr Friel's residence, Waitohi Flat, by A. LeG. Campbell, Esq., Coroner, on the body of Mary Connor. Mr Michael McCabe was chosen foreman of the jury, and the following evidence was given : — Peter Friel : Mary Connor, the deceased, was my service as housemaid and dairymaid. I last saw her alive about six o'clock on the morning of January 13th and I did not notice anything particular about her then. She was passing along the passage. She generally went out about that time to milk the cows. About half past eight or nine o'clock as she had not come back I called out at the back door for her, but got no answer. My wife had gone down to Temuka about half-past six that morning and I was left alone. I then went, with a child my arms to see I could see the girl. I went to the creek, as I had got alarmed, for the bank of the creek was very steep, and the morning was wet. When I could find nothing of her in the creek, I concluded she had either gone with my wife to Temuka or to Daniel Hannny's place. About half-past one in the afternoon I went to Mr. Coll's place, where my wife had to call on her way home from Temuka, and found my wife there, and told her I had not seen the deceased since six o'clock. I then came back directly with Charles Coll, got a folk and went into the creek, and searched. By that time four or five other persons had arrived. Some of them were standing by the loose box between the house and the hut, and I heard one of them cry out," She is here," and all went to the loose box. One of those present said she was hanged. I went to the door and looked in with two other persons, and could see nothing at first, but afterwards saw her hanging from the rafter. A person was sent to the Point to give information to the police, and ask to inform the girl's friends at Kerrytown. The deceased had been in my employment some eight or nine months. She seemed to be always very quiet and distant, or unsociable. She always seemed to forget anything she had been told to do. By the Coroner : The calves were in the loose box, and I thought, from the appearance of the buckets in the hut, that they had been fed. I cannot assign the least reason For the girl committing suicide. I am not aware if she had any sweetheart. Patrick McIntyre gave corroborative evidence as to searching and finding the body of deceased. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect— "That the deceased committed suicide while suffering from temporary insanity."

Timaru Herald, 10 February 1879, Page 3
"That the deceased, George Evans, captain of the ketch Palmerston, was accidentally drowned on the 1st of September, 1870." The body had been found on Saturday morning by some boys on the beach in Caroline bay and removed by the police to the Melville Hotel. The following jury was sworn : — A. G. Stone (Foreman), M. Whitridge. J. S. Gibson, J. Paterson, G. Filmer, C. Goodman, A. Ritchie, A. Southwood, M. S. Meredith, G. Paterson, T. Hampson, F. Risdon, and M. Mullins.
John Thomas Stephen : I was on the beach at Caroline bay this morning I saw there the body which is lying at this hotel.
John Neil : I am a detective officer, stationed at Timaru.

Star 3 March 1879, Page 3
THE LATE SERGEANT-MAJOR KERR.
The Inquest. An inquest on the body of Sergeant-Major Kerr was held at the Royal Hotel, Temuka, on Saturday, before A. Le G. Campbell, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Alex. Wilson was chosen foreman. The facts elicited in evidence were substantially the same as already reported, and the jury returned a verdict of " Accidental Death." After the inquest the body of deceased was followed to the railway station by a large number of volunteers from Temuka, Winchester, and Timaru, most of whom went by the express train, which conveyed the body to Christchurch, so as to be present at its interment. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, and was marked by the customary military honours. The procession was announced to leave for the Presbyterian Church, Addington, at 3 o'clock, for the Addington cemetery. ...

North Otago Times, 14 March 1879, Page 2
Timaru. March 13.
A man named Shields was standing between the rails this side of Pleasant Point; last night, and was caught by the engine and seriously injured. He was brought into town, but expired this morning. At an inquest to-day a verdict was returned that no blame was attachable to the engine-driver. Shields was under the influence of drink at the time. He leaves a wife and three young children comfortably provided for. The barque Loweswater is expected to sail for London on Monday.

North Otago Times, 20 March 1879, Page 2
Timaru. March 19.
The barque Loweswater, sails for London to-morrow, with 8100 sacks of wheat.
A man named Thomas McKenna, a tailor, was found dead on the beach this morning, at an inquest a verdict of accidental Death.
Inquest: Timaru Herald, 20 March 1879, Page 3
An enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of one Thomas McKenna, whose body was found on (he beach near Bruce's mill on Wednesday morning, was held in Stone's Hotel yesterday, before R. Beetham, Esq., R.M., Coroner, and a jury of thirteen, of whom Mr William Priest was elected foreman. Three defaulting jurors, named Thomas Russell, Robert Muir, and Richard Sandilands, were each fined 10s.
Carl Kraf, a plasterer, residing in Timaru
Dr. McIntyre arrive at the spot where the body was lying.
Eugene Throu, a cabinet maker, residing in Timaru,
Timothy McGrath, constable, stationed at Timaru.
Anne McKenna, wife of the deceased.
I am of opinion the death was caused by disease of the heart and lungs. There was nothing about the body to indicate drink. The Coroner pointed out to the jury that the evidence went to show that the deceased had died from natural causes ;

Timaru Herald, 26 March 1879, Page 5
An inquest was held on Monday, March 10, in Stone's Hotel, on view of the body of Reuben Cremar, a laborer, before R. Beetham, Esq., K.M., the Coroner for the district, and a jury of thirteen, of whom Mr Thomas Machin was chosen as Foreman. Edward Keillor, John Brosnahan, John Murdoch, and James Fowler, jurors who did not put in an appearance, were each fined 10s. His Worship said that it appeared a fine of 10s was not sufficient to prevent jurymen from not attending. This non-attendance was very unfair to those gentlemen who were punctual, and it was not right that they should be kept waiting for others ; and in future cases he should inflict double the amount mentioned, viz., £1. If he found that that course had not the desired effect, he would go on increasing the fine till it reached the limit, which was £10. The Coroner said that the jury had been called together to enquire into the circumstances surrounding the death of one Reuben Cremar. He believed the deceased would be found to have been fighting with someone or other, and that sometime afterwards the deceased went into a violent sickness and died. As he had instructed a post mortem examination to be made, medical evidence would be placed before them to guide them in coming to a conclusion as to how the deceased came by his death— whether his death was due to the effects of the fight, or solely from natural causes. Inspector Pender, who conducted the enquiry, stated that Alexander Todd, a young man who had fought with the deceased on Tuesday evening last, was present in custody. Mr Hamersley appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of Todd. .. He got up and made a rush at Todd, and, as he did so, Todd hit him on the nose ; and they both fell down together, Cremar's nose commencing to bleed. I took Cremar away (Todd standing off at the time), and I washed his face. Afterwards Cremar and Todd went away with Archibald McDonald in an express. He did not make any complaint to me of feeling unwell. He was nothing like intoxicated. Todd was sober. Saturday lust was a very warm day. Cremar wore a soft cloth hat. As far as I can recollect Cremar asked Todd not to strike him when down, and Todd did not do so. Archibald McDonald, carrier, residing in Timaru... The deceased rushed at Todd, who then struck him on the nose. They rode with me man express into Timaru. On the way Cremar's bat was blown off, and Todd jumped off the express and picked it up. Henry Newland, a shoemaker, living close to where the deceased resided. It was a somewhat similar case to one of sunstroke. To the Coroner: The depression on the skull was not of a recent date. To Mr Hamersley : We operated on the depression before the deceased died- It had no signs of having had violence recently applied to it. Dr Lovegrove gave similar evidence. and according to the evidence of Drs Lovegrove and Hammond, the cause of the deceased's death, and, of course, they were bound to give great weight to the evidence of skilled men. He then proceeded to point out to the jury that the question they had to decide was whether death had been caused by the diseased state of the brain, or whether it had been accelerated by violence received by Cremar from the hands of Todd. Fighting in itself was unlawful, and if the death of one of the parties to a fight resulted from it, then the survivor was guilty of manslaughter. The jury, after about fifteen minutes' consultation, returned a verdict of " Died from natural causes," and Todd was discharged from custody.
    An enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of John Shields, who was killed by coming into contact with a train on Wednesday evening, was held on March 13 in the Lynwood Hotel before R. Beetham, Esq., R.M., the coroner for the district, and a jury of fourteen, of whom Mr T. O'Driscoll was chosen as Foreman. ...Thomas Quinn, the guard of the train, the engine of which struck the deceased: I did not feel any shock. When at the Washdyke I telegraphed to the Timaru station that there was a man in the train who had been knocked down by the engine. When going to Albury earlier in the evening. I saw him just outside the racecourse. That the deceased, John Shields, met his death by coming into contact with the train from Albury on Wednesday evening, the 12th met., and that, no blame is to be attached to the engine-driver, stoker, or anyone connected with the railway."

North Otago Times, 26 March 1879, Page 2
Timaru. March 25.
A man named Brown fell into a boiling vat at the New Zealand Meat Preserving Works at the Washdyke to-day, and was horribly scalded. The flesh was hanging in shreds. He was removed to the hospital. Hopes of his recovery are entertained.

Timaru Herald, 3 April 1879, Page 2
An inquest on the body of one Mitchell Martin, which was found floating in the Washdyke Creek about four feet distant from the boat-shed on Tuesday, was held yesterday m the Doncastor Hotel, Washdyke, before R. Beetham, Esq.. R.M., coroner. The evidence went to show that the deceased had lately been working at the Meat Preserving Works, and that he was last seen m Timaru on Thursday, the 27th ult., that his life was insured for the sum of £100, and that he was a widower and had several children who are residing m Dunedin. There were no marks of violence on the body of the deceased, and no evidence to show that he had been drinking. A verdict of " Accidental Death " was returned.

Otago Witness 5 April 1879, Page 19
An inquest was held at Timaru on the 27th ult. on the body of Jeffreys, who was severely scalded at the Meat-Preserving Works on Tuesday, and who died yesterday. A verdict of " accidental death was returned." Timaru Herald, 29 March 1879, Page 2 Edward Jeffry That the deceased came by his death by falling into a vat of hot water at the Washdyke," to which they added a rider recommending the floor surrounding the vat to be battened, so as to afford better footing. He was a sober man,

North Otago Times, 26 April 1879, Page 2
Timaru. April 25.
This morning a lad named George Gallick, about thirteen years of age, working at. Bruce's Sawmills, met with a frightful, and which has since resulted in a fatal, accident. It appears that the boy was helping a planer named James Ellis, at the planing machine in the mill, and they had occasion to go below to mend the lacing of the belt which was attached to the main shaft. The boy was holding the belt whilst his mate was lacing it. By some means or another he got entangled in the main shaft, and was hurled round and round with considerable force, the floor of the mill only being about two or three feet above the shaft. Both his arms were torn off just below the shoulder socket, and his legs were severely crushed. On the doctor proceeding to the scene of the accident, he saw what a hopeless case he had to deal with, and had the sufferer taken immediately to the hospital, where he was handed over to Dr Hogg, the resident surgeon, Dr Williams remaining with him for an hour. Drs Hammond and Lovegrove were also quickly at the hospital, and remained with him a considerable time, and Dr M'Intyre followed after. Despite every attention, however, the lad died about one o'clock this afternoon. Inquest Timaru Herald, 21 May 1879, Page 5
    The nominated immigration list from Timaru this month comprises 102 souls. The Governor telegraphed to-night that lie would prefer a ball to a banquet, and his wish will be complied with. The weather is again very web and windy.

Timaru Herald, 13 May 1879, Page 2
Inquest. — At Albury on Sunday morning, Sergeant Burtenshaw was informed that a man named William Little was dying in Cuthbertson's blacksmith's shop. A short time after the Sergeant arrived, the unfortunate man, who had been drinking heavily of late, expired; and yesterday Sergeant Burtenshaw had the body conveyed by rail to Timaru, where an inquest was held in the afternoon at the Club Hotel, before the Coroner, R. Beetham, Esq., 8.M., and a jury, of whom Mr W. Evans was chosen foreman. Only two witnesses gave evidence, Sergeant Burtenshaw and Dr. Macintyre. The former stated he had only known the deceased since Tuesday last ; that he had come from Ben Ohou, in the Mackenzie Country, and had been in the employ of Mr Ostler. The deceased had also told him that he had been drinking in Timaru. Dr McIntyre gave it as his opinion that the deceased had died from inflammation of the stomach and lungs "such as would have been brought on by exposure and drink." Little was a single man and had been in Canterbury for over seventeen years, but at the inquiry his nationality was not stated. After about ten minutes deliberation the jury returned a verdict — "That the deceased William Little died from natural causes." Mr W.H. Ostler was buried in the Timaru Cemetery, the funeral left from Lynwood House.

Evening Post, 14 May 1879, Page 2
Timaru. 13th May. [A similar accident occurred 29th July 1879 resulting in another death]
A young man named William Payne met with an accident this evening, which will probably result in his Death. Payne was engaged with some others in launching a boat, and as the boat was sliding down __Ways he was jammed between it and another boat which was lying on the beach. His mates immediately took him in an express to Dr. McIntyre's, where an examination proved that his chest was fearfully crushed, and his lungs injured by broken ribs. 
Jacob Hill deposed: I am manager of the George street Landing Service. He is not expected to live.
Titus Evans deposed : I am a boatman at the George street Service, and assisted m launching the boat.
Frederick Clarkson deposed : I am a boatman, and was employed as such at the George street Landing Service on the 13th inst. I was one of the crew of the boat which was being launched.
A man named Duncan Emerson, caught bold of him, and brought him up. He had been in our employment for three months. He was a very sober man.
    Mr. William H. Ostler, of Ben Ohou station, Mackenzie country, was found dead in his bed last Monday morning. He retired on Sunday night complaining of a slight headache; and when the servant went to call him the following morning he found him dead. Both inquests May 17 TH. The station was over 100 miles away, and as Morrison could not ride, it was impossible for him to arrive in Timaru in time for the inquest. Dr Macintyre deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found that the membranes of the brain were congested ; that the heart was enlarged and fatty, and that a blood vessel close to the heart was ruptured. He was of opinion that death was due to the rupture of the blood vessel. There were no external marks of violence on the body. The jury brought in a verdict of death from natural causes

Evening Post, 20 May 1879, Page 2
Timaru. 19th May.
At the Resident Magistrate's Court to-day, Mr. Arthur Perry was summoned for allowing a horse to wander on the railway. Mr. Perry argued that as the railway was not fenced on both sides from Amberley to the Bluff fines could not be inflicted on persons whose cattle wander on it. The Magistrate said to uphold Mr. Perry's argument would result in endless trouble, and inflicted a fine of £2. An inquest was held to-day on the body of Edward Hart, who died in the hospital from injuries received from an accident while drunk. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, caused by the deceased having been supplied with drink, and being in a state of intoxication." The publican will probably be prosecuted. Rogers, a defaulting debtor, who levanted a mouth ago, has been arrested. Charles Henry Verity, was fined £5, and costs £6 10s, in the Resident Magistrate's Court to-day, for unlawfully rescuing cattle which were being impounded. He was also fined £2 and £3 14s costs for assaulting H. Packson at Pleasant Point, on the 6th May last. Inquest Timaru Herald, 20 May 1879, Page 3 Richard Sullivan : I am a constable of police, stationed at Timaru. I knew the deceased, Edward Hart, for the last three years. He was a man given to drink. From information I received I went to a house on the beach, in company with Joe Ireland.
This having completed the evidence, the Coroner said that cases of death from accidents caused by drunkenness were of such frequent occurrence that one gets sick of having to write the word drunkenness. This was a case of this nature. The evidence from beginning to end was nothing but drunkenness it might be said to smell of drink ; and it was only one of the many cases of the kind that had come under his notice. There was no denying the fact that the man was supplied with liquor while in a state of intoxication. The barman's evidence showed that Hart had come to the hotel half drunk, and went away three parts drank, and that he had been supplied with two or three drinks while in that state. However, they, (the jurors) were not the proper tribunal to consider what the responsibility of those who supplied the drinks were ; their duty was simply to find what the cause of death was ; he believed they would have no difficulty. They had the medical testimony as to what had caused death, and they could not go beyond that, but they could add a rider if they desired to do so. He believed he was quite safe in stating that seven out of every ten inquests over which he presided were caused by drink, but it was not with such things they had to do, as no doubt the proper authorities would take steps to inquire into that if deemed necessary. After a quarter of an hour's deliberation, the following verdict was returned : — " That the deceased, Edward Hart, died from inflammation of the bowels caused by a wound, there being no evidence to how the bow it was received." The following rider was added : — " The jury are of opinion that the deceased met with the accident through having been supplied with drink while in a state of intoxication."

North Otago Times, 31 May 1879, Page 2
Timaru. May 30.
At the Licensing Court, to-day, William O'Brien, licensee of the Albion Hotel, Timaru, was charged with supplying liquor to a person named David Hart, who was at the time intoxicated. Hart is the man who was found lying on the beach in an injured state about a fortnight ago, and who subsequently died from the injuries which were caused by drink. The evidence showed clearly that Hart had been supplied with liquor in the Albion Hotel, but the Bench considered there was not sufficient proof of the identity of the person who actually served it, and dismissed the case.

Evening Post, 4 June 1879, Page 2
Timaru, 3 June. Richard Longfield Cornelius, an old Crimean veteran, died to-day, after a lingering illness.

Evening Post, 6 June 1879, Page 2
The Timaru Herald of yesterday says:— "An old Crimean veteran was buried in the Timaru Cemetery yesterday. Richard Longfield Cornelius was born of a very respectable family, in the Queen's County, Ireland, in the year 1826, and was therefore fifty-four years of age at the time of his death, which occurred last Monday night, at his residence, Timaru. He first joined the Royal Irish Constabulary, and afterwards the 3lst Regiment of Foot, to which he soon was promoted to the rank of a Sergeant. He was present at the attempt to take the Redan, Sebastopol, on the 18th of June, 1855, when his regiment was repulsed and afterwards at its taking on the 8th of September of the same year, and we were told by some of those who were with him at the time, that there was not a more active, or more efficient sergeant attached to his regiment. On his return from the Crimea he severed his connection with the Army, and obtained an appointment as guard on the Great Southern and Western Railway, and was subsequently employed in a similar position on the Enbiskillen line. After having filled these positions creditably for some years, he became proprietor of livery stables at the Curragh of Kildare, and was well known in sporting circles as being the boldest horseman and the best steeplechase rider in that part of the country. About five years ago he came to this town, and the respect in which he was held was testified by the large number of friends which followed his remains to the grave yesterday."

North Otago Times, 30 June 1879, Page 2
Timaru. June 28.
At an inquest to-day on the body of Richard Bartley, who was killed by a fall of earth last evening, a verdict of accidental Death was returned.
     A boat accident, accompanied by loss of life, occurred in the harbor this afternoon. Shortly after three o'clock, Captain Jones, of the steamer Beautiful Star, left his vessel in one of his own boats to land at the Government Service landing, although at the time the signal "Bar dangerous" was flying from the pilot station. In the boat were three sailors, named Yorkoditch, M'Carthy, and McEwen. Just as the boat got in the channel a sea broke over and capsized her. Captain Jones was thrown on the reef, McCarthy swam ashore, and Yorkoditch was hauled out of the surf, but McEwen, who could not swim, sank after holding on to an oar for some time. His body has not yet been recovered.

Timaru Herald, 30 June 1879, Page 3
An enquiry touching the death of Richard Bartlett, who met with in fatal accident at Shears' brickyard on Friday, was held in Stone's Hotel on Saturday morning, before the Coroner, R. Beetham and a jury of twelve, of whom Mr T. R. Jones was chosen as foreman. Inspector Pender conducted the enquiry. After the jury had viewed the body, the following evidence was taken : Samuel Shears : I am a laborer, and working for my son at his brickyards, Timaru. The deceased has been working for my son at the brick making for eight months. Yesterday he was getting come clay, and was undermining it. The wall was from ten to eleven feet, high on the outside. During the day, and within half an hour of the accident, I cautioned him to come away,
William Constable, : I am a brickmaker, and I work for Mr Shears.
Dr Williams : Shortly after five o'clock last evening I was called to attend the deceased at Shears' brickyard. I examined the body, and found that one of the thighs was broken, the cavity of the chest broken in two, and the heart and lungs protruding, as also a treat portion of the abdominal viscera ; the legs were fractured, and death meet have been instantaneous. James Shears : I am the owner of the brickyard at which the deceased worked. He had been in my employ for about nine months, he had only been at excavating for about three days. Without retiring, the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

Timaru Herald, 1 July 1879, Page 2
Death.— The infant child of Mr Thomas Norman, expressman, Latter-street, was found dead in bed yesterday morning. An inquest will be held at eleven o'clock this morning.
    The Late Boat Accident.— The body of James McKeown — the seaman belonging to the steamer Beautiful Star, who was drowned last Saturday in coming ashore in a boat, was found on the beach at Caroline Bay yesterday. An inquest will be held this afternoon.
Frederick Jones : I am the captain of the steamer Beautiful Star, which is now, and was in the roadstead on Saturday, the 28th ult.
Francis McKenzie : I am a laborer, residing at Timaru
The boat was a whaleboat, about 23 or 24 feet long. The boat was heading straight for the shore when the sea capsized her.
Henry McCarthy : I am a seaman on board the steamer Beautiful Star. I have been at sea about six or seven years, and have been about six months in the Beautiful Star.
Louis Yorkovitch: I am a seaman on board the steamer Beautiful Star, and have been with the steamer for seven months. I have been only once ashore here before Saturday last.
Alexander Mills : I am the Harbor Master at the port of Timaru.
" The jury find that the deceased, James McKeown, was accidentally drowned by the upsetting of a boat in the Timaru roadstead on the 28th of June ; and the jurors are further of opinion that the Harbor Master should be empowered to hoist signals, warning boats not to land when he considers it unsafe to do so."

Timaru Herald, 2 July 1879, Page 2
An inquest touching the death of the infant child of Thomas Norman was held yesterday morning, at the Hibernian Hotel, before S. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of whom Mr T. Geany was chosen foreman. The body of the deceased having been viewed by the jury, the following evidence was taken : — Thomas Norman : I am an express driver living in Timaru, and the father of the deceased female child. The child was ten days old, and in good health. My wife has not been in strong health. I saw the child about 10 o'clock in bed with her mother on the night previous to her death. About six o'clock yesterday morning the mother called me and said she thought the child was dead. The child was then in her mother's arms.
Sarah Jane Norman : I am the wife of the last witness, and the mother of the deceased child. I found her in such a position that she could not breathe. I called my husband, and she died shortly afterwards. Mrs Donaldson was present when she died. There was nothing at all wrong with her up to the time of her death. She was my first child. Maria Donaldson : I am the wife of James Donaldson. I was called by Mrs Norman yesterday morning. Mrs Norman said her child was dead.
I went for Dr Macintyre. I am of opinion that she died from suffocation. She appeared to be a well nourished child. This hearing completed the evidence, the jury, without retiring, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had died from accidental suffocation.

Evening Post, 15 July 1879, Page 2 Timaru. 14th July.
The body of the man Thomas Price, who died at Burkes Pass from exposure in the snow on Friday last, was brought to town this evening, and an inquest held, at which a verdict according to the evidence was returned. Several other parties of men had narrow escapes, and have only been rescued with great difficulty. Great anxiety is generally felt for the road parties and others in the McKenzie country.

Timaru Herald, 14 July 1879, Page 2
Thomas Price was a native of Ireland, and had only been four years m the colony, during which he had lived in the South Canterbury district.

Timaru Herald, 14 July 1879, Page 2
An inquest touching the death of Elizabeth Catherine Chiffey— the wife of Edward George Chiffey, who died suddenly about one o'clock last Saturday morning at the Orange Ball, Oddfellows' Hall— was held the same afternoon at the Queen's Hotel, before Richmond Beetham Esq., and a jury, of whom Mr John Kelleher was chosen foreman. The following evidence was taken :  Edward Chiffey: I am a painter, living at Timaru. The deceased, Elizabeth Catherine Chiffey, was my wife. I was attending a ball at the Oddfellows' Hall last night, and my wife was with me. She was in good health when she left home. We had been dancing up to almost midnight. When in the middle of a dance she fainted. She was taken to a back room, and about 1 o'clock she died. At supper she said she felt a pain in her chest. George Thomas Waters : I am a carpenter, living at Timaru. I was in the Oddfellows' Hall last night. The deceased and her husband were dancing. I went afterwards into a room, whore I saw her lying on the floor. She was then dead. James F. Lovegrove : I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, living in Timaru. I was called to the Oddfellows' Hall at about a quarter-past twelve this morning, and found the deceased apparently in a fainting fit, but without any sign of life. I could not feel her pulse. I performed artificial respiration for about half an hour, but she was dead. No doubt she was dead when I arrived. I ascribe her death to fatal syncope. Charles Banks : I was at the ball last night. I saw the deceased and her husband there. After the dance was finished the deceased went into a room. I went in about two minutes afterwards and saw her die. The verdict of the jury was in accordance with the medical testimony.

North Otago Times, 15 July 1879, Page 2
Timaru. July 14.
The body of the boy, James Shea, who was drowned at the wreck of the Akbar, was found to-day in Caroline Bay. The body of Thomas Price, who died from exposure in the snow at Burkes Pass on Friday, was brought to town today. Terrible accounts of fearful weather in Mackenzie Country have reached town, many persons have undergone fearful sufferings and narrowly escaped with their lives. Some are more or less frost-bitten. Already large numbers of sheep are reported lost in the snow, which is now hard frozen by frost.

Timaru Herald, 15 July 1879, Page 2
The body of Thomas Price — the young man who died at the Burke's Pass Hotel last Saturday morning, from exposure to cold, to which he had been subjected while travelling through the snow from Lake Pukaki to Burke's Pass during the previous three days — was brought to town yesterday by Sergennt Burtenshaw, of the Albury station. Accompanying the body were most of the men who had been travelling with him, and the account which they gave of the hardships and privations which they endured is appalling. From one of these, named John Keenan, we learn that there were twenty three men — not twenty, as already stated — working for Mr Forgan, at road making, on Dark's run at the head of Lake Pukaki, about twelve miles beyond the Pukaki ferry. Out of the 24 men, Michael Shea, Sullivan, Camerson) one died, one has had his foot frost-bitten and another is at the Silverstream hotel suffering from the effects of the cold to which he was exposed. He is a native of Sydney. All the men speak in the highest terms of the kindness shown to them by Mr Phillip Stock, proprietor of the Burke's Pass Hotel and Mrs Stock and also Mrs Burgess. Price when found was completely insensible and brought along by Messrs Burgess and Frank Rossiter.
Inquest : Malick Collison : I am a laborer, living in Timaru. I knew the deceased. He was a laborer. I was working with the deceased at road making near Lake Pukaki. Last Wednesday we left the camp, intending to come to Timaru. The first day we came about twelve miles, and camped on that night at Pukaki Ferry. "We came on the next morning for the Tekapo river, about fourteen miles distant, which we reached about five o'clock in the evening. The weather was still bad, and we camped there that night. Next morning we started for Burke's Pass, leaving the drays behind. We got on all right until nearly one o'clock, whim we were about seven miles from Burke's Pass, and some of the men began to get tired. The strongest pushed on to Burkes Pass, intending to Bend assistance to those who were unable to come on. I was one of the first who reached Burkes Pass, about 5 o'clock m the evening. We went to the hotel there, and the proprietor went with four horses for those who had remained behind.
John Demmity : I am a laborer, living m Timaru. I was working with the deceased for the last ten weeks at Lake Pukaki.
James Burtenahaw : I am a sergeant of police, stationed at Opawa. On Saturday, the 12th inst., at one o'clock m the afternoon. it was reported to me that a man had perished m the snow, and I left at once for Burkes Pass. I saw the body, and examined it. There were no marks of violence on it. I bad the body removed to where it row lies. The distance from Lake Pukaki to Burkes Pass is about 32 miles. The jury, after having been briefly instructed by the Coroner, returned a verdict to the effect that, the deceased had come by his death through exposure to cold.  

Timaru Herald, 16 July 1879, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday morning on the body of James Shea, who was drowned at the wreck of the Akbar, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner. Mr Pearson was chosen foreman of the jury. The jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was taken :— Timothy McCartney: I am a constable stationed at Timaru. About one o'clock on the afternoon of the 14th inst., one Edward Newton reported to me that he had found the body of Shea who was drowned at the wreck of the Akbar, between Splashing Rocks and where the wreck now lies. I went with Newton to the place and there found the body buried in shingle and had it removed to he Melville Hotel. I received a description of the body of Shea who was drowned from the Akbar, and I recognised the body as that of Shea from that, description. Charles Dahlin : I was a seaman on board the Akbar. I recognise the body now lying hero as that, of James Shea, who was an ordinary seaman on board the Akbar when ship was wrecked. He joined the vessel at Newcastle. He told me that his family were at Liverpool, and that he had been away from home three years. His parents were Irish, and he was about 19 years of age. The jury without retiring returned a verdict of accidental death.

Timaru Herald, 21 July 1879, Page 2
The rescue of Forgan's men, among whom was the unfortunate Thomas Price, by William Burgess, Elijah Smart, Frank Rossiter, and Phillip Stock, was one of the pluckiest things that has been done for some time. From numerous inquiries I have made, I learn that these men left Burke's Pass at half-past six at night, in the face of a blinding snow drift, and 3ft 6in depth of snow, to go to the rescue of those who were lost, and after wandering about for hours in the bitter cold and utter darkness, and often losing their own way, at length they found the objects of their search, and returned to the Pass at half-past eleven with them. Then everything that could be was done to save Price's life, but without avail, and the others' lives were probably only saved by the exertions made to revive them. To-day Elijah Smart and William Burgess started for the Whale's Back Station, to bring, in a man named James Crue, who was lost in the snow on Wednesday night last, and severely frostbitten. These men started on their merciful errand in the face of a north-west snowstorm, and over three feet of snow to go through for about six miles. Of course no man will let a fellow creature die such an awful death as that from cold, without rendering him every possible assistance ; but the help rendered in the two cases I have cited, has been at some cost and intense toil and hardship to the brave fellows who effected it.

Timaru Herald, 22 July 1879, Page 2
Sudden Death. A very sudden death occurred at Temuka yesterday. Mr Michael Barrett, of the Caledonian Hotel, dropped down dead in the main street while returning from the Post-office. Mr Barrett arrived in Timaru fully sixteen years ago.

Timaru Herald, 23 July 1879, Page 2
Sudden death at Temuka. Michael Barrett, of Temuka, died very unexpectedly at his residence on Monday. He had been ailing for some time, but the suddenness of his death was mainly caused by his immersion in the Opihi river last Wednesday, when he and two other gentlemen were thrown out of a trap on entering the river at the south side.

Timaru Herald, 31 July 1879,
Mr White applied to His Worship, as Chairman of the Licensing Bench, for a special license to be granted to Annie Brosnahan as agent for Francis Innes, assignee in the estate of the late Michael Barrett, so as to allow her to carry on the business of the Caledonian Hotel at Temuka. The application was granted.

Timaru Herald 9 August 1879, Page 3
An inquest was held at the Geraldine Hotel by F. Guinness, Esq , Coroner, on the body of a main child three months old, a son of Caura Guloskoi. It appeared that the child enjoyed good health until Sunday last, when it was noticed to be ailing and refused food. On Monday morning the symptoms became so serious that Dr Fish was sent for, but before his arrival the child died. A post mortem examination was held on Monday by Dr Fish, when the child was found to be well nourished and all the organs m a healthy condition with the exception of the lungs, which were congested. To this cause the doctor had no hesitation m attributing death. A jury, of which Mr R. Morrison was chosen Foreman, returned a verdict of " death from congestion of lungs."

Timaru Herald, 13 August 1879, Page 6
An inquest touching the death of Andrew McGowan was held in the Royal Hotel on Tuesday July 29, before B. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Thomas Squires was chosen foreman. The following evidence was taken : — James Wilson : I am a boatman, employed at the Government Landing Service. I knew the deceased, Andrew McGowan. He was employed as a boatman at the Service. There were six of us working in partnership, and one named Foster acted as working manager. About 3.30 p.m. on Monday we launched a boat from the shed. The deceased and another man were standing at the lowest skid ready to put the skid under the boat. The deceased bad just placed the skid, and was in the act of jumping back, when the surf line hit and knocked him down. He was thrown right across the course of the boat, which passed over him.
Alexander Smith : I am a clerk at the Government Landing Service.
James Leask : I am the engineer at the Government Landing Service.
William Foster : I am one of the landing service partners. I acted as foreman, but was not present when the accident occurred.
The jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict of "accidental death," and added the following rider : — " The jury is of opinion that the Engineer to the Harbor Board should be requested to examine and report on the safety of the working of the Government Landing Service, with the view of preventing the occurrence of similar accidents, as the jury is of opinion that the present method of working at the boat-way is highly dangerous."

Wanganui Chronicle, 19 August 1879, Page 2
August 18. Mr Peegit the plasterer, who was hurt at the high school building on Saturday, has died.

Evening Post, 22 August 1879, Page 2
Timaru. 21st August. August. On Wednesday a party from Burke's Pass proceeded to the ravine where the bodies of the men 1 missing from Rollesby's station were supposed to be. Four feet below the surface of snow they found the body of one of the dogs, and no doubt the men are buried there. Another party of forty left this morning to continue clearing the snow.

Thames Star, 3 September 1879, Page 2
Timaru. Last night. At the inquest on the bodies of Smith and Morrison, who mot their death by being smothered by, snow in McKenzie country, a verdict of Accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 24 September 1879, Page 2
Mr Stronach, of the Ben Ohau Station, was on the evening of the 18th driving a trap across the Ohau river, containing a laborer named Morrison, and his wife and child, who were endeavoring to catch the starting from Omarama on the morning of the 19th Sept. The trap capsized i the river. Mr Stronach and the man got clear, but Mrs Morrison and the child were swept away. Some difficulty was experienced in finding the bodies of the mother and child, but they were rescued on Saturday morning last. Mr Sutherland is attending to the burial of the bodies. There will be no inquest.

Timaru Herald, 27 September 1879, Page 2
Inquest.— An inquest was held at Fairlie Creek on Monday last, before Mr Gray, Esq., J.P., Acting. -Coroner, upon the body of Victoria Anne Collier, a child aged about sixteen months; From the evidence it appeared that the child was playing about, when she was suddenly missed by her mother, and upon search being made was discovered drown n the creek, about 500 yards from the house. The jury returned a verdict of " Accidental death."

Timaru Herald, 15 October 1879, Page 2
An inquest on the body of James Guy, who died suddenly on Sunday last, was held at the Star Hotel, Temuka, before Guinness, Esq., coroner. The jury haring been sworn, elected Mr P. Wareing as foreman. After viewing the body, the jury adjourned to the Star-Hotel, where the following evidence was given : — . Thomas Edwards : I am a carpenter residing at Temuka. Deceased was my stepson, lately employed at the Telegraph Office. On Sunday morning last, about, 8.30 o'clock, the deceased came home, and complained of being unwell. His mother advised him to lay down, but she did not think that he was seriously ill, and gave him some tea. At the deceased did not complain of anything in particular, I did not send for medical advice before I went out for a walk. After I came back my wife told me that the had sent for a doctor, but he had not come. I then ran and told Dr Cumming, and he came at once. The deceased had very good Health for the past two years, but sometimes ho used to complain of a little giddiness, but it did not affect his general health.
This concluded the evidence, arid the jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from pulmonary apoplexy; and the foreman stated that a majority of the jury wished the following rider to be added, viz :— That Dr Hayes was much to blame for not going to see the deceased when twice sent for. The Coroner said that he could not accept the rider in the face of the medical evidence, and the fact that the jury were not unanimous regarding it. He pointed but to the jury that it was quite possible that Dr Hayes was unable, to attend.

Timaru Herald, 3 November 1879, Page 3
An inquest, touching the death of Christian Arras who committed suicide by shooting himself last Friday evening at Saltwater Creek, was hold last Saturday in the Queen's Hotel, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and at jury, of whom Hr James Bruce was chosen foreman.
Peter Pender: I am an inspector of Police stationed in Timaru. Yesterday evening shortly after six o'clock, from information received from a man named Ford, I proceeded with Constable Mackinnon, to a farm owned by Mr George Talbot, and on arriving there saw the body of deceased about one hundred yards away from the camp.
Peter Bertie: I am a barman at Saltwater Creek
Philip Kippenberger : I understand the German language. "All that I have belongs to my father. I have £34 in gold, five shillings in silver and copper, £2 in paper money. My master owes me about ten pounds yet. This document was signed in English "Christian Arras." ..William Arras: I am working with my father on a farm on the levels plains. The deceased was my brother. He was 21 years of age. It is two years since he left his father. he had no reason for leaving. He left suddenly. He came back last Christmas and another time since, when my father was sick. The papers produced are in his handwriting. He was brought up in the old country with his father. he was very sober. he never had any trouble.
William Henry Ford. I am a ploughman residing at Kingsdown. The deceased and I were working together for Mr Talbot.

Timaru Herald, 4 November 1879, Page 2
Inquest: Held yesterday at the Hospital, before R. Beetham, Esq, Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr S. Sibley, was chosen foreman, touching the death of James McKee, who died from the effects of an accident which occurred to him at the Albury railway extension works. Edwin Lock, inspector of works at Albury railway extension, stated that the deceased had been employed on the works, and one day, about a fortnight ago, some earth fell on him. He was taken to his tent, but soon recovered, but he remained working until he got a fit, and was removed to the Hospital, on the 30th, and died on the 1st. A verdict of accidental death was returned.
    Another inquest touching the death of Moses Bolger was held at the Hospital the same day, before R. Beetham, Esq,, Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr A.O. G. Stone was chosen foreman. Dr Hogg's evidence was to the effect that the deceased had come to his death by blood poisoning, accelerated by excessive drinking. Dr Cumming saw him and ordered him to the hospital. Constable McKinnon stated that deceased had been locked up on the night of the 24th. The jury returned a verdict of death by excessive drinking.

Timaru Herald, 5 November 1879, Page 6
An inquest touching the death of Christian Arras, who committed suicide by shooting himself last Friday October 31, at Saltwater Creek, was held last Saturday m the Queen's Hotel, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr James Bruce was chosen foreman.
    Peter Pender : I am an Inspector of Police, stationed in Timaru. Yesterday evening shortly after six o'clock, from information I received from a man named Ford, I proceeded with Constable Mackinnon to a farm owned by Mr: George Talbot, and on arriving there I saw the body of deceased about one hundred yards away from the camp. The deceased was lying on his back with a gunshot wound in his left breast. He was quite dead. Close beside him was this gun which had apparently been recently discharged. The ramrod, which was close to the body also, appeared to have been used in pulling the trigger. His watch, which had stopped at four o'clock, was lying close to him on the grass. From the appearance of the body I think the deceased must have put the muzzle to his breast and then fell back when he was shot. The watch was placed so that he could see it. I then went into the tent and found some powder and shot, and some percussion caps were found in his trousers' pocket. I also found a book with some writing in German on the fly-leaf of it. In the pocket of his coat, which was lying on the bed, I found a pocket handkerchief containing 34 sovereigns, 2 one-pound notes, five and fourpence in silver, and twopence in copper. The handkerchief was knotted in a peculiar way.
    Philip Kippenberger : I understand the German language. I made a translation of some writing shown me by the police as follows :— "All that I have belongs to my father. I have £34 in gold, five-shillings in silver and copper, £2 m paper money ; my, master owes me about ten pounds yet." This document was signed in English, " Christian Arras." The second paper translated reads as follows: — "Father and mother, forgive me. I have committed a great fault. I wanted to go to America, but it is too late. I shoot myself. I have only twenty-five minutes to live. Our Father will forgive my fault! I leave my watch to, Christopher. Should any of my friends see this paper he can show it to my father. Father, I have followed a wicked course. Trouble not yourself about me, I am quite lost." This paper was signed in German, "Christian Arras."  There were two other papers enumerating the different articles of clothing and other effects left by deceased at Kingsdown.
    William Arras : I am working with my father on a farm on the Levels plains. The deceased was my brother. He was 21 years of age. It is two years since he left his father. He has no reason for leaving. He left suddenly. He came back last Christmas, and another time since, when my father' was sick. He never wrote any letter to us. The papers produced are in his handwriting.
    To the Foreman : There was nothing wrong with him. He was brought up in the old country with his father. I do not know of any cause for what he has done. Ho was very sober. He never had any trouble;
    William Henry Ford : I am a ploughman residing at Kingsdown. The deceased and I were working together for Mr. Talbot. On Tuesday last he left the tent for Timaru. He was to be back again the following morning, but he did not return until 1.30 p.m. yesterday. I did not speak to him then, as I was working a good way off from the camp. I next saw him lying dead in a paddock near the Camp, when I was returning home that evening. The gun and other things were lying near him in the same way that they are described by Mr Pender. I came into town and reported the matter to the police. The book produced belonged to the deceased. I had no reason to think he was insane. He was studying and writing a good deal on Tuesday. He was a man of sober habits. I have known him since April last. He his been working with me all the time since. He was always cheerful and quiet. Ho used to read a good deal. The gun, powder, and shot belong to me. The percussion caps belonged to him. It was all right when I left it the tent at dinner time.
     To the Foreman : There was no other person about the place that I could see. It is an isolated place. I saw him coming to the tent after dinnertime. I did not hear the report of the gun. I, was too far away.
    Peter Bertie: I am a barman at Saltwater Creek. I know the deceased. He had dinner at the hotel yesterday. He left about 12.30 p.m., and went in the direction of his tent. He appeared well, and was sober. He had a glass of shandygaff. He was a quiet, sober mad. This completed the evidence, and after short deliberation, the jury found that the deceased had committed suicide while suffering under temporary insanity.

Evening Post, 25 November 1879, Page 2
SUPPOSED DROWNING NEAR BLENHEIM. Blenheim, This Day.
A swag has been picked up in the Awatere River, containing a quantify of clothing, a pocketbook, a number of letters addressed to "James Stewart, care of Mr. Swinton, Winchester, Canterbury; and "E. Hunt, Esq., Christchurch." The owner is supposed to be drowned.

Evening Post, 3 January 1880, Page 2
Timaru. 2 January.
A man named Buckley, while excavating near the railway works, was buried by a fall of earth, and his spine severely crushed. He has been removed to the hospital.

North Otago Times, 28 January 1880, Page 2
The nominated immigration list this month includes forty-one persons, of whom twenty nine are Irish, and twelve English.

North Otago Times, 18 February 1880, Page 2
A young lad named Thomas Adamson died from sunstroke at Albury on Monday.

The Star Tuesday 24 February 1880 page 2A
The Timaru Herald 23 Feb. 1880 Fatal accident - MUNRO
A man named George James Munro, a workman in the employment of Mr Sugrue, a road contractor, on a road near Raincliff, met with an accident on Friday last by which he sustained injuries which have since caused his death. He was engaging in blasting rock, and a charge exploded while he was doing something with it. Besides sustaining internal injuries, the man had his right arm and a portion of his face including his right eye blown off. He was at once taken to Geraldine, and attended to by Dr Fish, and on Saturday was brought to Timaru Hospital. Dr Hogg had no hopes of his surviving, and at noon yesterday the poor fellow died. The deceased was a native of Glasgow and 43 years of age. It is said he had no friends in the colony except one a farmer named Travick, living in Wanganui. At the inquest a verdict of accidental death was returned.

Evening Post, 16 March 1880, Page 2
We regret to learn that Mr. Edward Allen Hargreaves, lately of Canterbury, but formerly an old Wellington settler, died very suddenly at Timaru last week, being attacked by a fit of apoplexy from with he never rallied. The late Mr. Hargreaves originally came out to Wellington, but subsequently removed to Lyttelton, where he continued to reside, carrying on business as a merchant until a few years ago, when he retired, and took up his resident alternately at Timaru and at his station on Lake Tekapo. He was the first Mayor of Lyttelton, and some years represented that constituency in Parliament. He was very popular, both in public and private life, and the news of his death will be read with deep regret by a wide circle of friends, both in Wellington and Canterbury.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 21 April 1880, Page 2
Chalmers. — On the 18th April, at the hospital, New Plymouth, after a short illness, Robert Chalmers, farmer, late of Timaru, Canterbury.

Timaru Herald, 8 June 1880, Page 2
On Saturday week Thomas Morris, a laborer living on Waitohi Flat, took some beer home from Temuka and at night drank too much of it and got tipsy. The next morning he and his wife, Eliza Anne Morris, had some angry words, and the wife said she would clear out, and did so, a neighbor named Boston being at the house when she left. She went, it has been ascertained, to the house of in person named Grant, living near Pleasant Point, and stayed there till the next Monday afternoon, when she went away, saying she was going to the Cave. From that time the unfortunate woman was not seen alive, and inquiry and search were alike unavailing until yesterday, when her body was found by Mr N. C. Nicholas in the Opihi river. He at once informed Constable Stanley, stationed at The Point, who had the body removed to the Railway Hotel at the Point. An inquest will be held this afternoon.

Timaru Herald, 9 June 1880, Page 3
An inquest touching the death of Eliza Ann Morris was held yesterday afternoon at the Railway Hotel, Pleasant Point, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr William Halstead was chosen foreman. The jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was taken : —
Jeremiah Boston : I am a carpenter, residing at Waitohi Flat. I was in the house of Thomas Morris, the husband of deceased, on Sunday, the 3rd of May. The deceased was then present. A few words passed between Morris, deceased, and his daughter, but nothing to speak of. The deceased said she would clear out, and she did so then and there. So went out of the house and returned and put on a fresh dress and then went away again. She left wearing a plaid dress and white straw hat, and had a shawl across her arm. There were no marks on her face of any kind. I never heard Morris say an unkind word to her before Thomas Morris : I do not recollect my wife, the deceased, leaving the house on the 3rd May, as I had had a drop of drink. My daughter told me afterwards that I had some words with deceased.
John Grant : I am a contractor, residing at Pleasant Point. I remember Sunday, the 30th May. The deceased came to my place on that day, just about dark. She said she had missed the train in Timaru on the Saturday. She remained at my house on the Sunday night, and up to two o'clock on Monday. She said she came up to the Point to meet some drays, to get across the Waitohi ; if she did not, she was going to come back that night, but she did not return. There were no marks on her face. She did not complain of anything happening at home. To the Foreman : I never knew the deceased and her husband to have had any words.
Nicholas Charles Nicholson : I am a stablekeeper at Temuka. About eight o'clock yesterday morning I saw what I took to be a swag in the Opihi river, but it proved to be deceased. She was lying partly on her breast, and partly on her right side, with her face up stream. Her head was facing northwards, and was just covered with water. I then gave information to the police. Deceased appeared to be about 100 yards from the fording place, and I should think her body had been washed down the river. The river on the 31st and following day was high, and it commenced to fall on Thursday and Friday last. Joseph Stanley, constable stationed at Pleasant Point: About 8.30 o'clock yesterday morning the last witness reported to me that a body of a female was lying in the Opihi River. I found the body as described by him. Her clothes were pulled up over her right shoulder as if she had been attempting to ford the river. There was a mark on the bridge of her nose, and another further up, and a small bruise over the right temple, about the size of a sixpence. Dr Cumming stated that, the bruises were likely to be caused by the body being carried down stream. The jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally drowned while crossing the Opihi river.

Wanganui Herald, 17 July 1880, Page 2 A CHILD SEVERELY GORED BY A PIG.
Timaru, July 16. At Saltwater Creek, Timaru, yesterday, a child two years of age, son of a farmer named Wilson,; was knocked down by a sow, gored with its tusks, and so severely bitten that its life is despaired of. Two fingers of the left hand were bitten through and had to be amputated at the Hospital, while the child's head, face, and body are covered with lacerated wounds.

Evening Post, 31 July 1880, Page 2
The child which a fortnight ago was bitte: severely by a pig died in the Hospital has night from blood-poisoning.

Timaru Herald, 2 August 1880, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Hospital on Saturday evening, before B. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr Strongwork Morrison was chosen foreman, on the body of John Longley, a child two years of age, whoso death had resulted from injuries received by being bitten by a pig on the 15th July. The nature of the accident and the character of the child's injuries wore described some time ago. None of the witnesses examined saw the commencement of the pig's attack on the child, but it was stated that she had some young pigs, and it is probable that the pig was viciously inclined in consequence. The animal was one of a mob of forty or fifty belonging to Mr Wilson, which were in the charge of the child's stepfather. The child was taken to the Hospital immediately after the accident and at once attended to, but the next day, at the mother's request, it was taken home again. Dr Hogg visited the child twice at the house, and then advised that it should return to the Hospital. It was re-admitted on the 20th and died on the 30th from blood-poisoning, resulting from the injuries received. After a long consultation about the rider, the jury returned a verdict of accidental death, adding a recommendation that the sow should be destroyed.

Timaru Herald, 27 August 1880, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Sportsman's Arms Hotel, Saltwater Creek, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of whom Mr Henry Harrod was chosen foreman, touching the death of Ah Song. The jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was taken :— Ah Mow : I am a native of Canton. I knew deceased, who lived with me at Saltwater Creek. On Saturday morning last he went away with a spring cart to Timaru about half-past seven o'clock m the morning. It was. blowing very much. I saw him about an hour afterwards lying on the ground near the cart, which had capsized. Mr William Scarf was there. Deceased was bleeding from the mouth and could not speak. I brought him into the camp and sent for Dr Hammond, who came about half an hour afterwards. The jury returned the following verdict :— " That the deceased, Ah Song, was accidentally killed by the overturning of a cart."

Star 6 September 1880, Page 2
The body of Mr John Palmer, a schoolmaster, who has been missing from Hokitika since August 3, has been found on the beach north of the Teremakau river. Mr Palmer was formerly schoolmaster at Woodbury, near Geraldine, and came from Gippsland, Victoria.

Timaru Herald, 26 October 1880, Page 2
An inquest was hold before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, at the Courthouse, Temuka, yesterday, on the body of J. B. Glasson, who committed suicide on the previous day. Mr J. M. Ollivier was chosen Foreman of the jury. The jury, after being sworn, viewed the body, and on returning the following evidence was taken : — Eliza Glasson : I am the wife of the deceased, J. B. Glasaon. My husband was a hairdresser, living and carrying on business at Temuka. He left home about nine o'clock yesterday morning, in very low spirit, and had been so for some time past. The cause was reduced circumstances. He returned home about eleven o'clock, and remained home until four o'clock in the afternoon, when he went to the Crown livery stables to take back a horse and trap that my brother had brought to the house. He was away about an hour, and when h» came back be appeared much more low spirited. My brother had left while my husband was away. Thinking my husband had been drinking, I told him he had better go to bed. He said he would do so, and while I was putting the baby to bed I heard my husband go outside. He returned in about five minutes, and noticing something very peculiar with him, I asked him what he had taken. He denied having taken anything, and directly after he fell on the floor. I then called for assistance, and some neighbors came. Dr J.S. Hayes and Sergeant Carlyon were sent for, and when they came my husband was breathing heavily. He never spoke after having denied taking anything. After he denied taking anything I said to him, " Yes you have, you have taken the carbolic acid." The carbolic acid was on the mantel-shelf. Ernest Clements : I am groom at the Crown livery stables, Temuka. I recollect seeing the deceased at the stables yesterday afternoon about half-past four. He asked me if I had any troubles. I told him no. The deceased then told me I was a lucky man. I thought be had been drinking, as he seemed very queer. He staggered when he walked. Percy Frederick Carlyon: I am Sergeant of Police, stationed at Temuka.  A spoonful of carbolic acid would cause death. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased had committed suicide during temporary insanity.

Timaru Herald, 1 November 1880, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Geraldine Hotel, Geraldine, on Saturday, before Mr Beetham, Coroner, touching the death of John F. McDonald, aged l½ years, son of Alexander and Mary M'Donald, Pleasant Valley. The mother stated that on the previous day the child was playing outside the house. She missed him a few minutes, and on going in search found him lying m a pool of water, the result of recent rains, a short distance from the house. She called the child's grandfather, William McDonald, who drew the child from the water, quite dead. A verdict of  " Accidentally Drowned " was returned.

Timaru Herald, 9 November 1880, Page 2, Inquest Timaru Herald 12 November 1880, Page 2
Our Winchester correspondent telegraphed last evening as follows:— "As Mr Stewart and his men were proceeding towards Winchester this morning at 11 o'clock, they observed a man lying on his face by the roadside, near Mr De Ranzy's house. On examining him they found him to be dead. They at once informed Mr Swinton, of I the Winchester Hotel, who was soon on the spot, and found the body to be that of Mr Andrew Macpherson, son of the late Captain Macpherson. The body was convoyed to the hotel, whore it lies waiting the coroner's inquest." From further enquiries made, we learn that Mr Macpherson left Winchester for Geraldine on Sunday evening in company with two other persons. Shortly after passing the river the three started racing, but on reaching the road turning down to Mr De Renzy's place, Mr Macpherson was lost sight of. His companions, after proceeding some distance, returned and halloed, but receiving no response, concluded Mr Macpherson had turned off the Main Road, and they therefore t went homo. Dr Fish, who was sent for immediately after the finding of Mr Macpher- son's body, gives it as his opinion that death resulted from suffocation, the face of the deceased being buried in the grass. The riderless hone was found feeding some distance from the body, and the natural presumption is that the animal swerved suddenly throwing Mr Macpherson to the ground and stunning him. An inquest will be held to-day.

North Otago Times, 27 November 1880, Page 2
Timaru. November 26.
An inquest was held to-day at Pleasant Point on the body of Louis Raddon, a very old settler in the district. Mr Raddon, in company with a grandson aged ten years, left the Point in a cart on Wednesday evening for his farm. Yesterday morning the cart was found upturned, and Captain Raddon lying dead underneath. The boy is still missing, and as his hat was found in Opihi river close by, he is supposed to be drowned. At the inquest a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned in care of Raddon.

Timaru Herald, 9 December 1880, Page 2
An inquest was held yesterday at the Bush Inn, Geraldine, before R Beetham, Esq., Coroner, on the body William Patrick, a child eighteen month old. From the evidence of the child's mother, and a neighbor named Scobie, it appears that the child left the house about half past two o'clock on Monday afternoon, and about ten minutes afterwards the mother went to look for it, but could not find it.. Supposing the child had gone to a neighbor's Mrs Patrick did not make much search then but on going at three o'clock to this neighbor's she found the child had not been there. The river, which is only seven yards from the house, was then searched, and the child's body was found in it, and was taken out quite dead by Mr Scobie. The house was fence round, but a child could get through the wires. The jury, of whom Mr W. Maslin was Foreman, returned a verdict of accidental death. Mr Scobie stated that three other children had been drowned in the same place before.

The Medical Times and Gazette, 1881. Page 282
John Brown Rowlands, fourth son of James Rowlands, F.R.C.S., of Carmarthen, drowned off Timaru, NZ, aged 28 years.

West Coast Times, 24 July 1885, Page 2
Timaru, July 23. Arrived: King Alec, barque, Captain Raddon, 104 days from London. About five weeks ago a very heavy sea broke over the vessel's poop, throwing down the captain (who was at the wheel) and flooding the decks, and nearly washing another man overboard. Captain Raddon's ankle was seriously injured, but was put in splints. On coming ashore it was found the small bones had been broken but had been well set.

Otago Witness, 19 March 1881, Page 17
On the 15th March, at Otipua, Timaru, Philip H Russell.

Timaru Herald, 24 March 1881, Page 7
An inquest was held at the Doncaster Hotel, Washdyke, on Friday, Feb. 25, before R. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr Richard Buist was chosen foreman, touching the death of John Peter Kippenberger, fanner, who was found lying dead on the road on the previous morning. James McGinn deposed that he was a laborer residing near the deceased. The deceased visited witness place on Thursday morning about 4 o'clock, and borrowed a pair of loading chains, to bring home a dray. Witness saw him no more alive, Maurice Gentlemun, residing on the Washdyke Flat, deposed that at about half-past six on Thursday morning he heard a man singing out to horses, and also heard a whip cracking. Did not take any notice for about an hour. Witness and his man were just going to breakfast when they saw two horses pass witness place. The shaft horse was trotting and the leading horse cantering. Witness sent his man after the horses. He followed them for twenty or thirty chains and then let them go. They then had breakfast and witness went up the road, when he found the deceased lying in the road dead. He had a slight bruise on the left side of the head and a bruise on the other side. The road presented the appearance of his having been dragged for some distance. Then went to deceased's home and informed his daughter. Constable Black gave evidence as to the injuries received by the deceased. The jury returned a verdict at accidental death,

Timaru Herald, 24 March 1881, Page 7
Death of Sir Cracroft Wilson. — We regret to learn of the death of this gentleman which took place at his residence, Cashmere, on Wednesday, March 2. Sir Cracroft who was formerly a Judge in the Bengal Presidency, received the Knighthood of the Star of India for services rendered during the Indian mutiny. In that eventful period he served for a time under Lord Clyde, and, though a civilian, soon made himself distinguished by his soldier like qualities. Previous to the mutiny breaking out, he had visited Canterbury on furlough, and had acquired property in this Province, on which, at the close of the Indian trouble, he came to reside permanently. During the twenty years Sir Cracroft has been amongst us he has not, excepting a session or two in the House of Representatives, taken much share in public affairs. But as a settler and colonist, ho has been invaluable. Energetic to a degree, he infused energy in all about him, and land which twenty years ago was dismal swamp and nigger-head has been transformed into magnificent pasture country. Though of ripe age, 73, he will cause a blank in society, and the dramatic world will miss him sadly, for to the drama he was a kind and constant friend.

Timaru Herald, 3 May 1881, Page 3
An inquest upon the body of a man, name unknown, who was killed by falling off the South train on Saturday evening, was hold at the Resident Magistrate's Courthouse, Timaru, yesterday, before B. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr D. West was chosen foreman. The jury proceeded to Saltwater Creek to view the body, and upon returning the following evidence was taken : — James Boyce deposed : I am a carter, living m Waimate. I was in Timaru on Saturday, and left by the evening train for Waimate. I travelled second-class. There were about 15 or 16 other passengers in the carriage. There was any amount of room. Deceased was one of the passengers. He was also going to Waimate. The stationmaster at Timaru told deceased and another man to go back into the carriage and leave room for others to go in. After the stationmaster went away deceased went into a smoking carriage, and I and a man named Shore went there also. Deceased stopped outside on the platform. There were five or six standing outside. As we neared Normanby, I saw deceased tumble off the train. The bar slipped, find deceased was thrown off. We tried to arrest the attention of the engine driver, but to no use. The train was not pulled up until Normanby station was reached. I then jumped out and ran back at hard as I could. I found deceased lying across the metals near a crossing about a mile from Normanby....
Thomas J. Kennedy : I am a carrier in Timaru. I identify the body as that of a man whom I know as William O'Regan. He came with me from Victoria in 1864 and served with me in the colonial forces in the North Island at Taranaki. He was discharged there after serving two years. I did not see him again until I met him in 1863 in Timaru. I saw him a little over a week ago in Timaru. The coat was rather a peculiar one, and the same as that now on the body of deceased. I recognised him by the coat and his face, from what I could distinguish of the small part which was left. I addressed deceased when I met him as Regan, but he said, "My name is not Regan here ; It| is Woodyear." I heard to-day he was known by the name of Lawrence. I am not aware if he was married. He was known by the nickname of Brockley Bill, from his face being pockmarked. The Coroner having briefly instructed the jury, they retired for a short time, and returned with the verdict — " That deceased came by his death by falling off the South train on Saturday evening, April 30th, but there is, the jury do not think, sufficient evidence to prove his identity. " 

Evening Post, 5 May 1881, Page 2
Timaru. 4th May. The remains of George Martin, who lost his life in the Tararua, were buried to-day at Otaio. The funeral was attended by a large number of people.

Waikato Times, 14 May 1881, Page 3
Attempted Suicide. Timaru, Last Night.
At the Magistrates' Court to-day, Michael Quirk was, charged with attempted suicide in the Park by stabbing himself. The man was only discharged from the Hospital this morning, and immediately arrested by Detective Kirby. He was committed for trial, but liberated on his own recognisance of £50.

Wanganui Herald, 4 August 1881, Page 2
An inquest was held yesterday at Geraldine on the body of a man named Healey, who shot himself through the breast while getting his gun through a fence. The verdict was "accidental death."

Grey River Argus, 5 August 1881, Page 2
An inquest was held yesterday at Geraldine, on the body of a man named Heatley, who shot himself through the heart while getting his gun through a fence. A. verdict was returned of accidental death.

Wanganui Chronicle, 4 August 1881, Page 2
An inquest was held yesterday at Geraldine on the body of a man named Healley, who shot himself through the breast while getting his gun through a fence. The verdict was "accidental death."

Timaru Herald, 9 August 1879, Page 3
An inquest was held at the Geraldine Hotel by F. Guinness, Esq Coroner, on the body of a main child three months old, a son of Caura Guloskoi. It appeared that the child enjoyed good health until Sunday last, when it was noticed to be ailing and refused food. On Monday morning the symptoms became so serious that Dr Fish was sent for, but before his arrival the child died. A post mortem examination was held on Monday by Dr Fish, when the child was found to be well nourished and all the organs m a healthy condition with the exception of the lungs, which were congested. To this cause the doctor had no hesitation in attributing death. A jury, of which Mr R. Morrison was chosen Foreman, returned a verdict of death from congestion of lungs."

Otago Witness 3 September 1881, Page 9
On Wednesday morning, at Timaru, a Mr Thomas Watkins, of Pleasant Point, was found unconscious in the bedroom, and died in the in the evening. He had retired to rest the previous night in apparently his usual health. And at Waimate, on Wednesday evening, Mrs Butcher, whilst going about her house suddenly staggered and fall. She remained unconscious till she died, an hour afterwards. She was the mother of 11 children, some of them very young.

New Zealand Tablet, 23 September 1881, Page 15
On the 9th inst., of bronchitis, Francis Hugh, infant son of Arthur and Elizabeth McGeown, Main North Road, Timaru, aged l1 months. R.I.P.

Timaru Herald, 12 October 1881, Page 2
Inquest at Waimate. — On the 10th inst., an inquest was held at the Royal Hotel, Waimate, touching the death of George Lee, before B. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of twelve, of whom Mr W. M. Southan was foreman. W. Jeffrey, in evidence, stated that about 7 o'clock last Sunday morning, he saw deceased about four yards from his (deceased's) tent door. Deceased was then dead ; he was lying on his back. There was no appearance of violence or a struggle. Thomas Jones said he lived in a tent near deceased's tent. Deceased had been ailing for some days, and had had fits about 10 o'clock on Saturday. The previous night witness asked him how he was, and deceased said he was better ; he was then in bed. He did not see him after until found by last witness. Deceased was not in want of food or necessaries. A verdict was returned that deceased was found dead. Deceased had been for many years in and around Waimate, and was about 62 years of age. He is not known to have any relations in this part of the colony.

Evening Post, 4 January 1882, Page 2
Timaru 3rd January. A man named John Laurie, while standing on the edge of a cliff to the north of Timaru, to-day, was precipitated to the rocks beneath, through the earth giving way. He was seriously injured, and died shortly after arrival at the Hospital.

Timaru Herald, 3 January 1882, Page 2
A little girl named Mary Ayton, aged 10 years, met her death near Waimate on Sunday. She was in a trap with others on the way to church, and through the horse bolting was thrown out and killed. She is the daughter of a farmer living near Waimate. An inquest will be held to-day.

Timaru Herald, 4 January 1882, Page 2
Inquest at Waimate. — An inquest was held in the Courthouse, Waimate, yesterday touching the death of Jeanette Mary Ayton before R. Beetham, Esq , Coroner, and a jury of twelve of which Mr J. Neilson was chosen foreman. It was shown by the evidence of Mr James Ayton, of Deep Crock, near Waimate, that on last Sunday morning himself and three children were m a spring dray about to start for church. There was something wrong with the rein, and m endeavoring to get it right witness stopped on the shaft and leaned forward. The horse immediately bolted and caused the cart to strike the gate-post, the vehicle capsizing. The two younger children escaped by being under the seat, but deceased was caught between the seat and the road. Witness was thrown off the vehicle. Deceased did not live more than five minutes after the accident. Witness was thrown off the vehicle. Deceased did not live more than five minutes after the accident. Colin Campbell, who lived near Mr Ayton's place, said he heard the noise of the accident, but did not see it. He afterwards ran down and went for the doctor to Waimate. The horse was always quiet. Deceased was about eleven years old. A verdict was returned of accidental death.

Timaru Herald, 5 January 1882, Page 3
An inquest was held at the Hospital yesterday morning before B. Beetham, Esq., Coroner, and a jury touching the death of William Lawry. The following evidence was taken: W. S. Lynn stated that he was on Tuesday assisting the deceased to unload drays at the works, and put the stone over the cliff. He and deceased were standing on one side of the dray, barring stone out, when the ground gave way, and deceased went with it down to the beach, a distance of 45 feet. Witness and deceased's eon wont and found him buried in the clay. They soon got that away, and found him alive. He complained of a pain in his leg. They carried him round to the end of the cliff, and then got him taken to the Hospital, where he died soon after his arrival. Wm T. Lawry was foreman, and directed the works at the cliff. About ten minutes before the accident occurred they had tried to loose the earth at that particular spot with crowbars, and deceased must have stepped upon it. The work had been carried on very carefully, and witness did not consider that anyone was to blame. The jury returned a verdict of accidentally killed by a fall of earth."

Hawera & Normanby Star, 30 January 1882, Page 2
Timaru, This Day. A child, two and a half years of age, son of Mr. Davis, a draper at Geraldine, was drowned in the Waihi river yesterday.
    John Henry Healy, an old resident, has been remanded till 3rd February, on two charges of forging promissory notes.
    At the inquest on Saturday, on the body of a man who fell down stairs at Geraldine on the 14th and injured his spine, so that he died on the 26th, a verdict of accidental death was recorded.

Timaru Herald, 1 February 1882, Page 3
An inquest was held on Monday last a Temuka before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr Franks was chosen fore man, on the body of Harry Langton Lewis, child, who was burnt to death in a tent at Orari on Saturday night. The following evidence was given; Elizabeth Lewis I am the wife of Wm Lewis. The deceased is my son, of which my husband is the father. I was residing in a tent at the Orari on Saturday last. Between 3 and 4 o'clock in the afternoon of that day I lighted a fire in a fireplace outside the tent. After I had lighted the fire I went for some water about twelve chains away, and I was coming back I saw the tent in flames. The child was ton months old; and was asleep in the tent when I went for the water. I have no idea how the fire took place. I could see the tent all the time I was away. All my clothes were burnt in the tent. Charles Smith I am a laborer. I reside on the School Reserve, about three miles on the north side of Orari river. I am employed by Mr Gamack. I have been there about five months. I lived in a tent. At the time of the fire on Saturday last I was about 35 chains from the tent. I had been to the tent about one o'clock for my dinner. ..I took Mrs Lewis to Mr Gamack to ask his advice, and I afterwards gave information to the police. Constable Morton gave evidence that he had visited the place, and believed that from the surrounding circumstances the wind had swept fire out of the fireplace into the tent, and that there were no grounds for suspicion. The jury returned a verdict of Accidental death."

Timaru Herald, 2 February 1882
An inquest was held at the Woodbury Hotel yesterday before B. Woollcombe, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, touching the death of Kenneth McLennan. Donald Mackay deposed : I am a shepherd employed by Mr Tripp at Orari Gorge. On Monday last, the 30th January, we were out mustering sheep. At about a quarter-past eleven o'clock we came to a creek called the Basin Creek. It was very hot, and we were to let the sheep we had mustered have a spell there. We were resting at the creek, when we saw Kenneth McLennan coming past. He was out with others mustering that day. He asked me to come and have a swim. I refused, but went with him about two chains below where I was sitting where there was a deep pool. I sat on the bank and saw McLennan stoop and dive into the water. He then struggled about in the water trying to swim. He sank, came up again, and give a gasp. I began taking off my clothes, and called to McLeod, and jumped in to assist McLennan. The water was over my depth, and McLennan caught hold of my legs, but did not hold on. I then dived head first and tried to catch him by the hair, but failed. He was at the bottom of the pool, and I could not stay longer in the water. McLeod and I tried again to get McLennan out of the water, but failed. With the assistance of two other men I got McLennan out of the water. He then appeared to be dead, and we tried by rubbing to recover him, but did not succeed.
Murdoch McLeod deposed : I am a shepherd for Mr Tripp.
William Willoughby deposed : I am a constable in charge of the Geraldine district. The death of Kenneth McLennan was reported to me at half-past six o'clock on Monday the 30th January. I reached the place of the accident at about 2 a.m. on the 31st. At daylight I examined the body all over particularly the skull. I could find no marks of violence or broken limbs. A verdict of " Accidental death " was returned.  

Bruce Herald, 7 February 1882, Page 3
Waikato Times,  7 February 1882, Page 2
Ashburton, February 6. A man named Henry Cullow, [Crullows] an inmate of the Old Men's Home here, went to bathe with three others on Saturday evening in the Ashburton River, and dropped dead directly he stepped out of the water. He had been suffering from heart disease. Deceased had been an inmate of the Home for the last twelve months, and before that was for some time a resident of Timaru. An inquest was considered unnecessary.  He was a native of Ireland, 22 years of age.

Timaru Herald, 20 February 1882, Page 3
From Mr B. Woollcombe, Coroner, dated January 31st, forwarding a copy of a rider to the verdict returned by the jury at an inquest held on view of the body of Arthur H. Davies, as the child had fallen off the bank into the river, and was thus drowned.

Timaru Herald, 6 April 1882, Page 2
An inquest will be held at Stone's Hotel at three o'clock this afternoon, touching the death of the infant child of Charles Burbery, at Timaru, which died on Tuesday.

Timaru Herald, 25 May 1882, Page 2
An inquest touching the death of John William McLaren, who was drowned m the port, on May 14th, was held at the Melville Hotel yesterday afternoon, before B. Woollcombe, Esq., .I.P. (Coroner), and a jury, of whom Mr K. B. Walcot was chosen foreman. I he following evidence was taken Philip E. Thoreau: I am a constable, stationed at Timnru. Yesterday afternoon, about half-past five o'clock, while out at Splashing Point, I observed the body now lying her, floating in the surf off the rocks. About an hour afterwards it was washed ashore in among the rocks. I had it brought to this hotel. Philip Bradley I am a licensed waterman living in Timaru. I have seen the body lying at this hotel and identify it as that of John William McLaren He was a seaman by profession, was aged 32, and was unmarried. He had been out in the colony about three years. On May 14th he went afloat with me in a boat to the City of Perth, following Captain Mills, the late Harbor Master. ... I saw McLaren get into the ship's lifeboat, out of which he was washed several times. I then left for the shore. When I last saw him he was bleeding profusely from a wound on the temple and shouting out "Save me." I identify the body as his by the clothing. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased met his death by drowning, on May 14th, while courageously attempting to care the lives of others.

Timaru Herald, 25 May 1882, Page 2 How Coroners have to travel
Coroners and medical men in New Zealand have to do a considerable amount of travelling  at times. Lust Thursday (says the Waimate Times) the Coroner, J. Beswick, Esq., came from Timaru, a distance of about 28 miles, and, in company with Dr Chilton, left here on Friday morning for Upper Waitaki. 42 miles off where a post mortem and inquest was held, returning to Waimate on Saturday morning. The Coroner thus had to traverse 110 miles and Dr Chilton 81 miles simply to certify that a man died from excessive drinking. Both gentlemen speak very ruefully of the state of the roads.

West Coast Times, 27 May 1882, Page 2
THE Timaru CALAMITY. Timaru, May 25. Four bodies are still unrecovered of those drowned on the occasion of the late wrecks. The fire bell of the Town Hall cracked to-day, whist being tolled for the death of M'Laren, whose funeral was taking place.

Timaru Herald, 29 March 1882, Page 2
Death by Drowning. A lad named Charles Johnston, the son of a settler at Kakahu, was drowned near his father's homestead on Friday last. While playing with his sister near the Kakalm river he fell into a deep hole, and before assistance could be procured and the little fellow recovered, life was extinct. At the inquest a verdict of accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 30 May 1882,
An inquest touching the death of William Harris was held at the Hospital last evening before Joseph Beswick, Big , Coroner, and a jury of fifteen, of whom Mr J. R. Stansell was chosen foreman :— The following evidence was taken : —
George Glendining : I am an engine-driver employed on the New Zealand railways. On the evening of the 21st inst. I was driving the 4.20 p.m. train from Oamaru to Timaru. We were due at Waitaki North at 5.21, and timed to leave at 6.25, which was done. The Waihao station is distant about six and a half miles from Waitaki. If required we stop at the former place. I know all the lights were in their proper place. Our speed would be from 16 to 17 miles an hour. About two miles south of the Waihao Station the engine struck something. I saw something fly off the track, which I took to be a piece of timber and at once shut off steam, and told the fireman to put on the break, I at the same time signalling the guard to apply his. The train was brought up about 160 yards from where the accident occurred. The smoke and steam prevented my seeing far ahead. The guard with myself examined the engine and found a coat and spanner on the foot-plate. Going back a short distance along the line we met a platelayer named Allan, who seemed very much confused, but was, I believe, sober. A little further back we came across the bodies of two men tying near the rails. On examination they proved to be deceased and a man named Hamley, also a platelayer. There were portion of a trolly lying close by. Both men were insensible. We brought the train back to where they lay, and placed both in the guard's van and brought them on to Timaru...
William Carruthers : I am inspector of permanent way. Deceased held the position of ganger. All gangers have printed instructions and time-tablet. Part of their duty ii to lee that the trolly belonging to each gang I removed at least a quarter of an hour before any train ii due. When working four miles from home they leave work a quarter before lire o'clock. I have every reason to believe they were all sober men.
William Allan : I am a platelayer on the railway.
Dr Gray Hassal: I am the Hospital Surgeon.
James Sibley :  I am a guard employed on the railway.
The jury deciding that William Harris met with his death accidentally, but that no blame can be attributed to anyone.

 Timaru Herald, 2 June 1882, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Hospital yesterday afternoon, before J. Beswick, Esq. Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr Ogilvie was foreman. To enquire into the cause of the death of Richard Hambley, one of the two men who met with the trolly accident on the railway line a few days ago. After hearing the evidence of the guard, which was similar to that given at the inquest on the body of William Harris, and that of Dr Hasssll, the inquest was adjourned until Monday next at the Courthouse at one o'clock, to permit of the attendance of the third man, Allan, who was on the trolly at the time of the occurrence.

Otago Witness, 3 June 1882, Page 17
Both the railway labourers who were injured last week near the Studholme Junction, through the trolly on which they were being ran into by the train, are now dead. Harris died on Sunday and Hanley yesterday, at the Timaru Hospital.

Otago Witness, 3 June 1882, Page 11
The fireball of the Timaru Town Hall cracked on Thursday whilst being tolled for the death of M'Laren, whose, funeral was tailing place.

Timaru Herald, 10 August 1882, Page 7
Suicide. — A case of suicide occurred at Gully Bush, Waitohi Downs, on Monday July 23. A married man named Joseph Jardine, a shepherd in the employ of Messrs Ford and Co., went out of the house about 7 a.m., ostensibly to go and catch his horse. Being away longer than usual for that purpose, his wife went to the stable to seek him, and there found her husband hanging by the neck. She immediately cut him down, and called to her assistance two men who lived m the hut, but life was extinct. One of the men, named Ellery, immediately went and gave information to the police. An inquest will be held at Temuka on Thursday morning. No cause has been assigned for the man's rash act, except that for a few days previously he had been drinking heavily.

Marlborough Express, 2 August 1882, Page 2
Timaru, August 2. A married man named Joseph Jardane, employed on Forde and Co.'s estate at Waitohi Flat, committed suicide by hanging himself in stable. When found shortly afterwards by his wife he was quite dead. No cause is assigned for the act, but it is stated he has been drinking heavily of late.

Timaru Herald, 21 August 1882, Page 3
An inquest was held at the Hospital, Waimate on Saturday before J. Beswick, and a jury, touching the death of William Chambers of Waimate. Mr F Gait chosen as foreman, and after being sworn in the jury. Deceased got, on the dray from the buck and went, forward on the bags on his face. He then rose and rolled over the wheel and fell on the road on his right side the wheel went over his head. He also said the conduct of Mrs McGuinness deserved to be favorably noticed, as she acted very promptly and judiciously on the occasion. Verdict of accidental death was returned.

North Otago Times, 4 September 1882, Page 2
Timaru. September 3.
The body of Edward Henry Tate, who has been missing since Wednesday last, and for whom continuous search has been kept up, was found yesterday afternoon about fire miles south of Timaru, by two little girls and word was at once tent to the police. The body was close to the top of the cliff overlooking the sea, and amongst tussocks. It was lying on its back, with the legs extended and the arms close to the side grasping the tussocks. The face was calm, and the whole aspect, with the exception of the hands, one of perfect repose. There are no signs of violence on the body ; In fact, nothing so far to cause death. He must have been dead two days at least. The body was brought into town, and an inquest will be held to-morrow. Tate was formerly a resident of Wellington, but had lived here for the last thirteen years. He was greatly respected by all classes of the community. He was about sixty years of age and leaves a large family.
    At the inquest at Washdyke on the child Irving a verdict was returned that it died by being overlaid by its mother.

Otago Witness, 16 September 1882, Page 22
A Timaru baker named John Dunce, who accidentally set fire to himself about a week previously while in a state of intoxication, died on Monday.
    A man named Joseph Lane, carpenter, at Timaru, went out of his mind on Friday, and but for being arrested by the police would have thrown himself into the sea.

Timaru Herald, 12 September 1882, Page 3
Inquest was held at the Hospital yesterday on the body of John Duncan, who was recently burned m the bakehouse of Mr John Douglas, before J. Berwick, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury Andrew Wilson, Carl Vogeler, James Shea, Harry Hird, Samuel Stansell, Thomas Giese, Samuel Anderson, Thomas Flaherty, William Morgan, Ceaser Kelly, Henry Powell, Thomas Dillon, James Byers and George Bezzant. Mr Dillon was chosen foreman. Mr Pender, Inspector of Police, Teas present..  Dr Hassall, Resident Surgeon at the Hospital, deposed to deceased's being brought to the Hospital severely burned, and that there were no marks of violence about his body. His condition was consistent with the supposition that his clothes had caught fire. After bearing the evidence, the jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental death," and the enquiry terminated.

Timaru Herald, 19 September 1882, Page 2
The Missing Waimate Bailiff. On Saturday evening it was reported to the police at Waimate that the body of a man was found by a creek near the road leading from Waihao Forks to Evan's farm, about six miles from The Forks Hotel. On Sunday morning Sergeant Ramsay and Constable Fitzpatrick went to the place indicated and found the remains of a man, which, from the clothes and other circumstances, were at once believed to be the body of E. Wilson, late Bailiff of the Resident Magistrate's Court, Waimate, whose disappearance some five months ago caused a good deal of interest and enquiry. The body was removed by means of an express to the Criterion Hotel, Waimate, to await a coroner's inquest. The inquest was held yesterday on the remains, at the Criterion Hotel, before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury consisting of Messrs Goldsmith, F. Gaitt, Bannister, A. Watt, R. Boyd, Joseph Martin, W. J. Williams, W. Melton, .T. Smart, A. Sellars, P. Sinclair, M. Peek, and Depeaux, Mr Gaitt being chosen foreman. Ben Fox, a laborer living at Waimate, said he himself and son had been working above the Waihao Forks for the last fortnight... There was insanity in the family of deceased. The jury returned a verdict of found dead."

West Coast Times, 23 September 1882, Page 2
Timaru. September 22.
Alexander McBratney, a very old resident in this district, committed suicide at Arowhenua this morning, by shooting himself under the armpit. He was only married to a second wife a few days ago, Julia McBratney.  He and I had never had a word of difference since our marriage on the 7th inst.  Wm. Sugrue I was a farm servant in the employ of Mr McBratney. No cause is assigned for the deed.

West Coast Times, 28 September 1882, Page 2
Timaru. September 27
A man, named Jeffrey Robinson, has been found drowned in Saltwater Creek, His clothes were lying on the bank. At the inquest to-day, a verdict of found drowned was returned. He was about 50 years of age, and lately worked as a shepherd.
A settler, named William Leishman, fell between the railway carriages and platform at Winchester station this evening, and got terribly crushed from the thighs downwards. The injuries are believed to be very serious.

Timaru Herald, 28 September 1882, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Sportsman's Arms Hotel, Saltwater Creek, before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of thirteen, of whom Mr Jacob Hill was chosen foreman, touching the death of one Jeffrey Robinson. The following evidence was taken Alex. Sejournι, a lad about 11, stated that on the previous afternoon be, with some other toys, was walking along the bank of the Saltwater Creek, when they found a suit of clothes a couple of yards from the water's edge [The clothes were produced and identified by witness.]
Henry Gardner, proprietor of the Sportsman's Arms Hotel,
Charles Massey, carrier, stated that he recognised the deceased as Jeffrey Robinson. He was commonly called Harry. He was married to witness' step-daughter, who was sow dead.
Jessie Laidlaw, (errant at the hotel, stated that the saw the deceased at the home m the forenoon of the previous day, and saw him go to the bridge over the creek, and after remaining upon it some time go along the bank towards the lagoon. He came back to the hotel, and then, about eleven o'clock, went back to the bridge and down the creek again. This was the last the saw of him. She thought be appeared in very low spirits, as if he had something on his mind, and made a remark to that effect to another person that he thought the man was going to drown himself, that he had no idea that he was really going to do so. He did not seem at all drunk.
This was all the evidence adduced, and the Coroner having made a few remarks upon its general tendency, the jury returned a verdict of Found drowned," the Foreman remarking that it was possible the deceased had gone into the creek to bathe, and had met his death by accident."

Hawera & Normanby Star, 6 October 1882, Page 2
Timaru, This Day. The body of a man, named Archibald MacIntyre, who had been missing since Monday evening last, was found in the Washdyke creek yesterday. An inquest is to be held.

Timaru Herald, 13 October 1882, Page 2
The adjourned inquest into the circumstances of the death of William Miller, who died on Monday night last at the Railway Boarding-house, was held yesterday morning at the Club Hotel, before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr McBeth was chosen foreman. Sergeant Cullen conducted the enquiry. The first witness examined was Thomas Chance, who deposed to being a mate of deceased. During Sunday they were together, and deceased complained of pain in the stomach and other ailments, and witness wanted him to go to a doctor. This deceased would not do, but ultimately he went to the chemist's (Mrs Watkins), and got a bottle of mixture. Witness told the chemist what deceased complained of, and he said he thought he could give him something that would relieve him. He took a dose of the medicine before leaving the shop. They went home together, and during the night witness was called to go to deceased, and he sit up with him an hour and a half. He wanted to go for the doctor but deceased said no, he would be better by-and-bye. Witness then, finding Millar was getting worse, called a man named Carew to stop with him while he himself ran for Dr Macintyre. The doctor attended him at once, but the deceased died before the medicine ordered by the doctor arrived. He was 57 years of age. The bottle of physic produced was the one they got from the chemist. He identified the body as that of Miller.
    William Holmes, a painter, deposed that he was staying at the Railway boarding-house on the day m question. About half-past twelve at night he heard some one groaning and he went to see what was the matter. He found deceased lying on the floor, dressed, and in great pain. The body he had seen was that of deceased.
    Roderick Fraser Stewart, Manager at the Medical Dispensary, deposed to the witness Chance and deceased going to his shop and asking for some physic. Deceased said he was suffering with pain in the stomach and weakness of the lower organs of the body. Witness told him he ought to see a doctor, and at deceased's request he gave him the bottle of physic produced. It contained a little opium.
    Dr Macintyre deposed that he was called to see the deceased about half-past two on Monday morning, and he found him m convulsions. He prescribed for him, but he died before the medicine arrived. He had made a post-mortem examination of the body m conjunction with Dr Hammond, and found the kidneys extensively diseased, and the heart enlarged and fatty. In his opinion the immediate cause of death was blood poisoning. The Jury at once returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence to the effect that deceased died from natural causes. The enquiry then terminated.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 31 October 1882, Page 2
Death IN A COURT-HOUSE. Timaru, This Day. Captain White, sailmaker, an old resident, died suddenly in the R.M. Court yesterday from apoplexy.

North Otago Times, 31 October 1882, Page 2
Timaru. October 30. Captain R. White, for some years a ship chandler here, dropped dead in the R. M. Court this morning. He was for a great many years trading as master of the Rosannah Rose, Nightingale, and other vessels, on the coast. He leaves a wife and child, fairly provided for, at home.

Evening Post, 11 December 1882, Page 2
Suicide of the Timaru Leranter.
This day. A startling case of suicide occurred here at 11 o'clock. The Supreme Court criminal sessions had just opened, and one of the first cases on the calendar was that of J. M. Shepherd, the storekeeper, who committed extensive frauds, and levanted to San Francisco about six months ago. He returned to the colony three months ago, crossing on the way the detective who was sent after him. He was arrested at Auckland and brought to Timaru, where he was committed for trial on six charges of forgery and uttering. Shepherd's uncle resides almost opposite the Supreme Court, and Shepherd went into his office a little before 11 o'clock. A few minutes afterwards a shot was heard fired in the office, and on the people running in they found Shepherd lying on the floor in a dying state. A revolver was lying beside him, and on examination it was found he had shot himself through the head. Medical assistance arrived promptly, but life was pronounced extinct, and the body was removed to Stone's Hotel, where an inquest will be held. It is stated Shepherd, who was out on bail, had been advised that defence was useless, and his only chance was for him to plead guilty.

Timaru Herald, 13 December 1882, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday morning at Stone's Hotel, before Mr Watt, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of James Martin Shepherd. The following jury were sworn m Messrs J. B. Stansell (foreman), G. Wade, T. O'Driscoll, G. Newey, G. Stumbles, W. L. Edwards, K. Bowie, Henry Taylor, W. Dunn, J. Anderson, R. Holmes, G. Burdie, S. Front mid Edward Mitchell. Inspector Broham conducted the examination of witnesses. The following evidence was taken Peter Scott I am a grocer's assistant in the employ of Mr James Shepherd, of Timaru. I know the deceased. I last saw him alive about eleven o'clock yesterday morning, in Mr Shepherd's shop." He came in, shook hands, and said Good-bye." He then went upstairs and came down again in the course of two or throe minutes. He went into the office and locked the door, and about a minute afterwards I heard the report of a pistol. I tried the door and found it locked, and then gave the alarm. James Shepherd, a cousin of the deceased, came, and also Mr Richard Turnbull. The hitter forced open the door of the office. I looked in and saw the deceased lying on his back, dead. ... Samuel Hammond I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, residing m Timaru. Shortly after 11 o'clock yesterday morning, I was called to see the deceased. I examined him and found he was quite dead. I cut open his shirt and waistcoat and found a wound over the region of the heart. The body was removed to Stone's Hotel. I afterwards found the bullet produced m deceased's left fide, about three inches from the spine. It is such an one us might have been fired from the revolver produced. The wound was sufficient to cause instantaneous death. This was all the evidence, and the Coroner having briefly addressed the jury, the latter, after some consultation, returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst m a fit of temporary insanity

West Coast Times, 19 January 1883, Page 2
Timaru. January 17.
The heat during this morning and afternoon has been most intense. The thermometer at one time registered 150 degrees in the sun; several cases of sunstroke are reported, one being fatal. In one case a man named Sullivan, belonging to Oamaru, was stricken down in the harvest field at Makikihi. He was brought into town by the train and conveyed to the hospital where he is in an unconscious state. In a second case, a young man named David Hutcheson working in a field at Tiko Flat was struck and died in a few minutes. A number of milder cases are also reported.
    An old man named " Yankee Sam," fell into a fire at Waihi bush to-day and was seriously burned. His life is considered in danger.
    January 18. James Sullivan, who received sunstroke at Otaio yesterday, died in the hospital last night.
    At the Resident Magistrate's Court today, Patrick Ryan, arrested in Melbourne, was charged with horse stealing. The case was dismissed as it appeared the prosecution had made a claim on the estate for the value of the horse alleged to be stolen. There are a number of other cases against Ryan, his wife and daughter.

Otago Witness, 3 February 1883, Page 12
A man named Jeremiah Casey was admitted into the Timaru Hospital on Saturday morning, suffering from rheumatic fever. In the afternoon, in the absence of the warder, he got through a window and made for the sea beach, but was rescued just after entering the water. He was taken back, but became very violent. Late on Saturday night he expired very suddenly.

Evening Post, 12 February 1883, Page 2
Timaru, This Day. A sad fatality occurred here yesterday, William Mahon, aged 15, son of Mr. Mahon; schoolmaster, of Otaio, was accidentally drowned while bathing in Saltwater Creek. Two of his companions tried to rescue him but were unsuccessful. The police being informed of the occurrence, dragged the creek, and recovered the body in two hours.

Timaru Herald, 14 February 1883, Page 2
A little girl seven months old, named Gertrude Colville, died suddenly at George Town, Temuka, yesterday morning. An inquest will be held.

Southland Times, 22 February 1883, Page 2
Timaru. A girl named Simpson dropped dead in school to-day.

Otago Witness, 31 March 1883, Page 17
On the 21st March, at the residence of his father in-law (Mr Hubert H. Clarke) Cav_ersham Rise, Mr Robert Ponton, late of Timaru; aged 25 years. Timaru papers please copy.

Timaru Herald, 13 April 1883, Page 2
Sudden Death. — About 7.30 p.m. on Wednesday an old man named Jas. McIntyre fell down dead in the bar of the Railway Hotel, at Pleasant Point. The deceased was 62 years of age, and was a farmer. An inquest was held yesterday before Mr Beswick, Coroner, and a jury. Dr Lovegrove, who made a post mortem examination, deposed that death resulted from effusion of blood on the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned. A verdict of Death from natural causes was returned.

Timaru Herald, 19 April 1883, Page 8
Timaru Hospital Returns. — The following is a return of patients m the Timaru Hospital for the month of March, 1883 : dead— male, 1 (Robert Moulton)

Hawera & Normanby Star, 19 April 1883, Page 2
Timaru, This Day. A man named George O'Brien was thrown from his horse near Saltwater Creek, on Tuesday night, and his foot getting entangled in the stirrup he was dragged some distance, and picked up insensible. He expired yesterday morning.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 10 May 1883, Page 2
FOUND DROWNED. Timaru, This Day. A man named William Burroughs was found drowned in the water near Washdyke. It is supposed that he had missed his way in trying to take a short cut across the paddock in the dark.

North Otago Times, 17 May 1883, Page 2
DEATH On the 16th inst., William Gillespie, of Washdyke, Timaru, aged 38 years. The funeral is appointed to leave the Criteron Hotel, Oamaru, at 2.30 p.m., on Friday, 18th inst, for the Oamaru cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
G. L. GRENFELL, Undertaker.

Saturday 19 May 1883 Supplement: Third sheet to The Maitland Mercury, page 3.
Near the Hinds station, Lyttelton, Samuel Chesson, a fireman on the Southern express, while firing up, was standing with one foot on the engine and the other on the tender. Suddenly the couplings parted and Chesson fell, and the whole train passed over him, mangling him dreadfully. His neck was broken, and his right hand and left foot were cut off. He was single, 20 years of age, and lived at Timaru.

Timaru Herald, 19 June 1883, Page 3
An inquest was held in the Courthouse a Timaru, yesterday, before Joseph Beswick Esq., Coroner, and a jury of thirteen, whom Mr Henry Taylor was chosen foreman touching the death of William Craigie, aged one year and ten months, the son of John A Craigie, painter, North street. The evidence went to show that the child had been taken ill on Saturday morning last and the father went to Dr Hogg and state its symptoms and received a prescription which was obtained, Dr Hogg being unable to visit the child that night. A portion of the prescription was given to the child the same evening. The parents went to bed about one o'clock on Sunday morning and found the child to be dead about three hours later. Drs Maointyre and Hogg made a post mortem examination, and in evidence stated they had found the child's blood in a very thin and morbid state, and all the viscera especially the lungs, in a congested state. The jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 29 June 1883, Page 2
Timaru, June 29. Captain Bascand, harbor master of Timaru, died at Waitaki, near Blueskin, last night. The cause of Death was strangulation of the bowels. Deceased was only married yesterday week, and leaves a large family by a former marriage. He was a highly respected officer.

Evening Post, 29 June 1883, Page 2
Sad Death of Captain Bascand.
Timaru, This Day. Captain C.S. Bascand, Harbourmaster of Timaru, died at Waiti, near Blueskin, at 9 o'clock last night, of strangulation of the bowels. Deceased was married yesterday week, and had been spending 1 a few days at Dunedin. Returning by the express on Wednesday, he was seized with illness, and conveyed to the hotel, where he died. Deceased leaves a large family by a former marriage, and was much respected as a highly efficient officer.

Timaru Herald, 12 July 1883, Page 7
The following is a return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of June, 1883 : — died — female, 1 (Wilhelmine D. Campbell)

The Maitland Mercury, and Hunter River General Advertiser  Tuesday 17 July 1883 page 2
Death of an Old Shellback.-The Timaru Herald records the death of " old Sam" Williams, who was a very ancient mariner. He was an old whaler, who came down in 1845 from Sydney, and for some time he conducted a "whaling station" at Timaru. Afterwards he found employment with the Messrs. Rhodes near Lake Ellesmere, and it was he who recommended them to take up country at Timaru which has since been a fortune to them. The first home ever built in Timaru was occupied by Williams as overseer for Messrs. Rhodes. In later years he went into business as a publican both in Timaru and Christchurch ; but a few years ago he returned to Timaru alone and penniless, since when a few of his former acquaintances supplied his wants for the sake of old times.

North Otago Times, 21 July 1883, Page 2
A man named Edward Pine, a farm laborer, was crushed by a dray against a post the Cave on. Thursday evening, and died from, .the effects of his injuries.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 22 September 1883, Page 2 DROWNED IN A WATERHOLE.
Timaru, September 22. A child 14 months old, son of Fraser, Hotelkeeper at Albury, has been drowned in a waterhole.

Taranaki Herald, 25 September 1883, Page 2
Timaru, September 25. "At the inquest on a child named Fraser, who was drowned at Albury on Friday, a verdict of Accidentally drowned" was returned. The Coroner strongly commented on the want of care shown by the parents in not looking after their children when the river was so near.

Feilding Star, 25 September 1883, Page 2
Timaru. This Day. A labouring man named David Paterson was found dead on the Sherwood road this morning, He had been drinking.

North Otago Times, 25 September 1883, Page 3
Timaru. September 24. At an inquest on a child named Fraser, drowned at Albury on Friday, a verdict of accidentally drowned was returned. The coroner strongly commented on the want of care shown by the parents in not looking after the child when the river was so near.
A laboring man named David Paterson was found dead on Sherwood road this morning. He had been drinking.

Timaru Herald, 4 October 1883, Page 2
Inquest — An inquest was held yesterday in the Crown Hotel, Temuka, before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of whom Mr Kirk was chosen foreman, on the body of Terence Douglas, aged 3 years, who was found drowned on Monday in the Sod Town Creek, Temuka. The evidence of the mother and sister of the child showed that the deceased was only out of their sight for about twenty minutes, and directly he was missed the mother went to the creek. At the place where the child evidently fell in there is a steep bank. A verdict of "Accidentally drowned was returned."

Tuapeka Times, 10 October 1883, Page 6
A man named T. Millard, a veterinary surgeon, was killed by a fall from his horse near Geraldine last evening.

West Coast Times, 13 October 1883, Page 2
Timaru, October 12 Alexander Sutherland, aged 40, unmarried, who was run over by a ballast wagon at the Albury extension line yesterday, and whose leg was amputated, survived the operation only four hours.

Timaru Herald, 16 November 1883, Page 2
Timaru Herald, 17 November 1883, Page 3 inquest
Suicide. — Honora Falvey, a servant at the Crown Hotel, Temuka, was noticed by another servant at 11.15 on Wednesday night to have something the matter with her. An alarm was at once raised, and Dr Campbell sent for, who, on arrival, found that she had taken poison. Efforts were made for several hours to nullify the effect of the poison, but without success, the girl dying at 7.80 the next morning. The deceased, who remained sensible until the last, it is stated, admitted taking the poison owing to an unfortunate connection with a young man. An inquest will be held to-day.

Timaru Herald, 17 November 1883, Page 3
An inquest on the body of Honora Falvey, who died on Thursday morning last from the effects of poison, was held in the Crown Hotel, Temuka, yesterday, before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr Brower was chosen foreman.
H. W. Campbell: I am a medical practitioner, residing at Temuka. On the evening of Wednesday last I was called to the Crown Hotel, where I found the deceased in bed, evidently suffering from some irritative poison. Mr Kirk had shown me a cup containing a small quantity of wet white powder. I promoted vomiting with the white of eggs and milk. After some hesitation the deceased confessed that she had taken arsenic with the view of putting an end to her life. I remained about two hours with her, and when I left I gave full directions for carrying on the treatment. I had no hopes of the girl recovering. The deceased told me that she had purchased the poison at Mr Rayner's chemist shop. I was sent for again about 7 o'clock in the morning, but found the girl had just died. The body was still warm. I have no doubt the cause of death was arsenical poisoning.
Mary Kerran : I am cook at the Crown Hotel.
Leonard T. Raynor : I had charge of my father's chemist's shop on the 1st of the present month. I knew the deceased. She came to the shop for 1s worth of arsenic at about six o'clock on the evening of November 1st. The entry in the poison book states that it was purchased for poisoning rats, and is signed by the deceased, but is not witnessed. It is not usual to get a witness before selling this poison. For strychnine we nearly always require a witness. I believe there is a regulation which requires a witness, unless we know the purchaser well.
A. R. Kirk : I am landlord of the Crown Hotel.
The jury, after a few remarks from the Coroner bearing on the evidence, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 23 January 1884, Page 2 FATAL COACH ACCIDENT.
Timaru, January 23. A man named John Henney, coach proprietor, was found dead underneath a capsized coach near Peel Forest. No particulars are yet to hand.

Timaru Herald, 31 January 1884, Page 7
News reached Geraldine on Tuesday morning that Mr John Heney, an old and much respected resident of Peel Forest, had met his death by an accident, caused by the overturning or his coach. On receiving the news Constable Willoughby at once left for Peel Forest, and on his return kindly supplied our correspondent with details of the sad occurrence. It seems that the deceased drove his coach as usual to meet the last train from Timaru, and reached the Rangitata Hotel safely. He left about nine o'clock, and reached the top of the cutting on his way home all right. On arriving at the top, it was his practice to turn off on to the tussocks to avoid some metal on the road. In the darkness he must have turned too for round, and have driven back towards the cutting, not keeping the road, until he reached a place where the bank was about three feet high. At this point it is thought he was thrown off the seat, and the coach turning over fell with its off side on his body, the deceased being found with his shoulders under the body of the coach, which held him down. The examination of the body showed that he had fallen on a sharp stone, there being a cut on his right temple, and another in the centre of the forehead. In all probability deceased died without pain, as no signs of a struggle were visible, neither was there any indication that he had made any effort to extricate himself from his position under the coach. The body was found by Mr Adam Rae about eight o'clock on Tuesday morning. An inquest was held on Wednesday at the Rangitata Hotel. The late Mr. Heney was a very old settler, and was widely respected. At the time of his death he occupied a seat on the Mount Peel Road Board, to which position he had been elected more than once previously. He was also a prominent member of the Masonic body, having been for some time Master of Ledge Southern Star, 619, S.C., in which capacity, and throughout; his connection with that body, he was known as a zealous officer and a member who took the greatest interest in the welfare of the Order. For some years past he had been engaged in running a coach between the South Rangitata railway station and Peel Forest, and was well known for his hearty manner and good nature. He leaves a family, and will be greatly misted by a large circle of friends.

Timaru Herald, 31 January 1884, Page 7
The funeral of the late Mr John Heney, Peel Forest, took place yesterday at Geraldine, and was attended by a very large number of relatives and friends of the deceased from all parts of the district. The funeral cortege left Peel Forest about eleven o'clock, after the customary service of the Presbyterian Church had been held. At this service, as well as at that held at the grave, the Rev. George Barclay officiated, the serviced on both, occasions being most impressive. On nearing the Presbyterian church, Geraldine, in addition to the very large number of vehicles and horsemen, representatives of nearly every Masonic Lodge m the district, to the number of between 60 and 70, joined the funeral train, and in procession in the following order was then formed
(1) Tyler and Inner Guard of Lodge Southern Star, 619, S.C., with drawn swords Marshals, Bros. Willoughby and Cook.
(2) Visiting brethren representing the following Lodges :—Winchester Lodge, 1737, E.C. St. John's Lodge, Timaru, 1137, E.C. Conyers Lodge, Christchurch Caledonian Lodge, Timaru Thistle Lodge, Ashburton; Kilwinning Lodge, Patea; Caledonian Lodge, Invercargill Corinthian Lodge, 1.C., Christchurch St. John's Lodge, Temuka.
(3) Members of Lodge Southern Star, 619, S.C., Geraldine, of which deceased was a Past Master officers of the above Lodge; Master, supported on right by SD. Bro. Gould, on left by J.B. Bro. Coltman.
(4) Hearse,
(5) Chief mourners.
(6) Relatives and friends of deceased. Among the latter we noticed the Hon. J. B. A. Acland, Mr C. G. Tripp, and Mr G. J. Dennistoun, members of the Mount Peel Road Board, of which deceased was a member, and gentlemen from all parts of the district, numbering between 200 and 800. Arrived at the cemetery, the coffin was taken from the hearse and borne to the grave by members of the Masonic body. The Presbyterian funeral service was then performed by the Rev. G. Barclay, who at the termination intimated that in compliance with the wish of the friends of the deceased, the services prescribed by the Masonic constitution would be held. The rev. gentleman then read the usual address and prayers, after which the Masons moved slowly round the grave, each dropping in a leaf of evergreen. The whole ceremony was most impressively conducted, and will be long remembered in Geraldine.

Poverty Bay Herald, 9 February 1884, Page 2
At Timaru yesterday Mr. W. C. Bailey, an Inspector under the Rabbit Act, dropped dead in his house—supposed from heart disease.

Timaru Herald, 11 February 1884, Page 2
An inquest was held on Saturday morning, before J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr A. O. w. Stone was chosen foreman, touching the death of Mr W. C. Bailey, whose painfully sudden death was recorded in our Saturday morning's issue. In accordance with the evidence of Mr Macintyre, who showed that Mr Bailey's, death was due to extensive heart disease, the jury found that deceased died from natural causes.

Waikato Times, 3 May 1884, Page 2 SUICIDE AND MURDER NEAR TEMUKA.
The landlord of the Arowhenua Hotel, near Temuka, Mr John Walter Garland, shot his wife and afterwards himself on Thursday morning. Mrs Garland was shot while sleeping in bed. No cause is assigned for the crime.

Grey River Argus, 3 May 1884, Page 2
UNSATISFACTORY INQUEST. Temuka, May 2. At the inquest on the bodies of Mr and Mrs Garland, of the Arowhenua Hotel, nothing fresh was elicited. The evidence proved that financial troubles urged Garland to commit the double deed; The jury, returned a verdict that Mr Garland committed the deed, but that there is no evidence as to his sanity.

Auckland Star, 24 May 1884, Page 3 FEARFUL DOUBLE MURDER.
A PUBLICAN MURDERS HIS WIFE AND COMMITS SUICIDE. Timaru, May 1. John Walker Garland, licensee of the Arowhenua Hotel, near Temuka, shot his wife in the bed-room at 6.30 this morning, and then shot himself. Garland died instantaneously, and when the matter was reported the the police, Mrs Garland was dying. Jealousy is reported to be the cause of the tragedy.

Timaru Herald, 19 June 1884, Page 6
Obituary — Mr William Nicholls, one of the oldest employees of this journal, died on Monday, May 26, after a brief illness of three days. He had been nearly fourteen years in the Timaru Herald office, for five as an apprentice, and for over eight and a half as a journeyman. During most of the time he held several responsible positions amongst his fellow-workmen, and was held in great esteem by them. He arrived in Lyttelton with his parents, by the ship Tiptree, in January, 1864, and has resided in Timaru ever since. He is the first employee of the Timaru Herald who who has died in harness. He was 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss. Mr Nicholls was a member of the Foresters' Lodge, Court Southern Cross; The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon at the Timaru cemetery, and was well attended, about thirty members of the Foresters' Court Southern Cross, of which deceased was a member, and about twenty of the employees of the Timaru Herald, besides the near relatives and some other personal friends of the deceased, joining in the sad procession. The body was carried all the way to the cemetery, the Foresters arid others relieving each other in the labor. A portion of the Foresters' funeral service was read at the house by the Chaplain to the Court, Bro. Burford, and concluded at the side of the grave, and the Rev. Mr Fairclough read at the cemetery the burial service of the Wesleyan Church, to which the deceased belonged.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 2 September 1884 SUICIDE BY POISON.
Timaru, September 2. A woman named Bridget Healey, a domestic, went into the Catholic Church last evening, and swallowed a large quantity of ammonia. The woman's cries attracted attention, and she was taken to the hospital. Remedies were applied, but they were unavailing, the woman dying shortly after. It is supposed she was insane. Martain Minogus found deceased lying in the church, she was screaming.

West Coast Times, 2 September 1884, Page 2 Timaru. September 1.
Timaru Herald, 3 September 1884, Page 3
A woman named Bridget Healey, aged 35, died in the hospital today from the effects of taking a large dose of ammonia. It is evidently a case of suicide. She was picked up in the Roman Catholic church last evening by Father James Goggan, who was attracted there by her cries of distress.

Timaru Herald, 3 July 1884, Page 2
The following is a return of patients in the Timaru Hospital, for the month of June :— dead, female 1, Helena Mitchell;

Timaru Herald, 9 October 1884, Page 2
Death of Mr Adam Millar. We regret to announce the death of this gentleman which took place on Tuesday evening at Mrs Smith's, Otipua Road. He has been one of the classical masters at the High School for nearly two years, and was much respected by the Rector and staff. He was a distinguished graduate of the Queen's University Ireland, and had been before leaving the Old Country in charge of a Christian Unitaria congregation in the north of Ireland. His death was not unexpected, for he has been for a long time in delicate health, but with such fortitude did he battle with the insidious disease that carried him off, that he has been only two weeks away from school. His enthusiasm for the school was well exemplified last Saturday, when at peril of his life he would attend the funeral of one of his pupils Master Andrew Burnett, who died so suddenly last week.

Timaru Herald, 9 October 1884, Page 7
The Rev. Peter Wills, the Wesleyan Minister m charge of the Temuka circuit, died on Monday evening, the cause of death being rheumatic fever combined with congestion of the lungs. His illness was of very short duration, as ho had only been ailing at all for about a couple of weeks, and did not take to his bed till last Saturday. He was attended by Dr. Hayes, and on Monday Dr. Hogg was sent for from Timaru, but nothing more could be done for the patient when he arrived. The sudden death of the reverend gentleman east quite a gloom over the township, as he was beloved by his congregation, and highly respected by all. He had taken great interest m all local movements calculated to advance the spiritual well-being of his flock, and at a meeting of the Blue Ribbon Mission held on Monday evening, the Rev. Mr Hamilton and others dwelt at some length on the loss the temperance cause had sustained through the Rev. Mr Wills' untimely death, he having as Vice-President labored hard for the cause. Mr Wills was the son of an old settler near Springston, North Canterbury, and was 31 years of age. Both his parents are still living, and also several brothers and sisters. Two of his brothers were present at his death haying come down to see him, on Saturday. He was educated for the Wesleyan Ministry at Wesley College, Auckland, and received his first charge m 1873. He was appointed to the Temuka circuit in April of last year, having spent the previous term at Milton, Otago. He was married only a short time before his arrival at Temuka, and besides his widow leaves an infant son, some three months old.

Timaru Herald, 21 January 1885, Page 2
Serious Accident at Pleasant Point. — Yesterday morning Mr Jas. Rogerson, of the firm of Rogerson and Paterson, met with a nasty accident. It appears he was helping to load a dray with machinery at the Point railway station, when the horses attached to the dray took fright and bolted. Mr Rogerson managed to catch the reins as the horses started, but did not go far with them before he lost his footing, fell, and was dragged some distance until finally the horses got clean away. Persons standing near picked up the fallen man, who was found m on insensible condition, and as they thought the dray had passed over him they called m Dr. Hayes, who fortunately, was at hand at the time. Dr Macintyre, of Timaru, was also telegraphed for and at once proceeded to the Point. Mr Rogerson recovered consciousness in the course of the afternoon, and at latest advices was suffering from slight concussion of the brain and from the severe bruises he sustained. Happily no more serious consequences are anticipated.

Timaru Herald, 22 January 1885, Page 2
The Accident at Pleasant Point. — We regret to learn that Mr James Rogerson, who met with an accident at Pleasant Point on Tuesday, died early yesterday morning, he was much respected in the district. He will be buried at Oamaru.

Timaru Herald, 2 February 1885, Page 2
A boy named Thomas Cosgrove, two years of age, son of Mr M. Cosgrove, who is in the employment of Mr James King at his farm at Mount Horrible, was found drowned in a creek near the farmhouse on Saturday. It is supposed the child was playing on the banks of the creek, that he accidentally fell in and was drowned. An inquest is to be held at the parents' residence at two o'clock to-day, before the Corner, Mr J. S. Beswick.

Timaru Herald, 26 February 1885, Page 6
The following is a return of the patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of January, 1885 dead — male 1 (David Gray) ;

Star 17 February 1885, Page 3
Geraldine, Feb. 17. An inquest was held to-day, on the body of William John Harvey, a bushman, of Peel Forest, before Mr Baddeley, Coroner, and a jury of thirteen, Mr R. T. Button, Foreman. Alma Harvey, wife of the deceased said her husband was ill for some time. On Sunday last they drove to Woodbury. Her husband was taken very ill after they crossed the Orari river. When they got home he was undressed and put to bed. He slept an hour, when witness woke him and gave him some tea. He slept again, and then got up. Afterwards he paced the rooms of the house in great pain. Two other persons were in the house at the time. He died at 4.30 on Monday morning. Witness had sent for a doctor before they got to Peel Forest. Dr Fish deposed that he opened the abdomen and found a large quantity of blood, the result of a rupture of a blood vessel. Deceased died from inward bleeding; nothing could have saved him.

Timaru Herald, 18 February 1885, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Geraldine Hotel, Geraldine, yesterday, before H. W. Baddeley, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr R. T. Button was chosen foreman, on the body of William John Harvey, a bushman at Peel Forest. Alma Harvey identified deceased as her husband, and said he had been ailing for two or three months. On Sunday, the 15th, he and she were in Woodbury, and after crossing the Orari river on their return Harvey was taken ill with pains inside. On arriving home at Peel Forest he laid down and slept till about 7.30, when ho had a cup of tea. Shortly after, he got up, and paced about the house in great pain. He died at 4.30 a.m. on the 10th. Dr Fish deposed to making a post mortem examination of the body. He found the abdominal cavity full of clotted blood, which had come from a rupture of the main artery which supplies the lower part of the body with blood. The rupture was lower down than the diaphragm, and the cause of death was that deceased had bled to death internally. The jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes, m accordance with the medical evidence.

Timaru Herald, 26 February 1885, Page 6
It is with great regret we hear of the death of Mr George Rutherford, of Leslie Hills, North Canterbury, several of whose sons have for years past lived in this district. The Press of February 18th contains the following in regard to the deceased gentleman :— The Amuri has lost an old and valued settler in the person of Mr George Rutherford, of Leslie Hills, a gentleman whose genuine qualities and unassuming manners endeared him to all with whom he came in contact. ...

Timaru Herald, 10 April 1885, Page 2
The friends of the late Mrs McKenzie — Mr T. Winter's aunt — are invited to attend the funeral, which will leave the railway station for the Timaru cemetery on arrival, of the early train from Fairlie Creek. 

North Otago Times, 7 May 1885, Page 2 Timaru
A man named John Reid, a brother a farmer (Alexander Reid), was found hanging to a tree in Raukapuka bush today. He left his brother's house on Friday 1st, and had not since been heard. His body was found by some boys.

Star 11 May 1885, Page 3
On Saturday an inquest was held at the Geraldine Hotel, Geraldine, on the body of John Reid, who was found dead in the Raukapuka bush on the previous Wednesday. Mr H. C. S. Baddeley, Coroner, presided, and a jury was empanelled, of whom Mr D. Denoon was chosen foreman. The body was identified by Mr Andrew Reid, farmer, as that of his brother, who had been on a visit to him from Otago. William Rae, a lad, deposed to finding the body in the bush on the day mentioned. The jury returned a verdict That it is the jury's decision that John Reid came to his death by hanging himself whilst labouring under a state of temporary insanity." The funeral took place yesterday.

Star 14 May 1885, Page 3 Alleged Wife Murder.
An inquest was held yesterday at Geraldine on the body of Hannah Trengrove, before Mr Saddeley. The evidence showed that although suffering from low fever, the wounds received had accelerated death. The husband, Samuel Charles Trengrove, who had been drinking lately, went home at night, and hit his wife with his fists. Of the jury of eighteen, sixteen were for a verdict of wilful murder against Charles Trengrove, and two against. The Coroner committed him for trial at the Supreme Court on a charge of wilful murder.

Timaru Herald, 8 July 1885, Page 2
An inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Melville Hotel, touching the death of Arthur Manley, infant son of J. O. and R. Manley, who was found dead in bed on Monday morning. J. S. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, presided, and the following were sworn m as the jury: — Messrs A. Drysdale (foreman), V. Brown, J. Kenny, J. Doyle, J. O'Neil, R. McCombe, T. Cronin, B. Murray, G. Innis, R. McKnight, W. T. Waldren, J. Young and. A. Padget. P. Bertie, a defaulting juror, was fined 5s for non-appearance. The evidence of Ruth Manley, mother, and J. O. Manley, father of the deceased infant, showed that ho was m good health up to Friday last when he caught cold. The child scorned better on Sunday night, but on the parents waking on Monday morning they found him dead. Dr. Lovegrove said he had made a post mortem examination of the child, and found the right lung and vessels of the surface of the brain congested. The cause of death m his opinion was an apoplectic fit induced by congestion. The jury returned a verdict of " death from natural causes."

Timaru Herald, 1 August 1885, Page 2
Death of an Old Timaru Resident. The English mail just arrived brings news of the death of one of our old residents, Mr W. P. Munro, who died in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 8th of June, after a lingering and painful illness. Mr Munro was here in the good old days, when money was easily made, and had a successful partnership in the firm of Cain, Munro and Co., general merchants, commencing in 1865 and ending about 1872, when the firm disposed of their business. In the following year Mr Munro took his departure for the Old Country and afterwards resided in Edinburgh. Many of the early residents in Timaru and district will regret to hear of the death of one who proved to them a real friend.

Timaru Herald, 25 August 1885, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday morning at the Timaru Hospital before J. S. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of Edwin Best. The following jury was sworn in: — Messrs Jonathan Allpress (Foreman), Robert Harvey, Peter Scott, Edward Chiffey, William Fogerty, Charles W. R.Hunt, Christopher Gruhan, John O'Rorke, Jaret Fitzsimmons, Henry Wagstaff, Robert Home, George Nicolls, Denis Shea, and Joseph Peatson. After the jury had - viewed the body, the following evidence was taken : — 
    Elizabeth Best : I am the widow of deceased, and at 7 o'clock on Saturday night I was in the house with him. He was then the worse for drink. He told the children he was a " very miserable man," and that he wanted to speak to me. I went into the front room and asked what he wanted, and he replied " I want to tell you my troubles." I replied that I knew his troubles too well ; that it was the cursed drink that was troubling him. He looked so wild that I put on my things and went out. I came back within a quarter of an hour and not finding him in I went out to look for him. Whilst I was down the town I met my little boy, who told me his father had taken two bottles of  " stuff," and that he (the boy) was going to the Criterion Hotel to tell Eaton he (Best) had " taken the dose." I returned to the house, saw two empty bottles of chlorodyne, and my little girl said her father had taken another one. I then went, down to Eiehbaum's, enquired there about the chlorodyne, and again returned home and saw my late husband. I immediately afterwards "went for Dr Hogg, and he accompanied by Dr Drew came to the house and removed deceased to the Hospital. Deceased has lately been always talking about taking his own life or mine. He has never been sober for two days together for a long time. To the Foreman : Deceased was the worse for drink on Saturday night.
    Lavinia Best, aged nine years, daughter of deceased, said : I remember seeing my father take the contents of three bottles of stuff. I poured the contents of the last bottle out into a cup for him. He drank the stuff out of the cup, and said he took it to cure his cold.
    J. J. Hiskens, assistant at Mr Eichbaum's (chemist), said : Deceased came to the shop about 9.30 on Saturday night and asked for chlorodyne, adding that lie wanted it to make him sleep. I supplied him with one of the smallest sized bottles (produced), and told him to take from 10 to 15 drops of it in reply to his question as to what quantity was a dose. The bottle contained about 180 drops. He returned about 9.45 with the empty bottle, said his child had capsized it and asked me to give him another. I did so, retaining the empty bottle, and registering the sale of the two bottles m the " Poisons book." Mrs Best came to me shortly after this and I told her what I had sold Best. He was in the habit of getting sleeping draughts at the shop, but I never before sold him chlorodyne. When he bought the chlorodyne, he appeared as if recovering from drink.
    William Salek, apprentice at Watkins' (chemist) said : I sold a bottle of chlorodyne to Eaton on Saturday night about nine o'clock, and gave him warning to follow the instructions on the bottle most carefully as it was dangerous stuff. As he left the shop I noticed the deceased standing outside the shop door.
    Arthur Eaton, accountant, said : About 8 o'clock on Saturday night I left the Clarendon Hotel with deceased, and when pasting Watkins' he asked me to get him a small bottle of chlorodyne. I did so. Passing Eichbaum's he pretended to cross the rand saying he wanted another bottle. I replied, "If you get another I'll tell the police," more in joke than earnest, as I never dreamt he meant anything. We then went to the Criterion Hotel, had a drink each, after which I left him at Gabites' corner. This was between nine and ten o'clock, and so far as I could see, deceased was quite sober. I have heard him say frequently — some time ago — that he would blow his brains out or cut his throat. I noticed nothing strange about him on Saturday night ; he seemed to be only low-spirited in consequence of troubles with his wife.
    To the Foreman : The only reason I can give for deceased asking me to purchase the chlorodyne, is that he had no money, and as I owed him money, he asked me to get it. He said he wanted a few drops of it, as he had not slept for days.
    A. C. Lawrence, residing in Timaru, said : I saw deceased at the Clarendon Hotel about 8.30 on Saturday night, and spoke to him about doing a job for me. He replied that he did not think he could do the job, as he would be a "stiff-un" by Monday morning. He added, " I will leave a letter, which will be found after I'm buried, and when putting it in type you can think of old Best." I laughed at his remarks, when he said, "It is no laughing matter." Deceased appeared to be quite sober.
    R. B. Hogg, a duly qualified medical practitioner, said : Mrs Best, called for me about 10 o'clock on Saturday night, and after asking if chlorodyne was dangerous and receiving my reply in the affirmative, said her husband had taken a bottle of it. I, accompanied by Dr H.V. Drew, went to the house, found Best lying in bed in stupor, roused him, and then took him in a cab to the Hospital, on the way to which he was quite conscious. On arrival we used the stomach pump until we removed all traces of chlorodyne smell. A nurse was then put to attend him and instructed to do everything to keep him awake. I then went away and returned in the course of three quarters of an hour, when I found Dr Drew performing artificial respiration, at which I assisted. Everything was done to restore the deceased, but to no purpose, as he gradually sank and died about 1 a.m. on Sunday. Each bottle of chlorodyne contains half an ounce, the half of which— two tea-spoonfuls — is enough to destroy life. Drew, a duly qualified medical practitioner, and Resident Surgeon at the Timaru Hospital, corroborated the evidence of Dr Hogg, and added : The man died about 20 minutes to 2 a.m. on Sunday. Over two hours had boon spent in efforts to restore him. I think it was a very prudent thing to remove him from his house to the Hospital. This was all the evidence.
    The Coroner said there was no doubt the deceased had committed suicide ; the only question really raised was, what was the state of the man's mind at the time he did so. There was one other thing he might speak of, and that was that although this medicine was not marked " poison," considering the facilities for person purchasing it, it really was as dangerous as other poisons. However, so far as his experience went, if a man were determined to commit suicide very few things would prevent him doing so. Referring again to deceased, the Coroner said the man had appeared in Court before him last Tuesday and on several previous occasions, and he appeared to him (the Coroner) to be almost mad with drink, or something else. It was for them, however, to consider the matter. After the Foreman had consulted with his follow jurors, a verdict " That deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity through drink," was returned.

North Otago Times, 18 May 1885, Page 2
May 16. Gardner's stables at Saltwater Creek, two miles from here, were burned to the ground early this morning. Three horses were destroyed, one being the racehorse Master Morris.

Timaru Herald, 7 October 1885, Page 6
We regret having to announce that Zephaniah Aldrous died at the Waimate Hospital yesterday. Deceased was railway guard on the Waimate branch line, and had been only a few weeks engaged in that capacity. His death was directly caused by blood poisoning, ; arising from a serious wound which he received on Wednesday last while shunting at the Waimate station. Deceased was a married man, and leaves six children to mourn his loss.

Timaru Herald, 7 October 1885, Page 6
Mr James Duncan, a apprentice of the ship Rangitiki, died in the Hospital on Sunday night. The deceased was taken ill shortly after arriving in Timaru. Some two years ago his father and stepmother left Port Chalmers for the South Seas in sailing vessel, and were never afterwards heard of. Mr Duncan intended on the arrival of the Rangitiki at Home, to pass his examination for second mate. His body was conveyed by train to Dunedin yesterday (Oct 5.).

Star 7 November 1885, Page 3
Geraldine, Nov. 7. A man named Joseph Drurey, better known as "Navvy Joe," dropped down dead in the Crown Hotel last night. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause. An inquest will be held.

Timaru Herald, 11 November 1885, Page 2
Inquest at Geraldine. — An inquest was held on the body of Joseph Drury in the Crown Hotel on Monday last, before H. Clinton S. Baddeley, Coroner, and a Jury of six persons, of whom Mr Williard Lawson was chosen foreman. After the Jury had viewed the body the following evidence was taken : — Dr Fish said — I was sent for on Friday evening last to see the deceased, but found that life was extinct. I made a post mortem examination on Saturday morning, and found the heart was diseased so much so that I am of opinion that it was the cause of his death. Joseph Kennington said —I knew the deceased for several years. Saw him in the bar of the Crown Hotel, Geraldine, on Friday evening last. At his request I handed him a glass of beer, which he drank. He fell from his seat, and I with others carried him and placed him on a sofa in another room. In a short time he was found to be dead The Jury, without retiring, returned a verdict m accordance with the medical testimony.

Timaru Herald, 23 November 1885, Page 2
Mr Palliser, senr., expired at his residence Barnard street, on Friday evening, after a protracted and most painful illness. His death, which had been expected for some time, will be sincerely mourned by all who knew him. His funeral took place yesterday. In the afternoon nearly 100 of the brethren of the Manchester Unity assembled at their Hall to pay their last tribute of respect to the deceased. They marched to his house, and then in procession preceded the hearse to the cemetery. The procession was marshalled by P.G. Bro. A. Mills, and was a very representative one, a large number of friends and others joining in. The Church of England service was performed by the Ven. Archdeacon Harper, and the Oddfellows' funeral service by P.G. Bro. E. Goldsmith. The deceased had been for many years previous to his arrival in this colony a respected member of the Manchester Unity in Yorkshire, of which county he was a native, and was the oldest Oddfellow in the colony, being a member of the Society for no less than 40 years.

Timaru Herald, 3 December 1885, Page 2
Fatal Accident. — Our Burkes Pass correspondent writing last night says : — A man of the name of Ross, brother of the manager at Richmond Station, Lake Tekapo, was killed yesterday by his dray upsetting. He had been to Tekapo for stores, and not returning in reasonable time some of the men went to look for him and found the dray upset. No further particulars are to hand.

ANDREW ROSS Age: 38 years
Interment Date: 4/12/1885
Occupation: SHEPHERD
Cemetery: BURKES PASS Plot 10 & 11 Block: E
Clergyman: J COCHRAN
Next of Kin HUGH & MARGARET ROSS
Other KILLED BY FALL OF DRAY

Grey River Argus, 9 December 1885, Page 2
Mrs Johnston, wife of Judge Johnston, died al Peel Forest last night.

Star 10 December 1885, Page 3
Johnston, Dec. 8, at Peel Forest, Amelia D., wife of Alexander James Johnston, Judge of the Supreme Court.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 21 January 1886, Page 2
Timaru, January 20. W. J. Newton, a farmer residing at Pleasant Point, attempted to commit suicide today by shooting himself and afterwards hacking his throat with a bread knife. He is not dead, but in a critical state.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, February 1, 1886
Thomson -Drowned on the 7th December, in a quicksand in Lake Pukaki, New Zealand, aged 29, George M. Thomson, second son of the late George Thomson, Esq., Baron Cliff, Cove.

Timaru Herald, 15 February 1886, Page 2
Inquest. — J. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of six held an inquest on Saturday afternoon touching the death, of an infant, the son of Mr M. O'Keefe, of Albury. The inquest was merely a formal one, as the child had been prematurely born, and died when four days old. After Dr Macintyre had stated that death resulted from natural causes, the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. 

West Coast Times, 22 February 1886, Page 3
Timaru, February 21 A married man named Martin Dunn, a laborer, fell off a stack at Temuka yesterday and broke his neck. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

North Otago Times, 16 March 1886, Page 2
Timaru. March 15. A stable, men's hut, and coalhouse at Hakaterarmea station were burned on Friday. There is no clue to the origin of. the fire. The insurance is about L30.
A boy was killed at Arowhenua this morning while moving a gate. He got his head between the bars, and the gate only having one hinge, swung over, breaking his neck.

Timaru Herald, 17 March 1886, Page 3
An inquest on the body of George Henry Prattley, son of Eli and Jana Prattley, who was found dead in the yard at the rear of the farm house, Arowhenua, on Monday, was held at the parents' residence, yesterday morning, before J. S. Beswick, Esq.., Coroner for the district. The following were sworn m as a jury :— Messrs Austin (foreman), Hart, Fly, Nicholas, Edgworth, and Bealey, and after they had viewed the body, evidence was taken as follows ;—
Jane Prattley : On Monday evening, about 6.30, I sent the deceased to put a mare in the yard for me, and desired him to leave her there. After some ten minutes time I went out of the house to the yard, and found my boy with his head fixed between two bars of the gate leading to the yard, the rest of his body lying across the other bars. He was then quite dead. I called Mr Smith, and he took the boy from the gate, and I then immediately sent for Dr Singleton, who after making an examination, pronounced life to be extinct. To the Coroner: The boy had often closed the gate previous to the accident. A day or two ago his father had accidentally broken the wire which did duty as a hinge at the top of the gate, and I think the deceased was not aware the wire was broken. William Smith, of Milford, said : I was in Prattley's yard on Monday evening, and walked out past the gate at which the accident took place. I had gone about 7 chains from the house when Mrs Prattley called out to me. I immediately returned to the yard, and found deceased fixed in the gate, one bar of which pressed tightly on the back of the head and another held him firmly under the lower jaw. The deceased's head was be securely jammed between the bars that I had to twist his body completely round before I could extricate him. The gate had not been closed at all ; it seemed to have canted right over on deceased. It would be about five minutes from the time I left the yard till I returned. As Dr Singleton had been called away on urgent business, the Coroner decided next to hear the evidence of John Morton, the constable in charge of the Temuka district. Constable Morton said : At a quarter to seven on Monday evening I received information of the accident, and on reaching the farmhouse I found Dr Singleton examining the deceased, who, he said, had then been dead sometime. There was an extensive scalp wound on the back of deceased's head, which extended well on to the crown, but there was scarcely any blood about the wound. The doctor could not tell me whether the cause of death was fracture of the neck, or suffocation. The Coroner thought the jury would have no difficulty m arriving at a verdict, for there was no doubt that the gate must have fallen forward and killed the boy. The jury after a very short consultation returned a verdict of " Accidental death."

Timaru Herald, 1 April 1886, Page 3
RESIDENT MAGISTRATE'S COURT Timaru — Tuesday, April 20th (Before J. S. Beswick, Esq., R.M.)
Lovegrove v. Wood — Claim £2 12s 6d. Mr Lynch appeared for the plaintiff. Dr Lovegrove said he was doctor to the Foresters' Lodge. He had been attending defendant's wife when she was ill. She ultimately died, and when he went to give a certificate of death, defendant asked him to make it out in the name of "Mrs Clarkson," as that was the deceased woman's name, and she was not his wife. Wood, the defendant, said the deceased woman was not his wife, but the had been living with him for some time. He denied telling the woman to call in a doctor. His Worship said that it was clear the doctor attended the woman as defendant's wife as a club doctor, and he would give judgment for plaintiff for amount claimed and costs.

Star, 1 May 1886, Page 1
Mr B. G. Crocker, a farmer, resident on the Waitohi Flat, near Temuka, was found dead in his bed yesterday morning. The deceased, who was 74 years of age, had been in tie enjoyment of good health until within a day of his death, when he was taken with a fit of an apoplectic nature. He appeared, however, to have recovered from this, and retired to rest in good spirits. In the morning, however, he was found dead, as above stated, life having been extinct for some hours. Deceased, who was formerly a resident in North Canterbury, was much respected here.

Timaru Herald, 3 June 1886, Page 3
A man named Thomas Raine, employed in a cordial manufactory, carried on by Mr James Turner, at Geraldine, met with a shocking death on Tuesday. About 12 o'clock on that morning he purchased a 21oz bottle of spirits of wine, at Mr Cook's, alleging that it was for the purposes of his trade. When Mr Robert Skilling Cook returned to his shop after dinner, Raine entered the back premises and told him he had drunk the entire contents of the bottle. Mr Cook at once administered an emetic, and sent for Dr Robert Fish. The man became insensible, and though Dr Fish at once used the stomach pump, and attended to him carefully, Raine expired soon after eight o'clock, having remained in a state of insensibility the whole time. Raine was a man about forty years of age. He leaves a widow and two children in Christchurch. An inquest will be held, probably to-day.

Otago Witness, 18 June 1886, Page 17
On the 21st of May, at the Timaru Hospital, George Gallie, second son of Alexander Gallie ; aged 29 years. Deeply regretted. Home papers please copy.

The Star Tuesday 29 June 1886 Inquest - SUGRUE
An inquest was held on Monday .... touching the death of Dennis Sugrue, whose body was found in the Hae Hae, te Moana...... saw the deceased on Saturday night proceeding towards Geraldine with dray. verdict accidentally drowned. ....Mr Henry Smith was chosen foreman of a jury of six. After the jury had viewed the body, Hugh Urquhart, plumber, Smithfield, deposed that on Saturday evening last he was in Winchester, and saw deceased on the Geraldine road with a team of horses ; harnessed to a dray. In was then about 9.45 , p.m., and a fine night.
James Smith, farmer, Smithfield, gave evidence
William Webster, labourer, Winchester,
Dr J. S. Hayes, M.D., Temuka, said he had examined the body

Timaru Herald, 29 June 1886, Page 2
Mrs Miller, wife of Mr James Macpherson Miller, late of Hakateramea Downs, died in Waimate on Saturday at the age of 41 years. Till about four months ago the deceased lady was in excellent health. Suddenly she was seized with an internal complaint. Mrs Miller was the daughter of Mr McGibbon, one of the earliest settlers in Otago. Her remains are to be interred in Dunedin. She leaves a much respected husband to mourn her loss but no family.
    The funeral of the late Mr James Fullarton took place yesterday afternoon and was followed by forty members of the Ancient Order of Druids, of which deceased was A.D.

Evening Post, 21 August 1886, Page 2  20 August 1886, Page 2
Timaru, 20th August An inquest was held to-day on the body of a man named Edward Mewburn, who was found dead on the Main South-road about four miles south, of Timaru. The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The medical evidence showed that deceased must have fallen from a dray, the wheel of which passed over his ribs, smashing several, and severing the liver. He had been m Mr William Moody's employ for many years as a general farm hand. Mewburn left the farm, which lies some five or six miles to the south of Timaru, early on Wednesday with a load of produce for Timaru.
Shepherd Hughes. : I am a farmer, residing at Singsdown.
Peter Anderson : I am a blacksmith's apprentice, residing at Timaru.
Richard Bowen Hogg : I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, residing at Timaru.

Star 15 September 1886, Page 4
A middle-aged woman named Sarah Kennet committed suicide by jumping off the northern end of the breakwater between the hours of 5 and 6 o'clock last evening. Thomas Hood, a waterman, who was working on board the barque Annie Bow, which was lying alongside the wharf, saw the occurrence and gave the alarm, and two men, Wolf and Hansen, getting into one of the Annie Bow's boats, rowed towards the end of the breakwater, and found the body floating about forty yards from where she had jumped in. The body was at once hauled into the boat and taken to the watermen's steps, where Dr Macintyre, who had in the meantime been sent for, tried every possible means to resuscitate life, but without avail. After he found that his efforts were fruitless, he ordered the body to be taken to the Royal Hotel, where it now lies awaiting an inquest, which will take place to-day. Deceased, who has lived in this district for the last sixteen or seventeen years, was at one time housekeeper to Mr Green, at the Ship Hotel, and lately she has lived with a Mrs Huband, in High street, on her private means. She took a lively interest in the Hall-Houston case, attending the Court regularly every day, and was in the Courthouse yesterday. She then appeared perfectly sober, but it is well known that lately. She has been drinking heavily. From the time that she jumped in until she was picked up was but a very few minutes, and when found she was floating, and it is supposed that the shock of jumping into the sea must have killed her, as the short time she was immersed in the water could not have been the cause of death.

Timaru Herald, 16 September 1886, Page 3
An inquest was held at the Royal Hotel yesterday morning before J. S. Beswick, Esq., Coroner, and the following jury :— Messrs F. J. Wilson (foreman), Frank White, John Sutherland, G.W. Green, W. Renshaw and D. Lea, touching the death of Sarah Kennet. John Hood, a seaman on the barquentine Annie Bow. The vessel was lying alongside the wharf, and deceased passed by and sat down at the end of the wharf. She was alone, and sat there two or three minutes. The watchman passed her and came back again, and after she had passed the ship, witness saw deceased get up and go on to the breakwater. She went to the end of the breakwater, held her arms extended twice, and then wont on her knees and climbed down the end backwards. Witness called out to the captain, and said, " I believe that woman is going to commit suicide. You had better stand by the boat."
Charles Wolf, seaman, said he remembered putting off in a boat with Hanson from the Annie Bow to save deceased, who was in the water. She was picked up, put in the boat, and taken to the waterman's steps, where Dr MacIntyre tried to restore animation, but without success. Deceased died from drowning. The jury, after a slight consideration, returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity.

Timaru Herald, 28 September 1886, Page 3
An inquest on the late William Goodier, who fell off the roof of Mr Jonas' private residence on Friday last, and died late the same evening, was held at 1 o'clock yesterday at Werry's Boarding house, before J.B. Beswick Esq., coroner for the district. The following jury was empanelled. — Messrs W. Brown (foreman), Bertie, Power, Wildmoth, Targuse and O'Connor, and after they had viewed though body evidence was led by Inspector Broham as follows :— Thomas Pringle carpenter, said : — I am in the employ of Mr Targuse, builder. I am engaged helping to erect a dwelling house for Mr Jonas in Arthur street. Deceased was in Mr Targuse's employ and had been at work on the building named. On Friday the 24th as the weather was wet, I did not go to work, but I sent deceased about 10.30 a.m. to the house to see if there were any leaks in the roof.
Mrs Jonas said : — I am the wife of Moss Jonas, and reside in Arthur street.
Dr Hogg said : — I was called to see deceased on Friday the 24th, between 12 and 1 p.m. I found him man extreme state of collapse ; he complained of pain in his left side, and on examination I found that several ribs were broken. His condition was so low that I also diagnosed severe internal injuries. Deceased never rallied, but sank and died a few minutes past 10 on Friday night. In my opinion Goodie died from the effects of the fall.

Otago Witness, 1 October 1886, Page 13
Timaru, September 24. A man named Godey, aged about 51, fell off the roof of Mr Jonas' private residence, which is just now undergoing additions and repairs, on to the concrete steps at the back of the house this morning. He was picked up in an insensible condition and conveyed to his residence, where he was attended to by Drs Hogg and Lovegrove. He was found, to have had several ribs broken and to have sustained serious internal injuries. The man lingered all the afternoon and died about 10 o'clock to-night.

Timaru Herald, 28 October 1886, Page 2
Waimate, Oct. 27. An inquest was held today on the body of Mrs P. Burke, of Lower Waihao. The jury returned a verdict the deceased died from natural causes (heart disease). An inquest was held to-day at Waitaki North on the body of the infant child of Charles Johnston. The jury returned a verdict of "death from natural causes."

North Otago Times, 29 November 1886, Page 2
Inquest 30 November 1886, Page 3
November 27. Mrs Annie Mary Westropp, wife of the schoolmaster at Orari, who was thrown from a wagonette on Thursday last, and sustained ; great injury to the head, died from the effects on Friday. Wife of Mr G.W. Westrop. George William Westropp. I saw the conveyance Mrs Westropp was m near the Town Board Office, the horse going rapidly, shied to the left and Mrs Westropp fell out. I ran over and Mrs Boswell came up about the same time. Mrs Boswell undid deceased's necktie and took off her gloves. We raised her up and supported her till she was carried away. Blood was running very fast from her mouth and from the back of her head. The blinkers were off the horse when I saw it.
Thomas Finch, deposed : I am Postmaster at Geraldine.
Robert Fish, deposed : I am a medical practitioner residing in Geraldine.

Star 29 November 1886, Page 2
Westropp.— Nov. 26, at Geraldine the result of an accident, Annie Mary Josephine, the beloved wife of George William Westropp, of Orari Bridge, schoolmaster; age 45. Limerick and Clare papers please copy.

Timaru Herald, 15 December 1886, Page 2
A letter was received by Mr Jabez Lukey yesterday afternoon containing the sad news of the death of his brother Joseph who, it will be remembered, on the breaking out of the Kimberley gold rush left Timaru with a party for the scene of operations. They arrived safely at Derby and went up to the field, but not finding it payable resolved to return home. It was on the way down to Port Darwin that he was taken ill with sciatica, and on reaching Port he was in a very low condition. He was attended by a doctor, but not wishing to remain at Port Darwin ho was taken on board a vessel bound for Sydney. He was then hardly able to be touched, and on the sixth day out (29th November) died. His remains were interred at sea. Mr Joseph Lukey, who was a single man, arrived m this colony about 23 years ago having been invalided from a British man-of war. About two years afterwards he went to the diggings m Otago and then to those in North Queensland, and followed a digger's life for a number of years.

Grey River Argus, 29 December 1886, Page 2
Timaru, December 28. On Saturday a fatal accident occurred at Arowhenua, whereby a child named Airly lost his life. At the inquest the mother of the child gave evidence that she last saw her son alive about ten o'clock. A quarter of an hour after that time she went for a bucket of water to the creek that runs past the front of the house, when she discovered the body in the creek. All signs of life were extinct. It is supposed that the child was following his father, who passed over the creek a short time before. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

Evening Post, 29 December 1886, Page 2
Timaru, 28th December. On Saturday a fatal accident occurred at Arowhenua, whereby a child named Tirey lost his life. At an inquest the mother of the child gave evidence. She last saw her son alive about 10 o'clock. A quarter of an hour after that time she went for a bucket of water to the creek that runs past the front of her house, when she discovered the body in the creek, and all signs of life were extinct.

West Coast Times, 29 December 1886, Page 4
Timaru, December 28. On Saturday a fatal accident occurred at Arowhenua, where a child named Deary lost his life. At the inquest the mother of the child gave evidence that she last saw her son alive about ten o'clock quarter of an hour after that time she went for a bucket of water to the creek that runs past the front of the house when she discovered the body in the creek; all signs of life were extinct. It is supposed that the child was following his father who passed over the creek a about time before. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

'If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed;
if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed.'
- Mark Twain

Otago Daily Times 1 February 1887, Page 2
A man named George Turner, working on the Hakateramea station, has died through injuries received by being tossed and gored by a cow. The unfortunate man went to the stockyard for the purpose of milking the cows, when it is supposed one of them turned on him, inflicting the injuries from which he died before medical aid could reach him. He leaves a wife and one child to mourn their loss.

North Otago Times, 3 February 1887, Page 4
At the inquest to-day on James McHenry, found dead on Monday under Perry's viaduct, near Timaru, the jury returned a verdict of accidental Death through a fall from the railway viaduct. The medical evidence showed that the neck wag broken. There was no evidence to show how deceased came on the viaduct.

Timaru Herald, 22 February 1887, Page 2
On Sunday, the 13th inst., a little boy 2 years of age, the son of Mr Wm. Welsh, ate some matches. An emetic and other remedies were reported to and on Monday and Tuesday he seemed pretty well, but on Wednesday Dr Brittin was called in. From the first his opinion was that there was little hope of saving the child's life, and not withstanding that every effort was made, the child expired on Saturday afternoon.

Otago Witness, 25 February 1887, Page 17
Timaru, February 23. The body of E. G. Scolon [Scolan], a rabbit inspector, was found lying on the Grampians road, six miles from Burkes Pass, on Tuesday afternoon, 22nd. It is supposed deceased met his death by falling from his horse. An inquest is to be held. Deceased has a brother-in-law here, Mr. J.S. Watkins, accountant, Heaton street, and leaves a wife and five children living at Mornington, near Dunedin.

Otago Witness, 4 March 1887, Page 21
On the 22nd February, at Burkes Pass (suddenly), Edward Graham Scolon, late of Walter Peak Station, Queenstown.  

Star - Christchurch Friday 1 April 1887
ANDREW - at an early hour yesterday morning Mr W.C. Andrew, Registrar of Births, etc. for the district of Geraldine, was seized with an apoplectic fit. Mr Andrew died shortly after 3 in the afternoon. The deceased was one of the oldest residents in the district, and leaves a widow, 2 grown up sons and a daughter.

West Coast Times, 7 May 1887, Page 3
Sheep Farming— Wool is undoubtedly the most important production of New Zealand, its value in export approaching nearly treble that of gold. Formerly the pursuit was attended with a certain amount of risk, and the great distance from the station that a doctor could be found, necessarily increased the danger when illness occurred. May 6. A bullock driver named Willcox was killed at Fairlie Creek to-night by the wheel of his waggon passing over his head.

Timaru Herald, 21 June 1887, Page 2
An inquest touching the death of William King was held yesterday at the Grosvenor Hotel before J. S. Beswick Esq., Coroner, and a jury consisting of Messrs G. Davis (foreman), R. Verdon, F. Hooper, W. F. Potts, Thompson, and R. Millen. The following evidence was heard : Wm. Gordon, labourer, remembered on Saturday last seeing deceased William. King, labourer. Deceased and he boarded at the Railway Boarding House. Deceased was a Salvationist. Witness saw him alive for the last time about five o'clock on Saturday evening. Deceased was m a room with others when he suddenly fell down. Those present picked him up and put him on the sofa, opened the window and door, and bathed his forehead with water. Dr Hogg was sent for at once, and on coming m he sent every one out of the room. Deceased did not, so far as witness knew, speak after he fell. He groaned frequently. Mrs Ann Holmes, landlady of the Railway Boarding house, said deceased lodged at her boarding-house. She saw him last on Saturday evening. He was lying m his bed then. She had known him about four years. Ho had boarded with her all the time except six months when ho was m Napier. He was a native of Glasgow and a blacksmith by trade. He was a very sober man, but witness did not know his age. He was ill last winter, and this winter he complained of being ill. He had no relations in the Colony, and as far as witness knew, none at Home except aunts and uncles. He had been out here about nine years. Dr J. Ewat [sic. Ewart], surgeon to the Timaru Hospital, said deceased came in to the Hospital on May 7th, Buffering from symptoms of inflammation of the stomach, and severe pains m the back and the loins just to the right of the spine. This had troubled him for three years ever since he had met with an accident. ..He had since made an examination in the presence of Dr Ewat. The cause of death was internal bleeding caused through rupture of the main artery of the body. There was aneurism of the artery and ulceration and perforation. All these were natural causes. The jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes, m accordance with the medical evidence.

Auckland Star, 26 July 1887, Page 5
Timaru, this day. Mr Webb, senior member of the firm of Webb and Radcliffe, upholsterers, dropped down dead to-day. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause.

Timaru Herald, 2 July 1887, Page 2
The following is a return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of June, 1887 : —dead, males 2 (W. L. Edwards and Edward Kenny)

Timaru Herald, 3 August 1887, Page 3
An inquest was held yesterday at Fairlie Creek Hotel, before Captain Woollcumbe, R.N. (Coroner) and a jury, touching the death of Sarah Braddick, an infant. The following were the jury Messrs Malcolm McLeod (Foreman), H. Welsh, A. Bouluois, C. Barr, W. J. M. Hopkins, and J. Hall. The following evidence was heard Sophia Bodley, nurse, deposed that Mrs Braddick was confined of a female child on Saturday morning. The child was extremely weak and appeared to have phlegm on its chest. She left at seven o'clock, Rebecca Braddick, grandmother of deceased, deposed that she visited her son's wife on Friday evening, and was present at the confinement next day. The child was weak. It was artificially fed. On Sunday morning she gave it weak brandy, and water, and she went to sleep with it. On waking at half past five she found it dead. Dr Hogg said he had made an examination of the body, and found from the condition of the organs that the child was too weak to live. The jury found " That Sarah Braddick, a child born of Adelaide Mary Braddick, died on Sunday July 31, 1887 from debility."

Timaru Herald, 14 October 1887, Page 2
We regret to have to announce the death of Mr H. Barker which look place at his residence at three o'clock yesterday morning. Although his medical attendant had held out scarcely any hope of his recovery since Wednesday week death supervened somewhat suddenly. Mr Henry Barker some time ago caught a severe cold ; symptoms of internal inflammation set in and he was confined to his room for several days. Last Saturday feeling better he very imprudently went out to work and the consequence was a fatal relapse. Inflammation of the bowels of the most acute character set in and although an operation was performed yesterday afternoon he sank rapidly and died as above. Mr Barker who was a well-known and respected citizen, was born in Leicestershire in 1840, and was therefore 47 years old. He was a plumber by trade and 25 years ago he came out to New Zealand where he was always actively engaged in various pursuits. Some years ago he identified himself with the temperance cause and was a consistent advocate (and best of all, exemplar) of total abstinence. He was for six years engaged, in the service of the Borough Council as plumber in connection with the water supply of the town, and in     that capacity he was a most faithful, able servant. He was a member of the Congregational Church. He leaves a widow and eleven children, happily not unprovided for, to mourn his loss.

Wanganui Chronicle, 14 October 1887, Page 2
Timaru. October 13 At the inquest to-day on Mrs Oliver Hobbs, aged 62, who dropped down dead in Latter - street last night, the jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes. The immediate cause of death was effusion of blood on the brain.

Timaru Herald, 18 October 1887, Page 2
A sad and sudden death occurred at Waimate at an early hour on Saturday morning. It appears that Miss Philip, about 17 years of age, and daughter of Mr Philip, complained of feeling unwell on Friday night, and the services of Dr Nicolls were obtained. He did not fear any immediate serious result, but about one o'clock on Saturday morning, the deceased suddenly expired, the cause of death being paralysis of the heart. The funeral took place yesterday, when a large number of persons attended to pay the last tribute of respect to the deceased, who was universally respected, and was a member of Knox Church choir. The Boy, James McKee conducted the funeral service.

Otago Witness, 4 November 1887, Page 28
A child named McVey, 12 months old, was drowned in a tub of water at Timaru. The child strayed from the kitchen to the yard, and by some means or other fell into the tub.

Timaru Herald, 30 November 1887, Page 2
Many of our readers in the Geraldine district will regret to hear of the death of Mr Thomas Taylor, eldest son of Mr R. Taylor, of the Geraldine Hotel, which took place during Monday night last. For a long while past he had been a great sufferer, but lately no hopes were entertained that he would get over another severe attack of an insidious disease, to which he succumbed on the night stated. He will be regretted by many friends.

Timaru Herald, 2 December 1887, Page 2
The following is a return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of November, 1887 : dead— males 1 (Alfred Meager)

Otago Witness, 30 December 1887, Page 29
The Timaru Herald, in noticing the death of an old pensioner, Robert Campbell, states that Mr Campbell belonged her Majesty's 57th Foot, and went out to the Crimea in 1854. He took part in the engagements at Inkertnan and Sevastopol, afterwards receiving the medal and clasp. After a short sojourn in the old country he went out with General Sir Colin Campbell to the relief of General Havelock in India, for this campaign receiving the Indian medal. On peace being restored he again went Home, but very soon came out to take part in the Maori war. In this he also bravely took a leading part, and was among the first to receive the New Zealand war medal. At the conclusion of hostilities he went to Canterbury, and eventually settled down in Timaru, where he soon endeared himself to a large circle of friends, who heard with deep regret of his demise.

Otago Witness, 30 December 1887, Page 29
A fatal gun accident occurred at Geraldine on the 21st inst., the victim being a blacksmith at Hilton, named Paul Glasson. He had been out shooting, and stood talking to another man with the loaded gun on the ground with the muzzle upwards fronting him. It is supposed that one of the children he had with him at the time touched the trigger. The contents of the gun blew off the right part of his face, the man dying shortly afterwards. The deceased was 32, and leaves a wife and three children, aged four years, three years, and four, months respectively.

Timaru Herald, 23 December 1887, Page 4 ACCIDENT.
A blacksmith at Hilton, named Paul Glasson, met his death oil Wednesday evening last, at about half-past eight o'clock, under very painful circumstances. It appears he had been out shooting, and was standing talking to Mr Woodley, in Twomey's road, with the butt end of the gun on the ground, the muzzle protruding upwards in front of him. It is supposed that one of his children, who was with him at the time, touched the trigger. The gun went off and the contents blew the right side of his face to pieces, part of his brains being scattered on the road. Death ensued almost immediately. An inquest was to have been held at Hilton yesterday at 6 p.m. Glasson leaves a widow and three children, aged four years, three years, and four months, respectively, to mourn his loss.

In 1883 Paul Roach Glasson m. Emily Hyde Crompton in Temuka. Children:
Glasson, William Richardson 26/06/1883
Glasson, James Thomas          01/08/1884
Glasson, Mary Jane                 26/06/1887

Timaru Herald, 2 February 1888, Page 2
The following is a return of patients m the Timaru Hospital for the month of January,, 1888 : — dead — males 1 (W. J. Stewart) females, 1 (Maggie Curry) 

Evening Post, 3 April 1888, Page 2
Invercargill, This Day. Probably one of the oldest men in the colony passed away when Hapi Moko breathed his last in the Riverton Hospital on Thursday. His exact age cannot be ascertained. The oldest inhabitants remember him as an old man when they first came to Riverton, and his age is variously stated at from 100 to 110 years. Hapi Moko, who belonged to a tribe formerly settled about Temuka, came South with Pararoa about the time of the war in 1839, and ever since remained here.

Evening Post, 9 May 1888, Page 2
Timaru, 8th May. A fatal accident occurred near the Washdyke this morning by which a man named William Campbell lost his life. He was engaged carting hay and straw from Mr. Gilchrist's farm to the Washdyke Hotel, and fell from the stack between it and the dray, and broke his neck.
DUNEDIN, This day. A fatality is reported from Pembroke. The eldest son of Mr. Studholme was killed through falling over a cliff 150 feet high while gathering snowberries.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 9 May 1888, Page 2
Timaru, May 9. W. Campbell, a carter, was killed at Washdyke, yesterday, by a fall from a stack, breaking his neck.

Timaru Herald, 10 May 1888, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Melville Hotel yesterday afternoon, touching the death of William Campbell, recorded yesterday, before C. A. Wray, Esq., coroner, and a jury of six, of whom Mr Penrose was foreman, The evidence of William Sellars, who found deceased dead by his dray of Herbert Walker, a lad who accompanied the last witness, and of Dr J. F. Lovegrove, proved that deceased was killed by falling either off the dray, or the butt end of the stack; the fall dislocating his neck. Two other witnesses proved that deceased was under the influence of liquor when be left town for the Washdyke. One of these who met him just out of town, warned him to be careful, or he'd fall and break his neck. The jury found a verdict of accidental death.

Otago Witness, 11 May 1888, Page 22
Mr William Moody, of the firm of Moody and Ziesler, Timaru, was found drowned in Pig Hunting Creek, five miles to the south of Timaru, at 5 o'clock on Wednesday evening. Nothing is known as to how deceased got into the creek. An inquest is to be held.

Timaru Herald, 14 May 1888, Page 2
A little boy aged six, son of Mr George Culmer, Wai-iti road, was accidentally drowned in a dam on Friday evening. Mrs Culmer last saw the little fellow playing about the house about a quarter to four. Missing him about half an hour later, she went in search of him, and failing to find him, she told her neighbors, Mr and Mrs Morgan, who went with her to dam in Mr Philps', paddock, and there they found the boy floating in the water, dead. With a rake they drew, the body to the bank. Word was sent to the police, and Constable Bradshaw went out and removed the body to the parents' house. An inquest was held in the afternoon before C.A. Wray, Esq., coroner and and jury, of whom Mr Wilson was chosen foreman. After hearing the evidence a verdict of "accidental death from drowning" was returned.

Otago Witness, 18 May 1888, Page 21
The late Mr William Moody, who was drowned at Pig Hunting creek, 5 miles south of Timaru, was about 50 years of age, and a native of Scotland, He came to the colony as general manager of the New Zealand Meat Preserving Company, whose works are at Washdyke and Kakanui. This position he relinquished to enter business in Timaru. He had been chairman of the Harbour Board, and was also a member of the Geraldine County Council. He leaves a wife and family.

Otago Witness, 11 May 1888, Page 22
The eldest son of Mr Studholme, of Arrowtown, fell over a cliff 150 ft high while gathering snow berries. He was brought to Arrowtown Hospital, and died there on Wednesday night.

Otago Witness 18 May 1888, Page 17
The eldest son of Mr Studholme, curator of the Lake County Nursery, met with his death while out gathering snowberries. The lad, John, who was about 11 years of age, fell over a precipitous face of rock, estimated to be at least 200ft high, and landed upon a shelf overhanging another sheer precipice, also of great height. He was released from his still perilous position by the courage of a man who responded to the alarm given. When picked up he was still alive, and no bones appeared to be broken, but he succumbed to internal injuries on the following day.

Otago Witness 27 July 1888, Page 17
July 23. Obituary. The severe weather has played into the hands of the grim king of terrors, no less than three deaths having occurred during the past week or so it is, however, only fair to mention that heart disease in every case was the cause of death, there being nothing of an epidemic nature about it. The first to succumb was the wife of Mr Studholme, the curator of Lake County nursery, Cardrona. Mrs [Elizabeth] Studholme died after a short and in no way alarming sickness, leaving five young children, the youngest of whom is scarcely 12 months old. so that the loss of his wife is a severe blow to Mr Studholme, who only a few months ago lost his eldest son, a fine young lad 12 years of age, through an accident. The deepest sympathy is felt for Mr Studholme, who is widely known and respected.

Evening Post, 15 May 1888, Page 3
Timaru, This Day. The body found at Lyttelton has been identified as that of L. Mortin, a man lately employed cooking at Timaru Hospital, who was discharged for misconduct with the wife of a fellow servant. In a letter, dated the 13th, to a friend here, he hinted at suicide, saying he would forthwith settle all his accounts for life.

Timaru Herald, 17 May 1888, Page 2
Quite a gloom was cast over Geraldine yesterday when it became known that Mr George Smith, of Winchester, had died the previous night. The deceased gentleman was laid up with a bad attack of dysentery about a week ago, but up to Monday, no serious consequences were anticipated, in fact on Saturday he seemed to have improved considerably. His sudden death will prove a great loss to the Waihi Football Club, of which he was elected captain when the Geraldine and Winchester Clubs amalgamated, he was a perfect host in himself, and played a remarkably good full-back game. Mr Smith leaves a wife and child to mourn his lose.

Ashburton Guardian, 18 May 1888, Page 2
Mr George Smith, of Winchester, died suddenly on Wednesday last. Deceased was a well known local athlete and footballer, being only recently appointed Captain of the Waihi Club. He leaves a wife and child. The match Ashburton vs Waihi which was to have been played to-morrow has been postponed as a mark of respect.

Otago Witness, 18 May 1888, Page 22
L. Marten, who was found dead at Lyttelton, was lately employed as cook at the Timaru Hospital, but was discharged for misconduct with the wife of a fellow servant. In a letter dated the 13th April, to a friend here he hinted at suicide, saying that he would "forthwith settle all his accounts for life."

Otago Witness, 18 May 1888, Page 22
A boy named George Cullmore, aged five years and eight months, son of a labourer on the Wai-iti road, near Timaru, was drowned in a dam. It is believed that the child in trying to reach his wheelbarrow, which had got into the water, overbalanced himself. The depth of the water was 4½ft.

Timaru Herald, 5 June 1888, Page 2
The death is announced in Nelson of Mr R. Shallerass, well known as a former gaoler in that town. He was at the head of the police at the time of the Maungatapu murders, when Sullivan made such a notorious name for himself.

Timaru Herald, 6 June 1888, Page 3
A serious accident took place at Pleasant Point on Saturday evening between a buggy driven by Mr Charter Miles and a trap driven by Mr J. Worthington. The occupants of both vehicles were thrown out. Mr Miles' companion received severe injuries including, it is said, a broken shoulder-blade and collar bone. Mr Miles was considerably shaken. Mr Worthington fell on his head and was for a time stunned. Both shafts of the trap were broken short off, and the buggy had an axle bent.

Star 23 July 1888, Page 3
Death of Mr Michael Mitton
Our Timaru correspondent telegraphs, this morning, news of the death of Mr M. Mitton, of Mount Peel Station, on Friday last, at the age of forty-seven. Mr Mitton's name, is well and widely known in South Canterbury, and he had been manager at Mount Peel for the Hon J. B. A. Acland for many years. He took a great interest in sporting and athletic matters, and had been President of the South Canterbury Amateur Athletic Club, the oldest of its kind in New Zealand, and if we are not mistaken he was one of its founders. He will be best remembered among sporting men, however, as one of the originators of the Grand National Steeplechase Club, and from having acted as Clerk of the Scales, we believe, since the foundation of that Club.

Timaru Herald, 2 August 1888, Page 2
The following is a return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of July 1888 : — dead, 3; James Magor, Robert Ricketts, J. Ellis Fisher.

Otago Witness 28 September 1888, Page 10
An accident which is expected to prove fatal befel the youngest daughter of Mr George Edgeler, Arowhenua. The Timaru Herald reports that the girl, who is about 13 years of age, picked up some sticks near a fence that had been recently burned, and the high wind caused them to break out into flames, setting fire to her apron and clothing and burning her severely down the right side. The neighbours assisted her mother to extinguish the flames as quickly as possible, and the services of Dr Campbell were called in to apply the necessary remedies. The girl is not strong, and is not expected to recover.

The Guernsey Magazine October 1888
MAUGER - On the 13th of July at Timaru, James Mauger, formerly of Guernsey, aged 46 years.

New Zealand Tablet, 12 October 1888, Page 31
In our obituary column is announced the Death of Mr. Thomas Farrell, at his residence the Winchester Hotel, late of Carnew, County Wicklow; aged 37 years, late proprietor of the Winchester Hotel. - Requiescat in pace.
Mr. Farrell came to the Colony some thirteen years ago, and having settled in the Geraldine district as a farmer became proprietor of the Bush Inn, which he conducted for three years. Removing to the more populous part of the township, he soon became landlord of the Crown Hotel, where he established himself a popular and genial host. Here Death removed from him his first wife (the eldest daughter of Mr. Thomas Connelly, of Winchester) whose loss caused him to relinquish business for a time. He then took a trip to the Old Country where he spent a sojourn of some twelve months. Having re-established himself in business once more as landlord of the Crown, which, jointly with his brother, he now acquired by purchase, he married his second wife, who happily survives him. About twelve months ago he entered into possession of the Winchester Hotel, which he was carrying on at the time of his Death. His illness was comparatively short, only two months having elapsed from the first symptoms till the fatal hoar. He was attended from week to week by the good and pious Father Fauvel, whose spiritual consolation was all the more cheering from the fact that the earnest and zealous pastor had recognised in his penitent, one who had frequently served at Mass for him in years gone by, when junior acolytes were limited in number. Father Bowers, too, made frequent friendly visits to his late parishioner, so that spiritually his wants were fully attended to Dr. Hayes, of Temuka, was also constant in his attendance, but from the first gave but little hopes of ultimate recovery. The funeral which took place on Sunday, the 30th, was the largest ever seen in the district, being attended by friends for many miles around The procession, which included 80 vehicles and 110 horsemen besides a mate number on foot, was over a mile long. The interment took place at Temuka, alongside the grave of his first wife. The coffin was carried from the church to the grave by pall-bearers, relatives of the deceased, the "De Profundis" having been chanted in the church by the Rev. Father Fauvel, who completed the burial service at the grave. Mr Farrell, was a warm-hearted and generous Irishman, a staunch patron. He was a shrewd far-seeing business man. His widow and three children have the sympathy of a large circle of friends by whom their departed bread winner was well known and respected --RIP

Otago Witness, 16 November 1888, Page 10
Henry Williams, a groom, who was recently kicked by the horse he was travelling with, has died in the Waimate Hospital from the injuries received.

Te Aroha News, 8 December 1888, Page 5 A SHEARER'S SUICIDE.
Timaru, Dec. 6. A determined suicide was committed yesterday afternoon by a shearer named King, while working in a shed at Rangitata Island. He cut his throat with the shears, and attacked the other men with the shears when they rushed to him. He died in the evening.

Otago Witness, 18 January 1889, Page 15
David Milne, aged 20 years, a labourer, employed at Pareora station, went to Timaru for the New Year holidays, and has been missing since. His body was found on the 10th in a shallow creek a few miles from town, on a roundabout road home. His watch and money were in his pockets. Deceased was a sober and quiet man.

Otago Witness, 4 January 1889, Page 28
Bridget Brophy, aged four years, daughter of Mr E. Brophy, of Pleasant Valley, near Geraldine, met with a mishap on Thursday at Geraldine, which has since resulted fatally. The little girl rose at 7 am., and by some means obtained possession of a box of matches, in playing with which she set fire to her nightdress, and was instantly enveloped in flames. Before assistance could be rendered the child was so severely injured that she died on the following morning. Kyran Brophy - father. John Brophy -brother of deceased.

Star 5 February 1889, Page 3
Our Geraldine correspondent also informs us that, Mr Joseph Borborough, an old resident in Geraldine, and at one time a prominent member of the Victoria Lodge of Oddfellows, who had been ailing for some time past, breathed his last on Saturday afternoon. His funeral will take place to-day, and will be followed by the brethren of Lodge.

Timaru Herald, 25 February 1889, Page 2
    The funeral of Mr I. H. Peters' daughter, advertised on Saturday to take place to-day, is postponed till to-morrow, though the deceased will be brought down by train to-day.
    The funeral of the late wife of Mr B. P. Whitmarah, booking clerk at the railway, took place yesterday, and was conducted according to the Salvationist rite. There was a very large attendance, Mr Whitmarsh having an extensive circle of friends and acquaintances, and the Caledonian Lodge, of which he is a member, mustered well to express their sympathy with a bereaved brother.

Press, 27 March 1889, Page 5
Auckland, March 26. Mr E. P. Miles, head, of the firm of Miles Bros., of London, Miles and Co., Christchurch, and Miles and Archer, Timaru, who died suddenly of syncope, at the residence of Mr Hanmer, Te Aroha was interred to-day at Parewai Cemetery, in the Tamaki district.

Otago Witness, 2 May 1889, Page 22
A labourer named Rayner was received to the Timaru hospital on Sunday with his ribs broken and internally hurt by a fall. He had been drinking on Saturday night, and left a hotel at a late hour. He wandered about in the dark, and fell over a face a distance of 30ft into, a railway cutting, and lay there till next morning, when a man passed him. Though Rayner begged and implored this man to help him he passed on Rayner then crawled about a quarter of a mile round to the station into town. He is not expected to get over his injuries.

Otago Witness, 9 May 1889, Page 17
Mr W. F. Campbell, 29 years of age, accountant iv the Bank of New South Wales, Timaru, for the last two years, met his death by a foolish freak. He was at the Grosvenor Hotel with friends late on Saturday night, and between 1 and 2 am. he and another bank clerk started to run a race round a block of buildings. Campbell ran foul of a noise trough or horse post at the Ship Hotel. He said he was not much hurt. Dr Lovegrove was sent for on Sunday morning, and found no symptoms of serious injury. The patient took medicine and food freely, and at night appeared quite easy and collected. Next morning he was found dead. Mr Campbell's friends are in Wellington. At the inquest the medical evidence showed that death resulted from acute peritonitis, and a verdict of accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 29 May 1889, Page 3
An inquest on the body of George Wild was held before the coroner at the Waimate Hospital at 7 p.m. on Monday last. The following jury were embannelled : — W. Coltman (foreman). R. Inkster, F. Smith, P. Russell, G. Harding, and J. Ansell. The jury having viewed the body the following witnesses were examined : —
Charlotte Wild, mother of deceased, stated that on Tuesday last deceased, who had lived with his brother for the last fourteen months, came home complaining of a bad cold, and and he would stay with her until he was well. He remained from Tuesday until Saturday. As he was getting worse Dr Stacpoole was called in, He said that deceased was suffering from typhoid fever, and advised him to go to the hospital. On the Wednesday previous to this deceased had sent to Dr Niccols for some medicine. Witness did not know what the medicine was for, and whether it was taken. Deceased would not say what was the matter with him. To the foreman : I never spoke to Dr Niccols about my son.
James Wild, of Waimate, labourer, brother of deceased, said that his brother first complained of being unwell on the 21st April, but would not say what was the matter with him. He afterwards told witness he had consulted Dr Niccols. Witness noticed that deceased had several bottles of medicine.
To a juror: I saw deceased take a dose of medicine three weeks after the 23rd April. Dr Stacpoole deposed to having made a post-mortem examination which proved that the cause of death was typhoid fever. The immediate cause was hemorrhage of the bowels. In his opinion deceased had been suffering from fever for three weeks.
To the foreman : Would not say whether the removal to the hospital would aggravate the disease. Dr Niccols stated that deceased had on the 25th April consulted him for a complaint for which he prescribed and supplied a lotion. Subsequently deceased sent his young brother for another bottle of lotion, which was supplied him. To the foreman : Could not remember the exact date the boy came for the lotion, but thought it was within ten days or a fortnight ago. Mr Gall, chemist, and William Wild, father of deceased, were called but were not sworn, as the jury were satisfied that their evidence was not required. The jury returned a verdict of death from typhoid fever.

Timaru Herald, 31 May 1889, Page 2
A death under rather peculiar circumstances occurred near Waimate on Wednesday evening. William Pollard, a workman at a flax-mill at Deep Crook, had been ill for a week, and sent to the local chemist for some medicine. The chemist advised that a medical man should be called in, but it was too late, for almost immediately after the arrival of Dr Stacpoole the patient breathed his last. Our correspondent is informed that typhoid fever was the cause of death.

Timaru Herald Monday July 1889 pg2
Obituary Notice of Mr J.B. Stansell, father of Mr R. Stansell, of Timaru.
Mr J.B. Stansell, the usher of the Supreme Court, Christchurch, died on Thursday, at the age of 69.... Mr Stansell has been

North Otago Times, 5 August 1889, Page 2
An inquest was held at the Glencoe Hotel, Waitaki North, yesterday, at 11.30 am , on the body of Joseph Harper, who was found dead in his bed on the previous morning Mr Stratford, District Coroner, presided, and Inspector Thompson conducted the enquiry. Mr Nicholas O'Toole was foreman of the jury. From the evidence of the deceased's wife and stepson, it was shown that deceased, who belonged to Waimate, and was a native half caste, had been employed as a laborer at Waitaki North. For some years he had complained of ill health, and about four years ago was in the Waimate Hospital for a period of five weeks. On Thursday he was at work in his usual health. On Friday he had no breakfast, and worked throughout the day, but ate very little, simply partaking of some bread and butter. On Saturday his stepson rose at 6 a.m., and deceased was then asleep. He left him asleep, and returned at 7, and found him still asleep. Thinking he was ill he did no awake him, and on returning at 8 found him dead. He telegraphed to the police. Dr de Lautour, who made the post mortem examination of the body, found that deceased had been well nourished. There was a large quantity of internal fat, with the liver, kidneys, and lungs diseased. He also found fatty degeneration of the heart, which was, in his opinion, the cause of death. The jury found a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Press, 10 September 1889, Page 6 DEATH OF MR ANDREW GRANT.
The unexpected death of Mr Andrew Grant, the well known breeder and dealer, will cause a wide spread feeling of regret in the Temuka district and probably throughout Canterbury. Mr Grant has been ailing for about a week, but on Sunday last it was generally understood that his condition was improved. On Monday morning there was a change for the worse, and he expired at about 5 a.m. Mr Grant, although comparatively young -his age being only forty-eight—was looked upon as quite an old identity. He came to the colony at an early age, and was for some considerable time employed by Mr Tripp, of Orari Gorge station, who long after his leaving him continued to speak of his judgment, zeal, and ability in most flattering terms. As a successful dealer in sheep and cattle, but more particularly in the former, Mr Grant has long been known, and as a breeder he has gained numerous prizes. About two years ago he purchased a portion of the well-known Springfield estate at a figure that displayed his confidence in its resources, and latterly he has paid great attention to its systematic working. He continued to reside at Willow Bank, his Temuka homestead, and here his death took place. He was a large occupier at the Rangitata, and was interested in several runs in the Mackenzie Country. Except as a shareholder in various companies Mr Grant took little active interest n public affairs, but on the retirement of Messrs Talbot and Quinn from the Temuka Road Board, he was induced to become Chairman of that body. He also interested himself actively in the promotion of the local dairy factory, and was formerly the mainstay of the Temuka and Winchester Agricultural and Pastoral Association. Full of energy and enterprise, and with a keen business capacity, was yet so imbued with a kindly spirit that urged him ever to extend a helping hand to less fortunate or able men than himself that his loss will be felt through each circle of the community, and to the district especially will be irreparable. Mr Grant was a widower and leaves a young family.

Te Aroha News, 11 September 1889, Page 6
DOUBLE SUICIDE. Timaru, September 9.
The jury in the double "suicide case found a verdict of "temporary insanity." The deceased were last seen alive on Sunday, August 25th, and therefore it is probable they were dead twelve days when found.

Evening Post, 14 October 1889, Page 2
On the 2nd September, 1889, at the residence of his sister, John Lancet M'Guire, the beloved and deeply regretted brother of Mrs Doctor Roocha of Dublin, Ireland, also brother of Miss A. J. McGuire, late of Timaru. "May he rest in peace "

Te Aroha News, 26 October 1889, Page 2
SUDDEN DISAPPEARANCE. SUPPOSED SUICIDE. Timaru, Last Night.
Jas, Clark, aged 53, who has a wife and nine children, and who is surfaceman on the railway at Makikihi, has been missing since yesterday morning, when he left home coatless. He has been melancholy lately and it is feared that he has made away with himself.

North Otago Times, 28 October 1889, Page 2
Timaru. October 26. Two boys, who were riding home from the Upper Pareora School yesterday, had a race along the road. The saddle girth of one of the horses (Evans) broke, and the boy fell on his head. He was picked up in an unconscious state and brought to the hospital, where he died this morning of injury to the brain.

North Otago Times 30 October 1889 Page 2
The Timaru Herald of yesterday says : A child of Mr George Morton's, a little girl about one year and nine months old, died very suddenly on Saturday last at Waihao. It appears that a pedlar called and sold a bottle of mixture for electro-plating, containing nitrate of silver and cyanide of potassium. The bottle was placed in a chest of drawers in the bedroom, and was not labelled poison, nor was there any label on it at all. The child managed to reach it and drank the contents. Dr Stacpole was sent for, and tried the usual remedies, but they were of no avail. The child died on Saturday evening. No inquest is to be held.

Te Aroha News, 2 November 1889, Page 5 Crushed to Death.
Timaru, Oct. 30. A girl named Thomas, 13 years old, while riding on a Cambridge roller along the road at Pleasant Point yesterday, fell off in front, and the roller passed over her. Death was instantaneous. A verdict of accidental Death was returned at the inquest. The jury acquitted the driver of the blame.

Press, 3 December 1889, Page 5
Blenheim, December 2. The man William Jones, picked up near Jordan, on Friday, was evidently thrown from his horse, taken to the accommodation house, and died in a few hours from peritonitis. He was emaciated in appearance, and had been drinking heavily. He is believed to have been an hotel keeper at Timaru.
TIMARU, December 2. A sensation was caused among the promenaders on the wharf on Sunday afternoon. Mr M. S. Black, rabbit inspector, stabbed with a sheath knife a big Newfoundland dog, owned by Mr Moss Jonas, which had Mr Black's retriever by the throat. Mr Black says be was justified and was fully determined to kill it, but the knife slipped.

Timaru Herald, 28 January 1890, Page 4
An inquest was held at the Hibernian Hotel yesterday morning, before C. A. Wray, Esq., coroner, and a jury of six, of whom Mr; R. Webster was chosen foreman, into the death of Mathew Turk, shoemaker, who was found dead outside his house in the morning. Martha Catlow, a neighbour of deceased living in Wilson street, Sandie Town, stated' that deceased was a shoemaker, and also kept a small grocer's shop. She went to him at six o'clock yesterday morning, to get a pair of boots deceased had been given to repair. When she got there she saw the back door was open, and on going to it found Turk lying face downwards across the doorway, outside, quite dead. He appeared to have fallen in going out. ...Dr Hogg, who had made an examination of the body, stated he found the cause of death to be hemorrhage into the right hemisphere of the brain, commonly called apoplexy. There was a large effusion and deceased would fall and die almost, immediately. The jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes.

Otago Witness 13 February 1890, Page 32
The Timaru Herald reports the death, at the age of 59, of Mr Josephus Murphy, an old South Canterbury settler, who took up his residence there some 25 years ago, after some rough experience in Otago in packing stores to rushes. He had been for some years proprietor of the Criterion Hotel, and then removed to Pleasant Point.

New Zealand Tablet, 14 March 1890, Page 15
A most distressing accident occurred in Temuka on Wednesday evening last. After the public school was over some of the girls went to the Temuka River for a bath. The place chosen by the girls was about a hundred yards above the Temuka Traffic Bridge, where there are several very deep holes. After they had taken off their clothing, it appears that a girl named Milly Ackroyd, about 13 years of age, was standing on a clay bank overhanging one of these holes, when she slipped in. She cried out for help, which was responded to by another girl named Edgar, but this girl, too, began to sink, and a third one, named Franks, went to her aid, and succeeded in rescuing her. She was, however, too late to save the girl Ackroyd, whose body was only recovered after being in the water for three hours, though several experienced divers made a diligent search for it. A boat was procured, and after a good deal of dragging the body was hooked shortly after eight o'clock, in the presence of about 160 person. At the inquest a verdict of    "accidental Death " was returned.

Taranaki Herald, 10 April 1890, Page 2
Timaru, April 10. John Mulvihill  [Mulvahill] was killed on Wednesday by a fall of earth at the deep water race cutting near Geraldine. Inquest Timaru Herald,  11 April 1890, Page 3

Marlborough Express, 15 April 1890, Page 2
The latest accident from it is thus described by a Southern, paper:— "A sad fatality occurred m Temuka by which Albert Nicholas, aged five years, the third son of Mr N. C. Nicholas, was killed. Mr M. Scannell's threshing plant was being taken through the town, and when nearly opposite Dr Hayes' house, the deceased, who was riding on the bars by which the men's galley is drawn, slipped and fell, and the wheels passing over his head, fractured his skull and caused instant death.

New Zealand Tablet, 18 April 1890, Page 16
Elkis.— On Sunday, 6th April, at Winchester. South Canterbury. Norah, the beloved wife of John Elkis and third daughter of Mr. Thomas Connelly ; aged 21 years.

New Zealand Tablet, 18 April 1890, Page 19
In the usual column appears the obituary notice of Mrs. John Elkis of Winchester. The deceased, who was only in her twenty-second year, was the third daughter of Mr. Thomas Connelly, one of the oldest and most widely esteemed residents of South Canterbury. Taken suddenly unwell her illness soon developed into rheumatic fever, which, in spite of the flush of youth, of the most tender care, and the best medical skill obtainable, ended in Death on the ninth day, leaving two little ones motherless. The funeral concourse was one of the largest ever seen in the district, there being over 100 vehicles, and just about as many forming a cavalcade of horsemen. Father Fauvel officiated at the church and grave.

Press, 13 May 1890, Page 3
The news of the death of Mr S. Nashekski, which took place at 11.45 pm on May 5th, will be learned with regret, not only by a large circle of friends, but by the general body of the citizens of Christchurch, amongst whom the deceased gentleman has lived so long. Mr Nashelski was born in Lubrahitz, Russian Poland, in 1822. On account of the first decree issued by the Emperor Nicholas, that youths over fourteen years should be liable to be taken to serve in the Imperial army, young Nashelski, who had just reached that age, left his native place. He was subsequently taken by the Prussians into the fortifications of Posen, where he remained a political refugee under military orders. Here he was located about fifteen months. When released, he was favoured with the "march road," and under marching orders .made straight for England. In the home of liberty he followed different occupations, and passed through various ups and downs, such as might be expected in the career of a young adventurer in a strange land. In 1852, under engagement to Messrs P. and D. Folk and Co., whom he served for three years, Mr Nashelski sailed away for Victoria, to which the eyes of all the world had just been turned, as the certain road to big nuggets and high fortune, leaving to set up for himself as a general dealer, carrying on business on the Ballarat, Castlemaine, and Inglewood goldfields. He returned to Melbourne, and entered into partnership with the late Mr Julius Mendelson, of Temuka, and Mr Jacob Caro, carrying on business as general storekeepers at Sandhurst, Little River, Yackandaodah. When the Otago goldfields were discovered Mr Nashelski abandoned Victoria, and, in conjunction with his nephew, Mr H. Nashelski, opened in Rattray street, Dunedin, as general merchants. Here two years passed rapidly away. In the meantime Mr Jacob Caro Mr Nasheiski's former partner—in conjunction with Mr H. Cohn (now of Messrs B. Petersen and Co.) had opened in Christchurch, and, being desirous of disposing of their business, Mr Nashelski became the purchaser, and in consequence he removed to Christchurch In 1881 arriving on the day on which the foundation scone of the Cathedral was laid. ...

Otago Witness, 5 June 1890, Page 18
The body of a man named Robert Stevenson, a small farmer at Waitaki North, was found in the Waitaki river on the 27th. The deceased left his house on the 8th February after a quarrel with his family, saying he was going to do away with himself. He was seen by a person walking down the river side, but had not been heard of since. The remains were very much decomposed, but were identified by the clothing. At he inquest a verdict of "Found drowned" was returned.

Marlborough Express, 2 July 1890, Page 2
Dunedin, July 1. At the inquest on the body of William May, the evidence showed that he had been m a very despondent state for some time, and had been recently disappointed m not getting a start in business in Geraldine. His life was insured for £200 m the Government office and £200 in the Australian Mutual Provident office. A verdict of suicide while temporarily insane was returned.

Otago Witness, 24 July 1890, Page 16
DEATH OP MR R. TURNBULL, M.H.R
Wellington, July 17. Mr R. Turnbull, M.H.R. for Timaru, died at 5 o'clock this evening. He was 64 years of age, and had been very ill for the last nine months with Bright's disease. Mr R. Turnbull, was a native of Oxford, England, where he was born in 1826. He came out to the colony in the year 1851 in the ship Fatima, and took up land from the Canterbury Association, He was engaged in farming for over 11 years near Christchurch, and during a portion of that time he represented the Seadown district in the Provincial Council. He removed to Timaru in 1864 and went into business there as a draper, and afterwards as an auctioneer and commission agent.; He represented Timaru in the Provincial Council, and was afterwards elected to the House of Representatives in 1878 as member for Timaru in place of Sir Edward Stafford. He has represented the constituency ever since. He was a Liberal in politics and took great interest in the land question and social subjects, such as the employment of females. He leaves a widow and 10 children — six sons and four daughters. Timaru, July 20.
The funeral of the late Mr R. Turnbull took place this afternoon. The weather being fine, there was a large attendance— nearly 500 persons, walking two and two, and about 40 vehicles being present. Mr Wray, R.M., represented the Cabinet ; and the borough councillors, members of friendly societies, the fire brigade, and garrison band took part in the procession. The delay of the steamer upset the first arrangements and prevented the hour of the ceremony being known in the country, or the attendance would have been larger.

Otago Witness, 3 July 1890, Page 19 INQUESTS.
An inquiry into the circumstances attending the Death of Elizabeth Thomson, who was found drowned in a well at the rear of Mrs Christie's house, at Outram, on Thursday, was held before Mr Coroner Carew on the same day at the residence of Mrs Christie. John Thomson, carrier, deposed that the body shown to the jury was that of his daughter. She was born at Waimate, in Canterbury, and was 19 years of age. He last saw her alive on Sunday last. She was with him for a considerable time during the day. He noticed nothing unusual about her, and she made no complaint to him. She said nothing to him about getting medical advice... Constable Mackenzie stated that he assisted Mr Duff to get the body out of the well. The well was 9ft long, 6ft broad, and 8ft 9in deep. It had 4ft 5in of water in it. The opening at the lid was 18in by 18in at the narrowest part. He searched the room occupied by the deceased, and found the bottle of medicine produced and an old brandy bottle. There was some water in the latter and it smelt of spirits, but the smell might be from the bottle. The jury returned a verdict of "Found drowned."

Star 4 July 1890, Page 2
July 4. At the inquest on the body found in the harbour on Wednesday, it was proved to be that of George Priest, grain buyer and commission agent. He left home on June 25. His identity was proved mainly by his bootmaker and dentist. Deceased was in financial difficulties through unsuccessful grain speculations. The verdict was "Found Drowned."

Evening Post, 10 July 1890, Page 3
Timaru, This DAY. Died, this morning, Mrs Arthur Perry, mother by her first marriage of Mr. Rhodes, M.H R., and three brothers and a sister. Mrs. Geo. Rhodes came to Timaru in 1854 and was the second white woman in the district. She leaves also five children by her second marriage. The cause of Death was heart complaint.

Otago Witness, 10 July 1890, Page 20
At the inquest on the body found floating in Timaru Harbour on Wednesday it was identified as that of George Priest, a grain buyer and commission agent in Timaru. He left his home on the 25th ult. The identity was proved mainly by deceased's bootmaker and dentist. Deceased, who was a married man, was in financial difficulties through unsuccessful grain speculations. A verdict of "Found drowned" was returned.
    The body of the man found floating in Timaru Harbour is still unidentified, and as the boots and socks are the only articles on the body likely to give a clue the mystery may remain unsolved. The boots were watertights, in fair condition, with the nails and soles worn down. It has been suggested that the body may possibly be that of Christopher Mouatt, a sailor of the barque Diana, who was buried at sea on June 16 last, when the vessel was wind-bound off the Canterbury coast.

Feilding Star, 26 August 1890, Page 2
Timaru, August 23. A form hand named Denis O'Callaghan was instantaneously killed by a kick from a horse last evening at Pleasant Point.

Timaru Herald, 28 August 1890, Page 2
The remains of Mrs A. G. Anderson, nee Melton, were brought from Christchurch by yesterday's express, for interment in the Timaru cemetery. The funeral takes place this afternoon.

Otago Witness 11 September 1890, Page 20
A boy named Barkley, aged five years and four months, son of Mr John Barkley, farmer, Claremont, was drowned on Saturday afternoon. Mr Barkley (says the Timaru Herald) was engaged in ploughing on Saturday, And took his son out with him. After a time the boy was missed, and on the father going in search of him, he found the body in a dam situated in the paddock which was being ploughed. The dam is of fair size, and the water in it is about 5ft deep. How the unfortunate little fellow got in is a mystery.
    A girl named Simpson, aged seven years, daughter of a settler near Temuka, was accidentally burned to death on Sunday night by her clothes catching fire.

Timaru Herald, 16 December 1890, Page 3
Captain Woollcombe, Acting Coronor, held an inquest at the courthouse yesterday on the body found in the harbour on Sunday, The following was the jury : Messrs J. Shepherd (foreman), W. Tutton, J. Ogilvie, W.H. Butterworth, W. Collins, A. Bloomfield, and C. Green. The jury having viewed the, body Sergeant Major Mason called Mary Shears, who stated that she was the wife of James Shears and sister of John Airey. She last saw him about on the 26th November at 11 a.m. Ho seemed to be in his usual , health and spirits. He was 42 years of age and was born in England. His father was a Joseph Airey and his mother was Margaret Airey. He resided twenty-six years in this colony and was not married. He owned a cottage on an acre of ground in Sandietown. Her mother resided there, and deceased used to reside with her. He seemed a little troubled because he could „ not obtain work. This did not effect him enough to give any anxiety. He was addicted at times to drink, and was generally employed as a bricklayer's labourer. -
Dr Reid stated that he bed examined the body and did not see any marks about the skull to cause death. It looked as if deceased merely drowned. W. H. Collis, diver in the employment of the Harbour Board.
W. M. Thompson, contractor and builder. Saw him last on November 26th at Gabites' corner at 12 30 p m. spoke to him and told him that he would be able to give him work in a few days. Deceased was perfectly sober and complained a little about want of work.
J. Snoswell, stevedore
William Hallelt, son of Constable Hallett, 17 years of ago, said that at a quarter to eight o'clock on Sunday evening he was sitting on the North Mole with another lad. Saw a body on the rocks and at once gave information to the police. Constable Hallett stated that he searched the body of deceased after it had been brought to the police station and found only a leather thumb protector used by bricklayers' labourers. After consultation the following verdict was given by the jury :— " That the body we have viewed is that of John Airey, but there is no evidence to show how he fell into the water."

New Zealand Tablet, 13 March 1891, Page 19
A most distressing, as well as shocking accident occurred last (Sunday) night at half-past nine o'clock. Two young man off the Bells, which is in the Timaru Harbour, in company with two young ladies — one the daughter of Sergeant Major Mason, and the other a Miss Crawford, who was at Sergeant-Major Mason's on a visit from Lyttelton, drove out here in a buggy. On their retain journey, when crossing the Opihi Bridge, the horse begin to jib, and the two young men jumped out of the buggy and one got the horse by the head and was knocked down by it. The horse then made off, and Miss Crawford attempted to jump out, and in so doing, it is believed, struck heavily against the side of the Bridge, which rendered her unconscious. Dr W. Blunden was speedily brought to the Arowhenua Hotel to where she had been removed by some young men, but medical aid proved ineffectual, as she died at half-past eleven. Miss Mason, though having no hold of the reins, kept firm to her seat until the horse turned into a small yard near the hotel mentioned, and took the fence, leaving the buggy one side, and completely freeing herself. The buggy was not injured, and the harness was only slightly so. Miss Mason returned to Timaru the same evening. Mr. P. Brosnahan from the Levels Plains, deserves praise for the assistance he rendered.

North Otago Times, 17 April 1891, Page 2
Two months ago a man named Ralph Howarth left the Pukaki accommodation house in the horrors, and was lost. The police searched, but failed to find him. Some days ago his clothes were found a few miles away, and on a further search being made the body was discovered yesterday.

Timaru Herald, 2 June 1891, Page 2
The following is a return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of May 1891 : — dead : males, 1 (John Tandy)

Evening Post, 22 June 1891, Page 2
Timaru, 21st June. F. McQueen, who had been a clerk on the Levels Estate of the New Zealand and Australian Land Company for many years, was killed on the Washdyke road, about five miles north of Timaru, last night. The horse he was riding bolted and threw him, M'Queen landing on the hard metalled road and breaking his neck. A fellow traveller, on picking him up, found him quite dead.

The Isle of Man Times and General Advertiser (Douglas, England), Saturday, August 15, 1891; pg. 5
McQueen - On the 29th June, near the Levels Estate, Timaru, accidently killed by a fall from his horse, Dubar McQueen, aged 39 years, eldest son of Capt. McQueen, of the Isle of Man Steam Packet company.

Timaru Herald, 3 August 1891, Page 2
The following is a return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of July, 1891 : — dead : males, 1 (Thomas Nines)

The Isle of Man Times and General Advertiser (Douglas, England), Saturday, August 15, 1891; pg. 5; Death
McQueen - On the 20th June, near Levels Estate, Timaru, accidently killed by a fall from his horse, Dunbar McQueen, aged 39 years, eldest son of Capt. McQueen, of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company.

Timaru Herald, 7 September 1891, Page 2
The body of Charles Ryall was found in the Temuka river yesterday morning at a point just below Myers' property. The body was in a very advanced stage of decomposition and appeared to have been in the water a longtime. It will no doubt be remembered by many of our readers that the deceased had been missed for about two months, and that on such news first being reported to the police we published a description of the man. All that is known is that Ryall got off the train at Temuka whilst on his way home to Ashburton, but how or when he got into the river no one seems to know. Constable Morton, of Temuka, had the body taken to the nearest hotel, and Mr Wray, the coroner, will probably hold the inquest to-day.
    On Friday last an enquiry as to the death of Isabella Russell, wife of Mr William Russell, was held at the residence of the latter at Kakahu, before Mr H. W. Moore, JP. Mr J. Mailer was foreman of the jury. The husband deposed to having previously engaged one Jessie Baillie, residing at Winchester, to attend to his wife prior to his going away from home. Deceased had had several children, and had never had a doctor, but be told his wife when he left home on Monday last to send for a doctor if she thought she required one. Provision had been made for a doctor if she required one for her confinement. Jessie Baillie deposed that a few minutes after the child was born deceased went into convulsions. Witness sent for a neighbour immediately, and for the doctor. The convulsions continued off and on until death ensued. Doctor Fish deposed that in his opinion Mrs Baillie had noted wisely, and he could not blame her in any way. The jury returned a verdict of " death from natural causes," and added a rider to the effect that no blame attached to the nurse, who had done all in her power to save deceased.

North Otago Times, 17 September 1891, Page 3
Timaru. September 16.
It was reported to the police to-day that some human remains were found on Sunday last on a range in the Mackenzie Country, which are believed to be those of Andrew Thomson, chemist, who was missed from Burke's Pass so long ago as January, 1882. The remains consist of a skull and bones only, and were much scattered about.

Star 26 September 1891, Page 4
Intelligence reached Geraldine on Thursday that an accident had occurred on Mr C. G. Tripp's station, Orari Gorge. It appears that a man named Benjamin Berry, youngest son of William Berry, of Waimate, was carting manure from the railway station to Mr Tripps', and when going up an incline Berry jumped onto on of the shafts to adjust the weight of the load better. After proceeding a short distance hp fell off by some mischance, and a wheel of the waggon passed over his chest. He was taken up in an unconscious state, and Dr Fish was at once sent for from Geraldine, but the unfortunate man expired at about 1 p.m., the accident taking place, at 8 a.m. Singularly enough, no ribs were broken, as far as could be ascertained before a post-mortem had taken place, neither was the skin abraided, although the manure weighed two tons and a half and the waggon another ton. His watch, the case, of which was but slightly dented, received no other injury, and it was stopped at 8.5. Berry regained consciousness shortly before he died, and informed those around him where his parents resided. An inquest will be held in Geraldine to-day.

North Otago Times, 28 September 1891, Page 3
Timaru. September 26. A young man named Berry, employed as a carter on Tripp's Orari Station, was riding on a shaft and fell and the wheel passed over his chest. He lived to tell how the accident happened, but died in a few hours.
Heavy rain fell yesterday. It was of great value, but cold. The ranges are white to the foot.

Evening Post, 6 November 1891, Page 2 Death
Gosney — On the 4th November, at the Hospital, of typhoid, the beloved husband of N. E. Gosney, third son of George Gosney, Timaru, aged 27 years. Timaru papers please copy.
Not gone from memory,
Not gone from love,
But gone to his Father's home above.

Press, 9 December 1891, Page 4
A young man named Thos. Dunn, twenty-two years of age, an employee of Mr John Douglas, Waihao Downs, near Waimate, was drowned while bathing in the Waihao River, on Sunday evening last. An inquest was held at the station on Monday night, before Mr H. A. Stratford, Coroner, and a jury. The evidence showed that the deceased and a boy were bathing, and that Dunn got beyond his depth and sank before his companion could render him any assistance. As soon as the occurrence was reported at the station a boat was obtained and the body recovered with the assistance of drags. The deceased was unmarried. His parents are dead, but he has two brothers and a sister in the colony. A verdict of "Accidentally drowned," was returned.

Timaru Herald, 2 January 1892, Page 2
The following is the return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of December, 1891 :— dead females 2 (Louisa Vesey, Margaret Slater)

Otago Witness, 18 February 1892, Page 18
An old settler named John Higgs, 70 years old, died suddenly in his paddock at Timaru on Monday night while engaged driving cows home. He had been suffering sometime from heart disease.

Auckland Star, 22 February 1892, Page 2
Timaru, this day. George Olliver, a single man, 50 years of age, employed as a gardener, suicide by throwing himself before an express train near Temuka last night. He had threatened to do it. He died a few minutes after. The body was picked up badly mutilated.

Star 26 February 1892, Page 2
On Wednesday afternoon an inquest was held in the Court-house, Geraldine, touching the death of Martha Pratt, a six year old daughter of Mr H. R. Pratt. Mr C. A. Wray, RM., Coroner, presided. The evidence of Dr Craig showed that the child died from an enlargement of the heart, and the jury returned a verdict accordingly.
    News reached Geraldine yesterday morning that a man named Robert Jakeman, a farmer residing on the north side of the Rangitata River, had been killed on Wednesday evening last while getting on his horse at the Rangitata Bridge Hotel. His horse reared up on seeing a light which was being held for Mr Jakeman, and threw his rider heavily. Jakeman died shortly afterwards.
    A telegram was received in Geraldine yesterday morning to the effect that man named Samuel Chesterman, who bad been working at the Longbeach estate, Ashburton, had died in the local hospital from the effects of a sunstroke received the day previously. The deceased was a well known resident in Geraldine, where he had lived for several years, and was a much respected member of the Salvation Army. Great sympathy is felt towards his widow, who is in a very delicate state of health, and his family.

Star 27 February 1892, Page 4
An inquest was held at the Rangitata Bridge Hotel on Thursday afternoon, before Mr C. A. Wray, Coroner, on the body of Robert Jakeman, who was killed on the previous day by being thrown from his horse. Mr Thomas was chosen Foreman of the Jury. After hearing the evidence of Dr Craig, of Geraldine, and others, the Jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

Evening Post, 5 March 1892, Page 2
Timaru, This Day. A youth named McCaa, employed at Pleasant Point, accidentally shot himself yesterday. In dragging his gun through a wire fence a piece of wire caught the trigger. He died this morning.

Star 18 January 1892, Page 3
Temuka, Jan. 18. A sad fatality occurred at Milford lagoon, near Temuka, on Sunday. Mr H. J. Bowles, licensee of the Temuka Hotel, was canoeing there, when he was upset. He made for the shore, which he had nearly reached, when he was observed to sink suddenly. Messrs E. Blyth and A. Surridge plunged in, but were unable to see any sign of him. The body has not yet been recovered.

Timaru Herald, 23 January 1892, Page 3 Inquest
Edward Stephens, of Christchurch, and a friend of the deceased, said I have known Henry J. Bowles for five years. He was 29 years of age last June, and was a native of Yeovil, Somersetshire, England. He had been a temperate man as long as I had known him. He was married and leaves a wife and two children.

25 March 1892 - Western Gazette - Yeovil, Somerset, England
Mr Bowles of the Temuka Hotel, New Zealand, who is a native of Stoford.

North Otago Times, 16 February 1892, Page 2
An old settler named John Higgs, 70 years old, dropped dead in his paddock to-night.

Timaru Herald, 17 March 1892, Page 2
Our renders will regret to learn that Mr J. Blackmore, of Woollcombe's Gully, was found dead in bed at his residence yesterday. He had been in delicate health for a long time for long suffering from Bright's disease and the cause of his sudden death was uremic poisoning. Ho was attended by Dr Lawson. Mr Blackmore was 52 yours of age, leaves a wife and grown up family of sons and daughters. He was a resident of Timaru for 30 years, and had for 20 years lived at Woollcombe's Gully. Till lately he carried on active business as a dairyman, and was esteemed by his many friends as a man of the highest probity, and of a quiet retiring disposition. Deep sympathy is felt for Mrs Blackmore and family in their sudden loss. The funeral takes place tomorrow.

Star 17 March 1892, Page 3
Obituary. Mr Joseph Blackmore, who has resided in the Timaru district for nearly thirty years, and was greatly respected, was found dead in his bed yesterday morning by his wife. Mr Blackmore for many years conducted a large dairying business, but a short time ago he disposed of it owing to ill-health. As he had been attended by a doctor, an inquest will not be necessary.

Nancy Victoria and Joseph Blackmore possible children:
1867 Blackmore Annie 
1869 Blackmore Frederick
1871 Blackmore Joseph William
1873 Blackmore Emma Jane
1875 Blackmore Alfred Baxter  m. Charlotte Ellen Dale in 1901
1877 Blackmore Henry John
1880 Blackmore Ernest
1882 Blackmore Ethel m. Arthur Richard Theodore Brunsden
1883 Blackmore Cissy  m. John Victor McKeague in 1909
         Blackmore Walter -  he had an adopted son Lawrence Edgar Blackmore in 1907

Timaru Cemetery- A returned soldier
Private Henry John Blackmore 3/1824 served his country in the war against Germany 1915-1918. Died August 3rd 1918. NZMC (He died of sickness in NZ and is buried in Timaru)
Annie Blackmore died 21st July 1952 aged 85 years.
Alfred Baxter Blackmore died Oct. 11 1946, aged 72 years
Joseph Blackmore died March 16th 1892 aged 51 years.
His wife Nancy Victoria died Feb. 5th 1914, aged 73 years.

Otago Daily Times 7 August 1918, Page 5
A Press Association message from Timaru states that a military funeral was accorded yesterday to Harry John Blackmore, N.Z.M.C. He had been on the Maheno on two trips, and returned seriously ill (sarcoma of kidney). He was 40 years of age.

Otago Daily Times 19 April 1892, Page 5
A young man named John Caswell, 17 years of age, who was working for Mrs Luxmore at Waimataitai, near Timaru, was drowned in a dam on the 11th inst. Caswell and a youth named John Crerar, 14 years of age, went into the dam for a swim. After Caswell had been swimming about for a few minutes his companion saw him splashing about and apparently sinking, and though he tried could could not reach the spot before Caswell sank. As he did not come up again, Crerar at once set off to give the alarm, meeting Mr Stewart Richmond, who proceeded to the spot and recovered the body in 6ft of water. Mr A. Hope then arrived, but the attempt to restore animation was not successful. Caswell's parents reside near Timaru.

Timaru Herald, 25 April 1892, Page 2
One of the older South Canterbury settlers passed away at Dunedin last Tuesday and was buried on Thursday, namely, the wife of Mr James Collins, engineer, who will be remembered by old Timaru residents, as he was in business here for a good many years before he left for Dunedin about ten years ago. Mr Collins had a foundry, we believe, on the corner of Woollcombe street and Main Road. Previously he was in business in Waimate. Mr and Mrs Collins came out to Lyttelton in the Tiptree, in 1864, and they came to Timaru soon after their arrival, and after staying here a short time they went to Waimate. Mrs Collins leaves a grown up family of seven, one of whom is in Timaru, the wife of Mr A. W. Bascand. Mr Collins is now engineer on one of the Clutha gold dredges, in the neighbourhood of Alexandra.

North Otago Times, 4 June 1892, Page 3
Timaru. June 3. Carl Hansen, a Norwegian aged 40 years, a stronger, was killed at Waitohi by a tree falling on him. Death was instantaneous. There was a strong nor-wester last night, and there was a heavy easterly sea to-day.

Star 4 June 1892, Page 4
An inquest was held at Pleasant Point last Thursday, before Colonel C. B. Eichbaum, Acting-Coroner, and a jury of six, touching the death of Carl Hansen. The evidence showed that deceased was working in the Gully bush, Upper Waitohi, splitting fencing for Mr A. M. Clark. He was felling a tree, which fell on him. Deceased was a Norwegian, was about forty, years of age. A verdict of accidental death was recorded.

North Otago Times, 21 June 1892, Page 2
Timaru. June 20, Mr Robert Allan, an old colonist, died this morning, aged 63. He was a partner in the late firm of Allan and Stumbles, railway and harbor works contractors, and was previously in business as a mason and quarry man in Dunedin.

Otago Witness, 23 June 1892, Page 15
At the adjourned inquest at Geraldine touching the Death of a boy named Benjamin Trumper, age 5 years and ten months, s/o Benjamin Trumper, supposed to have died from poisoning, Professor Black's report on the analysis of the stomach and intestines having been read, Dr Craig deposed as to the analysis having been made, showing that no mineral or vegetable poison had been detected. He was of opinion that owing to the rapidity with which the symptoms came on, the severity of their nature, and the rapid and fatal termination, Death was due to the swallowing of some decomposed substance, probably picked up when the children (two brothers and a sister) of Mr Trumper were returning from the Pleasant Valley school, causing irritation and inflammation of the intestinal track. Three other members of the same family became ill with similar symptoms, and having been treated for some poisonous and irritating substance had recovered. (they ate berries and some ice from a pool) He was of opinion that the deceased met his Death through inflammation of the intestines from swallowing decomposed matter, which must have been in the pool of water from which they ate some of the ice and drank some of the water. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence. He died 4 pm Wednesday.

Auckland Star, 22 July 1892, Page 4
Gisborne, this day. The body of a teamster, named James Quaid, [age 29] drowned while crossing the Waipaioa River, at Rangitira ford, on May 16th, was found yesterday afternoon by a native girl at Pakowai, near Waerangaahika. The body was embedded in sand, and in a good state of preservation. An inquest is being held this afternoon. The remains of the unfortunate man will be forwarded by steamer tomorrow to his friends at Temuka.

Otago Witness, 28 July 1892, Page 10
SUICIDE AT Timaru.
Timaru, July 20. Mr J. W. S. Ziesler, the well-known financial agent and musician, committed suicide at about 3 o'clock this afternoon. The occurrence caused a great shock. Mr Ziesler had been for many years in business as a commission agent, &c. He was prominent in musical circles, and was highly esteemed. He was formerly a partner in the unfortunate firm of Moody and Ziesler, which was broken up by the Death of Mr Moody a few years ago. Mr Ziesler shot himself in the temple with a revolver in his office. Death was instantaneous. Financial difficulties are supposed to be the cause. July 21. At the inquest on W. G. S. Ziesler, evidence was given by a brother-in-law that deceased at times suffered from temporary mental aberration, as a consequence of an attack of typhoid a few years ago, and on this evidence the jury found a verdict of "Temporary insanity." All the other evidence showed that deceased was in his usual good spirits up to a few minutes before he took his life, but had been unwell at lunch, as was usual when the nervous attacks came on. The clerks evidence showed that a loaded revolver had been kept in the office for some years past.

Timaru Herald, 3 August 1892, Page 2
The following is the return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of July, 1892: — dead : males 2 (Frederick Evens and John Eaton)

Timaru Herald, 17 August 1892, Page 2
A young man named, Thomas Joyce, aged 20 years, had on several occasions complained of severe headache. Dr Barclay had twice prescribed for him, and getting rapid relief. A week ago he had a severe headache, but within 24 hours after medicinal treatment be was quite well. On Sunday last he again complained of his head, find became dozed. On the Saturday night previous he had been about the town in his usual health and was in good spirits, and ate a hearty supper. Towards the evening, on Sunday, the stepfatber getting alarmed went again for Dr Barclay, but before the doctor could reach the house the lad died. The doctor being unwilling to give a death certificate, a post mortem was authorised by the coroner and at the base of the brain, Dr Barclay found a small hydatid tumour the size of a walnut. This growth or cyst, had been pressing on some important veine at the base of the skull, and had ultimately stopped the circulation through then altogether. This caused great congestion of, and pressure within, the brain itself, resulting ultimately in unconsciousness and death. The pressure was situated in a position from which it could not have been removed.

North Otago Times, 20 August 1892, Page 3
Death OF MR JAMES HENDERSON.
Another old identity, ripe in years, and respected by all, passed away yesterday morning at the age of 78. Mr James Henderson came to Port Chalmers 18 years ago in the Wild Deer, and has resided in this district ever since. He was a native of Bridge of Allan, Stirlingshire, and previous to coming to this colony was well known in the parishes of Carnwath and Lesmnhagow, Lanarkshire, where he resided for many years. He has enriched the colony by the fact that eleven sons and daughters are settled in New Zealand, and their offspring and their children's offspring add considerably to our industrious population. His grand-children alone number nearly 80, and the tree has therefore borne many branches. Nine of his children are settled in this district, and are well known, one resides in Timaru, and another (Mr David Henderson) is settled in the North Island. The funeral will leave his late residence, Coquet street, to-morrow, for the Oamaru Cemetery.

Otago Witness, 1 September 1892, Page 25
Durham.— On the 24th August, at Timaru, accidentally killed on board s.s. Elginshire, George Henry Lythgow Durham, beloved son of Mr and Mrs Henry Tompkins, Dunedin, and the late Thomas Durham, of Geelong, Victoria, and son-in-law of Mr and Mrs Thomas Stevenson, Mansford Bay, Port Chalmers. Deeply mourned.

Evening Post, 5 September 1892, Page 2
Napier, 4th September. A man named George Watts, a recent arrival from Temuka, South Canterbury, committed suicide at the Albion Hotel yesterday. As he did not come down from his room, the landlord finally burst open the door, and found him lying in a pool of blood, with his throat cut from ear to ear. He was quite dead. He left a letter addressed to his father and mother, saying that life had been robbed of all its pleasure. This is supposed to refer to the recent loss of his wife. At the inquest last night a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane was returned.
 
Otago Witness, 15 September 1892, Page 15
A special meeting of the South Canterbury Building Society to-night received reports from the directors, Auditors, and accountant who investigated the affairs. The directors report that the late manager, W. Ziesler who committed suicide a short time ago, had been committing defalcations for the last seven years. He abstracted securities received and vouchered fixed deposits, making no entry in the books.; He forged vouchers, property lists, and deposit receipts, and kept bogus accounts. The consequence was that the company must face a loss of over L5000.

Timaru Herald, 17 September 1892, Page 2
A boy named John Aitkin, aged 14, was thrown from his pony at Smithfield, Winchester, yesterday morning and killed.  

Ashburton Guardian, 19 September 1892, Page 2
The son of Mr John Aitken, Smithfield, Winchester, met with a fatal accident on Thursday afternoon. He had been to the Winchester railway station on horseback to fetch a parcel, and on his way home, just inside the Smithfield paddocks, was thrown from his horse, presumably by the horse stumbling. He was found insensible, and died on Friday morning.

Timaru Herald, 15 August 1892, Page 2
Scotch papers record the death on May 14th of the Rev. James Largie Blake, M.A. minister of the parish of Langton, Berwickshire, in the 72nd year of his age, and 42nd of his ministry. Deceased was a brother of the Rev. A. Blake, M A. of Tinwald, and uncle of Mr Blake, of the Timaru Main School. Deceased was one of five sons, four of whom became ministers of the Gospel. At the time of the Disruption, when the Free Church of Scotland separated from the Established Church, deceased elected to remain with the Established Church, while the others became Ministers of the Free Church. The Rev. Mr Blake, of Tinwald, formerly a distinguished Indian missionary, is now the only surviving minister of the family. Deceased was at one time editor of the Church of Scotland " Missionary Record," and was of his literary attainments.

Press, 19 September 1892, Page 5
On Thursday the only son, aged fourteen of Mr John Aitken, of Smithfield; near Winchester, was found in an insensible condition on the road leading to his father's house. He -was removed to the nearest neighbour, Mr Robert Smith's house, and Dr. Cayley, of Temuka, was sent for. The lad, however, died the following morning at three o'clock from fracture of the base of the skull. It is presumed that he was thrown from his pony. An inquest was held on Saturday, and a verdict Accidental death returned.

Otago Witness, 10 November 1892, Page 24 Death
Every- On the 2nd November, at his residence, Homewood, Pleasant Valley, South Canterbury, Frederick Every ; in his 57th year.

Timaru Herald, 13 December 1892, Page 3 District Court
The following is a list of the business to be brought before His Honour Judge Ward at a sitting of the District Court. Application will be made for probate of the wills of William Couch, and James Macdonald, and for letters of administration of the intestate estate of Harriet Lamer.

The Irish Times Tuesday, January 3, 1893
Bailey - September 14, killed in action near Markbanal (India), Arthur Wellesley, Lieutenanut, 38th Dorset, eldest son of lieutenant Colonel C.S. Bailey (late Devonshire regiment), of Timaru, New Zealand, aged 30.

Timaru Herald, 4 January 1893, Page 2
The following is the return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of December, 1892:— dead : males 2 (Ezekiel McAlwee and Albert Abbott), female 1 (Agnes Southwood)

Timaru Herald, 4 February 1893, Page 3
An inquest into the death of W. Addison, journeyman butcher, lately in the employ of James Harper, St. Andrews, who died suddenly during Wednesday night, was commenced at the Masonic Hotel, St Andrews, yesterday afternoon, before C. A. Wray, Esq., coroner, and a jury of six, of whom Mr Duncan Anderson was foreman. The witnesses were A Dutson, storekeeper, J. Anderson, wheelwright, and J. Harper, deceased's employer. The evidence showed that deceased was walking round a paddock near the Rev. Mr Brady about 8 o'clock in the evening, and complained about pains in his shoulder and head, and during the walk he had some sort of fit. He was able to walk, with Mr Dutson's assistance, to Mr Brady's house, and was there given some simple attentions. Mr Brady returned home shortly after, and administered some medicine. Deceased seemed to become better, and was presently, about 10 p.m. taken to his home, being taken by hand in Mr Brady's buggy, Mr Brady giving him some medicine and directions for its use. Deceased said he felt better, and glad to get back to his hut, where he lived with J. Anderson, a wheelwright. During the night Anderson was awakened by bearing a noise, and he found Addison in a sort of fit, but able to speak, as he said he was dying, and he expired about ten minutes afterwards. Mr Harper gave deceased a good character, but said he had formerly been addicted to drink. Deceased was about 55 years of age, and had been in his employment five years. He had no friends in the colony so far as be knew. The Rev. Mr Brady was prevented by an important engagement, from being at the inquest, and though the jury seemed satisfied that death was the result of natural causes, the coroner thought it would be better, in order to prevent the possibility of idle and malicious gossip afterwards, to adjourn the inquest for the attendance of Mr Brady, and also to procure the evidence of a medical man. The inquest was accordingly adjourned till 10 o'clock this morning.

Star 17 March 1893, Page 4
News was received in Timaru yesterday of the sudden death of Mr E. J. Gould, a farmer at Raincliff, at 11 a.m. that morning. .Dr Morris, of Pleasant Point, was sent for, but on his arrival Mr Gould was dead.

North Otago Times, 21 March 1893, Page 3
Timaru. March 20.
On Friday last a farmer at Pleasant Valley named John Wallace, a single man, age 28, hanged himself on a tree on his farm.  He was the son of Joseph Wallace of Waitohi. The jury found a verdict of temporary insanity, supposed to be due to fall from his horse.
On Sunday the body of a man, unknown, aged from 25 to 30 years, was found drowned in the Opihi at Raincliff, tethered by strips of his shirt.

Timaru Herald, 20 March 1893, Page 2
An inquest was held on Friday at " The Waterfalls," river Opihi, by Mr B. Acton, J.P., acting as Coroner, as to the sudden death of Mr Edward James Gould. The evidence submitted to the jury of whom Mr Mitchell was the foreman, and the examination of the deceased by Dr Morris, resulted in the decision that death had been caused through failure of the action of the heart. Mr. Gould had been in Canterbury so many years and was so well known to those who like himself, had grown grey and weary in the battle of colonial life, that it is needless to say more thin that he will long be remembered as a true-hearted, honourable man, whose hand was always ready to help, at far as he could, all those who needed help. The deceased was a native of Devonshire, and had been 35 years in the colony and 31 years in the Pleasant Point district. He leaves a widow and eleven children.

Star, 23 March 1893, Page 2
Caskey.— March 22, at the residence of his brother in-law, J. Pearson, King street, Sydenham, Thomas Caskey, late of Fairlie Creek, in his forty-third year.

Timaru Herald, 17 April 1893, Page 2
We publish Ibis 'morning the funeral notice of the late Mr John Fraser. Mr Fraser was one of the earliest settlers in South Canterbury, and was well and favourably known by a large circle of friends. He landed in Nelson from one of the first ships to the colonies in 1841, and after a stay there of about ten years went to Marlborough, and then on to South Canterbury. He was among the first to settle in the Mackenzie Country, he and his son being principally interested in the Mount Cook, Black Forest and Braemar stations. The old gentleman had lively experiences in those early days, and had seen the district become settled, the railway built to Point, Albury and Fairlie, and the district he had made his home in become one of the most sought after from a traveller's point of view in the colony; On leaving the Mackenzie Country some time ago, Mr Fraser settled at Pleasant Point, being principally engaged in cattle dealing. It is in the cemetery at this township that his remains will be laid to rest this afternoon.

Timaru Herald, 17 April 1893, Page 2
A distressing accident occurred to an expressman named George Fox, residing at Geraldine, late on Friday afternoon. He was taking a load of travellers' luggage to the railway station from the township, and sitting on top of one of the oases, which was a large one, when near the stone bridge, on the Geraldine road, the case shifted and threw Mr Fox off on to the hard road. The case full off at the same time, jamming his head, and one of the corners forced its way into the skull a little above the eye at the side. A trap was immediately procured, help being close at hand, and the injured man was released from his dangerous position and speedily conveyed to his house in the township. Dr Fish was sent for, and dressed the wound. The neighbours attended to him during the night. The doctor gave very little hope of his recovery, but the sufferer was somewhat easier during Saturday.

Timaru Herald, 20 April 1893, Page 3 INQUEST.
An inquest was held at the Courthouse, Geraldine, on Tuesday, before Mr H. W. Moore, acting Coroner, and a jury of whom Mr A White was foreman, touching the death of George Fox, expressman. After the jury had viewed the body Constable Willoughby led the following evidence :
Elizabeth Fox deposed : I am the daughter of George Fox, carrier, living in Geraldine. He went away with the express about 9.80 a.m. and went to Orari about ten minutes to 10 and brought back a load. He didn't come home to his dinner. I saw him pass by the house in the afternoon with another load. The next time I saw him was when he was brought in to the house after his accident. After the accident he never recovered full consciousness. He would have been 66 years of age in May next. By the foreman : On the day previous to the accident he went two and three times to and from the Orari, and went to bed between 9.30 and 10 o'clock that night.
Richard Searle deposed : I am boots at the Geraldine Hotel, and knew deceased. He cams to the hotel at 1 p.m. last Friday for travellers' luggage to go to the Orari station, and asked me to help him to load the express. He said that he did not feel very well, and I called Harry Vernall to give me a hand. We put one case in front on top of another. The top case did not stand level. I told him that the top case did not ride very well and I pushed it back, but he told me to leave it where it was as it would ride safe enough. He had no drink at the hotel to my knowledge. Robert Fish deposed : I am a medical practitioner residing at Geraldine. By my direction he was taken in a cart to his home. I then examined him more carefully. He had a lacerated wound a little above the ear, a small fracture on the outside of the head, and from his symptoms I considered there was a fracture of the back of the skull. He was quite insensible.
Henry Vernall deposed : I am a labourer residing at Orari, and remember on Friday last about 3 p.m. Searle asking me to help load Fox's trap. I should think one of the cases on the top in front weighed over 1 cwt.. I met Fox next about half way down town, where one case had fallen off. Mr McCaskey, another man and myself helped to put it on the dray again, together with Fox. He seemed to understand what he was doing, and told us where to put the case on the dray- Fox next pulled up at the Bush Hotel and asked me to have a drink and bring him one. It was a small nip of port wine and brandy. He wanted some ginger ale put in his drink. He drove away all right, and was some distance away when I got on my horse again. By the coroner : I did not see the deceased have any drink at the Geraldine Hotel. He was not sitting on the box that fell, when he left the Bush Hotel, but on one of the lower ones. He was sitting about the middle of the express in front. When I arrived at the scene of the accident the case was not on him. The evidence of four other witnesses having been taken the jury returned a verdict of " accidental death."  

North Otago Times,19 May 1893, Page 2
At Timaru, on May 16th, James Walter, the only beloved child of John and Elisabeth Todd Smith (of Scotston), aged 1 year and 9 months. The funeral will leave the Oamaru Railway Station for the Cemetery on the arrival of the Timaru train about 11 o'clock on Friday morning. Thomas Falconer, Undertaker.

Evening Post, 7 August 1893, Page 2
Timaru, This Day. a Arthur G. Cox, third son of the late Alfred Cox, a well-known old colonist, met with trap accident on Wednesday at Geraldine and died this morning from an injury to his head.

Otago Daily Times 5 September 1893, Page 6
The Timaru Herald reports, the death of Mr Thomas Henderson, contractor, from inflammation of the lungs, supervening on a severe cold contracted while superintending his contract at the Opihi bridge.

North Otago Times, 28 September 1893, Page 3
Timaru. September 27. A swagger (supposed name William Cook) was killed on the Pareora railway bridge by the 4.30 p.m. train south today. The driver saw the man 200 yards away, and sounded the whistle. The man paid no heed, so the engine was reversed and the brakes put on, but of no avail, as the man was overtaken, the cowcatcher striking him on the leg and pitching him head foremost on to the sloop of though bridge, the body rebounding on to the riverbed below, The man was picked up, and sent on a trolley to Timaru Hospital, where he died at 7.40, never regaining consciousness. The driver of the train thinks the man who stone deaf or deliberately paid no heed to the whistle. The man is not known here.

Otago Witness, 5 October 1893, Page 16
The police at Timaru (says the Herald) received word on Saturday that the body of a man named Bell had been found in a creek at Winchester. Bell was a resident of the township, a widower with five children, and the body was taken out of the creek half a mile from his house. How he got into the creek is not known.

Timaru Herald, 5 January 1894, Page 2
The following is the return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of December, 1893 : — dead 1 (Robert Mayne)

Ashburton Guardian, 11 January 1894, Page 3 Death, of Mr Timaru Rhodes.
Timaru, To-day. Mr E. T. Rhodes, fourth son of the late Mr George Rhodes, a pioneer setter of South Canterbury, died this morning from blood poisoning. He caught cold while acting as a judge at the Caledonian sports, and quinsy rasulfced. The gathering was lanced on Friday, and septicaemia supervened. He was a popular young man, and his untimely death is much deplored.

Otago Witness, 18 January 1894, Page 27
Rhodes — On the 11th January, at Hadlow, Timaru, Ernest Timaru Rhodes ; aged 29 years.

Otago Witness, 25 January 1894, Page 20
A man named Frank Rossiter was killed on the 15th by a kick from a horse at Mistake station, 30 miles beyond Fairlie, Canterbury.

Otago Witness, 1 February 1894, Page 15
The Timaru Herald of the 27th says .— "The many friends whom Mr Donald McIntyre had made during the six years he was manager of Ashwick station took advantage of a flying visit he was paying to the district for the purpose of bringing his family to Wairnna station, Otago, to which he is now manager, and met him at the Silverstream Hotel on Monday evening last to present him with a handsome chronograph, suitably inscribed, as a token of the esteem in which he was held in the district. The presentation was made by Mr M. M'Leod, who referred in eulogistic terms to Mr McIntyre a kind and genial manner, and to the irreparable loss the Caledonian societies of South Canterbury would suffer by his departure. He considered Mr M'lntyre's claims to the premier position as judge of bagpipe music were paramount, as he was a first-rate piper himself, and his awards at keen competitions were never questioned. It would be impossible to find a more ardent admirer of this popular mode of observing the antiquities of his forefathers than Mr McIntyre. Messrs Macintosh, Ross, Stock, Leitch, Shaw, and O'Donohue also testified to Mr McIntyre a good qualities. Mr McIntyre feelingly responded and cordially thanked the donors for the agreeable surprise they had given him. The rest of the evening was taken up by a semi-musical and dramatic entertainment. Another old resident and very old colonist) has (says the Cromwell Argus) gone from among us in Mr George Partridge, aged 75, who has been so long and favorably known in the district.

The deceased came to Victoria in 1848, and settled near Geelong, taking up a piece of ground there and going in for farming. On the first ,gold discovery in 1851 he went to Ballarat, leaving his wife and family on the land, and did exceedingly well. He alternated between the diggings and his farm until the gold discovery in Otago. He then came over here with his eldest son, Mr H. Partridge, and after the Dunstan rash went up to Quartz-reef Point and started a store, doing fairly well. After the .first excitement was over he went back to Geelong and brought over his wife and family I in 1865, and settled at Quartz-reef Point and Lowburn, and since that time has been continuously working in the district rearing his family, who are all now comfortably settled. Some years ago he lost his wife, and before that a daughter, who were both buried in the old cemetery at Cromwell. His remains were yesterday laid by the side of his wife and, daughter. The funeral was largely attended, almost all the residents of Quartz-reef Point and Lowburn and a goodly number of the Cromwell residents paying their last respects to one who had been so old a resident and so well respected.

The West Australian  Monday 5 February 1894 pg4
SUICIDE AT FREMANJLE.
DAVID HENRY CUTLER POISONS HIMSELF.
A distressing ease of self-destruction occurred at Newman-street, Fremantle, shortly before 6 o'clock on Saturday morning, when ,David .Henry Cutler, a boiler-maker, aged 40, committed suicide by taking poison. The deceased, who is a widower, has resided in this colony for the last two months, together with his family of two sons and two daughters, the eldest of whom  is 20 and the youngest 14 years. The family came to. W.A. from Gawlar (S.A.), and formerly lived at Timaru (N.Z.). Cutler has not had employment for some time, and his idlenessness was the cause of a heavy drinking bout. On Friday afternoon, although not suffering visibly from drink, deceased appeared to he restless, and was very much perturbed concerning the death of Mr. Arnold, which took place on the preceding day. When Arnold's funeral passed along the street, deceased said to his eldest daughter, ".I'll be the next." She reassured him, and he seemed to have got rid of some of his despondency. He also remarked the fact of one of his sons having obtained employment at an increased wage, and said," You can get on without me now." His daughter said, " Don't talk like that. You need not; work any more. The boys wages will keep you, and you can be here to rule us all." He replied, "Very well, I'll put the matter out of my head." Deceased retired to bed on. Friday night at 9 o'clock, quite sober. At about six o'clock in the morning he was found by one of his sons in bed in convulsions. Dr. White was at once sent for. Miss Cutler asked deceased if he would have anything to drink, and he said, "No, I have taken my last drink in this, world." Death took place whilst the stomach-pump was being sent for. In a tumbler in the room traces of arsenic were found, which indicated that deceased had deliberately poisoned him-; self. An inquest was opened yesterday by Mr. B. Fairbairn, S.M., district coroner, and after the formal evidence of P.c Kelso was taken the enquiry was adjourned till Thursday next.

Timaru Herald, 6 February 1894, Page 3
We regret having to record the sudden death of Mr Peter Henry McShane, farmer, Geraldine Flat, on Sunday morning. It appears that Mr McSbane went from his house to the stable in order to get his horse and trap ready to take the family to church m the township, end on it appearing to some of the members of the family that their father was a long while about it, Mrs McShane went to the stable only to discover the body of her husband lying dead,. Assistance was sent for as speedily as possible. It is supposed that the deceased ruptured a blood vessel in the head. An inquest was to have been held yesterday afternoon.

New Zealand Tablet, 16 February 1894, Page 19 DEATH OF AN OLD COLONIST
The following is taken from the Geraldine Guardian, Thursday, February 8. "The funeral of the late Mr Peter Henry McShane took place on Tuesday, the procession leaving his late residence, Geraldine Flat, at 9. a.m. The funeral was held in the forenoon, and not at the usual conventional hour, we understand, at the express wish of the deceased. Strange to say, only about a week before his death the matter of funerals was being discussed in his family circle and deceased then said that at his death his wish was to be buried in the same manner and same time as was the custom in the country where he was born. This wish his relatives have dutifully carried out. The funeral procession arrived at Geraldine about 1015 a.m., and was one of the largest ever seen in the district. The cortege comprised about 80 conveyances, and a large number of people followed on foot on the street. The pall-bearers were W. Earl, E. Burke. M. Burke T McQuilken, J McQuillen, and Neil O'Boyle. On arrival at St Marys, Roman Catholic Church the coffin was carried in, and High Mass for the Dead was celebrated, the Rev Father Hyland; of Ashburton officiating, assisted by the Rev Father O'Donnell (Ashburton) the Rev Fathers Fauvel and Malone (Temuka), and Rev Father Bower (Geraldine). The clergy walked at the head of the funeral procession to the cemetery, where the Rev Father Bowers read the burial service at the grave.
I may mention as one who has known the deceased for a great number of years and heard him tell a good many aneodotes of his colonial life, that he left his native place (County Antrim) in the year of 1859 and came out to Melbourne. For some years he followed cattle dealing, and made several visits to New Zealand for that purpose. He was also for a time on the West Coast gold diggings. Then he married and settled down in Halswell in 1871. He only remained there a few years, till he finally cast in his lot with many more of his own countrymen in South Canterbury the place where he died. As a farmer few were his equal and as a Catholic the Church will lose in him one of its strongest supporters. He was always ready and willing to help any charitable purpose. He was a good husband and kind father. He leaves a widow and six children (the eldest is married), all well provided for, to mourn his loss.

Evening Post, 23 February 1894, Page 3
Timaru, This Day. James Stevenson, a farmer of Kakahu, committed suicide on Monday. A verdict of Temporary Insanity, through money troubles and drink, was returned.

Otago Witness, 22 March 1894, Page 22
The Oamaru Mail reports that a fatal accident happened at Waimate on Thursday whereby John Bowles, a stepson of Mr Wm, Manchester, lost his life. About 10 o'clock in the morning the unfortunate man went out to the back of the house to repair the windlass of the well, and nothing more was seen or heard of him until about half-past 2 in the afternoon, when the servant girl went to the well, and, seeing the water muddy and thick, had her suspicions aroused. She immediately obtained assistance, and after dragging the well the body of deceased was brought to the surface.

Otago Witness 22 March 1894, Page 22
Accidents, &c— Death has been busy in our midst during the past week, no less than four funerals having entered the cemetery portals within that time. One of these was that of Mr Alexander Allen, an old and respected member of the community and of the Presbyterian Church. — A second was that of John Bowles, who was the victim of accident. The young man was subject to epileptic fits, and on the day of his death, while he was in the act of effecting some repairs to a well, he must have been seized with one these fits and precipitated through the open lid into the well. He was not missed for some time, and when it was surmised that he had fallen into the well some delay occurred in bringing the body to the surface, as those who were concerned refused to do anything until the " sergeant " came. There is a very common notion among people that in such cases nothing must be done until the police arrive. It is a stupid and mistaken notion, and has often been the cause of death being consummated when prompt action on the part of bystanders would have saved life.

Otago Witness, 12 April 1894, Page 13
Mr John Poole, the well-known trainer, was thrown in the Hurdle Race at Timaru on Thursday and severely injured. Monday's Timaru Herald reports that Mr J. Poole, of Dunedin, dozed off on Sunday night into a semi-unconscious state. Dr Lovegrove has every hope that he will pull him round all right.

Timaru Herald, 27 April 1894, Page 2
The railway ballast gang working near Normanby yesterday unearthed in a sandhill, about five feet below the natural surface a couple of human skulls, and they were brought to the police station by one of the party. They are of an ancient colour and may have been in the sand a century or two. One is the skull of an old man as shown by the worn state of the teeth. This cranium is well formed in the back, but there is no forehead to speak of. The other skull is of a younger person, of a better type of head, and may have been that of a woman. It has a quite respectable forehead. There is also a lower jaw, which has been attached to the older jaw, which it almost fits, but not quite. It might have belonged to another skull, though the wear of the teeth is a pretty close fit. This lower jaw evidently belonged to an old person too, as the owner had lost two molars from it on each side, and the bone had grown over. Our doctors, as the only persons in town posted up in skulls, should should have a look at them.

Auckland Star, 23 April 1894, Page 4
Timaru, this day. Mr J. Poole, owner and rider of the hurdle racer Rebel, who bad a bad fall at the races on the 5th inst., died in the Hospital yesterday. He was a resident of Dunedin.

Otago Witness, 26 April 1894, Page 27
Poole. On the 22nd April 1894, at Timaru Hospital (the result of an accident), John, the dearly loved husband of Alice Milbrew Poole; aged 33 years. Deeply regretted.

Otago Daily Times 3 July 1894, Page 3
A young man, supposed to be an Italian or a Swiss, who came from Timaru on Friday night, was found dead in a watercloset at the Ashburton railway station. His name was supposed to be "Harry Montalebert." The Timaru Herald learn from the police that a man named Harry Montalerge, who was boots and barman at the Club Hotel, and recently in the employ of Mr M'Guiuness at the Ship Hotel, left Timaru by Friday evening's express for Ashburton, and there is no doubt he is the person referred to. He was a native of South America, of mixed extraction, and was about 27 years of age. He came to Timaru from Invercargill about four months ago, and is said to be well known there. He was a quiet man, of sober habit, obliging manner, and whilst at Timaru enjoyed perfect health. The cause of his death at Ashburton is not stated.

Otago Witness, 2 August 1894, Page 29
Pearce.— On the 27th July, at her parents' residence, Parkside, Caversham, Isabella, the dearly beloved and only daughter of Thomas and Isabella Pearce (after a long and painful illness) ; aged 24 years and four months, " Not dead, but gone before."
— Timaru papers please copy.

Otago Witness, 13 September 1894, Page 27
Young.— On the 9th September, at St. Andrews (unexpectedly), Georgina G. Munro, daughter of Mr W. Munro, Annfield, Toiro, and wife of James Young, jun., Fairlie ; aged 24 years.

Timaru Herald
, 19 September 1894, Page 2
The following is the return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of August, 1894: — dead males 2 (William Gosling, John Emmerson)

Evening Post, 29 September 1894, Page 2
Pohio.—On the 28th September, at Timaru, William Pohio, nephew of Mr T. Parata, M.H.R., aged 22 years.

Press, 2 October 1894, Page 5
Timaru, October 1. A small settler in the suburbs, named James Nash, single, forty-five years of age, was found dead this evening in his paddock, where he had been working. He had died without a struggle.

Timaru Herald, 3 October 1894, Page 3
An inquest was held by Mr Wray, Coroner, it 4 o'clock yesterday at the Hibernian hotel, into the death of James Nash, who was fund dead on his section, Knubley's padlock, the previous evening. The jury were Messrs Wm. McK Thompson (foreman), E Ball, R. McQueen, J Mulcahy, T. Peacook, and G. Burford. Sergeant-Major McDonald the evidence. B Mahoney, senr. stated that he lived at Watlington, about 20 chains from deceased's place. He saw and spoke to him about 10 30 on Monday morning, deceased being then at work on his land with a horse and grubber. Deceased said that in the afternoon he was going to prepare a certain piece of land for potatoes. About 7 p.m. went to his own house (near deceased's) and his daughter in-law said there must be something wrong with Jimmy because she had seen his horse sanding in one place for two or three hours, and she suggested that he should go over and see. Went over and found deceased lying on he ground on his back dead. Had known deceased 13 or 14 months. He told witness that he had relations in Bath (either father or mother) and a brother farming near Adelaide. Sergt-Major McDonald said deceased had cousin here. Dr R.S. Reid stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased. Would say he was a man over forty. He must have been of an uncomplaining nature as he had congestion of the liver. The Jury found the deceased died from disease of the heart, in accordance with the medical evidence. The funeral will take place to day from Mr John Anderson's residence, Sandietown, and from the Hibernian Hotel, as previously notified.

New Zealand Tablet, 19 October 1894, Page 19
On Thursday afternoon, the 11th met, the Sister Mary Magdalen (in the world Miss Julia O'Connor) died at the Dominican Convent in Dunedin. The deceased nun, who was a sister of Mrs Richard Hoare of Temuka, and a relative of the Brosnan family, several of whose members reside in the neighbourhood alluded to, was a native of the County Kerry, Ireland. Some fourteen or fifteen years ago she joined the Dominican community in this city, where a year or two afterwards she made her profession. She had been professed as a lay-sister for thirteen years, and her age was 41. She was of a particularly kind and amiable disposition, and her special characteristic was devotion to the sick, on whom she bestowed most tender care. For about three years she had been suffering from consumption, which finally settled in the throat.
..A handsome wreath of porcelain flowers in a glass case, to be placed upon the grave, was presented by Mrs Lusion

Star 20 October 1894, Page 6
A man named Marquis died at the Waimate Hospital on Thursday night, from injuries he received through being thrown from a trap in the Waimate Gorge on Oct. 12. At an inquest held yesterday a verdict of accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 20 November 1894, Page 2
The funeral of Mrs Alexander McKenzie, of Geraldine Road, took place on Sunday afternoon, and was one of the largest ever seen m the district. The Rev. A. B. Todd conducted the funeral' service in a very impressive manner. The deceased lady was an earnest and active Christian worker, who did her best to assist anyone who was m needj and her removal at the comparatively early age of 53, will cause deep regret in many a home. Her second son, Mr John McKenzie, M.A., is at present in the Old Country preparing for the Ministry.

Otago Daily Times 27 November 1894, Page 7
Osborne - On the 25th November, at Dunedin, Fanny Elisabeth, beloved sister of Mr William Osborne, of Tuapeka West, and of Miss Isabella Osborne, of Temuka

Timaru Herald, 5 December 1894, Page 2
The Illustrated London News of Sept. 15th records the death of Mrs Augusta Webster, and gives, with a portrait, a brief but laudatory notice of her literary and other labours. Some of our readers will take an interest in this voice lost from the choir of women poets, on learning that she was a sister of Mr Sydney Davies, of Timaru.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 17 December 1894, Page 2
Timaru, December 15. Three shearers crossing the river Tekapo on horseback were washed off their horses. Two got ashore much exhausted. The third landed with his horse on a spit and mounted and endeavored to cross, but was drowned. His name is O'Donald, aged 23. Parents reside in Taranaki.  

Timaru Herald, 18 December 1894, Page 3
An inquest was held deceased's house, Babington Street, Buchanan's paddock, yesterday, touching the death of Samuel Charles Adams, who died suddenly in his bed about 3.30 a.m. The deceased, a labourer, had been an invalid for a long time, with a heart complaint. The jury consisted of Messrs C. J. Butt (foreman), D. McCarthy, R. Shears, J. Durkin, A. Mahan, and T. Sutton. Miss Jane Hannah Adams gave evidence that her husband, who was about 45 years of age, had lived m Timaru about 11 years. Five years ago he suffered from rheumatic gout, and ever since had had pains about the heart, which became worse about twelve mouths ago but he would 1 never have a doctor. That morning he became suddenly ill and died immediately. She got a neighbour to go for a doctor, and Dr Bowe, arrived about 4 o'clock. Dr Bowe stated that when he arrived the man was dead. As directed by the Coroner he made a past mortem J examination, and found the heart diseased, and chronic congestion of the kidneys and liver. Death was due to heart disease, and no medical aid could have prolonged life. The jury accordingly found that death was due to natural causes.

Press, 3 January 1895, Page 4
On New Year's Day Mr Howell, of Timaru, was driving to the Caledonian sports there, and was just at the railway bridge when the first express came along. The mare in the buggy was so frightened that she dropped dead at the roadside; the shock of the fright probably acting on a weak heart.

Taranaki Herald, 14 January 1895, Page 2
Mr Fred Hodge, well-known cross country rider, was found drowned on Sunday in Timaru harbour. Case of suicide.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 29 January 1895, Page 2 Timaru, January 30.
The body of a young man named William Montgomery [age 39], employed at the Raincliffe station, was found on the beach beside the breakwater. He was last seen at eleven o'clock last night, and was quite sober. £42 was found in his pockets. It is supposed that he strolled on to the breakwater, and fell into the sea.

Star 29 January 1895, Page 3
Montgomery has a brother, Johnston Montgomery, at Raincliffe, a groom there for many years. Deceased came over from Australia some time ago to be near his brother. He was a native of Ballymena.

Otago Witness, 31 January 1895, Page 21
A CHARGE OF MURDER. Timaru January 28.
On Saturday night a seaman of the German barque Franz, which arrived from Adelaide a few days ago, went aboard drunk and went to the officers' quarters. The master and mate were ashore at the time. The second male, a young man named Frederick Sehnier, who was in bed, got up and told the man to go ashore and come back in the morning. The sailor, he says, rushed at him, whereupon he darted into the first mate's cabin and got a loaded revolver. The man, whose name is Thomson, went towards him again, and he fired two shots, one overhead and toe other at Thomson's body. The bullet struck him just below the navel, and Thomson fell. The police were sent for, and the man was taken to the hospital. The wound was found to be serious, and three surgeons endeavoured to extract the bullet yesterday, but failed to find it. The man's depositions were taken. The wounded man died at 1 p.m. today. Schnier was brought before the S.M., and remanded till Friday, bail being refuted. An inquest will be held this evening.

Otago Witness, 7 February 1895, Page 35
At the Magistrate's Court, Waimate, before Major Keddell, Jeremiah McCarthy was brought up on remand, charged with the wilful murder of a man, name unknown, who was found dead at Waihao on January 12. Evidence was given that the deceased, having asked the way to Sullivan's place, was told there was no such person in the district. He then asked for McCarthy's station, and was shown to M'Carthy's farm. On the evening of the 10th the deceased entered the house of George Kilworth, a shepherd, and when told he should have knocked at the door he asked, "Isn't this M'Carthy's place?" Kilworth showed him the way to M'Carthy's house. In stepping over a water race deceased was seen to fall, but he got up again and did not appear to be lame. Mary M'Carthy, a daughter of the accused, in the course of her evidence said the man came to her father's house about 8 o'clock in the evening. He tried the front door and as he could not get in had kicked it. He then went to the back door and kicked then also. Her father and brother went to the door, the deceased having said he would murder them unless admitted. When asked what he was doing deceased laid it was his own house. The man refused to give his name. The man was going towards the stables when her father told him not to go there as he might set fire to the place. The dogs were barking during the night, and her father, mother, and sister got up and were absent about a quarter of an hour. On the following afternoon the man was sitting on the roadside. He said "Good day" to her father, who asked him what ailed him. The man said he had his leg poisoned, and was going to the chemist's. The man was given some tea and scones. Johanna M'Carthy, another daughter, gave similar evidence. She said she went to the door about the middle of the night with her father and mother when she heard a man crying. Her brother Michael gave the man food on the following day. The next morning she saw the man lying at the cross roads. Rose Davis, in her evidence, said she and her brother in driving past on the 11th saw a man on the roadside. They did not speak to him as they thought he was intoxicated. The next afternoon she and her father saw a man at the cross roads half a mile from where she had seen the man on the previous day. Her father called out to the man, and not getting a answer went to him. No particulars are to hand of the remainder of the evidence. M'Carthy was committed for trial, the magistrate in doing so saying that the case was very weak one, but in the interests of the accused himself he thought it would be better to send the case for trial.

Star 13 February 1895, Page 2 Death
Button.— Feb. 12, at Merivale, Fanny, the beloved wife of E. T. Button, : junr., Peel Forest, and eldest daughter of the late Peter Fawcett, Hampstead, Ashburton.

The Belfast News-Letter (Belfast, Ireland), Monday, March 4, 1895
RAINEY - At Temuka, Canterbury, New Zealand, through being thrown off a horse, Thomas Rainey, late of Braniel, Castlereagh, County Down, aged 30 years. Full particulars not to hand. David Rainey.

Timaru Herald, 20 March 1895, Page 4 PROBATE, ETC.
Mr Raymond, applied for probate of the the will of the late Joseph Foster, coal - merchant, Timaru. — Granted. Messrs Perry, Perry, and Kinnerney applied for probate of the will of the late; J. H. Berriman, of Timaru, gas fitter ; and for letters of administration of the estates of the late William Montgomery, of Raincliff, labourer ; and of Matthew Wilson Rock, of Gleniti, labourer. — Granted.
Mr Clement applied for probate of the will of the late William S. Goldsmith, of Waimate, merchant. — Granted.
Mr Salmond applied for probate of the wills of the late Robert Redpath, of Waitohi, labourer, and of Marion Lloyd, a wife; of R. J. Lloyd, Temuka.— Granted.

Timaru Herald, 20 March 1895, Page 4
The hospital return of service for February showed :— dead 3— W. Shilling, Jane King, Jessie Gibson);

Timaru Herald, 22 May 1895, Page 3
The following return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of April, 1895, before members :— dead : male 1 (Daniel O'Sullivan);

Press, 1 June 1895, Page 9
At Timaru Constable Hallett died rather suddenly at 7 o'clock last evening, after a few hours illness. The officer had been thirty-four years in the colony, and joined the Armed Constabulary in 1868, and the police force in 1875. He saw three years service in the Maori war, and as a boy served in H..M. navy in the Mediterranean.

Timaru Herald, 17 July 1895, Page 2
The following is the return of patients in the Timaru Hospital for the month of June, 1895 :— dead : males 2, female 1, total 3 ; (Thomas Johnson, William Mawhinney, Mary Ann Saunders) ;

Otago Witness, 18 July 1895, Page 42
Au old identity at Pleasant Point, Timaru, named Reginald Orton was drowned by being swept off his horse in the Opihi river on the night of the 9th.

Otago Witness, 1 August 1895, Page 27
Forrest. On the 27th July, at Waimate Hospital (after a short illness), Robert Forrest, of Highway farm, Makikihi ; aged 56 years. Deeply regretted.

Otago Witness, 1 August 1895, Page 33
North Otago Times, 20 July 1895, Page 3
A 10-year-old daughter of Mr J. Pascoe, a settler at Nukuroa, Canterbury, was severely burned on the evening of the 16th by her clothes catching fire. The girl was taken to the hospital, but died on the evening of the 19th from the effect of the burns.

Otago Witness, 1 August 1895, Page 27
Forrest. On the 27th July, at Waimate Hospital (after a short illness), Robert Forrest, of Highway farm, Makikihi ; aged 56 years. Deeply regretted.

North Otago Times, 3 September 1895, Page 2
Butt. — At Glenavy, on August 3lst, 1895, Annie Maria, beloved daughter of Edward and Maria Butt, aged 14 years 11 months, after a painful illness. Deeply regretted. The funeral will leave her parents' residence, on Wednesday, September 4th, at 11 a.m., for the Waimate Cemetery. Friends are kindly invited to attend.

Press, 7 September 1885, Page 2
Timaru, September 5. A very melancholy affair took place here on Friday Bight. A Miss Louisa Cameron [age 22], a very highly respected lady, and formerly a teacher in the Timaru public school, who of late has been ins very depressed state of mind, went away from her parents' house about eight o'clock on Friday evening. Search was at once instituted for her, and her friends had great reason to fear she might have met with some accident. Search was made all sight, and at about five o'clock on Saturday morning her body was found on the sea beach, just south of Whale's creek. From her appearance there is little doubt she had been drowned and washed up again by the flood tide. At the inquest to-day, a verdict was returned to the effect that she had been found drowned, but there was so evidence to show how she came to get into the water.  

Evening Post, 19 September 1895, Page 3
Timaru, This Day. At the inquest of the body of Henry Lapthorn, the driver of the Fairlie Branch train (Bracefield) stated that deceased threw himself in front of the train. Evidence was given that deceased lived in great poverty, and had been despondent about the future of his children. The jury, in its verdict, said it did not know whether his Death was intentional or not, and exonerated the driver from blame.

Timaru Herald, 24 September 1895, Page 2
At the Waikonini orchard, Peel Forest, on Friday last, an inquest was held touching the death of Charles Hereward Barker. The inquest was held before Major Moore and a jury of five, of whom Mr R. Thew was chosen foreman. Evidence was, given by William Edward Barker, father of deceased, that the latter, who was six and a half years old, had gone with two other children to light a piece of grass, and in a minute or two screams were heard and it was found that the lad was in flames. Jane Fleming deposed that a little kerosene had been spilt on deceased's overall a few days before, but she did not think there was enough to do any harm. Dr Teevan gave evidence that the immediate cause of death was shock to the nervous system resulting from extensive burns. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Timaru Herald, 7 October 1895, Page 2
The funeral of the late Mr John Tresidder, late of Pleasant Point, took place yesterday afternoon at the Timaru cemetery. There was a very large attendance, including the members of the two Loyal Orange Lodges of Timaru, of which the deceased was a member. The Orange ritual service at the grave-side was conducted by Captain Parsons, of the Salvation Army, who also gave a very interesting address.

Timaru Herald, 18 October 1895, Page 2
An inquest will be held at noon today into the death of Mrs Elizabeth Waters, wife of Charles Sydney Waters, a wharf labourer, who dropped dead in her house, Bank street, at 3 p.m. yesterday. Dr Thomas was called in, but as he could not give a certificate of the cause of death an inquest will be held.

Timaru Herald, 29 October 1895, Page 2
The funeral of the late Joseph Beri took place in Temuka on Sunday, and was very largely attended. The deceased being a member of the Temuka Rifles he was accorded a military funeral. He was also a member of the Fire Brigade and the Oddfellows, and these bodies mustered very strongly. The coffin containing the deceased was carried on the fire engine and covered with the New Zealand flag. The fire brigade attended as bearers. The procession was headed by a firing party of the Temuka Rifles under Sergeant Carr, the body came, next, followed by the mourners, Fire Brigade, and Oddfellows. The remainder of the Temuka Rifles under Captain Cutten formed the rear of the different bodies, followed by the general public. The usual volleys were fired over the grave at the cemetery.

Timaru Herald, 2 December 1895, Page 3
A number of circumstances from which it is inferred that a man named John Murray McNaughton was drowned m Caroline Bay while bathing on Saturday evening, occupied the attention of the police and others yesterday. It has been ascertained that John Murray McNaughton, a farmer and drover occupying a farm on the Kakahu river, not far from Temuka, came into town oh Saturday, intent-ling, before returning home, to visit a brother, Mr William McNaughton, who lives at Salisbury. He spoke to a neighbour of the latter's on Saturday about going to Salisbury, possibly that night. He had dinner and tea at Mrs Taylor's Timaru Restaurant, where he was well known, and there spoke of going to Salisbury next day. At the tea table he spoke of going for a bathe, and after tea he asked one of the girls for a towel and was given one. He went out, and is not known to have been seen again. No surprise was felt at this at the boarding-house, as it was supposed that McNaughton had met with his brother and had gone home with him. Yesterday morning a full suit of clothes and a towel were found on the rubble at the north end of the Ben venue cliff, and as there was no one seen about to whom they could belong the police were made acquainted with the fact, and the clothes were fetched to the police station. In the pockets of the coat were letters and other documents belonging to McNaughton, and a clue was thus given to their ownership, and evidence that the unfortunate man, in ignorance of the dangers of the place, had lost his life in attempting to bathe off the Waimataitai spit, or from the rubble bank at this end of it. If he went m from the spit, the bottom is rough and steep and of slippery clay, off the rubble probably still steeper and rougher ; and on Saturday there was a considerable sea on, so that the swift undertow would be sufficient to make it impossible for a man to keep his footing on such a bottom. It is known that McNaughton could swim, but the cleverest swimmer might be unable to effect a landing on the beach there. There is no room to doubt that the unfortunate man lost his life through seeking a secluded spot for a dip, and selecting one of the most dangerous places in the neighbourhood. No effort- was made to recover the body by dragging : yesterday, as it was held that the nor'-wester blowing would prevent a boat being conviently handled for the purpose. A messenger was sent by the police for Mr W. McNaughton, and he at once came in. From him we learn that the missing man was from 30 to 35 years of age, and that he was doing fairly well, owning 1000 sheep or so. They have no relatives m the colony, but have brothers and sisters and mother living m the Old Country. Deceased was m good health and good humour on Saturday. That John Murray McNaughton has been drowned by misadventure there seems to be no room for doubt ; there is no mystery so far. But when the clothes found at the Benvenue cliff came to be examined, an element of mystery was developed. Mrs Taylor's daughter identified the towel as the one she gave to McNaughton ; but, notwithstanding that McNaughton's papers were found m the pockets, the clothes are not his. They are smaller than a man of his size could wear, are more soiled and worn than a man m his position would wear, and several persons are confident that they are not the clothes he did wear on Saturday evening. Mr McNaughton was seen to have some money, several votes, and some silver m his possession on Saturday, and there was none m the pockets of the clothes found. If these were McNaughton's clothes, the pockets had been rifled for money ; but everything about them seems to point to the conclusion that someone passing effected an exchange of outfit, taking the missing man's money to boot. The clothes found consist of a tailor made suit of brownish tweed, coat and vest half worn, trousers much worn and very roughly patched ; light-coloured fine-tweed hat, old and soiled ; white starched shirt, old and frayed, ticketed Drummond and Glaeson, linen collar, old pink flannel undershirt, ditto grey socks, and in place of the laceup boots worn by McNaughton, a pair of  shearer's leather slippers. It may be suggested with a show of reason, that whoever effected the exchange, was carrying his own property m bag or swag, because the slippers left have hot been walked on much since they were soiled in or about a sheepyard. Under the heel of one of them there is stuck in the dirt some short wool, winch, with the dirt, would have worn off by very little walking on a dry road or on shingle.

Timaru Herald, 7 December 1895, Page 2
A sudden death occurred at Geraldine on December 4th, the deceased being an old man named John Burke, 80 years of age, and a wheelwright by trade. It was found unnecessary to hold an inquest.

Star, 4 January 1896, Page 6
Timaru, Jan. 3, A farmer named Henry Squire was drowned in the Pareora River this afternoon. He was after cattle, when he got into, a deep hole, and becoming unseated from his horse was drowned.
    On Thursday evening Miss Welsh, daughter of Mr Hubert Welsh, of Fairlie, was riding through the township when her horse threw her, the result being that her right arm was broken near the wrist. She was taken to Timaru next morning for treatment.

Star 4 January 1896, Page 5 A FATAL RIDE. TIMARU, Jan. 4.
Henry Squire, a well-known farmer and stock dealer of Timaru, was driving cattle over the Pareora river yesterday, when one beast broke away. In riding after the animal he went at full speed along an old ford track, and plunged into a hole ten or twelve feet deep. The beast and the horse got over, but before Squire could be rescued by his companions, neither of whom could swim, he was dead. There have been several complaints of the manner in which, the fords are neglected by the local authorities. The track to this old ford is fenced across on the south side, but not on the north, side where Squire rode in.

Otago Witness, 23 January 1896, Page 17
Mr Alister Macintosh Clark, who has been resident in the South Canterbury district for the past 20 years, died on Sunday morning. The Timaru Herald says:-" Mr Clark came to South Canterbury from Mount Linton station, near Athol, Otago, in 1876, as manager of the Arowhenua estate and superintendent of the estates in South Canterbury then belonging to the Bank of New Zealand. He was a typical Highlander, belonging to one of the best families in Scotland, and was the greatly honoured president of the Temuka Caledonian Society, and previous to its formation had been of great assistance to the Timaru Society. A year or so ago he resigned the position he held so long held as manager of the estates, being succeeded by Mr Bain, and retired to his farm, Blair Athol. His health had been failing for a long time past, and though his Death was not unexpected, his disease at the age 60 will be deeply regretted by a very large circle of friends in Canterbury and Otago. When in Otago, the late Mr Clark married a daughter of Mr Lowe, a then well-known, station owner, who, with her son and four daughters survives him.

Otago Witness, 23 January 1896, Page 19
Edith Warner, aged 26, a domestic servant with Mr Watson at the Timaru Freezing Works, went out on Sunday night in the course of her duties. She did not return, and could not be found. On Monday morning she was found dead in a pool near the works. The deceased bad had fits of despondency.

Otago Witness, 23 January 1896, Page 17
Mr Alister Macintosh Clark, who has been resident in the South Canterbury district for the past 20 years, died on Sunday morning. The Timaru Herald says:" Mr Clark came to South Canterbury from Mount Linton station, near Athol, Otago, in 1876, as manager of the Arowhenua estate and superintendent of the estates in South Canterbury then belonging to the Bank of New Zealand. He was a typical Highlander, belonging to one of the best families in Scotland, and was the greatly honoured president of the Temuka Caledonian Society, and previous to its formation had been of great assistance to the Timaru Society. A year or so ago he resigned the position he had so long held as manager of the estates, being succeeded by Mr Bain, and retired to his farm, Blair Athol. His health had been failing for a long time past, and though his death is not unexpected, his disease at the age 60 will be deeply regretted by a very large circle of friends in Canterbury and Otago. When in Otago, the late Mr Clark married a daughter of Mr Lowe, a then well-known, station owner, who with her son and four daughters survives him.

Otago Daily Times 14 February 1896, Page 3
The Timaru Herald reports the death of Mr John Cairns, an old resident. Mr Cairn arrived at Port Chalmers by the Nicol Fleming in 1878. He leaves three sons, four daughters, and 52 grandchildren;

Otago Witness, 12 March 1896, Page 27
McFadyen — On the 5th March, at the residence of her son-in-law (S. Anderson, Bank street, Timaru), Hellen Hunter Morrison (relict of the late Hugh McFadyen), late of North-East Valley, Dunedin : aged 73 years.

New Zealand Tablet, 20 March 1896, Page 27
With great sorrow I have to chronicle the death of Mr James Gillespie, of Temuka, which took place at Castle Hill, near Christchurch, on the first of March. Your readers will remember that some time ago I referred to the promising future which was before this young man (who was only 26 at the time of his death), who was then about to take charge of the Seadown State school. I referred to the excellent results his energy and ability had produced, and to-day I join in his family and all who knew him in mourning his loss. Some time ago the deceased young man caught a bad cold.

Otago Witness, 26 March 1896, Page 87
Young.— At the residence of her son, at Fairlie (after a painful illness), Grace, the beloved wife of James Young, son., of St. Andrew's. Deeply regretted.

Timaru Herald, 8 April 1896, Page 3 THE LATE FATAL BUGGY ACCIDENT.
An inquest was held at the Waimate Hospital on Monday last concerning the death of the Rev. Frederick John Sotham, which occurred on the previous day. Mr J. Manchester, the acting Coroner, presided. Evidence was given by Frederick Sotham, Joseph Nind, Daniel Goodwood. William Geddes, William Haines, Dr Cooke, and Constable Parker. The facts were as previously stated. Mr Geddes. of Highway Farm, saw the horse bolting, along the road between Waimate and Makikihi, with the empty buggy. Mr Haines stopped the horse, and assisted Mr Geddes to convey deceased (from about 2 chains on the south side of the road, leading to Mr Bradshaw's, to the hospital, where he died at about 5 p.m., never having regained consciousness. The jury returned a verdict that "deceased met his death by a buggy accident, but that there was no evidence to show how it occurred." We learn that the deceased gentleman was a captain in the Royal Navy, having at one time been in command of H.M. ships Durham and Middlesex [late Commander Royal Navy troopships to India and Abyssinia]. On leaving the Navy, he took holy orders and then came out to New Zealand, serving at Port Chalmers, Waikouiti, and other cures in the diocese of Dunedin. He was subsequently stationed in Lyttelton Holy Trinity Parish, where he laboured for a number of years, and exchanging cures was stationed at Waimate. The late Mr Sotham was widely known all over Canterbury and Otago, and he had during , his previous career been brought into direct contact with some of the leading minds of the day. The late Admiral Tryon was his personal friend, and had visited him (at Sydney) just prior to the Victoria disaster. The funeral takes place at 2 p.m. to-day. His Lord ship Bishop Julius will not be able to be present, but all the local clergy will assembled. The deceased leaves a widow and five children. Rev. F. J. Sotham. incumbent of St. Augustine's Church, Waimate (Church of England).

Timaru Herald, 10 April 1896, Page 2
The funeral of the Rev. F. J. Sotham, (21 April 1841 -Easter day 5 April, 1896) Vicar of Waimate, took place on Wednesday, at 2 p.m., and was one of the largest ever "known m the history of Waimate. The clergy present were the Ven. Archdeacon Harper, Bishop's Commissary ; the Rev. James Preston, vicar of Geraldine; Rev. L. Carsley-Brady, vicar of Otaio and Bluecliffs ; Rev. T. A. Hamilton, vicar of Ashburton ; Rev. Stanley Hinson, vicar of Pleasant Point ; Rev. Mr Orbell, curate of Timaru ; and the Rev. Canon Gould, vicar of Oamaru. The clergy met the funeral cortege at the entrance of the churchyard, and on entering the church, which was crowded to excess by sorrowing parishioners, the Archdeacon conducted the first part of the service, and the vicar of Geraldine read the proper lesson, after which hymn No. 140 was sung by a strong choir. The procession then re-formed, and passing through a column of Sunday school children, proceeded to the cemetery, when the vicars of Ashburton, Otaio, and Bluecliffs took part, respectively, m the service, the Archdeacon committing the body to the grave, after which the beautiful hymn "Brief Life is here our Portion " was feelingly sung by the large concourse of people round the grave, and marked signs of grief were manifested at the lamented and sudden death of the rev. gentleman, who died at his post while in the discharge of his duty; and whose memory will ever be held m loving remembrance throughout the length and breadth of his parish, as a conscientious and faithful parish priest. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved widow and five children left to mourn the loss of one whom they dearly loved.

Star 25 April 1896, Page 6
Timaru Herald, 25 April 1896, Page 3 Inquest
An inquest was held at Temuka yesterday, before Mr C. A. Wray, coroner, on the death of John Arthur Smith; a lad of nine years, who had been found in the Temuka River the previous day. From the evidence it appeared that deceased, who was dumb from birth and mentally afflicted, had been last seen playing in the paddock at the back of his mother's house. The paddock adjoins the Temuka River, which runs at this place deeply and swiftly. One of the witnesses animadverted strongly upon the action of the South Canterbury Charitable Aid Board, which had been asked to have the child placed in some institution; or, as an alternative, to provide the mother with assistance to watch the boy. The Coroner thought it beyond the province of the jury to discuss the administration of the Charitable Aid Board, the members of which were presumably the best representatives of the. people. The jury, returned a verdict of accidentally drowned.
From the evidence of Mary Ann Smith, a widow, the mother of deceased, Jeremiah Boston, a labourer, and Samuel Wright, a retired farmer, it appeared that the boy who was 9 years of age, was of weak intellect and dumb from his birth. Mrs Smith was a widow who had a hard struggle to get her living by dressmaking.

The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 12 May 1896 Page 4
HASSELL -On the 3rd May, at Waimate, Canterbury, New Zealand, James Lloyd Hassell, aged 77 years.

Timaru Herald, 5 June 1896, Page 2
There was a very large gathering at the funeral of the late Mrs Murphy, which took place at Pleasant Point on Wednesday afternoon. Mrs Murphy, widow of the late Josephus Murphy, of Pleasant Point Hotel, was a very old resident of the district, and was highly respected by all classes m the community. A feature of the gathering was the large number of women who took part in the procession. The funeral was conducted by the Rev Father Le Menant Des Chesnais.

Timaru Herald, 6 June 1896, Page 3
An old woman named Mary Hammond, mother of Mr Robert Hammond, Fairfield, formerly of Geraldine, was burned to death on Thursday night about 9 o'clock. The unfortunate woman, who had been very feeble for many years, lived in a small cottage at Geraldine provided by her son, where for years she had persisted in living alone. On Thursday night it was noticed that the chimney of Mrs Hammond's cottage was on fire. When Messrs H. Pratt and Bennington broke open the door they found the room full of smoke and the poor old woman lying with the upper part of her body in the fire roasting. They pulled her out by the legs and extinguished the flames when it was seen that the woman was burned beyond recognition, from the lower part of the chest up. It appears that she must have fallen backwards into the fire, from the position in which she was found. An inquest was commenced yesterday before Mr H. W. Moore, J.P., and a jury of six of whom Mr J.J. McCaskey was chosen foreman, but an adjournment was made before any evidence was taken, awaiting a reply from Captain Wray, who was expected to be present. The deceased was long resident m Timaru, and was, we believe one of the immigrants by the Strathallan, with her husband and several children.

Southland Times 10 June 1896, Page 2
Timaru, June 9. At the inquest on the body of Alice Traverner, found in the harbour yesterday, an open verdict was returned.

Timaru Herald, 24 June 1896, Page 2
Deep regret and much sympathy was expressed yesterday among old identities of Timaru and their many friends, when it became known that Mr John Ogilvie, of Wai-iti road, had passed away somewhat suddenly early m the; morning. Mr Ogilvie had been ailing for about a week, but no one had, even the least idea that his illness would terminate fatally. He had been about thirty years a resident of Timaru, and in following his occupation as a contractor and carpenter, had helped to put up some of the oldest buildings m the borough. He. led a quiet life, and had enjoyed the best of health up to eleven months ago, when the death of his wife was a great shock to him, arid his intimate friends at once noticed that he took the sad loss very much to heart. His family are all grown up, and he died possessed of some property m the borough and district. Mr Ogilvie's funeral takes place to-morrow afternoon.

Timaru Herald, 1 July 1896, Page 3
An inquest was held at Geraldine yesterday, touching the death of Edward George Fifield, 17 years of age, who died suddenly on Monday morning last. The evidence went to show that deceased on Saturday evening had a friendly scuffle with a boy named William Arthur Prouting, and that the two boys fell on the asphalt together, but deceased was not seen to strike his head, nor did he I complain of any injury. He parted with his mate in good spirits on Saturday night, and at 8 o'clock on Sunday morning was called by his father to carry a bag of chaff. While carrying the load he felt a pain m his head, and dropping the chaff on the ground he went to his father's house saying that he never felt such a pain m all his life. Medical aid was sent for, but the young man expired three-quarters of an hour after taking bad. Dr Teevan gave, evidence that m making a. post mortem examination he found in one section of deceased's brain a patch of brain substance softened and broken down, and studded with numerous bloody points. Death was due to hemorrhage m the brain. The injury m the first instance might have been caused by a fall, and lifting the bag of chaff might have hastened death. There were no external signs of injury either on the head or the body, The jury returned a verdict m accordance .with the medical evidence that deceased met his death by hemorrhage m the brain, but added that there was nothing to show the primary cause for the infusion of blood.
    WAIMATE, June 30. A Coroner's Inquest was held to-day on the body of Amos Burch, who committed suicide on Monday by cutting his throat. The deed was done behind the counter of his shop. A deposit receipt for £130, some bank notes, and some silver, were found on him. The jury returned a, verdict that the deceased cut his throat whilst he was temporarily insane. He had been m business here for many years.

Timaru Herald, 7 July 1896, Page 2
It is with deep regret that we have to chronicle the death of one of the earliest settlers in the Fairlie district, Mr William Close, who died in Dunedin Hospital on 30th June, after undergoing an operation performed a few days previously. Mr Close was an old colonist having been on the West Coast in the early days. He came to Fairlie, in 1875, and in partnership with Mr C. Weddell opened the first hotel in Fairlie, and afterwards opened the first general store there. In connection with prospecting for gold in Mackenzie Country he will be long remembered. For the past nine or ten years he has spent a few months each year on the ranges at Sherwood Downs and Clayton, looking for the precious metal, and although he did not up to his death find gold in payable quantities, yet the specimens he did find warrant a more thorough search. For his pluck single-handed in following this matter so far the public owe him a debt of gratitude. The sudden and unexpected death of such a genial and respected resident has caused genuine and widespread regret throughout the whole district. Mr Close, who was 51 years of age, was a native of Leeds, in the North of England, and leaves a widow and seven children to mourn his death.

Otago Witness, 9 July 1896, Page 30
The Timaru Herald states that a rather sudden Death occurred at Geraldine on the 28th ult. A young man named George Fifield, 17 years of age, was carrying a bag of chaff at his parents' place on the Geraldine Downs, when he became dizzy. Throwing down the chaff, he went into the house and expired in less than half an hour is a kind of spasmodic fit. Dr Teevan was promptly summoned, but deceased was beyond recovery.

Star 2 July 1896, Page 1
On Tuesday an inquest was held at Geraldine touching the death of a young man named Edward George Fifield, who died on Sunday in a rather sudden manner. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, that deceased died from hemorrhage on the brain, and added that there was no evidence to show the primary cause of the infusion of blood on deceased's brain.

Timaru Herald, 7 July 1896, Page 2
It is with deep regret that we have to chronicle the death of one of the earliest settlers m the Fairlie district, Mr William Close, who died m Dunedin Hospital on 30th June, after undergoing an operation performed a few days previously. Mr Close was an old colonist having been on the West Coast in the early clays. He came to Fairlie, in 1875, and in partnership with Mr C. Wederell opened the first hotel in Fairlie, and afterwards opened the first general store there. In connection with prospecting for gold in Mackenzie Country he will be long remembered. For the past nine or ten years he has spent a few months each year on the ranges at Sherwood Downs and Clayton, looking for the precious metal, and although he did not up to his death find gold in payable quantities, yet the specimens he did find warrant a more thorough search. For his pluck single-handed in following this matter so far the public owe him a debt of gratitude. The sudden and unexpected death of such a genial and respected resident has caused genuine and widespread regret throughout the whole district. Mr Close, who was 51 years of age, was a native of Leeds, in the North of England, and leaves a widow and seven children to mourn his death.

Evening Post, 14 August 1896, Page 5
Geraldine, This Day. The wife of the Rev. Walter Harris, Primitive Methodist minister, died at Geraldine this morning, after a long and painful illness.

Timaru Herald, 18 August 1896, Page 2
The late wife of the Rev. W. Harris, the Primitive Methodist minister, was buried at Geraldine on Sunday afternoon, when a great many friends, fellow church workers, Sunday School children and others, followed her remains to the grave. The cortege was one of the longest ever seen in Geraldine. Prior to proceeding to the cemetery, a short service was held in the Primitive Methodist chapel by the Revs. Dawson, Christchurch, and Alford, Ashburton. At the grave the burial service was read by the Rev. Dawson, and the Rev. Alford gave touching address to the congregation assembled, referring to the good life led by the deceased lady. At the chapel in the evening a memoriam service was held, when the Rev. Mr Dawson preached from Revelations xiv, 13— Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord. A number of pretty wreaths were placed on deceased's grave by friends and co-workers in the church, by whom she was greatly beloved.
    At Geraldine on Sunday the firebell rang on three occasions giving alarms of fire. First of all it rang at 3.30 p.m., during the burial service at the grave of the late Mrs Harris, when someone had either intentionally or carelessly set fire to the cemetery fence. When church services had commenced in the evening the bell rang again for a fire in a gorse fence and later on, before some of the religious services were over, the bell rang once more. This time it turned out a fire in an old deserted building, a little beyond Williams and Son's baker, owned by Mr Hughes, schoolmaster, formerly of Geraldine, now of Christchurch. The building was unoccupied and was not fit to live in, but was handy for swaggers, who occasionally spent a cold night in it. It is thought that the three fires were the work of larrikins.

Evening Post, 13 August 1896, Page 5 FATAL GUN ACCIDENT. Timaru. 12th August.
Andrew McRae, a single man, aged 45, a farm labourer, accompanied by another named McDonald, were shooting on the Otaio river-bed this afternoon, and when they were crossing the fence, McRae being a few paces ahead, McDonald's gun went off and shot McRae in the back. The injured man was put on the express train but died before reaching town.

Timaru Herald, 14 August 1896, Page 3
An inquest was held at the hospital yesterday afternoon before C. A. Wray, Esq., coroner, and the following jury : — Messrs J. J. Grandi (foreman), P. Keddie, J. Workman, J. Cross, R. Miller, and P. W. Eiby, touching the death of Andrew McRae, who died of a gun-shot wound received at St. Andrews on the previous day. John McDonald, engine-driver and farm labourer, St. Andrews, stated that he had known deceased on friendly terms for fourteen or fifteen years. On Wednesday morning they arranged to go shooting rabbits m the afternoon, and they started out after dinner. Witness carried a gun, a breech-loader ; deceased had no gun, he could not shoot. Went about a mile from St. Andrews to the riverbed and there loaded the gun, a double-barrelled one, with small shot. Nearing the main road they had- to cross a gorse fence to get into a paddock next the road, and they got through a gap, with wire in it. McRae got through first, and witness, carrying the gun, followed. Carried the gun m his right hand at half-cock. In getting through the gap — whether through or over the wires he could not say— the gun exploded, and the contents struck McRae) who was about ten or twelve yards off. McRae fell forward. Ran up, and McRae said " I'm shot. Oh John, I know it's an accident." Pulled down his clothes and tried to stop the bleeding, with handkerchief and clothing, and keeping him on his face. Deceased wanted to lie on his side. Joseph Wilson, labourer, St. Andrews, who accompanied deceased m the guard's van to Timaru, stated that deceased was unconscious when put m the train. As far as he could say he died m the train about Normanby. George Lawrie, threshing mill owner, St. Andrews, said deceased had been m his employ for 16 years, and McDonald for 14 years. Both were steady good men and always the best of friends.
Samuel Hanson, dealer, stated that he was driving on the main road between Otaio bridge and St. Andrews at about a quarter to four, when he heard the report of a gun.
Sergeant-Major McDonald, who led the evidence, said he did not think it necessary to get a doctor, as a gunshot wound at 10 or 12 yards, m any part of the body, must be fatal. Deceased received the charge in the small of the back and being so near must have got the whole charge. The jury without retiring found that deceased died from being accidentally shot by John McDonald.

Timaru Herald, 19 August 1896, Page 2
The remains of the late Mrs Shallard, of Winchester, were brought to Timaru for interment yesterday. There was a long concourse of mourners, a large number of vehicles containing friends from Winchester and Timaru, and many townspeople joined the procession at the Borough boundary.

Otago Witness 24 September 1896, Page 55
Mr James Mabin, a well-known farmer and dealer in the Temuka, District, and a one-time prominent piper at Caledonian gatherings, died on Sunday, 13th.

Otago Daily Times 6 October 1896, Page 2
Dennis Wrenn, a labouring man, dropped down dead in the Convent garden, Timaru, while talking to the gardener. Death was due to heart disease. He leaves a widow and several young children.

Star, 23 November 1896, Page 2
Foster.— Nov. 22, at Sumner, Charles James Foster, LL.D. ; aged seventy-nine.

Timaru Herald, 24 November 1896, Page 3
The Christchurch papers announce the death of Dr Foster, which took place on Sunday morning, at his residence at Sumner.. The deceased gentleman had attained his seventy-ninth year. The following obituary notice, is taken from the Lyttelton Times Dr Foster's connection with Canterbury dates from 1864, in which year he arrived at Lyttelton in the ship Mystery. Previous to that he had lived an energetic and eventful life in England, where he took a very prominent part in the movement for the liberation of religion from State patronage and "control." He was born, it should be stated, at Cambridge, and took his degree of D.C.L. at the University, of London. ... In 1881 he went to South Canterbury. He returned to Christchurch six years afterwards, and for the last two years resided at Sumner. While in England Dr Foster wrote several works in connection with the movement in which he took such a prominent part. In New Zealand he wrote a handbook of the practice of the Supreme Court of the colony. He had been in feeble health for a considerable time, but the immediate cause of death was an attack of pneumonia. Buried Linwood.

North Otago Times,12 January 1897, Page 3
Timaru. January 11. George Morris, son of J. L. Morris, Pleasant Point (who died suddenly on Saturday, and is to be buried to-day), committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor this morning. He was subject to fits of insanity, and was only two weeks back from the asylum.

Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, 15 January 1897, Page 3
OBITUARY. We regret to record that Mr Morris, father of Dr. Morris of Little River, and Mr Herman Morris, who so kindly helped, us by assisting at a concert in Akaroa last week died at his residence at Pleasant Point near Timaru on Saturday last. Mr Morris was himself on a visit to Akaroa only a few days ago and seen then to be in perfect health and spirits, his geniality and interesting knowledge of the colony, and particularly Canterbury, making him an exceedingly pleasant companion. Monday's Timaru Herald, 12 January 1897, Page 2 says '
The residents of Pleasant Point and the friends of the family of the late Mr I. L. Morris, were inexpressibly shocked to learn that the grief of the family for the sudden death of the father had been cruelly intensified by the suicide of Mr George Morris, the eldest son, while the remains of the father yet awaited interment. The three sons were occupying two rooms detached from the store, and yesterday morning all rose about 6 o'clock. Dr W. and Mr H. Morris went outside and were absent a minute or two, and on their return found that George had cut his throat with a razor, so determinedly as to sever every artery, and he died almost instantaneously. The deceased, as is well known, had been subject to fits of insanity, and he had only been a couple of weeks returned from an incarceration of some months in Sunnyside. An inquest will be held at noon to-day. The late Mr I.L. Morris was born at Samotschin in the province of Posen, Germany, in 1925. He arrived in Victoria in the early fifties and found himself at Ballarat and then at Bendigo diggings, where he made many friends as a storekeeper. After the gold rushes he went back to Germany, and married. He then came to the colony, and entered into partnership with the late Mr Julius Mendelson at Pleasant Valley, which partnership existed until the death of Mr Mendelson. Prior to the death of his partner the firm commenced business at Pleasant Point. Altogether Mr Morris had been a resident of the Pleasant Point district between twenty five and thirty years.

Evening Post 13 January 1897 Page 5 THE PLEASANT POINT SUICIDE. Timaru. 12th January.
At the inquest at Pleasant Point to-day on the body of George Morris, the jury returned a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane. The evidence showed that, as the deceased was developing signs of insanity, the shock caused by his father's Death was too much for him. He was watched, but on his brothers going away for a few minutes he cut his throat.

Timaru Herald, 12 January 1897, Page 2
Mrs Bridget Ducie, aged 37, residing at the top of Elizabeth Street, died suddenly m her bed yesterday. The case was reported to the police and Detective Livingstone made inquiries, from which it appears that the deceased had been ailing and consulted Dr Thomas about Christmas time. Yesterday morning she lay in bed rather longer than usual and her daughter, aged 13, after waiting on her, on returning to the room found her dying. Dr Thomas was sent for but on his arrival life was extinct. The police were also communicated with, but as Dr Thomas certified that death was due to heart disease, no inquest will be necessary. The deceased, who separated from her husband many years ago, leaves four children, the two eldest in employment.

Timaru Herald, 18 February 1897, Page 2
The funeral of the late Mr P. B. Macgregor took place yesterday afternoon from the Hospital, and was largely attended. The pallbearers were four members of the Timaru Golf Club, of which he had been a playing member, and Mr Montgomery, his late employer. The service at the grave was conducted by the Rev. C. E. Beecroft.

Taranaki Herald, 24 February 1897, Page 2
THE DROWNING IN WELLINGTON HARBOUR. Wellington, February 24. The man drowned in the harbour was Joseph Tunny, aged 85, a tailor, he has a wife and two children at Timaru. When last seen on Monday night he was under the influence of liquor.

Timaru Herald, 16 March 1897, Page 1
FUNERAL NOTICE; The Friends of Mr and Mrs J. H Smith are respectfully informed that the funeral of their late eldest daughter Eliza Jane will leave their residence, Stafford Street, this day (Tuesday) the 16th inst., at 3 p.m. J. E. BECKINGHAM, Undertaker.

North Otago Times, 6 April 1897, Page 1 OBITUARY. (Timaru Herald).
We announce with regret the death, at the comparatively early age of 56, of Mr James Balfour, of Mansefield, Totara, near Pleasant Point, which took place at his late residence at midnight on Friday. Mr Balfour became seriously ill about eight weeks ago, and was attended by Dr Thomas, of Pleasant Point. Two weeks ago an operation was deemed necessary, and Dr Bowe and Dr Hayes were called in to assist Dr Thomas. It was found that an internal growth existed, which was impossible of removal, and this was the cause of death. The late Mr James Balfour came from Stirlingshire, Scotland to this colony about 1862, and acted for some time as a carrier to the Goldfields. He afterwards went in for farming at Totara in the Oamaru district and met with a good measure of success. About twenty years ago he took up land at Totara, near Pleasant Point, and proved one of the most enterprising and successful settlers in the district. He leaves a large estate, which he had gained by persevering toil, and died just when he was beginning to think of enjoying the fruits of his labors. He was one of the most popular men in the district, and was noted for his cheerfulness and good humor. He did not undertake any work of a public nature, but was liberal supporter of the Presbyterian church materially assisting, financially, when the pretty church was erected in Totara Valley. His death has caused another blank in the district, and great sorrow is felt to y all who knew him, whilst much sympathy is expressed with the bereaved family. He leaves a widow, three sons and six daughters (the youngest being about six months old), and a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.

Timaru Herald, 4 May 1897, Page 4 Sudden Death
An inquest was opened at the Timaru Hospital at 10.15 a.m. yesterday, touching the death of Maurice O'Connor, aged 18 years, son of Mr Maurice O'Connor of Glen-iti, before C. A. Wray, Esq., and the following jury : Mr J. J. Grandi (foreman), Messrs E. Bold, T. Wells, W. Tutton, F. B. Taplin, and T. Cocks. After viewing the body the inquest was adjourned till noon on Friday at the Courthouse. The deceased had been rabbiting on Haldon Station, and took ill at Fairlie. He was attended, by Dr Hornibrook, who found him suffering from an affection of the lungs, and ordered him to be sent to the Timaru Hospital. The deceased came in on Friday and was at once attended by Dr Bowe, who judged the symptoms to be those of English cholera, and prescribed accordingly. Deceased, received careful attention at the hospital, but suddenly took a bad turn on Saturday and did not get over it. Dr Bowe not being satisfied as to the cause of death reported the case, and the Coroner deemed an inquest necessary.

Timaru Herald May 8, 1897
On the 20th ult., we published a telegram from Dunedin stating that two young men named Aitken and Watkins had been drowned by the capsizing of in boat on Lake Rees, near Lake Wakatipu on the 18th. We learn, and many Timaru friends will regret to hear, that the latter was E. W. B. Watkins, only son of Mr Jas. Watkins, one time manager o the Farmers Co-operative Association, Timaru. The deceased was for some time employed as the secretary's assistant in the Harbour Board's office, and was a very nice and promising youth. He left the Board's employment when the family went to Dunedin.

Timaru Herald, 5 June 1897, Page 2
An old identity in the Geraldine district died very suddenly on Thursday, namely Mr W. Patrick, of Gapes' Valley. Deceased was within a month or so of 84 years of age, and was living with his grand-daughter, Mrs H. Scott, on the Geraldine Downs, where he died. Dr. Hislop was called in at once and it was not deemed necessary to hold an inquest. Deceased was well known throughout the district, and leaves a large number of relatives to mourn his loss.

Marlborough Express, 29 June 1897, Page 2
Christchurch, June 29. On Saturday a young man named James Ward, late of Geraldine, died suddenly at Cheviot. He had been suffering from consumption.

Timaru Herald, 6 July 1897, Page 2
At Geraldine, on July 3rd, 1897, Allan Macdonald aged 62 years.

Timaru Herald, 6 July 1897, Page 4
Timaru Herald, 7 July 1897, Page 2 Inquest
Mr Allan Macdonald, of Woodbury, met with a fatal accident on Saturday evening. The deceased was in Timaru on Saturday, transacting some business at the sale, and went out by the afternoon train. At Orari he mounted his roan horse in the usual manner and went off in the direction of his home, via the Raukapuka road. After passing the Geraldine bridge, and at a bend before reaching the cross roads deceased's horse shied and threw the rider onto the back of his head on the hard formation. A young man named McPherson, who met Mr Macdonald riding, happened to turn back and saw the accident occur. He immediately returned and lifted deceased by the shoulders, but found him unable to speak. The daymen of the Road Board came along with their cart at this time on their way from work, and the body was taken to the Geraldine Hotel, where it was examined by Dr Hislop, who pronounced life to be extinct, death no doubt having been instantaneous. The body was later on in the evening taken to deceased's home at Woodbury, where an inquest was to have been held yesterday. Deceased leaves a number of grown-up sons and daughters, some of whom are married. He was a very old identity and was much respected by a great many people in South Canterbury.

Timaru Herald, 21 March 1898, Page 2
The funeral of the late Mr Tutton, who had been for many years m business m Timaru as a butcher, was held yesterday afternoon, and was largely attended. He was a member of the Orange Society, and the hearse was preceded by the Protestant Band and about 50 members of the society, and followed by over 100 of his town friends and acquaintances and several vehicles from the country.

Timaru Herald, 13 July 1898, Page 2
McDonald— Collins — At Waimate, on July l2th, at the house of the bride's father, by the Rev. H. Kelly, J.W. McDonald, of Woodlands, Woodbury, to Miriam Louisa Collins, only daughter of Mr Wm. Collins, of Waimate, and late of Timaru.

Timaru Herald, 7 July 1897, Page 2 Inquest
An inquest was held at Geraldine on Monday before Major Moore, J.P., touching the death of Allan Macdonald, of Woodbury. The evidence showed that deceased was riding home from Orari, he having been m Timaru on Saturday, and a witness named Donald Macpherson, after meeting deceased on the road, turned to look after him, and saw the horse shy and throw him. Witness galloped back, and picked up deceased, who, however, never moved. A dray came along and deceased was taken to Geraldine. Dr Hislop testified that the base of the skull was fractured by the fall, and death must have been practically instantaneous. A verdict of accidental death was returned. Deceased was an old colonist, having come out in the Zealandia in 1859 [he was a shepherd age 31 from Ross], and he had been settled at Woodbury a great many years, where he was greatly liked and respected. He leaves a grown-up family of four sons and one daughter, one of the sons being Mr R. Macdonald of the Moa Cycle Works, Timaru. [died July 3rd 1897, buried at Geraldine, aged 62 years. Wife Christina, died 27 Nov. 1891 aged 51 years]
1870 Macdonald Ronald
1875 Macdonald John William
Donald Macdonald of Medbury (probably brother died 10 July 1941, aged 75, buried Geraldine, husband of Annie died July 6th 1936 aged 63)
Alexander Allan of Waikari

Press, 31 May 1917, Page 3 MILITARY SERVICE BOARDS.
CANTERBURY No. 1. SITTING AT RANGIORA. The Canterbury No. 1 Military service Board sat at Rangiora yesterday. The Board comprised Messrs J. S. Evans (chairman), J. D. Millton, and E. C. Studholme with Captain Pilkington as military representative. NOT A BALLOTED MAN. Alexander Allan, shearer, Waikari, appealed on the ground that his calling up would be contrary to the public interest. He was married, and was 33 years old. He had five brothers in the First Division and two were serving. He had been a shearer for eight years. Appellant casually stated that he was not drawn in the ballot, but had enlisted in March. The Gazette giving the list of those drawn in the fifth ballot was produced, and appellant's name was not included. The chairman then pointed out the Court had no jurisdiction. Appellant stated after he had enlisted his attention was drawn to the fact that there was a scarcity of shearers, and he communicated with the Shearers' Union, which advised him to appeal. The case was adjourned for further consideration.

Press, 28 December 1906, Page 7
A very sudden death occurred at Hawarden yesterday, about 2 p.m., while the stock sale was in progress. Mr Alexander Allan, a well-known and highly-respected farmer, living at Waikari, was looking over the rails, when he suddenly collapsed. He was attended to by several bystanders and Dr. Baldwin, who happened to be present. Mr Allan, who for some time past had suffered from heart trouble, never rallied, and expired almost at once. Business at the sale was suspended for a time, and a feeling of gloom was cast over the subsequent proceedings. Mr Allan was a native of Dunbartonshire, and was educated at Cumbernauld, being brought up to agriculture on his father's farm. Along with his brother, Mr John Allan, who is a member of the Canterbury Land Board [appointed 1903, owned Park View at Waikari], and who also resides at Waikari, he arrived in Canterbury in 1874  [in the ship “Crusader“]. The late Mr Allan was for a time manager of the farming at Horsley Downs and at the Albury Estate, and also had an estate of his own at Geraldine. In 1882 [sic. 1883] he purchased part of the Glenmark property at Waikari [for £12 per acre], where he had a capital farm. In 1885 he married Miss McDonald, of Geraldine. He leaves a widow and young family [three sons & two daughters]. [Alexander Main Allan married Margaret Macdonald in 1885]  [John Allan arrived in the ship “Opawa” in 1878 and in 1876, to a daughter of the late Mr. Joseph Forrester, of Hall Farm, Cumbernauld, and has six sons and three daughters. John died in 1925]

Press, 2 January 1907, Page 7
The Waikari Caledonian Society. As soon as the pipers reached the ground, the Scottish flags were lowered to half mast and Pipe Sergeant Hopping played a lament for Mr Alexander Allan, a vice president, who died suddenly a few days ago.

Evening Post, 2 June 1944, Page 3 Wounded
ALLAN, Alexander E., Dvr. Mr. A. Allan, Waikari Hills, Peel Forest, Rangitata (F).

Star 27 December 1906, Page 3
HAWARDEN, December 27. Mr Alexander Allan, a well-known farmer, of the Waikari district, fell dead at the Hawarden Saleyards this afternoon during the progress of the sale. Heart disease, from which he suffered, was the cause.

Star 28 December 1906, Page 3
ALLAN. December 27. Alexander Allan, beloved husband of Margaret Allan, Rockvale, Waikari; aged fifty-nine years.

[The Cyclopedia of New Zealand 1903
Macdonald, Donald, Sheepfarmer, Riverslea Estate, Medbury. Mr. Macdonald was born on the banks of the Hinds River in 1864, was educated at the Timaru High School, and resided at Geraldine until he ased “Riverslea” in 1896. It was originally part of the famous Horsley Down Estate and comprises about 1,100 acres of rich agricultural and pastoral land, nearly all drained and in grass. The improvements include ten miles of netting and wire-fencing, seventeen watered paddocks, a ten-roomed house, a stable, woolshed, men's huts, etc. The running stock consists of 3000 sheep and seventy head of cattle. Mr. Macdonald has served on the school and church committees.] [Riverlea had 1057 acres, 2 miles from the Medbury railway station, Donald sold it in 1902]

[Captain John Alexander MacDonald Allan was the son of Alexander Allan and Margaret Macdonald Allan, of "Rockvale", Waikari, North Canterbury died 20 May 1918 in an aircraft accident.]
Evening Post, 6 September 1918, Page 6
Flight-Lieutenant J. A. Macdonald Allan, R.A.F., of Rockvale, Waikari, has been killed in an aeroplane accident in the British Isles. Mr Allan came to England at the end of 1915, and went to a flying school shortly afterwards, getting his commission in the R.N.A.S. He spent more than a year in France, and was wounded-in July of last year.

Press, 20 May 1919, Page 1
ALLAN— In loving memory of Captain .J.A. Macdonald Allan. Royal Air Force, and of Rockvale, Waikari, killed in aero accident at Redcar, Yorkshire, May 20th, 1918; aged 23 years. Inserted by loving mother, sisters, and brothers.
ALLAN — In loving memory of Captain J. A. Macdonald Allan, R.A F. who was accidentally killed at Redcar, Yorkshire, on May 20th, 1918. Inserted by Hazel West.

Timaru Herald October 1892
MACDONALD. On the 29th inst, at Waitui, Geraldine, James, eldest son of the late Ronald MacDonald, of Gallavie, Inverness-shire, Scotland, aged 78. Funeral leaves Waitui on Monday the 31st at 3pm.

Press, 6 July 1897, Page 6
Mr Allan Macdonald, of Woodbury, who was returning from Timaru on Saturday, about 5 p.m., met with a fatal accident while riding from the Orari railway station to his home. About a mile beyond Geraldine his horse swerved and threw the rider on the back of his head on the hard metalled rood, death being instantaneous. Deceased was brought to Geraldine and examined by Dr. Hislop, and afterwards removed to Woodbury. He was a well-to-do sheep farmer and had been in the district for thirty-seven years, being widely known and respected. An inquest was held yesterday, at Woodbury, when a verdict of accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 7 July 1897, Page 2
An inquest was held at Geraldine on Monday before Major Moore, J.P., touching the death of Allan Macdonald, of Woodbury. The evidence showed that deceased was riding home from Orari, he having been in Timaru. on Saturday, and a witness named Donald Macpherson, after meeting deceased on the road, turned to look after him, and saw the horse shy and throw him. Witness galloped back, and picked up deceased, who, however, never moved. A dray came along and deceased was taken to Geraldine. Dr Hislop testified that the base of the skull was fractured by the fall, and death must have been practically instantaneous. A .verdict of accidental death was returned. Deceased was an old colonist, having come out in the Zealandia in 1859, and he had been -settled at Woodbury a great many years, where he was greatly liked and respected. He leaves a grown-up family of four sons and one daughter, one of the sons being Mr R. Macdonald of the Moa Cycle Works, Timaru.

Otago Witness, 26 August 1897, Page 25
Illness.— There has been a great deal of illness in Mouth Canterbury at the tail end of this winter, showing that the unseasonable weather we have had has not been conducive to health. At Timaru quite a number of typhoid cases have been reported lately, and influenza is prevalent all through South Canterbury. Mr H. Morrison, of the firm of Morrison Bros.. Geraldine, died on August 14 from an internal complaint after a fortnight's illness, which came on very suddenly, deceased appearing to be well and strong only the day before he had to take to his bed. The case was rather a sad one, as it is only two month since Mr Morrison married a Timaru young lady, Miss Wallace, well known as a nurse in the hospital for some years, and they had scarcely, as it were, returned from their honeymoon when the trouble came.

The Irish Times Saturday, September 25, 1897
Bailey - September 14, killed in action near Markbanal (India), Arthur Wellesley, Lieutenant, 38th Dorset, eldest son of lieutenant Colonel C.S. Bailey (late Devonshire regiment), of Timaru, New Zealand, aged 30.

New Zealand Tablet, 14 January 1898, Page 17 Death
Hennessey.— At the Timaru Hospital, on December 20th, John Hennessey, native of Youghal, County Cork. Ireland ; aged 50 years. —R.I.P.

New Zealand Tablet, 14 January 1898, Page 19
We regret to have to announce the Death of Mr. John Hennessy, which took place at the Timaru Hospital on the l9th of Dec. The late Mr. Hennessy was a native of Youghal, Co. Cork, and arrived in New Zealand by the ship Northumberland about twenty years ago. During that time he resided in the Timaru district, principally at Fairlie Creek, and was well known and highly respected by all classes in these places. He was of a quiet and unassuming disposition ; a staunch and patriotic Irishman, and a devoted member of the Church, to which he was always most generous, giving a bright example to the younger generation in these respects. During his illness, which only lasted a two weeks, he was constantly visited by the Rev. Fathers Lewis and Tubman, and received all the consolation of the Church of which he was such an exemplary member. He leaves two sisters to mourn his loss, both being married — Mrs. Kersey, and Mrs. Moynihan, the popular hostess of the Club Hotel, Shannon, Manawatu, for whom much sympathy is expressed by a large circle of friends, and in which we sincerely join. Mr. Hennessy was 50 years of age, and the cause of Death was dropsy of the heart, there being no hope of his recovery from the commencement of his illness. — R.I.P.

Evening Post, 21 January 1898, Page 6
QUARRELLING BROTHERS. ONE OF THEM CHARGED WITH MANSLAUGHTER.
Timaru, This Day. An inquest has been held at Peel Forest concerning the Death of a boy named Peter Finlayson, aged 11. The evidence showed that he and his brother Robert, aged 13, quarrelled as to who should fetch in the cows. Their mother turned Robert out of the house. He returned with a piece of iron, which he was swinging about, and it purposely or accidentally left his hand and hit Peter [behind the ear reports the Timaru Herald] on the head, penetrating the skull and killing him instantly. Robert said the iron slipped, and that he only meant to frighten Peter. The jury found a verdict of Manslaughter, and the boy has been arrested.

Timaru Herald, 18 February 1898, Page 3
An inquest was held before Mr J. M. Twomey, J.P. at Waitohio, Wednesday, touching the death of Eli Mitchell, a well-known farmer of Waitohi, who came by his death the previous day. The evidence of G. Davis, shepherd, showed that deceased was driving home from Temuka through the Arowhenua Estate, in a spring cart m which he had a bale of cornsacks, on which he was sitting. Deceased was not sober, and had the reins tied to the side of the cart, trusting to the horse to keep the road. At one point there was formerly a gate across the road, with banks for side fences, and the gate had been removed, leaving the banks stretching from each side into the roadway. It appeared that the horse went rather to one side at this point, and running one wheel of the cart up the bank overturned the vehicle on its side, and the bale of cornsacks fell on the deceased's chest and pinned him down. The witness went along the road a few minutes after the accident happened and rescued deceased  from his position, and with the assistance of a neighbour, R. J. McCallum, righted the horse and trap and took accused home, where he died an hour or two later, just before a doctor arrived. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death, and added a rider calling the attention of the Road Board to the dangerous condition of the road where the accident happened.

Timaru Herald, 25 March 1898, Page 3 Temuka Rifles.
Captain Findlay stated that as Commanding officer of the corps he had purchased a grave plot in the cemetery for the interment of the remains of Lieutenant White. This would be vested in the corps, and would be available in case of the death of an indigent volunteer. Captain Findlay's action was confirmed. It was unanimously resolved "That at this general meeting of the Temuka Rifles held on March 23rd 1898, the company desire to record their appreciation of the services of the late Lieutenant White, during his active association with the corps, and also while acting as caretaker of the volunteer ; they also wish to convey to his relatives their sincere expression of sympathy at his untimely decease."

Ashburton Guardian, 2 April 1898, Page 3
At the Magistrates' Court, Geraldine, on Thursday, an inquest was held touching the death of John Slattery, bootmaker, who was found drowned m the swimming baths on Wednesday. The evidence showed that deceased had been unwell for a long time. He had occasionally been attacked with giddiness, and he had been retching very badly m the mornings. On Wednesday morning he left home about 20 minutes to 8 o'clock, and seemed in his usual spirits, but as he did not return for breakfast a search was made, and at noon he was discovered m the bath by some school boys. Deceased was 25 years of age and was always m the best of spirits, and seemed quite happy.
Frederick Harvey lust saw deceased alive, going in the direction of the domain, when he was smoking a cigarette, and there was nothing unusual about his appearance. When found the body was about eight feet from the deep end of the bath, in five feet of water and fully clothed. Dr. Hislop gave it as a possibility that deceased might have been overtaken with giddiness and fallen into the water, and being unable to swim he would be likely to swallow the water, which would render his chance of recovery hopeless. The jury returned a verdict of "Found drowned." Mr J. O'Malley acted as foreman of the jury, and the inquest was held before Lieutenant-Colonel Moore, J.P.
The Geraldine Fire Brigade sent a letter of condolence to the widow of deceased. The remains were removed to Leeston on Thursday by the north train, the brigade and others following to Orari.

Wanganui Herald, 21 April 1898, Page 3
Timaru, April 21 Mr Arthur Perry, solicitor, a very old resident, died this morning from cancer in the mouth. He served in the Provincial Council, and took a great interest in acclimatisation and horticulture.

Timaru Herald, 14 May 1898, Page 2
A letter by yesterday's mail announces the death at Durham, England, of Mr Thomas Winter, an old identity of Timaru, and latterly of Burkes Pass and Fairlie. Mr Winter was a blacksmith by trade, and was working for "Bob Reid'' over 30 years ago in Timaru. He then started on his own account at Burkes Pass, and subsequently was licensee of the Silverstream Hotel. He went Home about 18 months ago.

Auckland Star, 18 May 1898, Page 8
Mr T. Palmer, a farmer of Temuka, who has been eccentric for many years, and was two or three times examined for lunacy, blew his brains out last night in his own house. The family were all away.

Timaru Herald, 24 May 1898, Page 3 No first name
An inquest wan held yesterday morning at the house of the deceased, at Attenborough, into the cause of death of Andrew Henderson, who died at the Hospital on Friday. The jury were: Messrs C. N. Macintosh (foreman), A. Adams, R. McDonald, C. J. Penrose, P. Reilly and T. Wagstaff. The witnesses were E. Elworthy, J. Rissell, D. Priest, J. McMillan, S. Trilford and Dr R. S. Reid. Their evidence showed that deceased, with a party of employees was engaged at Mr Elworthy's house on May 3rd, were taken out in his trap and were to return by it. The previous day Mr Percy Elworthy had hired a horse from S. Trilford, at the Stone Stables, and it was to be led back behind the vehicle, or ridden in. Deceased on hearing this offered to ride the horse in. It was understood to be a quiet horse, and deceased asked no questions about it. The witness Rissel one of deceased's men, saw him start and he went off all right. He had his overcoat thrown loosely over the front of the saddle. John McMillan, a blacksmith working for Mr Henderson near the Upper Pareora about 3 o'clock heard a horse galloping over the Pareora bridge, and up the cutting. Looked out and saw a horse galloping along the road, the rider seeming to have no control over it. Then saw the horse going on without a rider, and ran along the road and saw the rider on the ground. Found him in a sort of fit, on his hands and knees. Put him into a sitting position. A stranger came up and witness left him to take care of deceased, while he went for assistance. The horse must have stumbled and fallen, judging from the state of the ground at the time and place of the accident. He went to Mr D. Priest, who was working not faraway, and had heard the horse galloping, and some one shouting " Whoa," two or three times. Mr Priest got his trap, and with McMillan picked up deceased, and drove him as fast as possible to the hospital. On the way, about a mile from where the accident happened, they met Mr R. Parry leading back the horse, and they also met a baker's cart, the driver of which recognised the victim of the accident as Mr Henderson. On the way deceased asked, what time it was then he had a fit of convulsions, and the rest of the time was unconscious. S. Trilford said the horse was about four years old. It was broken in about two years ago, then turned out for eighteen months, and it had been in use as a hack for about six months. It was a free goer, with a good mouth, easy to hold by anyone accustomed to ride, and free from vice. He would not have let deceased have it, as he did not know whether he could ride. The horse had evidently been down, as one of its knees was skinned. Dr Reid described the injuries of deceased, as revealed by post mortem and otherwise. One of his collar bones was broken, and there was a fracture of the skull extending from above and behind the right ear, obliquely downwards and forwards, across the back of the skull, such an injury as might result from a fall from a horse. The cause of death was inflammation of the brain. The jury returned a verdict of " accidental death." The funeral of deceased took place in the afternoon, and was well attended by persons connected with the building trades.

Star 10 June 1898, Page 3
The funeral took place at Timaru yesterday of the late Mr David Sutherland, who had for fifteen years been manager of the Eskbank Estate, Otaio, under the Bank of New Zealand, and later under the Assets Board. His health had been failing for some time past, and in consequence of this he wished to resign the managership of the estate; The general manager, however, requested him not to resign, but to take an extended leave to recruit his health. Unfortunately he delayed too long in taking advantage of this offer, and died from an attack of pleurisy on Tuesday last. He was buried in the Timaru cemetery yesterday, the Rev L. C. Brady officiating. The cortege was a long one, being joined by settlers all the way from St Andrews, and numbers of Timaru people met and joined the procession south of the town. Among the wreaths sent were handsome ones from the Assets Board and his fellow officers on the Board's staff.

Otago Witness, 23 June 1898, Page 29
Sutherland.— On the 17th June, at Timaru, Christina, the beloved daughter of Peter Sutherland, Mansfordtown, Port Chalmers ; aged 28 years.

Timaru Herald, 28 June 1898, Page 2
An inquest was held yesterday morning at Pleasant Point Hotel, before C. A. Wray, Esq., the Coroner, touching the death of William Chisholm. It appeared from the evidence that Mr Chisholm had been living along with two sons at his Limestone farm. The boys went out to work at about 8 o'clock on Wednesday morning, the deceased remarking that he would go out and try and shoot some hares. On returning they could not find deceased, but did not get alarmed till Thursday night. They and some neighbours searched all day on Friday without avail, and then they communicated with Constable Madden at the Point. He instituted a search party on Saturday morning, and found deceased lying in a gully about 200 yards from his hut dead, with a double-barrelled muzzle-loading gun in his hands. It appears that deceased had made a loop of a leathern thong, and put his foot in it, and placed the muzzle of the gun in his mouth as the top of his head from the ears was blown away. No reason whatever was given for the act. Dr Thomas, who had attended deceased for about two years, gave evidence that he was suffering from heart disease and at times was very depressed m spirits, as he always thought that he had a growth inside. The jury returned a verdict that deceased died from a gunshot wound inflicted while he was m a state of temporary insanity. Deceased, who had been a long time m the district, was generally respected and was known as a good neighbour. Very great sympathy is felt for his family.

Evening Post, 27 June 1898, Page 5
Timaru, 25th June. An old settler at Sutherland, named Chisholm, left home on Wednesday ostensibly to shoot hares, but as he did not return a search party went out to-day and found he had committed suicide in a gully by shooting himself. Death must have been instantaneous.

Otago Daily Times 1 July 1898, Page 2
Mackay.— On the 30lh June, at Upper York place, at the residence of her son-in-law (W. F. Cuthbertson), Isabella Ferguson, relict of Kobert Mackay, Roslyn in her eighty-sixth year.

Timaru Herald, 1 July 1898, Page 2
Another old identity, Mrs Robert Mackay, passed away in Dunedin yesterday morning at the advanced age of 84. It is nearly 40 years since Mrs Mackay arrived in the colony with her husband and family, settling first in Dunedin, then in Oamaru for a time, and again returning to Dunedin. Mrs Mackay was well known in this district, having after the death of her husband, lived in Timaru with her daughter, Mrs W. F. Cuthbertson, for some years. Up to the last few months she was hale and hearty, and could get about without assistance. Of a kindly and cheerful disposition she was much respected by all who knew her. Two of her sons are well known in the printing trade, the eldest, Mr Joseph Mackay, having started the Bruce Herald and Mackay's Southland and Otago Almanac, while the other, Mr John Mackay, is the Government Printer. Mr Andrew Mackay, for many years one of the Bank of New Zealand managers and at present manager for the Assets Board in Christchurch, is another son.

Otago Witness, 11 August 1898, Page 22
A young man named John O'Grady has just died in the Timaru Hospital from the effects of injuries received through being thrown from a horse in the streets of Timaru. In falling his head stuck the guard post of a verandah, and his bead was badly injured that from the first little hope was entertained of his ultimate recovery.

Timaru Herald, 10 September 1898, Page 2
'Mr James Aitkin Nairn, a resident of Waitohi Flat for some 34 years, was found dead inhiabedon Friday morning. An inquest was held yesterday before C. A. Wray, Esq., Coroner, and a jury of which Mr Bruce Gillies was chosen foreman. Mrs Cunningham stated that deceased was her brother and aged 66 years. Mr D. Cunningham, jun., stated that his uncle, who lived a solitary life, was ill on Wednesday night. Witness attended to his comfort, and left him in fairly good spirits. Early next morning he again visited his house and found him in the same position as he had left him, but dead. Mr J.S. Hayes attributed death to pleurisy and pneumonia, and the jury returned a verdict accordingly. Constable Barrett, in the course of the enquiry, said that the deceased was in Temuka on Tuesday, and complained of being ill, and it was also mentioned that the deceaseod was of a very retiring disposition and averse to receiving attention from neighbours or relative's. The jury, under the circumstances and from their own knowledge, desired to say that no blame was attachable to anyone.

Timaru Herald, 11 October 1898, Page 2
The many friends of the late Mr Andrew Forrest, of Upper Otaio, heard with regret on Thursday last of the death of that gentleman. It came as a shock to them to hear of a young man m the prime of life to be taken away so soon. Mr Forrest had been farming for several years m the Upper Otaio district, and was considered a strong healthy man, but about a month ago he took a severe attack of influenza, as bethought, which compelled him to go down to Mr W. Geddies of Highway farm, Makikihi, where his sisters and brothers live. They sent to Waimate to the doctor who at once pronounced his lungs to be in a very bad state with pleurisy and other complaints, which eventually ended m his death at the early age of 31 years. The deceased was interred in the Waimate cemetery on Saturday, and the funeral was one of the largest which had gone through Waimate for a long time, being followed by friends from all parts of the surrounding districts.

Otago Witness, 13 October 1898, Page 29
FORREST.— On the 6th October, at Highway Farm, Makikihi, Andrew Walter, second son of the late Robert Forrest ; aged 31 years.

Grey River Argus, 31 December 1898, Page 2
Dunedin, December 29. The barque Nor'wester arrived to-day from London under charter to Reid and Gray. During the passage an AB named John Horne, a native of Timaru, fell off the foretop sail yard on to the deck and was killed instantly. There was heavy weather at the time.

New Zealand Tablet, 22 December 1898, Page 19
Mrs PHILLIPS. We deeply regret to have to record the death of Mrs. Phillips which occurred on October 8th in the County Wicklow, Ireland The deceased was the mother of Mrs. D. Doyle of Timaru, for whom much sympathy is felt by her large circle of friends throughout the Colony.

Evening Post, 31 December 1898, Page 5
The barque Nor'-wester arrived yesterday from London under charter to Messrs. Reid and Gray. During the passage an A.B. named John Home, a native of Timaru, fell off the fore topsail yard on to the deck, and was killed instantly. There was heavy weather at the time.

Otago Witness, 5 January 1899, Page 30
During the voyage of the barque Nor'wester from London to Dunedin able seaman named John Home, a native of Timaru, fell off the foretopsail yard on to the deck, and was killed instantly. The weather was very boisterous when the accident occurred.

Timaru Herald, 7 January 1899, Page 3
In connection with the fatal accident at Makikihi on Thursday evening. Mr Crawford identified the body in a moment, as that of a man familiar in the streets of Timaru, a partially crippled man named Richard Powell, an old bachelor who lived by himself in Sandietown, and was well known in the streets as a good humoured mendicant. The inquest was opened at Waimate Hospital at 5 p.m. and Constable Crawford gave evidence that he saw the deceased, whom he had known for eight years, on Thursday about mid-day, and that he was then slightly under the influence of liquor ; that he was a quiet inoffensive man ; that he was unable to do any work owing to some affection of the head, and had been m receipt of charitable aid ; that he was about 60 years of age and had no relatives in the colony, a brother who was formerly m Timaru having returned to the Old Country. Mr J. W. White attended the inquest (which was proceeding when the train left) on behalf of the Railway Department.
WAIMATE, January 6. The verdict was found that death was caused by accidentally falling off the train, and that no blame was attachable to the railway officials.

Wanganui Herald, 17 February 1899, Page 3
Timaru, February 17. An elderly man, Thomas Gurney, committed suicide yesterday morning by hanging himself from a tree on a cliff Caroline Bay. At the inquest the jury returned a verdict of suicide while temporarily insane.

Timaru Herald, 3 March 1899, Page 2
Mr H. Coulter, farmer, Rangitata, whose death was announced yesterday was a victim to the dreadful disease of cancer. Although not laid aside, Mr Coulter had been suffering for a number of years, but only found out his true state a month ago, when it was too late to do anything for the sufferer, and he calmly resigned himself to his fate. The deceased was a very old resident of Rangitata, and was married to a daughter of Mr W. Ash by. He leaves a widow and six children for whom the deepest sympathy is felt. Mr Coulter was a member of the local school committee, and also of the Rangitata Debating Society. This death is the fifth from this dreadful disease in this district within a few years.

Otago Witness, 16 March 1899, Page 19
Alfred Mufin, [Murfin] cook on the s.s. Poherua, was found dead in his berth at Timaru. The deceased, whose age was 49, was a widower, and has a daughter at Auckland, where he joined the steamer last month. At the inquest the medical evidence showed that Death was due to heart disease.

Timaru Herald, 17 March 1899, Page 2
At the Coroner's Inquest on Wednesday on the body of Mrs Rosanna Toomey, who had been drowned in the Hae-hae-te-moana on the previous day, her husband stated in his evidence that when he came to the river there was nothing to show that the ford was dangerous. Just about the time that the jury were handing the Coroner that rider, the overseer's report was under consideration by the Geraldine Road Board. The report contained the following words : — " The heavy floods a few days ago had destroyed almost all the river crossings, and rendered the major portion of them impassable for dray traffic, and which will necessitate a large expenditure to effect the necessary repairs thereto." It is plain therefore that the overseer had made the inspection which is usual and, in fact, absolutely necessary after a flood. We may suppose that he had included the crossing at the Hae-hae-te-moana m the places visited by him. The river was still very high when Mr Toomey arrived on its banks, and he appears to have had at first some misgiving with regard to its condition. He, however, saw wheel-marks entering the stream, and his wife thereupon pointed out to him that the baker had crossed. Mr Toomey, therefore, went on, as he had a good horse, and thought that what the baker had done he could do. The result was that horse and trap went into a hole and were washed down the stream. It was a repetition of a very old South Canterbury story, and one which will probably find its counterpart a good many times in the future until the crossings have all been bridged. But it will hardly do for the local authorities to rest satisfied with a consideration of that sort. To some extent they are the guardians of the travelling public. It is the duty of the Geraldine Road Board to look after the river crossings, and to repair as speedily as possible any that maybe injured by floods. It seems to follow that, pending necessary restoration where damage has been done, the Road Board should adopt some means for letting the travelling public know that the crossing is dangerous and ought not to be attempted. Having done that, the local authority is absolved from blame if the warning be disregarded and disaster ensue. The best method of conveying the warning is to put up a temporary rail or two at the usual place for entering the water. That plan has very often been adopted, and has been the means of saving many lives and preventing a multitude of minor accidents. Is it to be understood that no warning is to be erected at a flooded or damaged crossing until its danger has been demonstrated by the drowning of one or more farmers or their wives ? Surely it would be better to take precautionary measures a little earlier. Perhaps some of our readers will think that we have made too much of this incident. The Geraldine Road Board and their overseer will very likely be of that opinion. But we have a natural antipathy to the unnecessary destruction of human life, and if our remarks have the effect of stirring up the local authorities m the Geraldine Road District to a keener sense of their responsibility, we are quite content to put up with any ill-will that they may feel towards us for having ventured to animadvert on their apparent neglect.

Timaru Herald, 3 April 1899, Page 2
A fatal drowning accident happened at Cooper's Creek near Gerald me on Wednesday afternoon. The creek was in heavy flood, when an infant son of Mr B. P. Bartrum, of Creek Station, was missed for a moment from the house. After a search of two hours the body was found about a mile down the creek. An inquest was held on Thursday evening when the jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning.

Otago Witness, 13 April 1899, Page 33
AUSTIN— On the 29th March, at High street, Timaru, Ellen, dearly beloved wife of James Austin, jun., Bankside, Albury, youngest daughter of William and Isabella Stewart, Flaxburn, Orari, Canterbury, and sister of Mrs D. B: Hutton, Howe street; aged 31 years. Deeply regretted.

Marlborough Express, 11 March 1899, Page 2
Timaru, March 10. Mr Alfred Murfin, cook of the s.s. Poherua, was found dead in his berth this morning. He was 49 years of age, and a widower, and has a daughter at Auckland, where he joined the steamer last month. Mr Edgar Jones, of Pahau, Amuri, met with an accident lately, resulting in one leg being broken, badly.

Timaru Herald, 18 April 1899, Page 2
The following is a description of the unknown man who was found dead in a shed at Saltwater Creek. Supposed to be a native of Germany, an umbrella mender, about 50 years of age, 5ft 9in high, rather stout build, fair complexion and fair hair, small fair moustache, smooth face except for a few straggling hairs on cheeks and chin, high cheek bones dress — diagonal dark tweed coat and vest, striped tweed trousers, striped flannel shirt, dark worsted socks, watertight boots (soles much worn), black soft felt hat.

Otago Witness, 4 May 1899, Page 27
At the inquest at Studholme Junction touching the Death of Cuthbert Walker, who was accidentally shot at the Wainono lagoon on Sunday morning, 23rd, Mr William Coltman, J.P.,. acted as coroner, and Mr W. J. Black, of Waimate, was chosen foreman of the jury. The evidence of Ernest Hunt, a resident of Waimate ...

New Zealand Tablet, 4 May 1899, Page 28
MR. DAVID GRIFFIN, Jnr., Timaru.
On Saturday, April 20, Mr. David Griffin, junr. (writes our Timaru correspondent), passed peacefully away, fortified by the rites of the Church. The deceived had been ill only for a few days, so that his death, which was wholly unexpected, came as a great shock to his relatives and friends. Mr. Griffin, who was about 27 years of age, had been married only a year, and he leaves a widow and one child. The greatest sympathy is felt for Mrs. Griffin, and also for the parents of the deceased in the loss they have sustained. There was a very large number of persons present at the obsequies in the Church of the Sacred Heart. Rev. Father McDonald officiated at the interment in the Timaru Cemetery. — R.I. P.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 12 May 1899, Page 2
A press message from Timaru says Mr W. P. Grant, manager of the Assets Realisation Company's Waihaorunga state, near Waimate, was found dead his bedroom of the Empire Hotel on Wednesday morning. He had died while undressing to go to bed. Mr Grant had been in the service of the board and the Bank of New Zealand for many years, and was highly respected.

The West Australian Tuesday 16 May 1899 page 5
A heavy sea which broke over the wharf at Timaru to-day swept a workman named Carlow into the harbour. He was drowned.

Otago Witness, 25 May 1899, Page 23
A wharf labourer named Thomas Jamieson, who fell from the orlop deck into the hold of the steamer Waiwera on the morning of the 3rd of May, died at the Timaru Hospital on the 16th. He sustained severe injury to his head and never gained consciousness. At the inquest the evidence showed that the orlop deck was badly lighted, and that deceased stumbled over an open hatchway (which the other men working with him thought was covered until lights were brought and then saw it was not, with a drop of 20ft into the hold. It was shown that deceased was leader of the gang, and that it was his place to see that the hold was lighted before starting work. The jury returned a verdict of accidental Death, blaming no one. They drew the attention of the shipping authorities to the importance of providing better lighting before allowing men to go below.

Star 26 April 1899, Page 1
Mr T. W. Leslie, land and estate agent, Timaru, died very suddenly from heart disease on Monday evening, at the age of fifty five. The deceased had been many years in the district, engaged in farming pursuits, and latterly had acted as a commission agent.

Otago Witness, 22 June 1899, Page 26
At the inquest at Timaru on Blackburn Catlow, washed off the wharf on May 11, and whose body was recovered on Thursday the evidence indicated that the deceased, who was employed on the breakwater, had been taken by surprise. He had only just gone down the wharf, and the first heavy sea carried him away. A verdict of  "Accidentally drowned while in the execution of his duty" was returned. Funeral inquest funeral G. Stumbles, foreman of works at the breakwater, stated that a very heavy sea was running on the 13th May. W.J. Tennent, secretary to the Harbour Board.

Timaru Herald, 4 July 1896, Page 2
An inquest was held at the residence of his son, Mr John Wall, on Thursday last, concerning the death of Robert Wall, aged 80. Major Keddell acted as Coroner, and Mr Johnson as foreman of the jury. The following composed, the jury Albert Davis, M. Hyland, R. Finlayson, E. Charleston, and M. Leonard. Evidence was given by John Wall and John McGimpsie. The latter deposed to finding deceased hanging by some binder twine to the roof of the porch of his son's house. He was quite dead and cold. He was seen the night before at 8 o'clock by the witness, and complained of pain in his stomach, but declined to have medical advice. Deceased was found at 3 o'clock on Thursday. Deceased lived alone. The son stated that he had never thought deceased was weak in his mind, or likely to take his life. The jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide by hanging himself, but that there was no evidence to show what state of mind he was in at the time.

The West Australian Friday 14 July 1899 page 4
The Friends of the late Mr. WILLIAM JOHN PHILP, late of Timaru, New Zealand, are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, the Presbyterian portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery. The funeral is appointed to leave Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea's undertaking establishment at 2.35 THIS (Friday) AFTER-NOON, per 3 o'clock funeral train for Karrakatta, Koe-street entrance.
BOWRA AND O'DEA,
Undertakers and Embalmers,
195 Pier-street, Perth.
Telephone 308

Waimate Daily Advertiser, 8 August 1899, Page 3
INQUEST AT Timaru. ARREST OF AN EX-Waimate RESIDENT. Timaru, Aug. 7.
An inquest was held this morning before Coroner Wray and a jury to ascertain the cause of the Death of the infant child of Gwendoline Jane Clark. Dr Bowe gave evidence that he was present at the birth of the child. It was premature and still-born. Phoebe Story, nursing pupil, detailed circumstances attending birth, and said she had known Mr Gooch and the mother as man and wife since March. Gwendoline Jane Clark, the mother, said she had nothing to conceal. The body was buried two or three days after birth, being kept for Mr Gooch to see. H. N. Gooch declined to state how long they had been married. He understood the child was stillborn. Agreed to bury it in the garden and he did so. Did not consider it was necessary to ask for a certificate of Death under the circumstances. Detective Mayne said on Saturday last he dug up the body wrapped in a towel. The coroner commented on the evidence as showing whether the child was born alive or stillborn. The jury returned a verdict, that the child was stillborn. An information was at one laid against Harry N. Gooch and Gwendoline Clark, charging them with concealment of birth by disposing of the body of the child with intent to conceal the fact that the female accused was delivered of it. Accused were then remanded to Friday, bail being allowed in their own recognisance's to the amount of £50 each. The accused persons were married this morning.

Star 11 August 1899, Page 3
HAMMOND. — August 10, at 267, South Belt, Sydenham, Adelaide, the dearly beloved daughter of Sarah, and the late John Hammond, late of Timaru, in her twelfth year. R.I.P.

Otago Witness 28 September 1899, Page 23
Robert Kelson, a man of between 50 and 60 years of age, formerly employed at the Waikakahi station, who had been living at one of the Waitaki fishing huts for the past four or five months, was found dead in bed on Thursday morning. He had been suffering from Bright's disease, but declined to return to the Waimate Hospital. The Waimate Times states that an inquest was deemed unnecessary. Deceased, it is understood, had no relatives in the colony.

Timaru Herald, 28 October 1899, Page 4
An inquest was held at the Courthouse, Temuka, yesterday touching the death of late Mr George McMillan, late of of the Stumps farm, Orari and Rhoboro Downs station. R. Mr C. A. Wray, Coroner, presided, and the following jury were empanelled — Messrs J. Byth, W.C. Roulston, James Grant, H M. Miles, J. Sim, and E. B. Cooper. The first witness called was Frank King, in the employ of Mr A. Story, who stated that on Wednesday he was at Mr Charles Story's stable, a trifle before 8 o'clock. He saw the deceased and Mr McArthur in a gig just leaving the stables, and going in the direction of the railway crossing. After going a short distance they turned back and in front of the stable door, and Mr McMillan asked Mr C. Story to light his lamp, remarking that they ought to have been lit before. Mr Story lit the lamp, find Mr McMillan drove away in the direction of the crossing. It was a very dark night. About a minute later J. McLeod, who was standing outside, the stable watching the trap, called witness and said, Mac has had an accident " Witness and Mr Joseph Bernard Wareing who was standing there too, ran straight down to the crossing. Witness passed the body of the gig on the road near Mr Cooper's (the Road Board Office) gate. Witness ran on, and saw Mr John McArthur, manager of Rhoboro Downs station, lying on the road on his face with his arms stretched out. Witness touched him and thought him dead. Witness examined the spot and came to the conclusion that the trap had not touched the train. If it had the horse and trap would have been dragged to the cattle stop. Deceased must have been thrown out of the trap and dragged a short distance. Mr Wareing, who was close behind, said "go for a doctor," and witness went at once. getting Mr Kelland to drive to Dr Wareing. Dr Wareing advised witness to go to Dr Stuart B. Reid also, but not finding him at home witness went on to Dr Sir Wm. Blunden's. Dr Reid was there and after getting bandages they accompanied witness to Mr O'Donohue's hotel, where Mr McArthur was. The deceased was removed in a stretcher to Dr Hayes' private hospital. By the Coroner : The left leg of deceased was lying within an inch of the railway line. Witness noticed that the leg was bleeding. Witness did not see the train at all, but heard a rumbling as If the train had just passed the bridge. W. Hillier, stationmaster, Temuka. The guard George Dunn, did not report the accident. Accidental death, "in accordance with the evidence. The funeral will leave Willowbank, Temuka, for the Temuka Cemetery, at 2.30 p.m., to-morrow. There were about 3000 persons present.

Timaru Herald, 30 October 1899, Page 2
The funeral moved away from Mr Donald Grant's, Willowbank, to the Temuka cemetery. The pall-bearers included Messrs Simon Mackenzie, Alexander and Robert Bissett, B. Tripp, and James Scott, personal friends and long acquaintances of the deceased gentleman. In addition to the two mourning coaches (the first of which contained the four sisters and two brothers of deceased and the second relatives, four brothers in law walking next in order), there were between 40 and 50 other vehicles and a large number of horsemen in the procession. The burial services, at the house and at the grave, were conducted by the Rev. Messrs Dickson and Todd, of the Presbyterian Churches of Temuka and Geraldine respectively, and were very impressive. The coffin was of oak, silver-mounted, and wag | covered with most beautiful wreaths, three of which were forwarded from Christchurch. Among those who sent such beautiful tokens were his sisters and brothers, the Smithfield Meat Go , the N.M. and A. Co., Messrs W. Grant., S. Mackenzie, D. Grant, T. Buxton, J. Hay, Bissett Bros., P. Wareing, E and J. Brown, W J. A:ninall, Dr Hayes, J. O'Donohue, and many others. The concourse at the cemetery was very large, and the deepest sympathy was shown for Mrs McMillan and her little son, at the loss of loving husband and father, in such a sad and sudden manner.

Evening Post, 20 November 1899, Page 5
Timaru, 19th November. A settler named Edward Gobbitt committed suicide by hanging on Saturday afternoon at the Springbrook Farm Settlement near here. A verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane was returned.

Manawatu Herald 5 December 1899, Page 2
Death of Herbert Savell.
On Sunday evening at five o'clock death released the late Herbert Savell from his sufferings. He died from tumour on the brain, and for the past two years his affliction has been great. Before his eyes were affected he was working as a scutcher at King's mill, but finding that something was wrong with them, he sought advice, but unfortunately with no effect. It was on St. Patrick's Day 1898 that he last saw his wife when his eyes closed for ever. His friends sent him down South to consult an eye specialist but the result was the same as the first examination, no hope being held out of the sight being restored. The deceased was a steady, hardworking, and popular young man, a capital footballer, and he has received very much sympathy. The deceased was born in Timaru and came to Foxton with his parents about 20 years ago. He leaves a young widow and an infant six weeks old. The funeral this afternoon was very largely attend, the Rev. H. Leach reading the impressive burial service at the grave's side. Mr Jonson was the undertaker. In another column the relations render their thanks for the sympathy shown to the deceased and his family.

Manawatu Herald , 21 September 1893, Page 2 Death
Savell— On Sept. 13th, 1898, after a short illness, Francis Joseph Savell, third son of Samuel and Christina Savell, of Poplar Farm, Pohangina Aged 22 years. Not dead, but gone before. Feilding, Timaru, and English papers please copy.  

Otago Witness, 14 December 1899, Page 16
R. West, an engine cleaner, 18 years of age, was killed through an accident on the railway at Mercer. He was formerly a resident of Timaru.
    Mr W. H. Wake, a farmer at Fairview, was taken suddenly ill while visiting Timaru on Friday, and died from an attack of apoplexy. Deceased was well advanced in years. He was a retired school teacher, who formerly had charge of the Kaiapoi and Ashburton Schools. Several of his sons follow their father's profession.

Evening Post, 16 January 1900, Page 6
The Temuka Leader says that on Thursday the youngest son of Mr. W. Hopkinson went to his room und started to clean an old pistol which has been in his possession for some time. It is conjectured that he had forgotten that the pistol was loaded, and on examining the hammer, which was defective, the charge seems to have exploded. The bullet, a small one, entered the youth's left breast a little above the region of the heart and penetrated the lung. His case is a serious one, and may possibly end fatally.

Timaru Herald, 19 February 1900, Page 3
An inquest was held at the Courthouse on Saturday before the Coroner, Mr C. A. Wray, touching the death of William Norman Barron Brook Butlerworth who died suddenly at his residence in Woollcombe Street on Friday morning. The following sat as jury; H.J. Brown (foreman) T.J. Kennedy, T. M. Murray, A. Sinclair, H. Coe., T. Cox. The jury having retired and viewed the body, the following evidence was taken :— Dr Bowe said that he had made a post mortem examination of the body found that death had resulted from fatty degeneration of the heart. Mrs Butterworth, wife of deceased, said that deceased was in his usual health on Fri day morning. Deceased had been drinking the day before, and had taken no food for 48 hours. Deceased had complained from time to time about his health, and talked about seeing a doctor, but had never consulted one. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

North Otago Times, 6 February 1900, Page 2 DEATH.
Morton — At Morven, on the 3rd instant George Morton, J.P., farmer, aged 63 years; deeply regretted. The funeral will leave his late residence on Tuesday, the 6th instant, at 12 o'clock, for the Waimate Cemetery. Friends are respectfully invited to attend. G. W. COLLETT, Undertaker, Waimate.

New Zealand Tablet, 8 March 1900, Page 17
Gaffany — Thomas John, eldest son of Mr. Michael Gaffany, Arowhenua, at the early age of 28 years. He died at Dr. De Renzie's private hospital, Christchurch, after about 12 months' illness. His end was peaceful. — R.I.P.

New Zealand Tablet, 8 March 1900, Page 20
It is with sincere regret (writes our Temuka correspondent) that I record the death of Mr. Thomas J. Gaffany, eldest son of Mr. Michael Gaffany, of Arowhenua, which occurred at Christchurch, where he had been under medical treatment, on March 1, at the age of 28 until a few months ago the deceased was in robust health, and certainly hard to excel on the football field ; he was a prominent member of the famous team of some years ago of St. Patrick's College. In all weathers his place in the church was always filled, and his duties were never neglected. Since his illness (which he bore with Christian patience) came upon him he was resigned to the inevitable and died an edifying death, being attended by the Very Rev Father Le Menant des Chesnais. The remains were brought to Temuka on the following day, and the funeral was the largest ever witnessed there, the Rev. Father Galerne delivering a feeling discourse at the cemetery. Great sympathy is felt with the family in their loss of one who has been esteemed by all. — R.I.P.

New Zealand Tablet, 8 March 1900, Page 20
MR. JOHN J. BROSNAHAN, AROWHENUA.
General regret was felt in Temuka when it was reported that Mr. John Joseph Brosnahan, youngest son of Mr. John Brosnahan, Arowhenua, had died at Amberley on Friday last. The deceased, who had only attained the age of 15 years, was very popular in the district. The remains were brought to Temuka on the 5th, and (writes our local correspondent) were interred on the following day. The cortege was very long, the attendance showing the great sympathy felt for the deceased's family. — R.I.P.

Timaru Herald, 27 April 1900, Page 2
At the inquest on the body of the child J. B. O'Sullivan, at, Waimate, before Mr Graham, J. P., on Wednesday, the evidence went to show that the little fellow was playing about the yard in the morning, and must have tumbled head first into a hole in the garden. The hole contained water and mud, and the child wan found in it by his brother. The medical evidence showed that a child falling head first into the hole would be dead in a few minutes. The jury returned a verdict that death was due to suffocation caused by the child accidentally falling into a muddy hole.

Evening Post, 15 May 1900, Page 2
SUICIDE AT Timaru.
Timaru, 14th May. James Quinlan, a labourer, aged 50 years, a widower, living with his children in a suburban street, shot himself last night. Death was instantaneous. He had been complaining of ill-health lately, and seemed stupid. At the inquest a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane was returned.

New Zealand Tablet, 17 May 1900, Page 20
An accident, which unfortunately resulted fatally, occurred at Temuka on Thursday last. Nicholas O'Connell, a well known young man, was engaged in assisting to stack clover for Mr. E. Carr, of Arowhenua, and whilst forking from the dray to the stack, the handle of the fork he used, snapped, with the result that Mr. O'Connell overbalanced and fell heavily from the load. When picked up it was seen that he was severely injured, and the services of Dr. Hayes were at once procured. Mr. and Mrs. Carr, as well as other sympathising friends, did all they possibly could for the sufferer, but he succumbed to his injuries on Friday morning. Additional sadness (says the Leader) is felt in connection with this accident as deceased was about to visit the Old Country, and had already secured his passage. He contemplated travelling with Mr. J. Fitzgerald, who is a near relative. R.I.P.

Evening Post, 11 June 1900, Page 5
Timaru, 10th June. Mr. Andrew Turnbull, for many years manager of the New Zealand and Australian Loan Company's Pareora estate, and assistant general manager of the company, died here on Saturday, aged 64. He was a very old identity. For the last three years he has been in business in Timaru as a land agent.

Timaru Herald, 28 June 1900, Page 1
FUNERAL NOTICE. THE Friends of John McKay, Cricklewood, are respectfully invited to attend the Funeral of his late wife, Martha, which will leave her father's residence, Cave, THIS DAY, 28th, at 1 o'clock, for the Pleasant Point Cemetery, arriving there at 3 p.m. DONALD ELDER, Undertaker, Pleasant Point.
FUNERAL NOTICE. FRIENDS of the late Thomas Virtue J. Dalgleish are respectfully in formed that his funeral will leave his late residence, Elizabeth Street, Timaru THIS DAY (Thursday), the 28th inst., at 2.30 p m. J. E.BECKINGHAM. Undertaker. He was vice president of the S.C. Caledonian Society and a member of Lodge Caledonian No. 16.

Press, 30 June 1900, Page 9
On Wednesday, about a mile and a halt from Geraldine, a painful accident, which afterwards proved fatal, happened to a little girl five or six years of age, named Jessie Worner, a daughter of the late Mr F W Worner. The girl was playing with a boy named Bates, about her own age, in the riverbed at the back of Mr A. Bates's house, and they were in the act or lighting gorse fires when the girl attempted to carry a lighted piece of gorse to another bush, and it flared up in her hand, igniting her clothes. The girl was soon in one mass of flames, and losing presence of mind, ran about trying to beat out the fire the boy Bates assisting her with the result that he blistered his hands considerably. A young man named Thomas Annett, who was working at a stable near at hand, heard the screams and ran to the girl's assistance. Having no coat on, he had no means of smothering the fire, so he carried the girl to a pool of water and dipped her into that, and afterwards took her home. Dr. Gibson was sent for, but found the child so badly burned that he held out no hopes of her recovery. The girl died on Thursday evening, and an inquest will be held this morning.

Otago Witness, 5 July 1900, Page 37
FANCOURT.— On the 1st July, at Timaru, Charles St. John Fancourt, the beloved husband of Louisa Fancourt, of Ravensbourne, and representative of Wilson, Balk, and Co., Dunedin. Deeply regretted.

Otago Witness, 5 July 1900, Page 22
The Timaru Herald states that an accident, which afterwards proved fatal, happened to a girl named Jessie Worner, about 5 or 6 years of age, about a mile and a-half from Geraldine, on Wednesday afternoon. Along with a little boy about her own age, she was lighting gorse fires, when her clothes became ignited, and she was so badly burned that she succumbed to her injuries on Thursday evening.

Press, 2 July 1900, Page 6
At an inquest held at Strathnoon, near Geraldine, on Saturday, touching the death of Jessie Worner, a girl between five and six years of age, who died on Thursday from injuries received through her clothes catching fire while lighting gorse fires in the Waihi river-bed, after hearing evidence, a verdict of accidental death was returned.

Timaru Herald, 16 July 1900, Page 2
The death is announced this morning of Mrs Elizabeth Thomas, of St. Just, Cornwall, England and the respected mother of Mr Henry Thomas, of the staff of the Chief Post Office, Timaru. The deceased lady was well-known here. She came out to the colony, landing at Lyttelton, and coming straight on to Timaru, about 26 years ago, and was always looked up to as one of the old identities. She had enjoyed excellent health up to Saturday.

Waimate Daily Advertiser, 18 August 1900, Page 3 Fire.
DESTRUCTION OF THE " FRITZ " CYCLE WORKS. THE PROPRIETOR BURNED TO Death.
Shortly before two o'clock yesterday morning a fire was discovered in the building in Queen Street used by Mr J. Richard, of the " Fritz " Cycle Works, and owned by Mr J. Hunt, of Waimate, who resides next door. Several residents in the vicinity were startled by the noise of an explosion, little before 2 a.m. Mr Richard senr., father of the proprietor., was soon on the scene, and stated that his son had gone to Morven the previous afternoon and had not returned. The building, which was a very old one, burned very rapidly, nothing being left standing. Foreman Wilson felt something heavy on his hook, which, on examination proved to be the charred remains of Mr J. Richard. It appears the unfortunate man had left Morven at 11.10 a.m. on Thursday night and ridden to Waimate, going to his office to write a letter. He had apparently dozed off to sleep and knocked over the lamp, being suffocated by the smoke before he was fairly awake again. It was his bicycle was found outside the shop. The deceased was 26 years of age, and came to Waimate from Geraldine about two years ago, establishing the Fritz Cycle Works. He was to have married next month to a young lady at Mount Somers.

Timaru Herald, 5 September 1900, Page 3
On Tuesday morning the police at Temuka were advised of the sudden death of Mr John Wendelken, licensee of the Temuka Brewery. An inquest was held yesterday before Mr C. A. Wray, Coroner, and the following jury:— Messrs J. H. Anderson (foreman), J. Washington, E. Chapman. A Storey, T. Brosnahan, and E. Williams. George Wendelken, a lad of nearly 15 years of age, son of deceased, and 'who slept with him at the brewery, gave evidence that on Monday night he met his father at half-past 7 o'clock. He (witness) was on his way to attend a birthday party, but shortly before 11 o'clock he returned and went to bed, where he usually slept with his father. At about 4 o'clock his father rose and took a drink of water. He noticed after this that his father steamed "like a traction engine," and afterwards complained of pains in his chest. Witness offered to go for a doctor, but his father said " Don't leave me," and subsequently fell asleep. An employee at the brewery roused them in the morning, and on coming into the room exclaimed when he saw his father, "Oh! he's dead." His father was lightly addicted to drink, but on Monday morning had taken breakfast as usual, and gone to Timaru, where he (witness) was informed by his father that he had taken a feed of oysters. His father's age was 55 years. Henry Lee. owner of the brewery, gave evidence as to deceased's habits. He was irregular in respect of meals. John Monteith Warren, a duly qualified medical practitioner, deposed to having made a post mortem examination of the body, and gave his opinion that death was attributable to syncope. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Timaru Herald, 14 September 1900, Page 2
We are informed that Miss Matilda Butler, who jumped 25ft to the ground at 'the fatal fire at Martinborough, is a Waimate girl, her sisters and brothers residing at Waimate now. Mrs Nelson, the cook, who suffered such severe injuries that she has since succumbed to them, was also a Waimate woman.

Ashburton Guardian, 19 September 1900, Page 2
Mr Joseph Megson, whose death was recorded in our issue of Thursday, was one of the oldest settlers in South Canterbury. He arrived In Lyttelton in 1863, and shortly took up land in the Arowhenua bush, in the Geraldine district. He was very successful there, the soil being good. His crops were among the best in the province, wheat often going thirty bushels to the acre. When the land boom in Ashburton occurred, he took up a larger block. But he soon found that the change was not for the better, for in those days the water supply in the Ashburton County was very unsatisfactory. The yields, therefore, were by no means equal to what they had been at Geraldine, sometimes not exceeding seven bushels to the acre. Mr Megson therefore naturally regretted he his left his old farm, and when later on his wife died, he became disheartened, and removed from Newlands, making a new home for himself and his only son — Mr Alfred Megaon — at Hampstead. Mr Joseph Megon was very much respected, in proof of which it may be mentioned that he was for many years chairman of the Newlands School Committee. He was also elected as a member of the Ashburton County Council, but increasing deafness compelled him to retire from public life. Of late years, Mr Megson resided at Hampstead with his son, Mr Alfred Megson. He exceeded the usual span of time in life, and died "full of years and honor."

Wanganui Herald, 4 October 1900, Page 2
Timaru, October 3. An old resident, about 80 years of age, William Gosling, was killed last evening. He was out driving, when the horse bolted, and in turning a corner sharply Gosling was thrown out. His head struck a telephone post, badly fracturing the bones of the forehead and face. He lived only a few minutes.

Star 3 October 1900, Page 3 FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN EARLY SETTLER.
Timaru, Oct. 3. The late Mr Gosling, the victim of the fatal accident yesterday, -was a native of Cheshire, and was born on April 13, 1820. He was an engineer by profession, and owned large engineering works at Macclesfield. He arrived in New Zealand in the Randolph, one of the first four ships, accompanied by his wife and two or three young children. He spent two years in Lyttelton, and then removed to Christchurch, where he carried oh an engineering business, In 1863 he bought the freehold .property near Temuka, which is now Mr Guild's farm, Trevenna. In 1874 he sold out and purchased Coonoor, west of Timaru, where he resided until a few years ago, when he retired to Timaru. In his prime he took much interest in .public affairs. He was a member of the Provincial Council for Geraldine, and a member of the local Road Boards and other bodies. He always took an interest in horses, and at one time owned some well-known racehorses. His wife died nine years ago, alter being a worthy helpmeet 'for nearly fifty years. His surviving children are one son, Charles, a farmer at the Levels, and five daughters, Mrs Reid, a widow, three others married, Mrs Haskins, wife of the Town. Clerk at Christchurch, Mrs C. M. Smith, of Wai-iti, and Mrs Saunders, wife of the Clerk to the Levels County Council. His youngest daughter is unmarried.

New Zealand Tablet, 21 March 1901, Page 20
General regret was felt in South Canterbury when it became known that Mr. Jeremiah Egan, of Timaru, had died on the 6th inst, after a long- and painful illness. The deceased was well known and highly esteemed by all, and his death, at a comparatively early aye, was deeply deplored by a large circle of friends. The funeral procession from the Church of the Sacred Heart to the cemetery was very large, and was an evidence of the esteem in which the deceased was held by all classes in the community. The Rev. Father Tubman, assisted by the Rev. Father Aubry, conducted the burial service. A widow and three children are left to mourn their loss, and to these we tender our sympathy in their bereavement. R.I.P.

Timaru Herald, 13 October 1900, Page 2
The funeral of the late Mr G. Robinson Page's Road, took place-yesterday afternoon, at the Timaru Cemetery, and the deceased being a member of the Salvation Army. The Army Band took part in the funeral procession, and played the Dead March as the cortege passed through the town.
    The funeral of the little boy Barton also took place yesterday, and was attended by the Main School Cadets, the first sad occasion on which they had to parade for the funeral of a late comrade.
    Harold Tinsley, who died in Christchurch Hospital on Thursday morning from injuries received in a railway accident, was a son of the Wesleyan minister at Temuka, who is now on a visit to England' The young, fellow, who was 17 years of age, was a cadet at the Sheffield railway station, and was crushed about the waist while shunting some trucks on Tuesday evening. It appears that he slipped and fell across the rails, and a wheel went over him or rather mounted and then stopped on his body.

Otago Witness, 24 October 1900, Page 23
Two boys, named Cole, 13 and 12 years of age, were shooting sparrows with pea rifles at Timaru on Wednesday, when the weapon held by the elder boy accidentally went off. The pellet struck the younger over the left eyebrow, piercing the skull and traversing the brain. He was removed to the hospital.

Timaru Herald, 3 November 1900, Page 4
An elderly woman veil known about Timaru, named Julia Herbert, was found dead in her house, Cross street, last evening. From information received from neighbours near, who said that they had not seen Mrs Herbert since Monday last, Mounted Constable Crawford made enquiries, and finding that no one had seen her about the town since the day named, he, accompanied by Constable Dalton, went up at 7 o'clock last evening, to the little cottage in Cross street. They found the cottage in darkness and the doors barricaded and could get no answer to repeated knockings. The officers named then went to Mr Tubb, a neighbour, and procuring an implement, forced the door. On getting inside they found the poor old-woman lying dead in bed, clad in night garments, the body being covered with clothes and the arms folded across the breast. The body was in an advanced stage of decomposition, and from the general surroundings, they concluded that Mrs Herbert had died from natural causes. On reporting the matter to Sergeant Green, he directed the constables to summon a doctor, and the police returned to the cottage with Dr Dryden. The latter made a careful examination of the body, and came to the conclusion that death had resulted from natural causes, and, from the state the body was in, had occurred three or four days ago. The deceased was about 57 years of age, and so far at we can learn has no relatives here. Mr Wray, the Coroner was Communicated with, and will probably hold an inquest this morning.

Wanganui Herald, 6 November 1900, Page 2
Harry Cole, aged 12 years, who was shot by his brother on the afternoon of the 17th of October, the bullet from a pea rifle lodging in the brain, died in the Timaru Hospital at 8 o'clock on Monday night. Inquest held on the 30th. ult. "Accidental death, with an expression of sympathy for the deceased's brother."

Timaru Herald, 24 November 1900, Page 2
A well known and much respected resident m the person of Mrs John Williams, of Avenue Road, passed away quite suddenly on Thursday evening last. She had been confined to her bed for nearly a fortnight with an attack of paralysis, and seemed to be getting better. On Thursday evening she was seized suddenly with another stroke and quietly passed away a few minutes after the seizure. The deceased had been a resident of Timaru for nearly 22 years, and a member of the Primitive Methodist Church during that period. Much sympathy is felt for the relatives in their sad bereavement.

Otago Witness, 7 November 1900, Page 46
A little girl was admitted to the Timaru Hospital on Friday (says the Herald) owing to a pea-rifle accident. A week ago a lad at Fairview was handling a pea rifle, when it , went off, the pellet passing through the girls' instep among the bones. The pellet went clean through, but as the wound became inflamed it had to be opened and allowed to drain, dirt having caused suppuration.

Otago Witness, 7 November 1900, Page 46
An inquest was held at Timaru on the 30th ult. on the body of the boy Cole, who died from injuries accidentally inflicted by his brother with a pea-rifle. The jury returned ; a verdict of Accidental Death, with an expression of sympathy for the deceased's brother."

Otago Witness, 7 November 1900, Page 46
A woman, aged about 57 years, named Julia Herbert, was found dead in bed at 7 p.m. at Timaru on Friday. She had been missed from the neighbourhood since Monday. The body was in an advanced stage of decomposition. She has no relatives at Timaru, but was an old resident.

Timaru Herald, 15 November 1900, Page 2
Deep regret was expressed m Timaru last evening at the news of the death of Mrs C. S. Fraser, which we understand had taken place in Dunedin yesterday. The deceased lady had been a resident of Timaru for many years, and was greatly respected by a very large circle of friends. We are sure that the most heartfelt sympathy will be extended to Mr C. S. Fraser and family m their profound sorrow and bereavement.

Waimate Daily Advertiser, 20 November 1900, Page 2
A sudden death occurred at St. Andrews between Friday night and early on Saturday morning, when Mrs S. Hopkins passed away in her sleep. Some few weeks ago Doctors Gabites and Bowe advised the deceased lady to have her teeth extracted for the benefit of her health, which of late had been very much impaired. On Friday last she came to Timaru to get Mr T. G. Rowley to extract her teeth. Of course a medical examination was made before the administration of chloroform, and Dr Bowe found that Mrs Hopkins was suffering from heart disease, and he advised that it would be better not to administer chloroform or to extract the teeth at that time. Mrs Hopkins returned to St. Andrews, and at about 2 o'clock on Saturday morning her husband discovered that his wife had died in bed. Mr Hopkins communicated with the police, but as Dr Bowe is prepared to give a certificate as to the cause of death, an inquest will not be necessary. Very deep sympathy is felt for Mr Hopkins.

Timaru Herald, 26 December 1900, Page 3
A young man named Denis Murphy, aged 18 years, a son of Mr P. Murphy, Upper Hook, was drowned while bathing near Waimate on Sunday last. An inquest was held at the Waimate Hotel on Monday before Mr Graham, J.P., acting-Coroner, and a jury of six, Mr Crawshaw being foreman. The evidence of James Hickey and Lawrence Fogarty showed that after church service on Sunday deceased and four companions came to a pond m the creek on Mr Turner's land. Deceased and Fogarty went into bathe. They were not good swimmars. The pond, though little over a half-chain wide by five chains long, was from five to nine feet deep. Deceased crossed the pond a few times, but in returning the last time he went down. Fogarty tried, to get deceased up, but was not able, and the boys on the bank could not do anything to help. Hickey ran to the next two houses, and Mr W. Turner came and dived a few times until he found the body at the bottom of the pool, in 8 feet of water. He succeeded in getting the body on to the bank, but all efforts to restore animation were of no avail. Dr Barclay, who examined the body soon after it was recovered, was of opinion that death was caused by drowning, and he said that it was not unlikely that deceased was attacked with some kind of convulsive illness in the water. There was no appearance of a struggle, or mark of violence or external injury. Constable O'Halloran said that he had the body removed from the scene of the occurrence to the Waimate Hotel on Sunday afternoon. The evidence of Mr Turner and James Hosking was also taken. The jury unanimously brought m a verdict of accidental death by drowning while bathing, and commended Messrs W. Turner and James Hosking for their prompt attention and service.

Star, 27 December 1900, Page 3 DEATH
BOUGHTON.— Monday, Dec. 24, at Geraldine, Emily Ann, the beloved daughter of John and Charlotte Boughton; aged twenty-three years and six months. Deeply regretted.

New Zealand Tablet, 10 January 1901, Page 17
On 19th November, 1900, at Prospect Hall, County Waterford, Ireland, Patrick Reilly, father of Patrick and John Reilly, of Timaru aged 75 years. — R.I.P

New Zealand Tablet, 31 January 1901, Page 15
At a meeting of the Waimate Cemetery Board on Thursday last a motion was passed expressing regret at the loss of the late Mr Nicholas Wall, who represented the Catholic body on the Board during the past 15 years, and expressing the Board's appreciation of his services. The meeting directed that a letter of condolence be forwarded to Mrs. Wall, also that the Rev. Father Regnault be requested to nominate a successor.

Star, 7 February 1901, Page 3
FUCHS.— Feb. 6, at Fairlie, Frederick Joseph Fuchs, late of the Wellington and Fairlie Hotels; aged forty years. Deeply regretted.

Star, 7 February 1901, Page 1
Mr Frederick Joseph Fuchs, on old Canterbury resident, died at his residence, Fairlie Creek Hotel, yesterday. Mr Fuchs was the son of the late Joseph Fuchs, who for many years was landlord of the Old Mechanics Hotel, and afterwards built the Wellington Hotel. He was born in Christchurch in 1860, and on his father's death took over the Wellington Hotel, which he conducted for many years. He took considerable interest in sports of all kinds, and also in theatrical matters, and for several years was lessee of the Opera House. About a couple of years ago he removed from Christchurch to Fairlie, where he died. He leaves a widow and three Children. The remains will be brought to Christchurch for interment.

Otago Witness, 13 February 1901, Page 39
FUCHS— Frederick Joseph Fuchs, late Wellington and Fairlie Hotels; aged 40 years. Deeply regretted.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 14 February 1901
Timaru, February 13. Boyd Thompson, an old identity, was drowned in the Rangitata last night (Tuesday evening) while fishing. He was over 80 years of age, and an enthusiastic angler and ranger of the Acclimatisation Society.  His body was recovered on Wednesday afternoon near the mouth of the river.

Manawatu Standard, 22 February 1901, Page 3
A baby girl, sixteen months old, the the daughter of Mr Thomas Davidson, Orari Gorge, Woodbury, was accidently strangled on Friday night last. On Thursday evening, while the mother was attending to household duties, the child fell out of bed, and on Friday evening before going out to attend the cows Mrs Davidson used extra care to prevent another fall. She fastened a sash to the back of the child's night-dress, and tied the other end to the bed. While attending to the cows Mr and Mrs Davidson took turns in going to the bedroom window to hear if the baby was awake. When they entered the bedroom, shortly after their return to the house, they found the child hanging from the bed dead, the sash with the weight of the child on it, having tightened the neckband of the nightdress. It was not found necessary to hold an inquest.

Otago Witness 27 February 1901, Page 8
The Timaru Herald reports the death of Mr James Wilkinson, who came out to the colony in the early days. He spent a number of years on the West Coast and Otago Goldfields. and subsequently settled on a farm at Smithifield, near Winchester, where for several years successfully carried on agricultural pursuits, and eventually at the cutting up of the Raukapuka estate, he purchased that farm on the Geraldine road, on which he resided up till the time of his death.

Star 18 March 1901, Page 3
BRYANT — March 16, at Geraldine, Mary, the beloved wife of G. H. Bryant and daughter of J..M. Douglass, aged thirty-five.

Star 21 March 1901, Page 3
PEATTIE - March 19, at Woolston, the only and dearly loved son of Florence Carson, of Woolston, also of the late James Peattie, of Timaru; aged two years and nine months. Deeply regretted. Dunedin and Timaru papers please copy.

New Zealand Tablet, 21 March 1901, Page 20
MR. JEREMIAH EGAN, Timaru. General regret was felt in South Canterbury when it became known that Mr. Jeremiah Egan, of Timaru, had died on the 6th inst, after a long and painful illness. The deceased was well known and highly esteemed by all, and his death, at a comparatively early aye, was deeply deplored by a large circle of friends. The funeral procession from the Church of the Sacred Heart to the cemetery was very large, and was an evidence of the esteem in which the deceased was held by all classes in the community. The Rev. Father Tubman, assisted by the Rev. Father Aubry, conducted the burial service. A widow and three children are left to mourn their loss, and to these we tender our sympathy in their bereavement — R.I.P.

Star 10 April 1901, Page 3
MORRISON.— April 6, 1901, at her residence, Waihi Terrace, Geraldine. Susannah, the beloved wife of Robert Morrison.; aged sixty-two years.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 28 March 1901, Page 2
POISONED BY MISTAKE.
Timaru, March 27. An inquest was held to-day on an infant named Robinson. The evidence showed that it was ill, and the nurse gave it the wrong medicine in error. Belladonna linament was given, and the child died in an hour and a half after being given the dose. Three bottles of medicine were on the shelf, and the nurse mistook the bottle. A verdict of accidental Death was returned.

Otago Witness, 3 April 1901, Page 41
LANHAN.— On the 1st April, at Dunedin, Nellie Lanhan; aged 34 years. Timaru papers please copy.

Otago Witness, 17 April 1901, Page 29
Albury. Obituary — I regret having to relate that the stern hand of Death has descended in our midst since last writing, and claimed as his own Mr William Fountain, probably the oldest resident in the district. Deceased was formerly occupied as a general carrier, his teams being the admiration of all. Fountain by his strictly honourable conduct in all business matters and his kindly regard for the well-being of his fellow-creatures, won the friendly cognomen of "Honest John," a name he earned unchallenged to the grave. Mr Fountain, though especially of late, of a very retiring disposition, commended the respect of all with whom he came in contact, and when the poor old chap was found dead at the door of his somewhat secluded cottage quite a gloom was cast over the township. Though in restricted circumstances he could not be prevailed upon to avail himself of the old-age pension, always asserting that he had no right to what he had not earned or given an equivalent for. Would that such a spirit of manly independence were general.
    April 15 — Last week I had to record the demise of a resident of over 30 years standing, and now again I much regret having to announce the Death of Mr H. Batchelor, another Albury resident of many years, and one who has always taken an active interest in the well being of the district. Deceased identified himself with all local entertainments and school matters. He was predeceased by his wife many years, and leaves a grown-up family and a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.

Otago Witness, 15 May 1901, Page 58
Mr P. Meehan, who died at the Timaru Private Hospital on Saturday morning, was an old colonist, arriving in Victoria on the first outbreak of the diggings in 1852 in the ship Red Jacket. He followed mining pursuits on the Australian, Otago, and West Coast diggings. A few years ago he took up farming in the Makikihi district. Mr Median leaves two sons — Mr John Meehan, of Willowbridge, and Mr James Meehan, of Makikihi.

Otago Witness, 15 May 1901, Page 58
Says Nelson Colonist. On Saturday our old and much respected town.-man, Mr Benjamin Crisp completed his ninety third year. Mr Crisp has been a resident 59 years, and a colonial for 82 years, having left England for Australia when he was 11 years of age. He landed at what is now known as Otago in 1837 and was for some time engaged in whaling purists off the coast of Otago, Timaru, and Wellington, those localities then bearing Maori names. He has been a total abstainer for 58 years and he started the first Band of Hope in the colony, and annually for a long period he undertook the responsibility of seeing that the children had a treat.

Otago Witness, 15 May 1901, Page 58  22 May 1901, Page 17
Mr P. Meehan, who died at the Timaru Private Hospital on Saturday morning, was an old colonist, arriving in Victoria on the first outbreak of the diggings in 1852 in the ship Red Jacket. He followed mining pursuits on the Australian, Otago, and West Coast diggings. A few years ago he took up farming in the Makikihi district. Mr Meehan leaves two sons — Mr John Meehan, of Willowbridge, and Mr James Meehan, of Makikihi.

Timaru Herald, 30 April 1901, Page 2
The funeral of the late Mrs Wm. Anniss, took place at Burke's Pass on Thursday last and was attended by sympathisers from the surrounding country. Mrs Anniss was brought from the Timaru Hospital on Saturday the 20th and died the following Monday. About 18 months ago she underwent an apparently successful operation for cancer at Timaru but soon after the old symptoms appeared and she returned to the Hospital, but did not regain strength enough to submit to a second operation. Mrs Anniss had lived at Burkes' Pass 23 years and was highly respected. She leaves a husband and large family to mourn her loss.

Otago Witness, 19 June 1901, Page 58
Mrs Victoria Krull, relict of the late Mr Francis Krull, and an old resident of Dunedin, passed away on Wednesday last at the residence of her daughter, Mrs F. Fuchs, Fairlie. Mrs Krull, who had attained the age of 77 years, arrived in Dunedin with her husband in the ship Seville in 1859. They were engaged in storekeeping for some time, but afterwards kept the Caledonian Hotel in King street and subsequently the Al in George street. Mr Krull predeceased his wife by about 13 years. The funeral took place at 2 p.m. on Sunday.

Hawera & Normanby Star 27 June 1901, Page 2
Yesterday afternoon a young man named Thomas Weller (son of Chas. Weller, of Geraldine) accidentally shot himself while out shooting on the Hu__ road, Eltham. The unfortunate fellow was employed by Mr C. J. Maslin, and took the gun with him on the chance of securing a pheasant while mustering calves, and it is presumed he shot himself while getting through a fence. The charge entered the deceased's hand, and, passing along his breast, entered his head under the chin, death being instantaneous. Constable Simpson proceeded out to Mr Maslin's farm, where the body lies. An inquest is to be held. Deceased was a sober, industrious young man, and highly respected in the district. His father until recently had a farm on the Mangawhero road, Eltham, but at present resides at Geraldine.

Otago Witness, 16 October 1901, Page 44
A letter has been, received here stating that the Rev. W. C. Woodward, Primitive Methodist minister, Timaru, while returning from a trip to Europe for the benefit of his health by the steamer Afric, died, and was buried at sea on September 27.

Star, 22 October 1901, Page 3
SHANNON. — Oct. 20, at the residence of her son-in-law. J. W. Pye, Geraldine, Eliza Shannon, of Rakaia, wife of the late William Shannon, Raphoe, County Donegal, Ireland, in- her seventy-eighth year. Londonderry papers please copy.

Evening Post, 19 November 1901, Page 6
Coy. — On the 19th November, at 81, Cuba-street, James Lewis Coy, aged 60 years. Timaru papers please copy.

New Zealand Tablet 21 November 1901, Page 20
We deeply regret to announce the death of an old and highly respected resident of Temuka in the person of Mr. Michael Quinn. We learn that the sad event took place at his residence in Temuka on Tuesday night, when the respected pioneer passed peaceably away. Deceased had been in failing health for the past two years and was assiduously attended by the local clergy and died fortified by the consoling rites of the Catholic Church. The late Mr. Quinn was a native of Galway county. Ireland, and. while still a young man, came to New Zealand about 40 years ago. He subsequently settled in Temuka. arid, while conducting the Star Hotel, begun interest himself extensively in farming pursuits and ultimately became the proprietor of one of the finest properties in the district. Mr. Quinn was held the highest esteem by all who knew him, on account of his many sterling qualities and his marked business capacity, and he occupied seats on all the local public bodies. Some two years ago his once robust health began to fall and since that tune it has been very variable. Towards the close of last week he returned from a visit to Christchurch. He was shortly afterwards attacked by the illness to when he succumbed. Deceased leaves a widow and two sons and three daughters to mourn their lost, and to them we tender our deepest sympathy. — R I P.

New Zealand Tablet, 28 November 1901, Page 20
The remains of the late Mr. M. Quinn were interred in the Temuka cemetery on Thursday afternoon (says the Leader) and the funeral cortege was one of the largest and most representative which has ever been witnessed in the district. At 5 a.m. the body was taken to the Catholic Church, where a Requiem Mass was celebrated by the Rev. Father Fauvel. The body was afterwards taken to the deceased's late home, so that friends who arrived late from a distance could obtain a last look at their old friend. At 2.0 p.m. the funeral cortege left for the church where the usual impressive service for the dead wan conducted by Fathers Kerley, Devoy, Tubman, and Regnault. the Rev. Father Fauvel being engaged in tolling the bell. The church was crowded. Miss Twomey played the Dead March in  'Saul' as the procession left the church. The bearers, old friends of the deceased, were Messrs Macnamara and Flynn (Christchurch), Barrett (Kirwee), and Buckley. Among the many present at the funeral were representatives of the Temuka Road Board, Geraldine County Council, Timaru Harbor Hoard, Temuka Borough Council, Levels County Council, Timaru A and P. Association, and also members of the constabulary force and legal profession, and friends from as far as Wellington The respect in which the deceased was held, and the sympathy felt for his family, was evidenced by the many floral tributes and messages of sympathy sent from various parts of the Colony.

Otago Witness, 18 December 1901, Page 45
Mr Nicholas O'Brien, died in Timaru on the 9th inst. The deceased gentleman was a native of Castle Dennot parish, County Kildare, Ireland. He arrived in Auckland about 40 years ago, and in 1862 came to South Canterbury. He was never married. Deceased was for some years a member of the Waimate County Council, and a supporter of the Waimate Caledonian Society from its commencement.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 28 December 1901, Page 2
Herbert Hollows, aged 20, who came down from Timaru by special train to Dunedin for the holidays dropped dead on Christmas eve from rupture of the heart.

Heaven retaineth now our treasure,
Earth the lonely casket keeps ;
And the sunbeams love to linger.
Where our sainted loved one sleeps.

Western Australian Online Indexes Deaths

Surname Given Names 	Father 		Mother 		Reg. Yr	POB		Age Reg. No. 
Harrod 	William Henry 	Henry Sedgwick 	Ryan Maria 	1898 	Timaru NZ 	32 753
Philp 	William John 	James 		Sturrock Helen 	1899 	Timaru NZ 	30 1787
Grigg	William James 	Robert 		unknown 	1896
Clissold Stephen 	unknown 	unknown 	1895 	unknown 	35 561 

Moa

Evening Post, 22 February 1878, Page 2
Timaru. 22nd February.
A large quantity of immense moa bones has been discovered by a man digging in a swamp, in the south part of Timaru, 2ft. below the surface. One bone, from the ankle joint to the thigh, is 4ft. in length. The ankle joint, one bone, is 18in. in circumference. All the bones are charred by fire. They appear to be of great age.

North Otago Times, 13 September 1892, Page 2
Dr De Lautour delivered a lecture on the Moa.
Discoveries of moa bones had led to the discovery of other extinct New Zealand birds, such as an enormous rail, an eagle-hawk, and a large goose. The first great and important find of moa bones was that at Glenmark, and Sir Julius von Haast supplied the demand of the museums of the world for moa bones ; and in exchange for the surplus bones, Sir Julius yon Kaast obtained some L20,000 worth of curios. Of the 4o,ooo bones found at Eufield, the specimens before them had been built, and each bone in the casuarinus, the cnasus, and the didyna had to be compared with 3000 or 4000 other bones before these excellent specimens had been accurately fitted together. Mr Stumbles, a Timaru contractor, found some moa bones under the lava, and tint was the oldest geological find of moa bones. The lecturer himself found bones near the coast in Maori ovens ; and exhibited a few broken pieces of moa egg shells, which he had found near the mouth of the Awamoa creek, and indicated that the shells have been subjected to he _d. A race prior to the existence of the Maori, who were moa hunters. These people were called the Moriori, and were infinitely less civilised than the Maori. According to some writers the Moriories destroyed the moa. The Maori had very few traditions which we date back for 350 years, but little reference was made to the moa in these traditions ; while Papi, a Maori, told C. Macdonald that as a lad 16 years of age, he had been present at a moa hunt. Another authority averred that the Maori arrived in New Zealand 1350 years ago, and fell upon the moa and ate them up, and then forgot all about it. With regard to the find at Enfield, he could only attribute the finding of some 3000 or 4000 moas bones in a pit some 20 feet long by six feet wide and four deep, to the theory that the moas had come to that place to die, and if only two or three a-year died there, and if, as was supposed, the moa existed for 5000 years, that would easily account for so many being found at the same place. It was a well-known fact that some birds and other animals had burying places of their own. There has been discovered by Capt. Hutton some 33 different species of moas, varying in height from two to 12 or 13 feet.

North Otago Times, 11 November 1891, Page 4
The bones of a small species of Moa, found two years ago under it lava stream at Timaru, are still older and probably upper miocene.

Otago Witness, 30 August 1900, Page 9
The bones of a human skeleton were found on Tuesday (says the Timaru Post) by the men who are engaged removing clay. The skeleton was intact, and was found in a wellformed grave, about 10ft below the surface. It is supposed that the bones were the remains of a Maori. About three weeks ago, in the same cliff, a human skull was discovered. In both cases the bones were carted away with the clay, which was being removed, to the hole at the back of the goods shed.


Timaru Hospital 1907

The under the influence of chloroform

Evening Post, 4 August 1869, Page 2
Timaru Herald, 24 July 1869, Page 2
The Death of a man, while under the influence of chloroform, is reported from Timaru. The Herald relates the circumstance as follows : — John McIlwraith, a carter residing in Waimate, was run over by a bullock dray at Waimate, on the 28th ult., and his thigh was dislocated. There being no medical man in the neighborhood, he was brought in on the following day to the Timaru Hospital, where he died on Monday last. It appears the medical officer of the hospital deemed it necessary to put his patient under the influence of chloroform, in order to perform the necessary operation, and while under its influence the poor fellow died. He leaves a wife and eight children unprovided for.

North Otago Times, 7 April 1879, Page 2
A man named W. Lennox was sentenced to-day to three months imprisonment for forcing orders for chloroform. The prisoner confessed to being identical with the Dr Puttney who was sentenced for larceny in Dunedin and Timaru.

West Coast Times, 27 April 1881, Page 2
SUICIDE FROM TEMPORARY INSANITY.
Timaru, April 25. An inquest was held to-day on the body of H. L. Nathan, who was found dead in his bed yesterday morning. The verdict was that deceased committed suicide by inhaling chloroform, while suffering from temporary insanity. He left a letter which fully justified the verdict.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 20 March 1896, Page 2 Death Under Chloroform
Timaru, March 19. An inquest was held at the hospital on Wednesday evening, touching the Death of George Keene, aged 57, who died whilst on the operating table. The evidence showed he was admitted the previous day, suffering from strangulation of the bowels of some standing. The only chance of saving his life was by an operation, and that was remote. The man was almost -dying when carried into the operating room. A very small quantity of chloroform was given. The aperative incision had just commenced, when the man died. A verdict of Death from collapse was returned, and no blame was attributable to the surgeons.

North Otago Times, 6 October 1897, Page 3
Timaru. October 5. A railway platelayer named Richard Kelly died under chloroform to day. He had had a fit and fell and dislocated his shoulder, and was put under chloroform to replace it. He died under the influence of the drug. He had been on the sick list for some time.

Star 6 October 1897, Page 3
Timaru, Oct. 6. On the statement of the medical men an inquest is deemed unnecessary in the case of the platelayer Kelly, who died under chloroform yesterday.

Taranaki Herald, 19 November 1901, Page 3
Timaru. November 18. A shockingly sudden Death occurred this afternoon at Rowley dental surgery. A young woman named Annie Morris was put under the influence of chloroform to have some teeth extracted. The operation was going all right when the patient suddenly passed away. All efforts to restore animation failed, though a doctor was present. It is supposed Death resulted from shock.

Wanganui Herald, 16 December 1901, Page 2 Death UNDER CHLOROFORM.
Timaru, December 14. Frederick Tugwood, a station cook, aged 55, died at the hospital to-day under chloroform. He a fortnight ago sustained a severe cranial injury through a, fall from a house, and was being operated on. The evidence at the. inquest showed that his heart was diseased. No blame was attached to- the hospital staff.

Otago Witness, 18 December 1901, Page 21
Frederick Tugwood, station cook, aged 55 years, died in the Timaru hospital under chloroform. A fortnight ago he sustained a severe cranial injury through a, fall from a house, and was being operated on. At the inquest the evidence showed that he was suffering from heart disease. No blame was attached to the hospital staff.

Otago Witness, 29 October 1902, Page 56
Death UNDER CHLOROFORM. Timaru, October 26.
An inquest was held at Timaru touching the Death of Mrs Agnes Graham, aged 27 years, wife of a farmer near Temuka, who died in a private hospital in Timaru on Saturday under chloroform while being operated on for cancer in the breast. Deceased was examined in the usual way for soundness of the heart, and no weakness was detected. She had chloroform four months ago without ill-effects. Dr Reid was the operator, and Dr Thomas administered the chloroform with more than usual caution, as she showed unfavourable symptoms. After becoming insensible and the operation had begun she was showing signs of returning sensibility, when she suddenly collapsed, and all efforts to restore life proved unavailing. The jury found that she died from failure of the heart under chloroform, no blame being attributable to the doctors, as every precaution was taken.

New Zealand Tablet, 13 November 1902, Page 19
MRS NICHOLAS QUINN, MAKIKIHI.
It is with regret (writes our Waimate correspondent) I have to chronicle the death of Mrs Nicholas Quinn, which tock place at her residence, Bellview, Makikihi, on November 3. The deceased lady had been ailing for a long time, but it was not until a week before her death that it was thought serious consequences would result. In her illness she was attended by the Rev. Father Regnault, and died most peacefully, fortified by the rites of Holy Church. The funeral left Makikihi on Wednesday morning for Timaru, arriving there at 10 o'clock, when a Requiem Mass was offered up by the Rev. Father Regnault. At 2.30 the funeral left the church for the Timaru cemetery, the remains being followed by a large concourse of mourners. The Very Rev. Dean Foley (representing his Lordship Bishop Grimes) officiated at the graveside, assisted by the Rev. Fathers Tubman and Regnault.

Hawera & Normanby Star, 19 April 1910, Page 5
UNDER CHLOROFORM. ANOTHER Death RECORDED.
Timaru, April 18. Eric Cameron, aged eighteen years, died whilst under chloroform to-day. He was about to undergo an operation for the removal of a nasal growth, but collapsed before the surgeons began. An inquest will be held tomorrow.

Poverty Bay Herald, 26 May 1910, Page 5
TIMARU, this day. Thomas Gladwin, aged 65, years, died under chloroform at Timaru hospital last night whilst undergoing an operation for the removal of cancer in the throat.
Ashburton Guardian Inquest: 27 May 1910, Page 3

Hawera & Normanby Star, 22 April 1910, Page 6
MYSTERIOUS DISEASE. NO MEANS OF DIAGNOSING IT
Christchurch, April 21. That mysterious disease, status lymphaticus, which still puzzles doctors, was declared yesterday to have been the cause of the Death at Timaru of a young man named Eric Cameron, who died the previous day while under chloroform. It was .shown that the deceased had been carefully examined before being given the anaesthetic, and that there was no apparent reason why he should not be given it.
    The doctor who made the post-mortem examination of the body said he found the deceased to have been well nourished, and apparently a healthy young man. The internal organs, heart and lungs, were quite sound, but there was present a thymus gland. This gland was not present in a normal healthy adult. It was present at birth, but shrunk at the age of twelve months. There was also enlargement of the spleen of the thyroid and of the glands in the mesentery. These conditions were present in the disease known as status, lymphaticus, which gave rise to sudden Death on any occasion when some gross interference with the ordinary balance of life was made. It had been found in a large proportion of the cases of sudden Death in apparently healthy individuals. Some authorities went so far as to say that to administer an anaesthetic to a man with status lymphaticus meant almost certain Death. The disease had never been recognised during life-time, and there was no means of diagnosing it. He attributed Death to status lymphaticus, hastened by the administration of chloroform. Any sudden shock might have caused the Death of the deceased at any time. The thymus gland weighed 49 grains, and it was the main feature of the disease from which the deceased suffered. The coroner returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Evening Post, 26 May 1910, Page 8
Death UNDER CHLOROFORM. Timaru, 25th May. Thomas Gladwin, aged 63 years, died under chloroform at Timaru Hospital to-night whilst, undergoing an operation for removal of cancer in the throat.

Evening Post, 6 January 1912, Page 3
Death UNDER CHLOROFORM.
Timaru, 5th January. An inquest was held to-day into the Death of Mrs. Birchfield, wife of the licensee of the Saltwater Creek Hotel, who died yesterday while an anaesthetic was being administered for an operation to obviate blood-poisoning. The post mortem examination revealed weakness of the heart. Timaru Herald, 4 February 1879, Page 3

Ashburton Guardian, 27 January 1914, Page 2
Waimate, January 26. A regrettable fatality occurred here yesterday. Mr W. G. Leader, plumber, was about to have his teeth drawn, and was put under chloroform by Dr Barclay, but before Mr C. Coventry, the dentist started to extract the teeth Leader died under the anaesthetic. At the inquest to-day a verdict was returned that the deceased had died from the effects of chloroform administered when he had fatty overgrowth of the heart. The late Mr Leader started in business here some months ago. He was only 27 years of age and leaves a widow and three young children.

Kai Tiaki: the Journal of the Nurses of New Zealand April 1926, Page 92 Obituary
In February a very sad death occurred at the Christchurch Hospital, a probationer, Nurse Gladys Sayers, succumbing following an operation for quinsy, when she died of asphyxia. The event cast a great gloom over the staff.

Evening Post, 27 November 1937, Page 10
Timaru, November 26. Mary Waaka, a Maori woman, aged 59, of Temuka, who was admitted to Timaru Hospital some time ago for an operation for goitre, collapsed and died under an anaesthetic.


Timaru Herald, 4 February 1879, Page 3 HOSPITAL ENQUIRY.
An enquiry was held at the Hospital yesterday, re the death of Peter Cassidy, which occurred m the institution on Saturday, the 25th January. The Commissioners present were - Messrs T. W. Hall (Chairman), H. Belfield, F. Archer, and F. LeCren. The following evidence was elicited an answer to questions put by the Commissioners :— Dr. MacIntyre, the Visiting Surgeon, said  in his opinion it was not necessary that the deceased should have been confined in a strait-jacket. He considered Cassidy ought to have had more attendance during the night. He did not think the strait-jacket, though unnecessary, would have done him the slightest injury. It was typhoid fever of a slightly infectious type that Cassidy was suffering from. The sleeping draught would do him no harm if judiciously administered. The Steward ought not to have used the strait-jacket without his (the doctor's) instructions, unless the man was very violent. John Joseph Daily, Steward of the Timaru Hospital, said that the reason why Cassidy was not attended to during all. Friday night was that the sight warder had been helping his wife (who was a nurse) all the previous day, she being overworked. The man died about 7.40 a.m. If a Resident Surgeon had been m the Hospital it was not probable that the strait-jacket would have been used. Patrick O'Connor, anther patient, witness....

Manawatu Times, 28 March 1901, Page 3
At Timaru a nurse accidentally gave a child belladonna liniment in mistake for other medicine, causing its death. A verdict of accidental death was returned.



Timaru Hospital, Queen Street, Timaru, January 2008.
Photo taken by Margaret Todd, January 2008.

Dec. 2008. Today in 2008 the accidents are the largest causes of deaths in children over the age of nine. Road accidents and drowning cause nearly half the deaths followed by burns, falls and poisoning. Australia and Canada have reduced child deaths by 50% through prevention techniques, some as simple as limiting hot water taps to 122Ί F so as to prevent burns. One thousands deaths a day could be relatively easy to prevent with safety rules including obligatory lifejackets, smoke alarms, window guards and child resistant packaging according to the WHO and UN Children's Fund. The UN urges governments to require bicycle helmets, swimming pool fencing and an other measures. 


In 2009 the number of New Zealanders taking their own lives was about 540 a year, 50% higher than the road toll. Media are restricted in what they can report on suicides under the Coroners Act 2006, which bars the release of information except name, age, occupation and finding of self-inflicted death, unless the coroner rules otherwise.  Official numbers take years . One suicide is one too many. Awareness.

Depression Today there are not as many who tend to scoff and say, "Get your bloody act together!"  Society does not immediately categorises you. It needs a willingness by the sufferer to move on in life. It also needs willingness by the public at large to accept that the problem does exist, and unless the general populace accept there is this problem. The need is an understanding, and not to be referred to as nutcases, society dropouts or worse. Those who find that they are losing their marbles just can't bring themselves to talk about it, for fear of being ridiculed and in many cases, just suffer in silence. A supportive family is essential. They have to stick like glue. Find a hobby, something you have never attempted before in your life e.g. painting, writing... and cry. It takes guts to cry.

Volunteers live longer and suffer from less depression than their less connected counterparts. Volunteering is vital to attainment of social capital, a concept defined as "a network of social relations characterized by trust and reciprocity." "Social capital is a key ingredient for better health. It's connected to our sense of well-being. For some of us, creating those networks doesn't come easily, but we should "move beyond our shyness" to find a way to plug into our community. Don't wait for retirement, either. Volunteering enhances the resiliency that tides us over in stressful situations. "It's just a good feeling. We're like family."

A total of 522 people died by suicide in New Zealand in 2010. This equates to 11.5 deaths per 100,000 population. For the entire US population, there were 38,350 suicides in 2010, making it the nation's 10th leading cause of death, the CDC said. The overall national suicide rate climbed from 12 suicides per 100,000 people in 1999 to 14 per 100,000 in 2010. That was a 15 per cent increase. Suicide prevention efforts have tended to concentrate on teenagers and the elderly, but research over the past several years has begun to focus on the middle-aged. For the middle-aged, the rate jumped from about 14 per 100,000 to nearly 18 - a 28 per cent increase.

The total number of suicides for any age group over the 2012/2013 June year was 541, a decrease of six from last year, and two less than the average number of suicides over the past six years. Seeing friends die, family moving away and one's home becoming increasingly hard to maintain are losses that are hard to bear, and older people may become depressed about their ability to manage alone.